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by James Young, This Big Road Trip

All Bow Down.
Utah. The staid state that slaps you in the eyes with every corner, every turn, every time. The beer is good; commonplace session ales that average 3.2% alcohol by weight, promoting the addition of a second or third without fear of a morning dulled by hangover*. The option of stronger craft offerings, brimming with hipster passion for hops, is also there. The coffee is good, too. Moab boasts two or three excellent places to mainline your java and one even nitro-injecting ice cream so that it freezes in front of your eyes steampunk-style, billowing clouds of cold pouring over the countertop. Coffee and nitro-injected ice cream? Hell yes, welcome to Utah. The people are pretty nice too.

A Place With Purpose
The frippery of modern life pales in comparison to Utah’s lifeblood. It’s sole purpose – to get outside, in your vehicle, and make the outback your home. To that end, Utah is absolutely, undeniably, epic.


Basil, Willow Flats Road, Moab, Utah. Photo credit: This Big Road Trip

The Utah love of the outdoors brings together an unlikely symbiosis of hikers, RV enthusiasts, rock crawlers, and tourists. There is no ego here. Ego cannot co-exist with a landscape whose magnitude obliterates such a deadly sin; dishing out endless humility to mere humans as they kneel in deference before the red rock architecture, switchbacks, wide open vistas and zest for life – both on the road and camped under dark milky way skies. Utah commands respect. Every corner, every turn, every time.

Arizona On Stage
In contrast to Utah’s visual assault, Arizona plays its cards a little closer to its desert chest. Where else could you accidentally drive between the achingly beautiful Horseshoe Bend and the smokey orange ribbons of Antelope Canyon without realizing they were even there? A random glance at a map suddenly reveals two of USA’s greatest sights.
Horseshoe Bend, under the weight of a full parking lot and trail of camera-toting tourists, still blows your mind once you crest the lip of the canyon wall. I came, I saw, I cried. Not only is it breathtaking, the point from which you view the splendour is simply unbeatable.


Horseshoe Bend, Arizona. Photo credit: This Big Road Trip

Antelope Canyon is equally impressive, crushing other slot canyons in length, colour, smoothness and other ‘canyon-one-upmanship’ attributes. One of those places you feel you’ve already been to – the location not having shied away from having its portrait featured heavily online and in print. But certainly no less astounding when you visit in person.

A Grand Reveal
Of course, Arizona has many more riches to see: the small matter of the Grand Canyon, for example. A gouge in the earth notable for its scale and fame. You’ve probably heard of it. This typifies the main difference between Arizona and Utah. The Grand Canyon is non existent until your toes curl right up over its edge. We ascended to the North Rim via the backdoor Forest Service roads, as the main artery – Highway 67 – was still closed for winter. The dirt was impressively smooth for an unpaved road. As we gained altitude, the roads thinned, trees respectfully reaching out, their canopies maintaining their distance from the shell of our camper. The Grand Canyon only giving up its hiding place once we pulled into camp at Fire Point. Boom. You simultaneously recoil from the expanse and rush closer, wide-eyed and mouth expletives.
Ultimately, Arizona is a showman and master of the big reveal.

In The Red Corner
Giving the nod to one state or the other feels like a betrayal to the loser. No state deserves to be second best – and both put up a fight worthy of the finest locations in the world.

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Alstrom Point, Lake Powell, Utah. Photo credit: This Big Road Trip

At times the states bicker, naturally rather than legally, over custody of their treasures. The sullen child Lake Powell, staring at its beautiful shoes as it straddles the parent’s border. Arizona granted majority ownership, but Utah stealing back some of the thunder with its access to the utterly magical Alstrom Point via Big Water, a town firmly suffixed with the UT state abbreviation. The stunning panorama of crystal glittered water contrasting magnificently with the emerging rock formations in ice cream orange and vanilla pastels.

Speaking of ice cream pastels, White Pocket is another unwitting participant in the Arizona/Utah tug-o-war. Arizona winning the battle, grasping at the National Monument and holding it within inches of the border. White Pocket was a true highlight. The surprisingly unvisited formations accessed via some three hours of trail driving and soft sand channels just deep enough to make less capable vehicles think twice. White Pocket is a small unpaved lot, a short five-minute hike and a few acres of natural, uncrowded photogenic wonder coming into its own during the golden hours of sunrise and sunset. Its bowls, crests and humps radiant. A congealed mass of sandstone sundae.

