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Let’s go to the beach! What better summertime destination than a big sandy beach? Here are ten Canadian beaches we think you’ll love. This calls for a road trip!

Singing Sands Beach, Basin Head Provincial Park, Prince Edward Island

On the way to the most eastern point of Prince Edward Island, visitors will find Basin Head Beach – aka “Singing Sands Beach”. This quiet, dog-friendly beach is in Basin Head Provincial Park. You could walk along the shore for hours with your toes in the sand—everyone loves the warm ocean waters!

Nearby RV-friendly campsites: Campbell’s Cove Campground, St. Peters Park, plus more listings here

Ingonish Beach, Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia

Just along the Cabot Trail, visitors can choose to swim in fresh or salt water at Ingonish Beach. How, you ask? A rock formation separates the ocean waters from an adjacent lake and you don’t even have to leave the beach! The nearby Cape Breton Highlands National Park is a popular overnight camping spot for daytime beach-goers.

Nearby RV-friendly campsites: Hide Away Campground & Oyster Market, Piper’s Trailer Court, plus more listings here

Cape Enrage Beach, New Brunswick

If PEI’s beaches are warm, New Brunswick’s are still warmer. Did you know New Brunswick has the warmest saltwater beaches in all of Canada? Cape Enrage Beach is a little different than the others, though. It’s more about the view than anything else. This 7km beach lies along the bottom of the cliffs on Barn March Island. If traditional sandy beaches are more your style, there are plenty of those in the province.

Nearby RV-friendly campsites: Ponderosa Pines Park, Glooscap RV Park & Campground, plus more listings here

Wasaga Beach, Wasaga Beach Provincial Park, Ontario

Along the shores of Georgian Bay, beach bums flock to Wasaga Beach. You’ll also find a family-friendly area and plenty of places to camp nearby. The Town of Wasaga Beach is a fun place to be – they host a few festivals throughout the summer!

Nearby RV-friendly campsites: Gateway Camping, Jell-E-Bean Campground, plus more listings here

Sandbanks Beach, Sandbanks Provincial Park, Ontario

If quaint towns full of antique shops and the neighbouring wineries weren’t enough, Sandbanks Beach is a fantastic reason to head you to Prince Edward County. Sandbanks Provincial Park is home to one of Ontario’s largest beaches with an attached campground for easy access. This beach is on Lake Ontario, so bring your boat along, too, if you want to take to the water.
Nearby RV-friendly campsites: Log Cabin Point, Hideaway Trailer Park, plus more listings here

FIND A CAMPGROUND

The post 10 Best Beach Destinations in Canada appeared first on GoRVing Canada.

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We’re all about cooking tasty meals while out camping. What better way to enjoy Canada’s Wildhood than with a meal outdoors? Good food, great company, and fresh air is all we need!
If you’re travelling along one of Canada’s beautiful coastlines, chances are, you’ll be close to the prime pick of fresh seafood. We rounded up some promising recipes to try next time you’re in the mood for a meal fresh from the ocean.

Seafood Paella

This seafood paella is cooked with shellfish, but you can add whatever is fresh and local to your current destination. Don’t be intimidated by this delicious meal. It’s actually a simple one-pot recipe!
Seafood Hobo Packs
Who doesn’t love a good hobo pack recipe? Here are a few seafood hobo pack recipes for a little culinary inspiration! The best thing about hobo packs is that you can add whatever is in your fridge or cooler at the time. This list includes barbeque shrimp and clambakes—that sounds good to us!

Grilled Seafood Skewers

Skewers are a campfire classic. Seafood scallops, though? Yes, please! These grilled seafood skewers feature scallops, prawns, and salmon or tuna. The recipe also includes a dipping sauce that sounds super tasty. Choose from soy and ginger, tomato and ginger, or just tomato.

Tin Foil Seafood Boil

This seafood boil is an easy tin foil pack that “tastes like mid-Atlantic summers.” Anything with shrimp, scallops, and sausage sounds great to us! Just add potatoes and butter and you have yourself a filling meal after a long day of exploring in the sun.

