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GO Productivity by Go Productivity - 1d ago

According to the Canadian Institute for Health Information, Canadian companies lose an estimated $16.6 billion in productivity per year due to workers calling in sick as a result of mental health issues.  This trend is expected to increase in severity and this is having a measurable impact on business, productivity and talent retention.

And conservative estimates through the Canadian Center for Study of Living Standards, suggests that the number swells when taking into consideration those who are physically present at work but due to an unaddressed physical of mental health issue, are distracted to the point of reduced productivity.  http://www.csls.ca/events/cea2018/remillard.pdf

The World Health Organization suggests that 60% of employees have experienced mental health issues in the past year because of work.  When there is significant change in the work environment, it can affect the mental well being of a person.  An unreasonable boss, an unrealistic target, lack of clarity in processes and structures, competition for positions, unpleasant colleagues, inconsistent values, health issues, etc. can affect the productivity of a person and in turn cost the employer or company.

It’s a great thing that employers are now taking notice of the mental health of their workers.  Depression and anxiety are the two top issues impacting the majority of people around the world (World Health Organization).  Creating a healthy workplace is one of the most important things a leader can do to care for his/her people and it is of the utmost importance to prevent loss of productivity.  Having proper safety policies; involving employees in decision making; improving company culture through clear values of trust and respect; recognizing and rewarding employee efforts; effectively communicating about direction and tasks; providing supports to discuss challenges; ensure people succeed with an emphasis on team work; are just a few of the key opportunities to help address workforce mental health issues.

It’s important to note that every single one of us has mental health. Sometimes it’s good and sometimes it’s poor. So, creating a healthy culture, reducing stigma and providing ample opportunities for early intervention at the sign of poor mental health are the most important factors to prevent loss of, and bolster, organizational productivity.

The following resources are a great way to start creating a healthy, productive work environment:

  • Psychological Health and Safety Advisor Training will enable a champion in your organization implement the National Standard on Psychological Health and Safety
  • Not Myself Today is a mental health campaign that can support healthy conversations about mental health
  • Mental Health First Aid training can certify employees to recognize, respond and guide peers to support to reduce the impact of poor mental health and ensure they get the help they need
  • How to Optimize Organizational Performance through Health is an article outlining a five-step process to create a healthy, high performing culture

To access these resources and more click here. Pick one strategy and stick with it to support a healthy, productive culture.

Authors:
Victoria Grainger, Founder Wellness works Canada
and Lori Schmidt,  CEO GO Productivity          
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GO Productivity by Kevin Nguyen - 5d ago

I recently went on vacation to Taiwan. While on my trip in Taipei, I had the opportunity to represent GO Productivity and attend InnoVEX and COMPUTEX 2019; one of the global leading innovation trade shows.

This event is one of the leading ICT, IoT & Startup trade shows in the world. For the 2019 show, a focus on the latest technology trends such as Artificial Intelligence, Internet of Things, 5G Connectivity, Blockchain, Innovation, Startups, Gaming and Alternative Reality were on full display.

This year, the event overall hosted 5508 exhibitors at 1685 booths from 29 countries attracting 42,495 visitors from 171 countries. InnoVEX, focusing on global startups hosted 476 tech startups from 25 different countries.

At my brief time at InnoVEX, I got to experience the stories of many international startups and innovation accelerators and how they are focusing on the present, and future. With increasing awareness on Big Data & Analytics, many companies are starting to realize what they can do with that information, and how it can tie into other technologies such as implementation into AI and IoT to better automate workflows and improve manufacturing and production standards. Other prominent areas on display were the increasing yields and focus on alternative and green energy, such as solar, wind and thermal, which are important as we approach and enter the next decade into the 2020’s and climate change continues to be an of increasing concern.

With GO Productivity being part of NAIT’s Industry Solutions and Productivity & Innovation Centre, I felt blessed at my opportunity to attend and network with the world’s foremost progressive thinkers that are working towards continually pushing the boundaries of technology.