The Battle Is Won
Zion could clinch the deal on its own. Bryce Canyon, the petite and far prettier cousin to Grand. Taking to the back roads sees you crushing stones along Cottonwood Canyon with its abundance of distractions to stop at and explore. On road you have Highway 12, the powers that be labelling it a scenic highway, both blatantly obvious and unnecessary understatement. Utah has Moab. Enough said. Canyonlands provides more variety of terrain than any off-roader could wish for; the unique Schaefer Trail offering a subdued trail in a stunning cliffside and canyon location. Then, there is ‘The Maze’. A signed warrant for vehicles that don’t have the full arsenal of rock crawling hardware at their disposal.

Utah’s reputation is well deserved. It’s storied back roads, rock driving and camping free-for-all attitude runs deep, immovable.
As the state’s heavy percentage of Mormons would tell you, Utah is God’s country and they have a direct line to Him. Even the staunchest atheist would fall agreeably silent, no argument against.


Valley of the Gods, Utah. Photo credit: This Big Road Trip

Follow along our RVing adventures around the world at thisbigroadtrip.com or on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter @thisbigroadtrip.

*Of course, this goes without saying, but just in case: Drink Responsibly. Don’t drive and drive.

PLAN YOUR RV TRIP

Follow along with Go Rving Canada Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest.

The post This Big Road Trip: Red Rock Rebels appeared first on GoRVing Canada.

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It’s obvious: Canada is beautiful. There are so many gorgeous places to explore in our country. Surprisingly, some parks, lakes, and breathtaking views are overlooked for more well-known destinations.

Much like how the cast of our new Mythbusting Series sheds light on common misunderstandings about the RV lifestyle, we are here to shed some light on the lesser-known outdoor destinations we think you need to see at least once in your life!

Here are 5 overlooked (and underrated) destinations in Canada. All you have to do is plan your trip!

Lake Superior Provincial Park, Ontario

Explore the Great Northern Road (Trans Canada Highway) if you like blue-green hues and lakeside views. Lake Superior Provincial Park is on the road less travelled between Thunder Bay and Sault Ste. Marie. The highway winds between Ontario’s mountains of the Canadian Shield and old trees. Lake Superior – the largest lake in the world – is visible from the highway at times, but the best view of the water is from the beaches.

The Agawa pictographs are a must-see for hikers who like a historical adventure. The trail to Agawa Rock is difficult and steep, following along the shore of the Lake Superior. For a more relaxing afternoon, hang out on Agawa Beach.

There is plenty of camping to choose from, as well as activities like hikes and lookout points—both near the highway and a bit off the beaten path.

Gros Morne National Park, Newfoundland

Trust us—this place is worth the drive! Gros Morne National Park in Newfoundland and Labrador is home to the Tablelands, which is a meeting place for ancient sea floors and the earth’s mantle exposed millions of years ago by clashing tectonic plates. Cliffs tower over the glacier-carved fjords now accessible by boat. This UNESCO World Heritage Site offers landscape views unlike any other in Canada.

There are quite a few campgrounds in and around the National Park. If you don’t live in Newfoundland, but want to catch these views for yourself, we have a few tips for planning an extended road trip to help you out!

Cypress Hills Interprovincial Park, Alberta, and Saskatchewan

Fact: Not all of the prairies are flat! The Cypress Hills are nestled between Alberta and Saskatchewan. The interesting ecological history of this area has attracted a few archaeological projects. Findings show that humans existed in the area for more than 8500 years, and the hills themselves are known as an erosional plateau having never been glaciated. History buffs love to explore Fort Walsh, one of the earliest western frontiers of the North West Mounted Police.

There are over 10 campgrounds between the three main sections of the park: the Alberta side (Elkwater), the Centre Block (between Medicine Hat and Swift Current) and the West Block Wilderness Area.

Whiteshell Provincial Park, Manitoba

A hidden gem in the Canadian Shield of Eastern Manitoba, travellers find Whiteshell Provincial Park. Campers love to hike and canoe between the cliffs and valleys. Wildflowers grow rampant wherever they can take root, and the history of the area is fascinating, too. Look for Petroforms throughout the park, which are rocks laid on the bedrock centuries ago in the shape of animals for Aboriginal ceremonies.