Baja-Style Fish Tacos

Baja-style fish tacos. Need we say more? It’s a fast and filling dish – and easy to make while camping. Pair the fish tacos with a salad and all you’re all set. Yum!
Spanish Chorizo, Jalapeno, and Lime Seafood Packs
You’ll need clams, mussels, shrimp, scallops, and Spanish chorizo for this gourmet seafood campfire pack. Add garlic and jalapeños and cook the whole tin foil pack over the fire. Who said camping meals need to be boring?

Seafood Chowder

What is delicious, nutritious and makes enough to serve the masses? Camp oven seafood chowder. This one even has a yummy scone topping! Your family will be lining up for seconds (and thirds).

Shrimp Surprise Spread

The campfire meals that you don’t actually have to cook are sometimes the best option – especially after the busy day finding your Wildhood! This shrimp seafood dip will satisfy without having to heat a single thing.

Mediterranean Salmon

This Mediterranean salmon requires minimal prep work and cleanup because it’s made with only five ingredients in foil over the fire. Healthy campfire meals can be simple, too!

Campfire Seafood Boil

This is probably the easiest recipe of the bunch: campfire seafood boil. Throw all the ingredients for this seafood boil into one pot over the campfire. This recipe calls for crab, lobster, smoke sausage, corn and red potatoes. Sounds pretty hearty and delicious!

Which of these seafood camping recipes will you try first? Let us know on our Facebook group: Wildhood Recipe Club! We would love to have you join our community.

Or follow along on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest.

The post Go Fish! 10 Seafood Camping Recipes to Feed a Crowd appeared first on GoRVing Canada.

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What better way to experience Canada’s outdoors than trying your hand at clean, off-grid living?

It’s an investment to convert to solar powering your RV. It’s also a time-consuming project if you choose to go the DIY route. However, when all’s said and done, it’s free energy in your pocket! For folks who like to camp in the backcountry, or just avid RVers looking for ways to minimize their energy consumption, the project is well worth the efforts. All you need is a little bit of sun and the open road.

There are so many options when it comes to solar powering your RV. Where do you even begin? We have a few tips that might help you start your research.

Start small with solar

It’s easy to add solar panels to your RV, but it’s expensive if you buy too many to start. Consider your daily use: will you need to power electronics like laptops and televisions, or do you spend most of your time outside? Will you use shore power at all, or do you want to be entirely self-sufficient? Some dealerships can help you calculate exactly the power you need to meet your energy requirements.

Flat or curved panels?

There are a few differences between flat and curved solar panels aside from their shape. Curved is more aerodynamic for the road, but they can’t be tilted to face the sunniest spots because they curve smoothly around your rig’s body. Curved panels are lighter, while flat panels are more durable. Essentially, though, it comes down to budget—curved panels are the more expensive option.

Invest in a good battery

No matter the size of your solar system, it will require a battery. The battery packs the real strength when collecting energy from the sun. Many suggest installing a battery large enough that you could survive for 3-4 days without having to recharge, just in case you hit a bad batch of days. Again, ask your dealership to direct you to the best option for your energy needs.

Buy a controller

Protect the system you’ve worked so hard to set up! A solar charge controller prevents you from overcharging your batteries because it controls the power moving from the panels themselves to your battery storage. This is one component that you don’t want to cheap out on. Actually—it’s best to search for quality for your entire solar power system!

Consider compatibility

You have your solar panels and your batteries—how do you make your appliances run? Ensure that all systems are compatible. You may need to buy a power inverter to provide energy to your standard appliances depending on the difference in voltage between your batteries and electronics.

Connect to shore power

The same way you want to check that your solar system is compatible with your appliances, also purchase an inverter that allows your battery to charge on shore power if needed. This is a good idea if you don’t plan on using it often! If your rig is equipped for shore power, you will always have a backup in case something goes wrong with your system.

There are so many more factors to consider when converting your RV to clean energy, but it’s best to talk to an experienced retailer to get the details. For now, though, we hope this helps to get your project started!

Have you installed a solar energy system on your own RV? We’d love to know if you have any tips. Let’s start a conversation! Join our community Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.