It is important to embrace technological innovations moving forward. With the advent of many innovation networks coming to form in Alberta, the growth of grassroots movements assists in creating a venue and resource for the sharing of ideas, information, best practices as well as a vehicle for nurturing and growing innovation.

The shift is now becoming apparent with facilities such as NAIT’s Productivity & Innovation Centre. Located locally in Edmonton, Alberta. NAIT’s PIC is a prime vehicle to combine practical research and cutting-edge technologies and showcase them and help businesses implementing them moving forward. By participating at InnoVEX and seeing what the world has to showcase I believe I was able to see what trending technologies are taking the forefront, and how we can further explore those technologies on with businesses in Alberta.

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GO Productivity by Kevin Nguyen - 5d ago

I recently went on vacation to Taiwan. While on my trip in Taipei, I had the opportunity to represent GO Productivity and attend InnoVEX and COMPUTEX 2019; one of the global leading innovation trade shows.

This event is one of the leading ICT, IoT & Startup trade shows in the world. For the 2019 show, a focus on the latest technology trends such as Artificial Intelligence, Internet of Things, 5G Connectivity, Blockchain, Innovation, Startups, Gaming and Alternative Reality were on full display.

This year, the event overall hosted 5508 exhibitors at 1685 booths from 29 countries attracting 42,495 visitors from 171 countries. InnoVEX, focusing on global startups hosted 476 tech startups from 25 different countries.

At my brief time at InnoVEX, I got to experience the stories of many international startups and innovation accelerators and how they are focusing on the present, and future. With increasing awareness on Big Data & Analytics, many companies are starting to realize what they can do with that information, and how it can tie into other technologies such as implementation into AI and IoT to better automate workflows and improve manufacturing and production standards. Other prominent areas on display were the increasing yields and focus on alternative and green energy, such as solar, wind and thermal, which are important as we approach and enter the next decade into the 2020’s and climate change continues to be an of increasing concern.

With GO Productivity being part of NAIT’s Industry Solutions and Productivity & Innovation Centre, I felt blessed at my opportunity to attend and network with the world’s foremost progressive thinkers that are working towards continually pushing the boundaries of technology.

It is important to embrace technological innovations moving forward. With the advent of many innovation networks coming to form in Alberta, the growth of grassroots movements assists in creating a venue and resource for the sharing of ideas, information, best practices as well as a vehicle for nurturing and growing innovation.

The shift is now becoming apparent with facilities such as NAIT’s Productivity & Innovation Centre. Located locally in Edmonton, Alberta. NAIT’s PIC is a prime vehicle to combine practical research and cutting-edge technologies and showcase them and help businesses implementing them moving forward. By participating at InnoVEX and seeing what the world has to showcase I believe I was able to see what trending technologies are taking the forefront, and how we can further explore those technologies on with businesses in Alberta.

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Organizations considering collaboration are starting to get more support and resources to make their transformation into executing on collaborative construction projects. On May 7th, organizations came together for a seminar and continued the conversation to further build understanding and support for what it takes to be more collaborative and execute collaborative contracting models.

From the event, we have summarized the learnings below and provided a Collaboration Strategy Template developed by the workshop attendees to help your organization get started on the path to Collaborative Construction Projects. For more details from the event, visit our event page.

Collaboration Strategy

If you are ready to start a collaboration strategy of your own, consider the co-developed key elements in the file below developed the the workshop attendees.