The Lily Pond—a natural wonder visitors have to see for themselves—is located within the park boundaries. Cliffs surround the Lily Pond which fills with its namesake flowers each year.

Mont-Mégantic International Dark Sky Reserve, Quebec

If you know what a Dark Sky Reserve is, you know you need to go at least once in your life! These areas are known for their lack of light pollution – making the place perfect for stargazing. Minimizing the light pollution in Mont-Mégantic International Dark Sky Reserve is a joint effort between the municipalities within the boundaries.

At the heart of the Dark Sky Reserve, outdoorsy people play in Mont-Mégantic National Park. During the day, hike the many trails spotted with scenic lookout points over the Eastern Townships. At night, the stars align for visitors to ooh and aah over.

We love sharing hidden gems with you! Bookmark these ones for your next RVing adventure:

8 Hidden Gems in the Yukon and Northwest Territories
Must-See Maritime Travel Gems
Spectacular Summits in Alberta
13 Canadian Travel Gems to Add to Your Bucket List
Outdoor Gems in British Columbia
10 Stunning Waterfalls in Canada Close to RV Campgrounds

Join our community on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest to tell us your own hidden gems!

The post 5 Overlooked (and Underrated) Destinations in Canada appeared first on GoRVing Canada.

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We’re all plugged into something these days. We are busy scrolling through each other’s lives from the moment our eyes open. Emailing after work hours, checking counts and scores until it’s time to sleep at night.

Exploring Canada’s wilderness lets us escape for a little while. The fractions of our lives we spend outside or on the road balance the years of connectedness. Life is better in the place just past your Wi-Fi signal. Here are a few handy tips for those of you who want to take a break unscheduling, unwinding and unplugging in the great outdoors!

Set a Realistic Schedule

Nothing feels worse than stress while on vacation. To avoid this, set realistic expectations for each of your days away from home. Don’t try to cram a list of activities into a single day. Minimize long-haul driving days. The less pressure you feel, the more fun you will have.

Plan for Anything

The best way to relax while on the road is to plan your trip before you go. Preparedness brings ease on any camping trip! If you need some help getting started, we have some tips for planning an extended road trip. We also have quite a few trip planning resources to dive into.

Go with the Flow

On the other hand, you don’t want to plan too much! Leave time to live unscheduled. You never know who you will meet or what adventures might present themselves when exploring Canada in your RV. Beyond being realistic with your scheduling, leave time to live without a plan. Carefree. Just you and your crew and the open road.

Try a Digital Detox

Do you really need to bring your iPad every time you go camping? Aside from the perfect soundtrack, you don’t need electronics to enjoy yourself. Instead, read books and play board games with your family. Dance and play and sing songs around the campfire. Tell stories, explore nature, take an afternoon nap in the sun.

Try taking photos with a proper camera instead of your cell phone. That way you can minimize connection to social media, but you won’t lose out on any beautiful photo opportunities. Remember the moments you were able to disconnect outside.

Still stuck? We have a few other screen-free activity suggestions that will keep your kids (and you!) busy.

Live for the Moment

From the moment you pull out of the driveway until the time you unlock your front door, try to focus on being in the moment. Even the less exciting parts of your trip can be amazing if you know how to look at them. Try to really experience everything your senses offer while wandering outside.

Find Your Wildhood
Your kids are your best resource when searching for your Wildhood. Get outside and just explore with them. Having fun doesn’t need to be complicated. Replace schedules with natural adventures. Let your imagination run wild when it’s unplugged.

Not sure where to start searching for your Wildhood? Here are 11 of our favourite must-see destinations that we think are good places to escape in the wilderness for a weekend.

Life doesn’t have to move so fast – that’s a myth that the cast of our new Mythbusting Series debunks for us. Your days in your RV can be relaxing and fun!
Let us know how you unwind in the great outdoors by joining our community on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest!

The post Unscheduling, Unwinding, and Unplugging in the Great Outdoors appeared first on GoRVing Canada.

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by James Young, This Big Road Trip

We met in a small fishing village in England in 1985. A year when Prince, Madonna, Tears for Fears and Frankie Goes to Hollywood were adding their own particular brand of sparkle to the UK pop charts. Claire Smith was a 10-year-old who had yet to invest in her bubble perm and baggy jeans. I was an octopus limbed 13-year old whose world view was limited to the small seaside town where we lived.