The post Tips for Using Solar Panels to Power your RV appeared first on GoRVing Canada.

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One December evening, Eamon and I were dreaming and planning our year ahead with a glass (or two) of wine in hand. I can’t recall who blurted it out first (let’s blame the vino here) but I do remember us both being a bit intimated by the idea… as if we were going to drive our self-converted Sprinter Van down to Mexico! But, as the story goes, it was mid-winter in Toronto and the harsh temperatures were beginning to take their toll on us and our 60 sq-ft home on wheels. So, as you can imagine, the idea of driving as far south as possible didn’t take much convincing.

And with that, we headed to the beach.

Having just returned home from our wild adventure, we’re here to share our top five tips for making the most of your RV holiday in Mexico!

1. ENJOY THE JOURNEY

We all know the old saying “the journey is more important than the destination” and in our travel experience, this could not be truer. Our engine failed on us our second day in Mexico and finding a mechanic, replacing the motor, and getting back on the road took up three weeks. Instead of dwelling on the wrench this threw in our initial plans we decided to make the most of our time in Central Mexico. We explored neighbouring towns, hung out with new local friends and ate as many tacos as we could stomach!

The End of Van Life?

2. TAKE THE PATH LESS TRAVELED

Our most memorable nights were spent on remote beaches completely unmarked on apps or maps. Instead, we’d take the time to pull off the highway and explore where the dirt roads lead. Sometimes it’s a dead end and other times it’s your own private paradise.

3. BRUSH UP ON YOUR SPANISH

Hola, it’s time to practice your español. Don’t be shy… I can’t count on my hands the amount of times I said “dog” (perro) when I meant to say “but” (pero). Pero, learning to speak the local language will help you get to know the locals and I think we can all agree that meeting local people is the single best way to travel a country, town or region.

4. WATER DO’S AND DON’TS

You’ve heard it said time and time again: don’t drink the water in Mexico. Don’t fret, there’s plenty of cold beer and margaritas to keep your thirst at bay.* And when you want to reach for some agua? Do as the Mexicans do and stick to purified water. We refilled our three 5-gallon fresh water tanks at OXXO (a local convenience store) or at the water refill stations scattered throughout the country.

*Of course, this goes without saying, but just in case: Drink responsibly. Don’t drink and drive.

A Normal Day in the Life of Van Lifers

5. RESTOCK AT THE LOCAL MARKETS

Avoid the chain grocery stores, and instead grab your food from the local markets. We love cooking for ourselves while traveling, so it’s no surprise that the local fruterias and tortillerias quickly became our best friends. Large bags full of fresh fruits, veggies and pantry staples that would last our LARGE appetites 3-4 days would sell for 150 pesos. You can’t beat that!

Q&A Van Life in Mexico

Did we miss one of your top tips for RVing from Canada to Mexico? Let us know!

Follow Eamon and Becca on Instagram for daily travel stories and YouTube for their epic vlogs:

@Eh.mon
@RebeccaMoroney
Youtube Channel

Join Go RVing Canada’s community on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest. Be sure to tag #BringBackWildhood for a chance to be featured!

The post 5 Tips for Your RV Holiday in Mexico with Eamon & Bec appeared first on GoRVing Canada.

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Sure, travelling overseas is fun, but why not explore our own backyard? Canada has so many beautiful landscapes, quaint towns, and adventures to try that it might be impossible to see them all in a lifetime! One thing’s for sure – we are willing to try!

Here are a few tips for first-time renters hoping to test out an RV for a Canadian stay-cation, plus links to handy trip-planning resources to check out before you hit the road!

Who should you rent your RV from?

There are many dealers in the Go RVing Canada family who rent RVs in Canada. You can browse our RV rental map to see what your options are available in your area.

Check out our our handy RV rental checklist to help you find the best option for your family!

What do you need to know before you go?

Always plan your trip ahead of time! Especially on your first time out, you will want to know what direction you’re heading in, where you will park your rig each night, and which road is the best route to get there.