Practical Realities of Collaboration in Construction – Collaboration Strategy TEMPLATE.docx

The following is a summary of the learnings from the May 7th Seminar on the Practical Realities of Collaboration in Construction:

Principles of Collaboration

(Presented and Proposed by Richard Venerus of Venerus Advisory Partners)

  • Acknowledge the Need to Partner
  • Shared Vision and Joint Purpose
  • Commitment to the Purpose
  • Establish, Develop and Maintain Trust
  • Use a System for Collaboration
  • Monitor and Measure Collaboration

Contract Models

Frequently Asked Questions

(Fielded by Craig Webber from IPDA and the Industry panelists)

  • How to prove to a senior executive team the value of going away from 3 bids and a buy?
    • Bidding to lowest price doesn’t help the project. Need to pull industry benchmarking to compare and co-develop a market-competitive cost for the project
    • Look at successes per contract model.
    • It’s possible that if you go out to bid you loose all the value potentially created with early involvement
    • Opportunity to demonstrate; prove the value and share results.
    • Team selection should also be based on value not just cost.
    • Budget is co-developed and it is a complete shift in execution approach
    • Even without a design, select team based on competency, get to validation phase asking if we can build it, then press go.
    • Need to anchor on some sort of defined project value. Benchmarking does hep, this for example you could say ‘this type of project costs this amount and typically has this impact’ which is needed in order to make investment decisions. Then focus on how do we beat this benchmark.
  • What maturity level is needed to take this on?
    • Better go forward with teams and organizations that are committed to learning, stay clear of the ones that think they know it all. Doing this in the right way can result in really good results
  • How to make the change?
    • Establish the urgency: The data shows that we need to improve project performance, we are very far behind and need to make a shift to start attracting investment. Furthermore, collaboration has been proven elsewhere.
    • Get it started with demonstration / pilot projects.
    • Provide competitive and collaborative as two options. This can un-anchor the existing processes and neutralize the older ways so it doesn’t’ appear as such a big jump.
  • What is the secret to a good team?
    • Important to have ‘learn-it-alls’ instead of ‘know-it-alls’
  • What if one team or person is not working?
    • Can be voted off the island, if not performing consistently
    • The under-performing team has to present to all the other contracted parties and they will conduct a secret ballot vote. In the example the team was voted to stay and after that they were motivated and did a lot better and everyone else worked harder as well because they didn’t want to be in that position in the future
  • How to bring everyone on-board and make sure they understand the commitment and the goals?
    • On-boarding: translate down from senior management team. Find a strong leader from each trade and bring them in to the big rooms.
    • Reward best lean ideas or other incentives
    • Allow questions ‘couldn’t we do this?’
  • Are all the trades involved? If not how do you deal with contractors outside of the arrangement?
    • In big projects some trades are not included; to figure out which, look at the bones that have biggest impact on schedule and price.
    • When they are not contracted in you still have them on-boarded so they have opportunity to voice ideas and be celebrated for successes.
    • Often they had fewer problems with contractors outside the contract.
    • Working as a team and reporting together will naturally encourage accountability, shows if you’re meeting your promises.
    • Drive with purpose, make a vision statement, review the performance of all players and review what did we set out to do. Make it concrete and tangible For example, on Fort hills they had a clear high level goal of first oil by… but it took the senior leaders 2 weeks to define what success actually looks like so they could measure it.
    • Biggest win would be to keep it simple, celebrate successes

Early Involvement

  • We could include the community as stakeholder; some industries do this better like the forestry industry.
  • Bring people together earlier. Build relationships and invest time up-front for this
  • Exploring who should be involved and when, would be nice if everyone was involved at the beginning. But would they all really need to be involved at the beginning? Allow for all to be involved they would likely self-select if it’s not of value for them; as opposed to dictating when someone is useful.
  • Idea; select team players from bottom up. For example the trades select the designers.

Legal Team Support

  • Think of lawyers as suppliers or stakeholders; it is difficult for them to shift from company-protection to project-orientation. Having them involved all along the way will help
  • Involve lawyers in the risk management assessment
  • Have a project neutral but also a contract neutral with the main role to cause the agreement to come into fruition; more of a facilitator role.

