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Summary of Regional American English Accents: There are around 160 recognized dialects of the English language, or regional accents. These terms are often used interchangeably. Even if you’re really into accents, it would probably be impossible to learn them all. Even native speakers can’t understand them all. For example, it’s very difficult for us American English speakers to understand Scottish English speakers! Join our American English Pronunciation course to improve your accent now. (https://www.gonaturalenglish.com/pronunciation-course/) American English Accents: The 4 Most Common Ones If you travel around the US, you will encounter different American English accents. In this lesson we will look at 4 of the most common accents:  Southern, New England, New York City, & Midwestern. Remember, these are general accent regions.  Even within these regions there are smaller subdivision of accents!  Hale is from the South so this is the accent he is most familiar with. In this lesson, our English teacher Hale shares clips from American TV shows that feature the US Southern Accent: -Designing Women -The Help -King of the Hill Next, let’s look at the New England American English accent. The most famous version is the Boston accent. In this lesson, you can see examples from the video clips: -The Heat -The fighter -Good Will Hunting New York City is not too far from New England, but the accent is a bit different. Within New York City, there are even distinctive accents in different neighborhoods (Bronx, Queens, Brooklyn). Check out the clips from: -Rosie Perez -Raging Bull -Seinfeld Finally, let’s look at the Midwest. This is often considered where “standard” American English comes from. However, there are variations from speakers in Minnesota and the Dakotas that are definitely something different. Check out the clips in the lesson from the shows and movies: -Making a Murderer -Drop Dead Gorgeous -Fargo In conclusion, if you want to develop a specific regional accent, you’ll really need to find a teacher from that region or go there to get immersed in the dialect! In general though, it’s not necessary to become an expert in a regional dialect. It’s probably more sensible to learn “standard” American English, which is the accent you hear most news reporters, journalists or other nation-wide broadcasting professionals using. Pro Tip 1: Understand that there are four major regional dialects in the United States, each with different accents Pro Tip 2: Learn standard American English, not just one regional accent. Pro Tip 3: As you advance in your listening skills, if you want a challenge start watching TV shows and movies that feature regional accents. Pro Tip 4: Improve your standard American accent using our Pronunciation course (https://www.gonaturalenglish.com/pronunciation-course/)

The post Regional American English Accents appeared first on Go Natural English.

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12 Reductions 1. whatchya 2. gonna 3. ima 4. whereya 5. kinda 6. sorta 7. sup 8. gotta 9. wanna 10. tryna 11. lemme 12. gimme

The post The ONE thing you need to understand native English | Reductions appeared first on Go Natural English.