Beginner RVers should also take some time to get familiar with their rental rig.

As for campgrounds, review the rules and regulations for your campsite. While the rules are generally similar across the board, some campgrounds might have unique restrictions.

What should you pack?

The best way to pack: bring a bit more than the basics. You don’t want to overpack, but you also want to feel prepared for any adventure that might come your way.

When preparing for your trip, be sure to consider factors like the weather and outdoor elements at your destination. Will there be bugs? Rain or shine? Should you throw a few extra blankets into the vehicle for that extra bit of warmth at night? Does your campground have a washing machine, or should you bring extra clothing just in case?

Also, think of what activities your family has planned. What sporting gear or equipment will you need to bring along for each activity?

Still not sure what to pack? Watch this video for quick packing tips to help keep your load light on your next RV trip!

More handy tips and resources to make the most of your RV trip

For starters, there is camping etiquette you can brush up on before you head out on your first RV trek. And it’s a good refresher for seasoned RVers, too! Make a good first impression for your fellow campers.

We also have a complete roundup of a few recipes we think you might like to try while on the road. Check out our ooey-gooey camping recipes and fuss-free campfire meals.

Rain showers forecasted for your trip? Keep these rainy-day fun activities in your back pocket to keep your crew happy and entertained in case it rains during your RV trek.

Bringing your fur babies along for the ride? We have some helpful tips for travelling with four-legged friends. There are quite a few pet-friendly campgrounds in Canada. And here are some simple ways to make your road trip a little easier with Fido on board.

First time camping in an RV? We have tips from seasoned campers, too!

Are you joining us for #CampingWeekCA in support of Make-A-Wish Canada? What better time to head out for a stay-cation in the great outdoors?!

Join our community on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest.

The post Rent an RV For Your Next “Stay-cation” in Canada appeared first on GoRVing Canada.

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Go RVing Canada by Patrick Rowsome - 1M ago

Parker is an outgoing boy who loves spending time with his family outside. Last year, our partners Make-A-Wish® Canada approached us with Parker’s story. He is currently battling cancer and his treatment is almost complete. We did everything we could to make Parker’s wish for a pop-up tent trailer RV come true! Go RVing Canada, along with the Canadian Camping and RV Council, RVDA of Canada, RV dealerships, campgrounds, and campers nationwide, raised over $22,000 for Make-A-Wish® and granted Parker’s wish.

The Big Wish Event at #CampingWeekCA
Go RVing Canada presented Parker’s pop-up trailer to him at Emerald Lake Trailer Resort and Waterpark in Ontario during Canadian RV and Camping Week in 2017. Parker worked his way through a scavenger hunt with his friends and family waiting to surprise him at the campsite.

The wish granters created a fun scavenger hunt that led Parker to the splash pad, snack bar, and to the lake before he found his pop-up. “We had a lot of clues,” Parker said. Once he discovered and found his trailer, he was thrilled! He grinned the whole time while following his clues, and eagerly explored his new trailer.

We knew that Parker loves to camp. He’s a real outdoorsman! That’s why Emerald Lake Campground is one of his favourite places to visit. “I did a lot of swimming and we had campfires,” he said. Parker had so much fun with his family last summer, but of course, his favourite day of last summer was: “When I got the trailer!”

Parker has big plans for this summer. “I hope to travel further,” he said. “Grand Bend is one of the places I want to go to.” He’s hoping to do more hiking this year too.
Over the winter, Parker was excited to get back outside. “We watched a lot of TV,” he said. “I can’t wait to get back, that’s for sure!”

The Importance of a Wish

Wishes let kids be kids again, and allow their family to start a new chapter together. A wish has the unique ability to transform a child and family’s life during some of their most difficult trials – as a wish creates an opportunity for hope and the ability to experience life beyond illness. Parker’s mother, Danielle said, “When he got the trailer his spirits immediately changed.”

“Parker was in the hospital for a long time,” said Danielle. “When we got the trailer, he totally forgot about being sick.” The trailer is still a place where Parker can play like a kid again. “When he’s at home he tells me when his medication is due. At the trailer, he completely forgets about it.” Now that Parker’s treatment is almost complete, the family should be able to travel a little further. At Parker’s request, Grand Bend is next on the list!