Five years later we were officially an item, which everyone already knew anyway. In 1994 – aged 18 and 21 – we ignited an unabashed passion for travel, heading around the world for a year with shiny new backpacks and clutching a bruised copy of Lonely Planet’s ‘South East Asia on a Shoestring’. We were hooked.

We became Mr and Dr Young in 2005, and somehow landed in Canada in 2006 (becoming citizens in 2014) under the misguided belief that we would love the snow. We didn’t. And that kickstarted our RV lifestyle as we followed the silver flow of snowbirds to the warmth of southern US states.

We purchased a 26’ Outdoors RV ‘Creekside’ trailer, which I gingerly dragged off the lot and hauled to an empty mall parking lot to practice reversing. We spent the summer camping and using it as a base when we raced triathlon. It was our first taste of RV’ing and the wonderful, carefree people it attracted.

The next 5 years saw us spend over 370 days in the Creekside – wintering in San Diego via various other towns down the west coast. But we wanted more. The places we really lusted after were inaccessible to such a large RV so the search was on for something else. Google fed us off-road capable vehicles and the term ‘overlanding’ was discovered. This was it. Independent travel, but with your own vehicle, a go-anywhere vehicle, an off-road beast maybe! An RV that breathes adventure.

Over the years we have travelled to some 40 countries, always independently, in search unique places and random happenings that form longer lasting memories of travel. In 2016, Claire came up with the idea to drive around the world; I agreed without hesitation.

In 2017, we sold everything aside from items of personal importance which are currently tucked away in a storage locker in Kelowna. We gave up all our hobbies, purchased a truck and camper and set about making a vehicle able to get us into all sorts of off-road adventures. A
hand-built truck camper from XP Camper and a customized Dodge Ram 3500 that has proved itself on the trails of Moab to be more capable than we either give it credit for or are willing to find out.

We set off on January 1st, the start of an epic road trip that will see us move south through the US, and Central and South America before shipping the truck and camper to South Africa. From there, we head north – hitting up Africa’s east coast, then the west coast. A quick boat ride from Morocco to Spain dumps us in Europe, traveling to the countries we haven’t been to and revisiting others. From Europe we head east, through Russia, the ‘Stans, Central Asia, Nepal, India, Pakistan before driving through South East Asia and Australia. Possibly shipping back to Alaska from there.

All the way down. All the way up. All the way around.

We look forward to reporting back from our travels.

Follow along our RVing adventures around the world at thisbigroadtrip.com or on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter @thisbigroadtrip.

PLAN YOUR RV TRIP

Follow along with Go Rving Canada Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest.

The post This Big Road Trip: Embarking on a RV Trek Around the World appeared first on GoRVing Canada.

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by Rebecca Moroney, Eamon & Bec

We bought our empty Sprinter van in Toronto, Ontario over a year ago and proceeded to convert it into our home sweet home on wheels. Over the course of 30 days, we went from young city dwellers to nomads with no fixed address. The new living quarters were tight (not unlike our previous apartment) but would help us avoid the skyrocketing costs of renting in the city and use our hard-earned dollar bills to explore our beautiful country! A no brainer, right?

And so, with our sights set on the road, we left behind the fast-paced, bustling vibes of the city for a quieter, more adventurous life. With the city skyline in our rear-view mirror, Eamon and I wondered if we’d ever settle in Toronto again.

Surprise past self! Over the past year, we’ve spent as much time “vanlife-ing” in the city as we have parking out in the great outdoors. And we’re okay with it.

Yet, as we gear up to head out to Canada’s west coast for the summer, I’m feeling oddly guilty about my love for this city (and the small part of me that wants to settle here forever). Guilty because van people aren’t supposed to be tied down–not the ones I follow on social media, anyway. They’re all about nature; finding ultimate inner peace, running far from civilization and sharing their distaste for all things normal.

That’s where we differ.

It’s so easy for Eamon and me to sink back into urban life. Our business is here, our friends and family are here, and this is where the two of us first met. Maybe we’re getting old or call us nostalgic, but this city is full of memories and is ripe for making new ones. Friends are getting engaged or married, there are birthday celebrations weekly and cottage weekends are happening… all without us.