Understanding Shift and Environment

  • Perhaps we’re used to: Cost goes up then profit goes up in some traditional approaches, but with IPD profit remains the same so if the same deliverable / project can be done with less work (more efficiently) will mean more profit
  • Make sure it’s a safe place to provide ideas and constructive criticism.
  • Open door policy, set consistent expectations across all suppliers
  • Need consistent strategy
  • Importance of emotional intelligence, starting to see behaviour change from all parties
  • Know what you know and don’t know, know your role and have a succession plan

Day to Day Processes

  • Respond to needs of the project such as if answers need to be faster then make sure to co-locate the teams
  • Have a wish list of items as ideas are captured throughout the project design and execution. Then at the end of the project the extra profit made by the owner can be arranged to pay for the wish list items
  • For new ideas; always be open to listening even if it seems too late but then include a ‘last responsible moment’ after which we can’t do the change.

(Author: Caitlin Lopez May 22nd 2019)

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Whenever I talk about collaborative contracting publicly at a conference, or privately in a business meeting, I am often asked the question:  What exactly is Collaborative Contracting?  I am asked this question often enough, that I resolved to address it with this blog. So, Enjoy!

The reality is that there is no one, single definition of collaborative contracting in use by those who are familiar with the term.  Venerus has researched, studied and discussed several definitions in both public and private contexts.  We found two basic groups of definitions. One group that we feel is perhaps too narrowly conceived, focuses on the collaborative contract document as an artifact.  The other group of definitions (which we really prefer) is more broadly conceived and describes collaborative contracting as a method or process – treating the collaborative contract document as an important outcome of that process.  In the wide variety of definitions, there is a common theme:  alignment of interests.

Relying on this common theme, Venerus’ humbly offers its own contribution to the effort to define collaborative contracting:

Collaborative contracting is an approach to contracting that brings about an alignment of interests –  primarily commercial interests – among stakeholders (i.e. not just the parties to the contract) involved in a mutual endeavour and/or having some common goal.

Often the endeavour is a “project”, but not all collaborative contracts are necessarily project contracts.  When the endeavour is a project, then the aligned interest is often framed in a neutral way as: “the best interest of the project” and the common goal generally as “project success”.  However, in order for these terms to have meaning in the project context, they must themselves be defined by stakeholders as a natural part of the collaboration process.

Also, we note the terms ‘collaborative contracting’ and ‘relational contracting’ are sometimes used interchangeably.  Venerus believes that the latter term is best applied to collaborative contracting situations that involve long-term relationships that persist beyond the duration of a single endeavour or project.  In short, it is a species of collaborative contract.

Back to our definition:  In fact, the collaborative contracting approach manifests as a wide variety of methods and forms representing varying levels of collaboration that are probably best viewed as a spectrum or continuum.

The continuum we present here is probably most applicable in a North American construction industry context where the need for greater collaboration among project parties is now quite widely recognized.  For more information about the role collaboration contracts can play in exploiting productivity opportunities in construction projects, please see my next blog at: www.veneruspartners.com.

No matter what the definition, the collaborative contracting approach stands in stark contrast to more familiar ‘traditional’ or ‘conventional’ contracting approaches.  These contracts are often criticized for establishing a scheme of incentives that create situations of misaligned interests among stakeholders, each of whom is driven to prioritize their own interests above others – a situation which, all too often, culminates in a collective performance failure.

The practical need to avoid performance failures as well as a powerful desire to avoid the tiresome conflict associated with adversarial contracting had caused many enlightened individuals to create and enthusiastically support collaborative contracting methodologies – which are often passionately espoused as “a better way”.

Author: Richard Venerus – Venerus Advisory Partners

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GO Productivity by Caitlin Lopez - 2M ago

At GO Productivity, we think it’s critically important to amplify the industry voices that motivate positive change and encourage growth.  So, we want to highlight the good work of the Alberta Steel Manufacturers.

The ASM are a membership of steel suppliers in Alberta that started seeing industrial construction projects outsourcing steel to global suppliers but not realizing the actual benefits being promised. Alberta suppliers believed projects Owners were missing significant opportunities for innovation and efficiency which could be achieved through local supplier sourcing and collaboration.