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Influential Female English Teachers share their tips for international women To celebrate International Women’s Day, we have tips from the most inspiring women teaching English as a Second Language online. Through their social media, YouTube channels, online courses, and tutoring, their combined efforts are helping approximately 9 million women from all over the world learn English! These 9 inspiring and experienced female teachers have some specific tips for female English learners to help them improve their English fluency even more. English fluency presents a powerful way for international women to communicate and share their voice with the world, and these female teachers are proud to be part of their students’ success. An article in The Washington Post reported that recently women in several countries have been performing better than men in learning English. Way to go, women! Tips for Women Learning English Anna from English like a Native Have fun. Learning a language is a lot easier when you are having a good time. Find ways to enjoy your studies, incorporate movies, music, interaction with friends, etc. Our memory is a lot more effective when we are relaxed in learning. Learn more at: English Like a Native YouTube Channel Hadar from Accent’s Way Start speaking before you are ready. Women tend to be more perfectionists and highly judgmental of themselves. They often wait until the sentence is complete in their heads before speaking, but then it’s usually too late, and they end up not speaking at all.  Since men mostly dominate many industries making it more challenging for women to speak up and voice their opinions in ANY LANGUAGE, you have to make sure English is not yet another obstacle that keeps you from letting your voice be heard. Learn more at: www.theaccentsway.com Shayna from Espresso English Many women learning English lack confidence – they tell me “Sorry for my bad English” or “I’m making lots of mistakes.” and I want to tell you that your English is probably BETTER than you imagine! Don’t compare yourself to native speakers or focus on your flaws. Instead, celebrate the fact that you can communicate successfully (even if it’s not perfect yet). This positive mindset will help you speak more confidently. Learn more at: https://www.espressoenglish.net Christina Rebuffet from Speak English with Christina If you feel afraid or shy, empower yourself to overcome these feelings. Maybe that means preparing before you speak, or telling yourself in your head “My opinions are valid, even if I don’t express them in perfect English.” Maybe it means studying a particular aspect of English you struggle with, so you feel more confident about it in the future. Maybe it means finding a conversation partner you feel totally comfortable with. Never let fear prevent you from moving forward. Fear can be a powerful motivator, to push you outside your comfort zone and grow, as a language learner, and as a woman.  Learn more at: https://christinarebuffet.com/ Halima from Blackboard English Speak fearlessly and imperfectly—It leads to confidence and fluency. Learn more at: www.blackboardenglish.com Rachel from Rachel’s English Practice speaking as much as you possibly can, even if there’s no one to hear you. Learn more at: https://rachelsenglish.com/ Gabby from Go Natural English I’ve noticed sometimes women feel more insecure about their English than men. If you don’t feel confident speaking English yet, put your “acting hat” on! Imagine how your favorite fluent English speaking movie star, politician, public speaker, comedian or media personality would speak and pretend you are acting like that person. Get inspired by them and become a little bit like them when you speak.  My favorite powerful female speakers to  follow are Oprah Winfrey, Michelle Obama and Mel Robbins. Learn more at https://gonaturalenglish.com/keys Emma from MmmEnglish When you hear yourself speaking negatively about your English… “My English is bad. I’m not making progress. I don’t have anyone to speak with. I’m too shy to speak. I will never get an IELTS 8.”  Stop yourself. I challenge you to think differently about your situation. Perhaps what you are currently doing is not working and you simply need to find an alternative. So shake things up a little! Try something new. If you tell yourself that you are useless or unable and you’ll be stuck there, telling yourself you can’t. Tell yourself that you are remarkable and you will find a way to solve your problem.  Your only limit is your own mind! Learn more at: https://www.theladiesproject.com/ Vanessa from Speak English with Vanessa Sometimes we, as women, have a hard time believing in ourselves. We often doubt, “Can I really do it? Can I succeed?” Audrey Hepburn (the classic American actress) said, “Nothing is impossible. The word itself says, ‘I’m possible.” It’s true! Your goal of learning English is possible. Believe in yourself, be disciplined, and success will follow. Learn more at: http://www.speakenglishwithvanessa.com The advice here is especially for international women, but of course it is also helpful for men learning English too! What advice do you have for learning English as a woman? Tell us in the comments below!

The post Inspiring Advice for Women Learning English appeared first on Go Natural English.

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Here are 10 Very Useful English Phrases You Need to Know Please watch the video or listen to the audio to hear the correct way to say each phrase, well as tips for sounding more like a native English speaker! Thanks so much. Please. Excuse me. I really appreciate it. Never mind. how does that sound? That sounds great. Sorry, what was that? Let me confirm… Nice to meet you. Can/could I get your… Actually… For a limited time only you’re invited to my live online Master Class – The 3 Keys to English Fluency. Sign up and reserve your spot now at http://gonaturalenglish.com/keys

The post 10 Useful English Phrases You’ll Use Over and Over – Learn to Speak like a Native appeared first on Go Natural English.

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The Third Conditional How do you form the third conditional tense in English? The third conditional requires us to construct a sentence in two parts. We make the third conditional by using ‘if,’ the past perfect form of the verb in the first part of the sentence and then ‘would have’ and the past participle the second part of the sentence: if + past perfect, …would + have + past participle It talks about the past. It’s used to describe a situation that didn’t happen, and to imagine the result of this situation. If he had studied, he would have passed the exam (but, really we know he didn’t study and therefore he didn’t pass) If I hadn’t spent so much money in my 20’s, I wouldn’t have been poor in my 30’s (but I did spend a lot, and so I did become poor). If we had taken the subway, we wouldn’t have missed the plane (but we did not take the subway, and we did miss the plane) I wouldn’t have been tired if I had gone to bed earlier (but I was tired because I did not go to bed earlier) I would have become a lawyer if I had followed my parents’ wishes (but I did not become a lawyer and did not follow my parents’ wishes) He would not have felt sick if he had not eaten the questionable street food (but he did eat the questionable street food and so he felt sick) I hope that these examples help. If you have questions, comments, or would like to try your own examples, leave a comment! Learn more about the advanced tenses in English: “If I had been you” vs. “If I were you” vs. “If I was you” – Second and Third Conditional Tenses in English The Second Conditional Tense in English Grammar with Examples

The post The Third Conditional Tense in English Grammar with Examples appeared first on Go Natural English.