If this last year has taught us anything, it’s that people make a place and that home truly is where you park it. So, I’m not going to let myself feel guilty about loving Toronto. But, I’m also not going to let that love stop me from exploring the rest of this beautiful country. The city will be waiting for us when we return in the fall.

Until then, it’s time to hit the road.

Follow along with Eamon & Bec’s vanlife adventures on YouTube or on Instagram Instagram, @rebeccamoroney and @eh.mon.

PLAN YOUR RV TRIP
 

Follow along with Go Rving Canada Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest.

The post Does Loving the City Make Us Bad Vanlifers? appeared first on GoRVing Canada.

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First off, RVing is fun for people of all ages. Life on the road let’s you explore Canada while enjoying the comforts of home. Take it from our friends Rick, Brody and the friendly cast of our new Mythbusting Series – who unpack and squash common myths about the RV lifestyle, so you don’t miss out on the fun!

Another myth: Your summer festival days are over when you have kids. Here’s the truth: Just because you have a couple Mini Me’s tagging along these days doesn’t mean you can’t have a little fun! You won’t want to miss these 8 Family-Friendly Music Festivals this summer across Canada. This calls for a road trip!

Montreal International Jazz Festival

The International Jazz Fest is a long-time favourite in Montreal. The heart of the festivities take place in the Quartier des spectacles in downtown Montreal. There are free and paid shows over the 10-day duration and plenty of family activities! Check out the Musical Park for an interactive music display, and the Family Club for entertainment and kid-friendly workshops. Every day at 11am and 1:30pm the Little School of Jazz invites kids to join in their fun performance. That’s just the start!
Nearby RV-friendly campsites: Domaine Riviera, Parc RV Champlain, plus more listings here

Calgary Stampede Coca-Cola Stage

The Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth – aka the Calgary Stampede – is a summer must-see! The Calgary Stampede Coca-Cola Stageis a family-friendly (and free with park admission) alternative to the ticketed concerts on the roster. Eat your fill, have some fun on the midway, then settle in stage-side for the evening to take in some excellent Canadian homegrown live music.
Nearby RV-friendly campsites: Buffalo Lake Recreation Area, Mountainview Camping, plus more listings here

Ottawa Bluesfest

This Bluesfest offers more than just blues! The lineup for the Ottawa Bluesfest is sure to stellar. Kids are welcome, but parents are encouraged to review artists’ lyrics before choosing which shows to attend.
Nearby RV-friendly campsites: Parc De La Gatineau, Camping Cantley, plus more listings here

Hillside Festival

Pack your RV and head to Guelph for a fun weekend in the sun. Hillside Festival tries to bring artists for everyone regardless of age, style, culture and influence. There is the much-anticipated main musician lineup, but also the children’s Rainbow Stage, spoken word artists, and artisan market and lots of food. Admission is free for kids under 12, too! Join in the weekend of family fun and camp nearby at Guelph Lake each night.

Nearby RV-friendly campsites: Emerald Lake Trailer Resort & Water Park, Fernbrook Resort, plus more listings here

Folk on the Rocks

Families love Yellowknife’s annual Folk on the Rocks. There are over 24 hours of music to dance along to between all the stages, a designated children’s area and a whole lot of food to choose from too!

Dawson City Music Festival

These older festivals know what they are doing! Join the fun at the 40th annual Dawson City Music Festival. Children under 12 are free, there is camping nearby and sunny skies all summer long in the Yukon! The artists themselves make this country proud—all come from Canadian cities.

Nearby RV-friendly campsites: Gold Rush Campground – see map here

Calgary Folk Music Festival

Pack your picnic blanket for a weekend of lounging in the sun! The Calgary Folk Music Festival is a family-friendly favourite under the blue prairie skies in Prince’s Island Park, nestled beside the Bow River. The best part? Kids are free!

Nearby RV-friendly campsites: Tail Creek Park, Symon’s Valley RV Park, plus more listings here

Newfoundland and Labrador Folk Festival

Head to Bannerman Park in St. John’s for the Newfoundland and Labrador Folk Festival. This hallmark event celebrates the local community and culture on “The Rock”. There will be a youth stage, main stage and Francophone performances all weekend long. Take a break from the music at the food and craft fair in the afternoon before settling in front and centre at the main stage for the night!