Regardless of where the family camps, they all enjoy the time outdoors. “Just being there is my favourite. Seeing him able to run and be a kid again. Not worrying about hospitals. We love everything about the trailer,” said mom.

And now that summer is so close, Parker can hardly wait for May long weekend! “Since we parked the trailer for the winter, that’s all he talks about.” He always asks how much longer until May long weekend. The whole family is excited to bring the trailer out for another summer. “As soon as we get there he’s a totally different kid,” mom said. “It’s amazing that a wish can change a child’s spirits. It makes them stress free. They don’t have to worry about being sick.”

Join Us for Canadian RV and Camping Week

This year, #CampingWeekCA is on May 22-27, 2018. Join Go RVing Canada, the Canadian Camping and RV Council, and the RVDA of Canada as we partner with Make-A-Wish® Canada to grant another wish to a child in our community.

Do you want to learn how you can get involved in #CampingWeekCA? It’s easy! Leading up to Camping Week, buy a Wish Star for $2.00 from participating campgrounds and RV dealerships. The big wish event will occur on Saturday, May 26. Fellow RVers and campers at participating campgrounds will roast s’mores together across the country. See you there!

The post Parker’s Wish for a Pop-Up RV appeared first on GoRVing Canada.

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Rainy days can really put a damper on your day when you’re supposed to be spending time in the great outdoors. Even if it’s hard to be happy about an overcast day, try to not let a few clouds rain on your family’s parade. We’ll keep our fingers (and toes!) crossed that it doesn’t rain during Canadian RV and Camping Week. Just in case, here are a dozen rainy day activities to bookmark in the event of a little pitter-patter outdoors – perfect timing to get cozy and curl up in the RV with the family!

Family Story Time

It’s smart to always have a few books on hand for a rainy day! Take turns choosing the story and reading aloud to each other. Even better – use your imagination to create your own stories and share them.

Listen to Audio Books

Remember when radio stations had story time, too? Pick up a few audio books to listen along with the whole family snuggled up indoors.

Play Board Games and Card Games

A rainy day classic! Most families have a few board games or a deck of cards kicking around. Always remember to pack your (portable) favourites when planning a camping trip because you never know when they will come in handy! There are so many games you can play with a single deck of cards and 2-4 people. The possibilities are endless, which means hours of entertainment.

Make Arts and Crafts

Simple ones, of course! Colouring books are easy and don’t take up too much space. Same goes for these mess-free crafts.

Go for a Walk

Yes, you can walk in the rain with the proper attire and footwear! If it’s just a little sprinkle, bundle up and explore your campground with a slightly dewy perspective.

Sail Paper Boats

You read that right! Make paper boats then set them on a voyage across the biggest puddle you can find. Don’t knock it ‘til you try it. It’s fun!

Cook Up a Family Feast

Who doesn’t love a hearty meal? Fill your hearts and fill your bellies through the camaraderie of a home-cooked feast in the cozy comfort of your RV! Everyone can pitch in and help out with meal prep and then enjoy good food and good company around the table. Check out all the delicious camping recipes on our blog, or better yet, join our new Facebook Group – Wildhood Recipe Club: Cooking for RVers and Campers!

Sing Camp Songs and Play Skits

You probably have a few old singalongs up your sleeve. Show your kids what camping was like when you were a kid by teaching them a few old camp songs and make-believing skits.

Go For a Long Drive

It’s nice to drive along the back roads when there’s a bit of a sprinkle outside. You never know what treasures you will find in the next town over!

Have a Pajama Day

Who’s game for a day dedicated to naps and movies? Put some cartoon classics on and just enjoy each other’s company indoors for the day.

Plan Your Next Adventure

Rainy days that double as dreaming days are the best days! Bring the whole family together to brainstorm your next adventure. It could be your plans for the next day or your next RV trip.

What do you like to do on rainy days? Let us know and follow along on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest.