From GO Productivity’s perspective, ASM’s projections parallel our own. We have experience working with various companies at the firm level. We know there are opportunities to save time and money, as much as 10-30%, on improved processes. It requires taking a step back and investing some time working on the processes and the relationships involved.

ASM has resources on their website to frame the conversation around the business case for collaboration using local steel suppliers.  The shared outcomes for suppliers and owners are to find higher quality results through design improvements, long-lasting project performance results and lower total installed project costs. They have recently released a whitepaper through an article on the JWN Daily Oil Bulletin about the total installed cost comparison actually being lower with Alberta suppliers compared to global suppliers when tariffs, quality and schedule impacts are considered. Secondly, the study will include a look into the benefits of applying collaborative project models.

It’s clear that collaboration is an important topic now, but everyone is looking for proof that it works before jumping in. So, for Alberta to become globally competitive and attract direct foreign investment for our projects again, we will need to consider catching up to our international competitors who are already using applied project collaboration approaches and attracting investment dollars.

It is more important than ever for the Alberta industrial construction industry to talk more about formalizing collaborative models for project execution and for suppliers to consider the practical elements and impacts around how to implement those models.

We’re going to explore more about this in our seminar on May 7th. Do you have something to ask or add? Then you need to attend. During the event we will be discussing the implementation aspects of collaboration in construction but also develop ideas on where we can contribute more in achieving a collaborative project design and delivery environment.

Register Today

Author: Caitlin Lopez

in partnership with the Alberta Steel Manufacturers Association

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There are several sources and methodologies on how to collaborate in construction projects. We would like to highlight three such elements which take place at the beginning of a project and seem to be common among the different methodologies.

Early Involvement

As the project progresses through detailed conceptual engineering and detailed engineering/design more of the uncertainties are addressed and mitigated. This can be further enhanced if the project owner(s) were to establish a timeline in the main phases of the project that identifies when and where certain expertise could inform the design. For example, if a project has at its core specific pieces of equipment and processes, then it would help greatly to have the fabricator and manufacturer input even at the conceptual design phase. We often hear an emphatic desire from suppliers that if only they had been brought in on the design earlier they could have saved so much time and money. However, this must be balanced with how much the owner can spend before the final investment decision is made on the project to go ahead.

Shared Purpose

Once a project is fully setup, financed and ready to go, there is a critical time to bring together the core contracted parties and build alignment and understanding on the project. All further actions on the project can be more effective if a strong consideration and commitment is made at the beginning of a project to come together and build a ‘shared purpose.’ In some collaborative contracting models this can be facilitated with a shared risk/reward structure since often finances are the common denominator among the contracted parties. It is however also recommended that each party co-develop a sense of purpose as being part of the project more than just the monetary gain, such as the impact the project will have on the community and economy. An example of a shared purpose could be, “This project will serve the community to bring more jobs and local market for the oil and gas resources developed in our Province. Each company helping to build the project will be assigned a % of bonus when the project exceeds its target completion of Aug 1st 2020 and meets the community and economic impact”

Co-Developed Targets and Design

Given the clear shared purpose and plan for early involvement, the parties involved in a project should co-develop their set of targets, namely the project’s overall design capacity/outcomes and total estimated (fixed) cost. Once these targets are set and agreed upon by the owner, designer, constructors and suppliers where most impacted, then the collective teams can start working towards beating those goals for an established reward; a share of the profit. Imagine, however, if these targets were not co-developed, it would be difficult for any company involved to be fully committed.

We’re going to explore more about this in our seminar on May 7th. Do you have something to add? We’d love to have you attend. During the event we will be discussing the implementation aspects of collaboration in construction, and also start formulating the ‘business case’ for getting started.