Nearby RV-friendly campsites: Shriners RV Park, Bluefin RV Trailer Park, plus more listings here

Which of these Canadian festivals are you adding to your summer bucket list? Let us know if we missed any good ones and join our community on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest!

The post 8 Family-Friendly Summer Music Festivals in Canada appeared first on GoRVing Canada.

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Planning an extended road trip this summer in your RV? Sometimes the best way to explore is slow and steady. A few weeks on the road gives you a real chance to experience the route while you search for those hidden gems along the highway: beautiful lookouts, delicious diners or tiny towns with a little charm.
Extended road trips promise their own challenges, but if you pull out of the driveway prepared for the adventure ahead, it’s more likely to be smooth sailing until you return! Here are our top tips for planning an extended RV road trip:

Set Your Budget

Deciding how much you want to spend on your road trip should be your first step. From this number you can break it down to how many days you can reasonably spend away from home without breaking your budget.

FIND A CAMPGROUND

Plan Your Route

Next, plan the route you want to take and create a timeline. Include a rough estimate of time on the road and time spent exploring at each stop along the way.
Not sure where you want to go? Here’s a few ideas!

10 Best Beach Destinations in Canada
8 Hidden Gems in the Yukon and Northwest Territories
7 Pet-friendly Campgrounds in Canada
11 Must-See Places to Find Your Wildhood
13 Canadian Travel Gems to Add to Your Bucket List

Plan for Spontaneity

You never know what kind of locals you might get chatting with around the campfire. Leave time in your schedule for the recommendations you are sure to gather from friendly locals along the way.

Divvy Up The Drive Time

It’s easier on everyone if you take your time getting to your destination! Minimize long-haul days. Maximize rest stops to stretch your legs and stock up on snacks. Here are some helpful tips for keeping healthy during road trips

Map Out Gas Station Locations

Always know where the next gas station will be. There’s nothing worse than the feeling when the gas light dings and the nearest stop is miles away. Along the more remote sections of highway, you will thank us for reminding you of this one!

Pack Snacks

The same rule applies for snacks as it does for gas stations. Days on the road can be rough if you aren’t prepared for anything! Keep your snack kitty well-stocked with these road trip snacks to keep your crew happy!

Minimize Unhealthy Food

When you are travelling, you are likely living outside of your normal routine. Indulging in all the treats you pass by on the highway might seem like a good idea at first, but you could end up with a tummy ache. Instead, choose healthy options wherever possible, especially for days on the road. Healthy food keeps your spirits and energy high! Cook meals wherever possible as well. We have heaps of camping meal ideas in our community’s Facebook Group: Wildhood Recipe Club!

Prepare For the Weather

In which direction do you plan to travel? East to west generally tends to be about the same weather across the country. If your route includes a long stint north or south, be prepared for shifts in weather patterns and pack accordingly!

Hire a House Sitter

When leaving your home for an extended period, you should plan to have someone check on your house. Some neighbourhoods have specific rules as to how long your grass can get, duration for unchecked mail and other clues that no one is home. A house sitter can help give you that extra piece of mind while you’re away on holiday.

Pack Hard Copies

Even though everything is digital these days, you never know what might happen to your cell phone. Pack a hard copy of your RV route, campsite reservations and emergency information. If you are crossing the border or traveling abroad, it’s also a good idea to keep a photocopy of your passport with someone you trust at home.

Purchase Insurance

Depending on where you travel, you might need to buy insurance. If you’re crossing the border, health insurance is an important consideration in your travel plans.
Let us help you with your RV trip planning! We have a wide range of routes, recipes, how-to’s, travel inspiration and trip planning resourceson the Go RVing Canada website.

FIND A CAMPGROUND

Do you have any travel tips of your own to share? Let us know! Join our community on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest to join the conversation!

The post Top Tips for Planning an Extended Road Trip appeared first on GoRVing Canada.