And don’t forget to join us for #CampingWeekCA in support of Make-A-Wish Canada! It’s going to be a great time for a great cause! Have you booked your campsite yet?

The post 12 Rainy Day Activities for the Entire Family appeared first on GoRVing Canada.

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Cooking while camping doesn’t have to mean sticking to the basics. Hot dogs and hamburgers are tasty and all, but there are more flavours under the sun!
However, don’t be alarmed by a slightly longer list of ingredients. It’s actually pretty easy! The trick to making great meals around the campfire is to prep as much as possible beforehand.
Here are 10 delicious recipes that we think you’ll love. Better yet, why not try some of these during Canadian RV and Camping Week?

No-Boil Spaghetti and Meatballs

Who wouldn’t want no-boil spaghetti and meatballs after a long day of exploring?
First, no-boil makes this recipe easier than if you were cooking at home! Second, who doesn’t love good ol’ spaghetti and meatballs? We love it, and we can guarantee your kids will love it too!

Campfire Apple Crisp

You can’t skip dessert! Especially if it’s yummy campfire apple crisp and all you need is a cast iron skillet. Toast the oats a little before tossing in the apples. This recipe uses maple syrup instead of sugar – indulge a little extra around the campfire.

Peanut Butter Cookie S’mores

Who wants seconds? Yes, please! Who says that graham crackers are the only cookies worthy of a s’more? Peanut butter cookie s’mores deserve a chance, too!

Cheesy Bacon and Egg Breakfast Hash

Do we really need to explain this one? Anything with cheese and bacon is bound to taste good.
Technically this recipe isn’t meant for only the campfire – you can whip a meal together on a skillet in 30 minutes just about anywhere! Prep your ingredients ahead of time, place the skillet over the campfire, and crack a few eggs on top when you’re almost finished.

Mason Jar Pancakes

Breakfast outdoors just got a whole lot better. Tired of the same old camping breakfasts: cereal or grits? Take your pick! Cheers to something a little tastier to start the day off right…
Mason jar pancakes are exactly what they sound like. Pre-mix your wet and dry ingredients in separate jars, add butter to your pan and shake them all together. Pour, flip, repeat.

S’mores Dip

This is another recipe that is technically meant for the oven, but s’mores are meant for the campfire, no matter how you cook them! S’mores dip is an even better twist on the traditional.
Layer chocolate and marshmallows, add some heat, and dip your cookie of choice into the ooey-gooey treat. This recipe suggests graham crackers, but we already decided that other cookies need a chance too, right?

Bacon Hash Brown Breakfast Sandwiches

Bacon and hash browns sandwiched between two slices of bread? Sounds glorious. These breakfast sandwiches are nutritious and delicious! Optional: add eggs, avocado, cheese—any toppings you want! Simple and easy to fry up over the fire while outside, or even bring the recipe to your stovetop.

Campfire French Toast

This one is probably our favourite recipes on the list. Fresh campfire French toast cooked over the campfire.
You’ll need a full loaf of bread for this recipe—preferably not sliced so you can create a fan yourself between the slices. Wrap the loaf in parchment paper and tinfoil, pour over your egg mixture, and add toppings. Leave the whole bundle over a low flame for a little while, and voila!

Campfire Nachos

You’ll need your well-used cast iron skillet again for these tasty campfire nachos! It’s a relatively easy recipe to tackle if you prep as much as possible ahead of time. Then, it’s just a matter of layering all the delicious ingredients until the cheese is nice and gooey!

Campfire Mac n’ Cheese

First, we should mention that this mac n’ cheese only uses one pot. They aren’t your average noodles either. Sharp cheddar, diced chilies, tomatoes, and crushed corn chips for crunch. S’more, please!

Which recipe will you try first during #CampingWeekCA?

Show us what’s cooking on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest. Be sure to tag #CampingWeekCA for a chance to be featured!

The post S’more, Please! Ooey-Gooey Camping Recipes Galore appeared first on GoRVing Canada.

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When RV camping at most locations in our northern territories, consider it backcountry camping. Come prepared with any supplies you would need to camp off the grid for at least few days. Gas stations are fewer and more expensive, and the weather doesn’t always cooperate when you venture off the main roads.