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universeuniversityunisonunitunityunisex unique,unionunifyunicycleuniformunicornunicameralunanimous ubiety (name)ubiquityUclaf (name)Udale (name)Udall (name)UgandaUkraineUinita (name)UkaseUdy (name from Toy Story)Ueberroth (last name)Ullysesudometerufoukelele, ukeululate (one variant pronunciation)upasuraluraniumUranusureaureterurethraurine, urologyurususeusualusuryusurputensiluterusutilityutopiautricle (tr cluster doesn’t shorten the long u)uvaroviteuvas creekuveauvula EuropeEustaceeunucheulogyeugenicseuphemismeucalyptuseuphonyeurekaeuphoria one once

The post Words that Start with Vowels U or E that Sound like Y appeared first on Go Natural English.

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The Zero Conditional Using the zero conditional English grammar tense is a good way to improve your English, make longer sentences, and speak more like a native. How do you form the zero conditional tense in English? It requires us to construct a sentence in two parts. We can make a zero conditional sentence with two present simple verbs — one in the ‘if clause’ and one in the ‘main clause’: If + present simple, …. present simple. You can also think of it this way: — IF this, THEN that. This tense is used when the result will generally always happen. So, if water reaches 100 degrees, it always boils. It’s a fact. The result of the ‘if clause’ is always the main clause. However, we can create sentences in either order: — If + present simple, … present simple OR — Present simple… if + present simple. Notice in the second example, we don’t need a comma to separate the two parts of the sentence but in the first one we do. The ‘if’ in this conditional can usually be replaced by ‘when’ without changing the meaning. For example: If water reaches 100 degrees, it boils. (It is always true, there can’t be a different result sometimes). If I drink milk, I feel very sick. (This is true only for me, maybe, not for everyone, but it’s still true that I’m sick every time I drink milk). Also, here are some more examples of the zero conditional English grammar tense: If you eat too much, you gain weight.If you go swimming, you get wet.Call me if the package arrives. To further your studies, see this English tip about the first conditional to learn about the difference between the first and the zero conditionals. The first conditional is about a specific situation, but the zero conditional tense is talking in general.

The post The Zero Conditional in English Grammar with Examples appeared first on Go Natural English.

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The First Conditional Would you like to make longer sentences? Using the conditional tenses can help you to express logical ideas and sound more fluent in your speaking. So, how do you form the first conditional grammar tense in English? This tense requires us to construct a sentence in two parts. It is created with “if” then the present simple tense, after which comes the future simple plus the infinitive: if + present simple, … will + infinitive So, this tense is used to talk about things which might possibly happen in the future. Of course, we can’t always know what will happen in the future. However, this describes possible things, which could easily come true. If it rains, I won’t go to the beach. I‘ll go to the party tomorrow if I study today, If I have enough money, I‘ll buy the concert tickets. He will be late if traffic is bad. She will fail the test if she does not study. If I see her, I‘ll tell her. First vs. Zero Conditional: The 1st conditional describes a specific situation, whereas the zero conditional describes what happens in general. The zero conditional is for general facts and the first conditional is for your personal life. For example (zero conditional): if you eat too much, you gain weight (in general, people who overeat will become fat). But (1st conditional): if you eat too much, you will gain weight (specifically I’m talking about today and your situation). So you see, you can use both tenses to express similar but different ideas. The zero conditional is more general and the first conditional should be used for more personal or specific cases. First vs. Second Conditional The first conditional describes things that I think are likely to happen in the future, whereas the second conditional talks about things that I don’t think will really happen. It’s subjective; it depends on my point of view. For example (1st conditional): If she studies harder, she’ll pass the exam (I think it’s possible she will study harder and so she’ll pass) But (second conditional): If she studied harder, she would pass the exam (I think that she won’t study harder, or it’s very unlikely, and so she won’t pass) Click here to learn more about the Second Conditional Tense in English Grammar with Examples Read about the Third Conditional Tense in English Grammar with Examples

The post The First Conditional Tense in English Grammar with Examples appeared first on Go Natural English.

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