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Go RVing Canada by Patrick Rowsome - 3w ago

Fresh flavours make camping meals even better! Check out this tasty recipe for polenta grilled salmon burgers from our friends at Living Tiny.
Time: 30 mins | 3 hours waiting time
Servings: 4 people

Ingredients

Polenta “bun”
• 2 cups polenta
• 6 cups water
• 4 tsp veggie broth powder
• 1 tbsp butter
• salt & pepper

Salmon
• 500 gr salmon fillet
• Fresh lemon juice
• Olive oil
• Dill
• Salt & pepper

Sriracha mayonnaise
• 6 tbsp mayonnaise
• 2 tsp sriracha sauce
• 1 garlic clove
• 1/2 tsp maple syrup
• Fresh lemon juice

Toppings
• 1 avocado
• Fresh spinach
• 2 spring onions
• Sesame seeds
• Salt & pepper

 
BROWSE RECIPES

Instructions

Polenta

1. Bring the water with the broth to boil and throw slowly in the polenta while stirring. Depending on the type of polenta you’re using, you have to stir between 5-20 minutes until it has a sticky firm consistency. For us, it took only about 5 minutes, so best to check the instructions on the box/bag of polenta.

2. Spread out the warm polenta in a lightly oiled oven-safe dish. It needs to have a thickness of 1/2 – 3/4 inch.

3. Refrigerate for 3 hours, or overnight if you prefer.

4. Cut the polenta into 8 even pieces and bake them in the pan with some oil, until both sides are a bit brown and crunchy.

Salmon

1. Rub the raw salmon with oil and herbs and let it sit for 10 minutes.

2. Preheat your oven on 400F and bake the salmon in 15-20 minutes.

When your polenta buns and salmon are ready, it’s time to make your delicious burger by adding the sriracha mayo and all the fresh vegetables. It’s a little hard to eat with your hands as the polenta is more brittle than a bread bun, but you can either eat it with cutlery or wrap some aluminum foil around it. Bon appetit!

• Tip: instead of making this dish in the oven and on the stove, you can grill both salmon and polenta on the bbq. Just oil your grill pretty well whenever you bake your polenta pieces, as they can stick together pretty easily.

Be sure to follow our friends Dirk and Eelke from Living Tiny on their full-time RVing adventures on Instagram and online.

 
BROWSE RECIPES

Looking for more delicious camping recipes? Check out Go RVing Canada’s Facebook group: Wildhood Recipe Club! We would love to have you join our community.
Or follow along on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest.

The post Polenta Grilled Salmon Burgers appeared first on GoRVing Canada.

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Each year, we ring in the start of camping season with #CampingWeekCA! This year, we celebrated Canadian RV and Camping Week on May 22-27, 2018. More than 60 campgrounds and RV dealerships across the country participated in the outdoor festivities. It’s a fun week that Canadian families look forward to each spring.

We love that this annual event brings RV and camping enthusiasts together every year to find their Wildhood and celebrate the great outdoors. We also love that our community is so generous during Canadian RV and Camping Week in support of Make-A-Wish® Canada!

Go RVing Canada, in partnership with the Canadian Camping and RV Council, RVDA of Canada and RV dealerships, campgrounds and fellow campers nationwide help to raise funds to grant wishes for Canadian children with critical illnesses through Make-A-Wish Canada! We know that wishes mean so much to these children and their families, and we are honoured to continue our support of such a worthy cause. We know that wishes give children the physical and emotional strength they need to fight a critical illness.

Making a Difference in Our Community

We raised funds for Make-A-Wish Canada through online donations and wish stars available for purchase at participating RV dealerships and campgrounds leading up to #CampingWeekCA. A single wish star is only $2.00, but each one makes a huge difference in a child’s life! Alternatively, people can donate directly through our Make-A-Wish Canada campaign.

Atticus’s Wish for an RV

Each year, we team up with Make-A-Wish Canada to fulfill a wish for a child in our community. Last year, we had the pleasure to grant Parker’s wish for a pop-up RV.

Earlier this year, we were moved when our friends at Make-A-Wish Canada shared Atticus’s story, his love of the outdoors and his wish for an RV. Atticus is six years old and living with a neurological condition. He loves animals and fireworks and making memories with his family! Atticus’s mom remembers when he saw fireworks for the first time – he was amazed. This sparked the wish for the whole family to be able to spend more time outdoors. Atticus’s parents, Melissa and Terence, have fond memories of camping (complete with fireworks!) when they were growing up. They wanted Atticus and his two siblings to enjoy a similar childhood.