Register Today

Author: Caitlin Lopez

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There is a Ladder of Trust in human relationships including collaborative efforts.  Trust is going to be foundational in any progress towards authentic collaboration on construction projects.  Trust must be created, nurtured and grow if a collaboration construction model for projects I going to be optimized.  While Trust is not everything in developing a collaborative culture, it is way ahead of other elements in realizing the successful design, deployment and delivery of collaborative contracting approaches.

Trust is Neutral at the traditional Transactional level of project contracting and performance, it is neither good nor bad.  However, if we are attempting to change from a purely self-interested, “what’s in it for me” business transactional approach into a collaboration culture we must create and embed trust into the business approach.

The Trust options in the evolution of a project could go positive or negative.   We have all experienced negativity in our adversarial and competitive business culture.  We have all also occasionally enjoyed the positive outcomes of trust, but more often within our social and community interactions.  The key difference in dealing with applied trust between negative and positive options is, do we “break” it or “create” it.

Negative Trust:

These negative so-called “trust busters” are inherent in our highly competitive and aggressive business models, in both getting the work and doing the work.  The trust busters we have all seen start with the tendency to diminish and discount the ability of others through negativity.  It evolves into denial for personal protection and sees people withholding information or effort, even engaging in sabotage in extreme situations.  Next is manipulation where parties maneuver to achieve the winning end of the Win-Lose situation.  This is followed by Deception where lying and trickery are often used for protection and cover instead of taking responsibility.  Aggression follows where threats are made, and even direct attacks are instituted as parties “lawyer up” for a fight. The lowest level of broken trust is the vicious character assassination where a feeling of betrayal results and there are efforts at demonizing the “other.”

Positive Trust:

The positive trust builders are more relational than just transactional.  This is where a sense evolves that one is contributing to a larger purpose than just self-interest.  The early stages to build trust are founded in working on a relationship with others by active listening and seeking mutual fairness more than winning in a zero-sum approach.  There develops a sense of contributors having personal honour to uphold and people feel secure within the group.  The result is a trust in the team and a realization of the win-win potential from collaboration.  As a project evolves or new projects emerge, including with some or all the same participants, a sense of loyalty to the endeavour and to the group emerges.  There is a connected network tht creates a sense of entrusted predictability within the relationships.  People pride themselves in doing what they say they will do and the respect that garners from others. This is foundational to establishing a sense of true collaboration were risks and rewards are shared jointly.  The highest level of positive trust building is where creativity, innovation and synergy are a shared experience and highly valued by the participants.

Where do We Start Building Trust for Collaboration?

We might presume parties in traditional contractual arrangements are at the Neutral Transactional level of Trust.  However, given our competitive culture and adversarial contracting culture it is just as safer to assume we are starting somewhere in Negative Trust territory.  It is not too aggressive to assume parties are at least somewhat judgmental about others, feeling the need to protect themselves and be mostly self-serving in search of “winning” in a competitive mindset.

As we move up the Trust Ladder there will be points where there will have to be “leaps of faith” where risks are taken by at least one party in the hope that the collaboration model can progress to the next and higher levels of trust.  If the leap is unsuccessful the best possible outcome is to stall the trust level at the current state.  Alternatively, the sense of a broken trust or betrayal could result in a withdraw and decline into negative trust by one or more participants.

There are tools to deal with negative consequences and they revolve around applied communications, understanding, empathy, accountability, transparency, openness, honesty and integrity.   These tools need to be used early and often even before there is a crisis or breakdown of trust.

To be part of the conversation on how to facilitate collaboration by improving trust, join us for a one-day seminar on May 7th at the Edmonton Conference Center. Register Today

Author: Ken Chapman

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Is anyone getting tired of being told Alberta Construction Productivity is lagging behind the other industries? Is it possible that construction projects have some inherent aspects that just jam-up the gears and prevent us from improving as fast?

At first glance it seems to all come down to timeline and schedule. Construction is project work and often is one of a kind, even if it’s the same design in a new location. But many other industries are more like on-going operations that don’t really have a timeline, more like a constant chase for consumer’s attention.