At the same time, though, come prepared to see sights you won’t see anywhere else. That’s the beauty of road tripping and adventuring into Canada’s quieter destinations!

Dawson City, Yukon

First Nations Heritage meets the Klondike Gold Rush in Dawson City, Yukon, a mining hub in the north. Just outside the city, outdoorsy people escape to Tombstone Territorial Park for gorgeous mountain views. Come prepared, though—this park is essentially backcountry hiking with very few established trails. Although the views are worth the challenge, hikers are advised to be ready for all elements and animal encounters.

The most popular mountains within Tombstone Territorial Park are located within the Ogilvie Mountains: Tombstone Mountain and Mount Monolith.

Fort Selkirk, Yukon

Built on the banks of the Yukon River, there’s a reason why Fort Selkirk is a designated Yukon Heritage Site. This isolated area packs the history of Canada’s early expansion as a gold rush trading post. Even before the gold rush era, archeological evidence points to life at the townsite for over 8000 years—even some to point to late-prehistoric use!

Nearby, travellers find the Fort Selkirk Volcanic Field—the natural wonder of the north. No one is quite sure when the last volcano erupted, but we do know that Volcano Mountain’s lava flows are only a few centuries old.

Kluane National Park, Yukon

Probably the best part about RVing in the Yukon is the empty highways. Just you, your wheels, and endless views. The interior of Kluane National Park, like a lot of the parks in Canada’s Northern half, is only accessible by foot or plane. However, there are a few RV campgrounds just around the National Park’s edges, so visitors can plan day trips into the wild.

Kluane National Park is home to Canada’s highest mountain peak, and North America’s largest glacier. There are also lots of grizzlies, lakes, and winding rivers.

Watson Lake, Yukon

For a relaxing getaway, explore the trails or lounge at the beach on Watson Lake. If you like history, Sign Post Forest is a made-made must-see as well.

Sign Post Forest is a tribute to the town’s beginnings. The US Army of Engineers posted directional signs to their hometowns and points of interest while building the Alaska Highway. One man was injured and taken to Watson Lake, and he brought the sign tradition with him. The original sign of Danville, Illinois, is no longer there, but 72,000 signs make up the current Sign Post Forest in Watson Lake.

Virginia Falls, Nahanni National Park, NWT

This one is a bit of a trek for RVers to get to, but it’s worth every second of travel time. Early explorers originally though Nahanni’s terrain too rugged to conquer. Now, it is accessible by plane, guided hike, or guided canoe.

Park your RV near Fort Simpson or Fort Liard in the Northwest Territories, or Munch Lake in Northern British Columbia. Daily round-trip flights run from these locations into Nahinni National Park, an adventurer’s paradise along the continental divide. The tour planes land about a 30-minute walk from Virginia Falls. Alternatively, a more difficult loop takes hikers one hour around the falls, which are twice the height of Niagara in Ontario.

Wood Buffalo National Park, NWT

Wood Buffalo National Park expands across a large portion of the Alberta-Northwest Territories border. Just as beautiful, but a little more relaxing than the adventures Nahanni promises. Visitors to this park like to walk barefoot through the mud and salt plains—nature’s spa treatment while hiking.

The communities in the area work together to manager the massive park and protect its wood buffalo population—the last free-roaming herd in the world. While you might not see other people exploring, you will likely see buffalo out for a stroll.

Yellowknife, NWT
You will find the true wilderness of Canada when you drive north past Edmonton until you come to the last town accessible by the regular road. Yellowknife is built on the shore of Great Slave Lake—the deepest lake in North America. It’s known for its beautiful landscapes and even better fishing.

There are a handful of RV parks in and around Yellowknife, but the real experience is by float plane. If you go, book a guided fishing tour that takes you to one of the remote lakes only accessible by plane. You’ll be in for a treat!