Here’s why Atticus made a wish for an RV to enjoy with his friends and family in the great outdoors:

“Atticus’s love for the outdoors is second to none. His one true wish was to put his toes in the sand, feel the wind against his face, smell campfires, explore nature and wildlife and simply just spend time with family and friends. It was no surprise to his wish granters that he wanted an RV so he could fully experience the camping lifestyle.”

Thank You for Helping Make Wishes Come True!

We wrapped up #CampingWeekCA festivities on May 26 with the help of our friends at Make-A-Wish Canada, Canadian Camping and RV Council, RVDA of Canada, Campout RV, Forest River, Wayfarer, Goreski’s Landing and Hershey’s Canada. We gathered at Goreski’s Landing RV Resort on Scugog Lake in Kawarthas, Ontario, where Atticus received his very own RV – his wish come true! Campers from coast-to-coast roasted s’mores around the campfire that night, lighting up the night sky and coming together to celebrate #CampingWeekCA!

Atticus and his family are thrilled to #BringBackWildhood and spend the summer together outside with their new RV. They are looking forward to exploring nature, watching wildlife and just playing outside as much as possible. It also means that Atticus and his family can go camping regardless of the weather. “He’s going to love it!” said his mom. “He’s going to soak up the sun, the fresh air, the nature.” That’s just the kind of summer we love!

High fives and huge thanks to all our partners and our amazing community of generous campgrounds, RV dealers and campers who supported #CampingWeekCA this year! This wish meant so much to Atticus’ family and we couldn’t be happier for them at Go RVing Canada.

Looking for ways to #BringBackWildhood this summer? Join our community on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest.

The post Camping Smiles, S’mores and a Wish Come True! appeared first on GoRVing Canada.

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Let’s go to the beach! What better summertime destination than a big sandy beach? Here are ten Canadian beaches we think you’ll love. This calls for a road trip!

Singing Sands Beach, Basin Head Provincial Park, Prince Edward Island

On the way to the most eastern point of Prince Edward Island, visitors will find Basin Head Beach – aka “Singing Sands Beach”. This quiet, dog-friendly beach is in Basin Head Provincial Park. You could walk along the shore for hours with your toes in the sand—everyone loves the warm ocean waters!

Nearby RV-friendly campsites: Campbell’s Cove Campground, St. Peters Park, plus more listings here

Ingonish Beach, Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia

Just along the Cabot Trail, visitors can choose to swim in fresh or salt water at Ingonish Beach. How, you ask? A rock formation separates the ocean waters from an adjacent lake and you don’t even have to leave the beach! The nearby Cape Breton Highlands National Park is a popular overnight camping spot for daytime beach-goers.

Nearby RV-friendly campsites: Hide Away Campground & Oyster Market, Piper’s Trailer Court, plus more listings here

Cape Enrage Beach, New Brunswick

If PEI’s beaches are warm, New Brunswick’s are still warmer. Did you know New Brunswick has the warmest saltwater beaches in all of Canada? Cape Enrage Beach is a little different than the others, though. It’s more about the view than anything else. This 7km beach lies along the bottom of the cliffs on Barn March Island. If traditional sandy beaches are more your style, there are plenty of those in the province.

Nearby RV-friendly campsites: Ponderosa Pines Park, Glooscap RV Park & Campground, plus more listings here

Wasaga Beach, Wasaga Beach Provincial Park, Ontario

Along the shores of Georgian Bay, beach bums flock to Wasaga Beach. You’ll also find a family-friendly area and plenty of places to camp nearby. The Town of Wasaga Beach is a fun place to be – they host a few festivals throughout the summer!

Nearby RV-friendly campsites: Gateway Camping, Jell-E-Bean Campground, plus more listings here

Sandbanks Beach, Sandbanks Provincial Park, Ontario

If quaint towns full of antique shops and the neighbouring wineries weren’t enough, Sandbanks Beach is a fantastic reason to head you to Prince Edward County. Sandbanks Provincial Park is home to one of Ontario’s largest beaches with an attached campground for easy access. This beach is on Lake Ontario, so bring your boat along, too, if you want to take to the water.
Nearby RV-friendly campsites: Log Cabin Point, Hideaway Trailer Park, plus more listings here

FIND A CAMPGROUND

The post 10 Best Beach Destinations in Canada appeared first on GoRVing Canada.

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