What can we find in the various industry-leading research and articles? Let’s take a look at what MGI McKinsey presents in ‘Reinventing Construction’. The external factors they identify include regulation-heavy requirements, dependence on public-sector work, cyclical/seasonal demand, fragmentation and poor allocation of risk and rewards as well as a sizable learning curve to enter the market. In other words, there’s a lot inherently pulling away from the center of the project, the value of the project. (source: https://www.mckinsey.com/industries/capital-projects-and-infrastructure/our-insights/reinventing-construction-through-a-productivity-revolution)

It should then stand that if effort is applied to remove some of those factors that are pulling away from the value of the project, that the likelihood of success will be higher.

Hanson Bridgett also has a great set of publications, and Howard Ashcraft has a good way to depict this issue, showing how the different parties involved in a project can either be rowing in all different directions, or they can be aligned and all rowing in the same direction.

(source:  ©HansonBridgett Howard W. Ashcraft)

Therefore such efforts are becoming more of a hot topic lately; Collaboration.

If possible, re-engineer the whole arrangement so that the external factors that are pulling away, such as misalignment and experience-silos, are less likely to occur.

There are several methods of doing this, and although every project is different, this simple but custom approach can be successful on every project.

We’re going to explore more about this in our seminar on May 7th. Do you have something to add? We’d love to have you attend. During the event we will be discussing the implementation aspects of collaboration in construction but also start formulating the ‘business case’ for getting started.

Register Today

Author: Caitlin Lopez

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GO Productivity by Caitlin Lopez - 3M ago

If you are leading or part of a construction project in Alberta likely you are starting to hear more about collaboration as a best practice. However, it’s a concept that on the surface is easy to understand but for implementation it’s not as straight forward as a new technology or software. Thankfully, there is help coming. There are several industry associations that recognize the need for collaboration and are building tools and case studies to help organizations formalize their efforts to be more collaborative.

Let’s explore one of these today; The Integrated Project Delivery Alliance or IPDA.

This association is a group of action-orientated individuals and companies that help support implementation of the model called Integrated Project Delivery (IPD). This model is a concept where the construction project has a fundamentally different contractual arrangement and also has integrated teams that run and execute the project. This model has been successfully implemented across the globe and is becoming more common in Canada and Alberta. The IPDA have in-depth case studies for your review available on their website.

One study done in 2015 through the IPDA with the University of Minnesota surveyed 59 projects that implemented IPD in the USA and Canada. The results show overwhelming positive performance. Respondents indicated 80-90% had ‘better’ or ‘significantly better’ performance factors across the board including: schedule predictability, cost and budget control, quality of building outcomes, less scope changes, better handling of those scope changes, morale of the stakeholders and overall value delivered. (Source: IPDA, IPD: PERFORMANCE, EXPECTATIONS, AND FUTURE USE September 2015)

The study also notes that a majority of those projects implemented Lean tools and Building Information Modeling or BIM. This is of particular interest from GO Productivity’s perspective because we know that Lean tools help all industries and will certainly have a very important role in construction projects of the future. Therefore GO Productivity provides Lean six sigma training and coaching support for the construction industry.

What exactly is Lean? Lean is a methodology and it’s simple! It can be remembered as; Having a clear Goal, knowing and measuring the Value of a process, making that process meet the goal 100% with as little Waste as possible and continuously improving. (goaL, valuE, wAste, Never stop)

The value proposition for a construction project is therefore; Facilitate collaboration and ultimately successful performance and relationships by implementing an IPD arrangement with a shared risk-reward pool, thoroughly-designed fixed cost, and each party is given the tools (lean tools, BIM, technology) to work towards ‘beating’ that fixed cost.

To be part of the conversation on how to facilitate collaboration, such as implementing Lean and IPD, join us for a one-day seminar on May 7th at the Edmonton Conference Center. Register Today

Author: Caitlin Lopez

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