Twin Falls Gorge Territorial Park, NWT

Along the “Waterfall Route” road trip through the Northwest Territories, RVers can find a haven in Twin Falls Gorge Territorial Park. A favourite spot to rest for the night is Louise Falls Campground, which has only 28 powered sites. Walk the spiral staircase from the campground to the viewpoint for Louise Falls.

Louise Falls isn’t the only reason why people like this destination. 400-million-year-old limestone formations line the banks of the Hay River gorge. Other must-sees in this area: Escarpment Creek, and Alexandra Falls.

For more destination inspiration and ways to embrace RVing, visit Go RVing Canada blog.

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The post 8 Hidden Gems in the Yukon and Northwest Territories appeared first on GoRVing Canada.

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Nobody likes a bad neighbour, and in a campground, your neighbours are a little closer than normal. Be a good camper by following these camping etiquette guidelines.

Know the camp rules

Find the rules and stick to them. Most parks have a list of their individual rules readily available. Find them, read them, and follow them. Rules could include quiet hours, open beverage restrictions, keeping four-legged friends on leashes, and cautious driving. Assume these are the norm, but each park likely has their own unique set to follow.

Leave space

Most campgrounds have a standard space to park your rig already laid out on the site. It’s usually okay to sway from this area, but always be respectful of neighbours nearby. Meaning, don’t block their personal space with your rig. A lot of this just comes down to being aware of your surroundings and leaving room for others to feel comfortable.

Polite pets

We’re not sure why, but not everyone is a dog person. Be polite with your pets by keeping them on leashes, minimize barking, and always clean up after them. Explore our tips for RVing with multiple pets blog post for a refresh!

Don’t cut corners

Yes—no one owns space in a campground, but that rented space is ours for the duration of our stay. For that reason, take the couple extra seconds to walk around campsites instead of through them. While you might think it’s no problem to cut corners, you could be intruding on someone’s personal space, making them feel uncomfortable.

Keep it clean

It’s common camping courtesy to clean your site daily and pick up any leftovers before you pull out of the park. When you’re not at your site, dispose of garbage correctly. Together we’ll keep our parks green!

Leave no trace

This is more than keeping your site tidy. If you’ve rearranged your campsite, move everything back before you leave. If you hung string between trees, remove this as well. There should be no trace that you stayed when you pull out of the park.

Put food away

No one likes critters crawling all over their picnic table. Always put food away when your family is finished eating so you don’t attract unwanted guests to your campsite.

Respect the facilities

Respect the facilities, and others using them. For example, avoid using the communal bathroom sink to wash your dishes while others might be trying to use the same sink to wash their hands. Clean dishes at your campsite. Some parks also have large outdoor trough sinks for cleaning things like dishes.

Keep noise down

That includes generators, music, cranky kids—keep everyone and everything at a noise level that is comfortable for your neighbours. Most parks have quiet hours restrictions to abide by, so everyone enjoys their stay.

Respect your other neighbours

Camping means some of your neighbours might walk on four legs or sleep in trees. Respect the wildlife of the area! They’re the reason why you like to get outside, aren’t they? Make sure the campground is a safe place for all beings that stay there.

Fire hazards

Safety precautions are a big one! Make sure your fire is out before calling it a night. In the correct circumstance, a smouldering fire can quickly become a large flame while everyone is asleep.

Leave the trees

Related to campfires—don’t harm any trees if you need firewood. Most campgrounds sell firewood, or even offer unlimited wood for a flat rate (the cost of your fire permit). You can pick up fallen brush off the ground to use as kindling, but do not chop any trees to light your fire.

Also, don’t bring firewood from home. Lots of parks have restrictions on what kind of wood can come into their areas. Different types of wood bring in different pests, and it’s important to preserve the local wildlife.

Be friendly

RVers are some of the friendliest people you will ever meet! Take a walk around your park and strike up a conversation with your neighbours. You’ll probably find quite a few people you like!

Camping etiquette comes down to a couple simple ideas: be aware of others and be safe. If you do those two things, you won’t have a problem making friends in the park!

Show us where you go! Our community hangs out on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest.

The post Be a Good Camper: Camping Etiquette in Canada’s Parks appeared first on GoRVing Canada.

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