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Teacher Appreciation Week sale at Teachers Pay Teachers
Have you heard the news? The Teachers Pay Teachers site-wide sale is happening on Tuesday, May 7th - Wednesday, May 8th. 

All resources will be 20% off, plus an additional 5% off with the code GIFT4YOU. 

Check out my store here!

Everything in my store will be marked off 20% (including all bundles that are already discounted!). You can also get an additional 5% off by using the code "GIFT4YOU".
    Here are some items that you may be interested in adding to your wishlist to start getting ready for next year:Google Drive resourcesPaper resourcesVirginia SOL teaching resources
    I have four ways to prepare for the sale!
    • Earn TPT credits by leaving feedback (credits = free money!)
      • Login to your TpT account and leave feedback on resources you have previously purchased. For every dollar you spend on TpT, you'll earn 1 credit that can be used on future purchases!
    • Buy from your wishlist: 
      • Browse TPT and add items to your wishlist so you remember which products catch your eye. If you have a terrible memory (like me!), it can be so easy to forget about an item that would be perfect in your classroom. There's nothing worse than remembering that you wanted a specific product until after the sale!
    • Shop with bundles: 
      • Bundles already save so much money (my bundles range from 20-35% off year-round). During the sale I discount them an additional 20% off - which is a HUGE savings!
    • Tell a teacher bestie: 
      • Remind your teacher friends so they don't miss out!
    Feel free to email me at glitterinthird@gmail.com if you have any questions about certain products or resources. I am more than happy to help!
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    Measurement picture books
    Are you teaching measurement? Have you used math picture books? I love using picture books in math to introduce a topic, or during math centers to reinforce real-life math application. You can read more about how to use math picture books in your elementary classroom HERE, including introduction lessons, math centers, literacy centers, and even writing.

    Below, I highlight a few of my FAVORITE measurement picture books. Then, you will find a complete guide to measurement picture books that you can use in your classroom. All book links are Amazon Affiliate links (I get a tiny commission if you purchase a book from the link, which goes toward this blog's site maintenance), but you can find the same books at your local book store!
    My favorite measurement picture books
    Millions to Measure by David M. Schwartz
    This book stars Marvellisimo the Mathematical Magician.... you know a book with a character name like that is going to be a fun read! This book explains standard units of measurement and the history of measurement. Specifically, the author zones in on length, volume, and weight. Marvellisimo takes the kids on his hot air balloon throughout time to show them the history of measurement, starting with non-standard units back in the time with cavemen, and ending with present times. It also shows students how we CAN measure with non-standard units, as long as we are using consistency and accuracy. Also - Steven Kellog illustrates the book - I love his work. Every year for character traits I read his version of Jack and the Beanstalk, the pictures are fabulous and his retelling of the classic story is spot-on (and not overly gruesome as some versions can be).
    Me and the Measure of Things by Joan Sweeny
    This book gives examples of units of measurement. I LOVE how it gives real-life objects as benchmarks to get kids making real-life connections. For example, the book states that one inch is the length of a postage stamp. It definitely helps get kids thinking about concrete measurement examples that they would see day-to-day. Another example of relating measurement to real-life is when the little girl is discussing her breakfast. Instead of "I drink a cup of orange juice," the little girl states "I drink 8 ounces of orange juice." The illustrations complement the book very well. Although colorful and fun to look at, the pictures do the most perfect job of explaining the concept at hand. The author also bolds all the measurement words, so you can integrate identifying text features while reading the story. 
    Room for Ripley by Start J. Murphy
    Carlos brings his new pet fish Ripley home from the pet store... but he needs to have a tank the right size! Carlos uses cup, pints, quarts, and gallons to figure out how much water he needs to put in the tank. This book has a special place in my heart. One of my teammates used this book every year to teach capacity. She would read the story, do the water measurements as dictated by the book, and at the end of the lesson, my teammate would pull out a fish as a class pet! The fish's name was ALWAYS Ripley, just like the fish in the story. Year after year, I would hear her kids excited about their new class pet, Ripley. She moved to North Carolina, but she was the most amazing teacher who cared so dang much about the students, her lessons, and their learning. Snag this book and do the fish/capacity lesson - it will be an unforgettable lesson!
    More measurement picture book ideas
    Still looking for more picture book ideas? Below, I compiled a list of some of the best measurement picture books that you and your students may enjoy in your classroom! 
    General measurement math picture books
    Length and distance math picture booksLiquid volume math picture books
      Weight picture books
      Need more measurement lesson and activity ideas?
      I have a variety of measurement resources that you may find useful in your classroom lessons along with these measurement picture books. You can find these lessons and more on Glitter in Third on TPT.

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      How to create assignments in Google Classroom using a computerDo you need help creating an assignment for students on Google Classroom using a computer to assign a digital resource from Glitter in Third? Read the steps below and take a peek at the pictures to help you out.
      Common Google Classroom questions
      Is this not what you are looking for? Here are other frequently asked questions that may help you!
      Create an assignment on Google Classroom using an iPadStep 1Sign in to Google Classroom.
      Step 2
      Click the class.
      Step 3Click on "Classwork."
      Step 4
      Click the purple "Create" button.
      Step 5
      You will have five options. Click "Assignment."
      Step 6
      Click the Google Drive icon.
      Step 7Select the Google resource that you want to assign to students.
      Step 8
      Select "Make a Copy for Each Student."


      Step 9
      Click "Assign." Your assignment is now posted and ready for your students.
      Resources featured in post available at Glitter in Third on TPT
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      How to create assignments in Google Classroom using an iPadDo you need help creating an assignment for students on Google Classroom using an iPad to assign a digital resource from Glitter in Third? Read the steps below and take a peek at the pictures to help you out.

      Please note that all the pictures below are shown on an iPad. On a computer/laptop, your screen will look slightly different. There is a blog post that will show you the steps, click here to read.
      Common Google Classroom questions
      Is this not what you are looking for? Here are other frequently asked questions that may help you!
      Create an assignment on Google Classroom using an iPadStep 1Sign in to Google Classroom.
      Step 2
      Click the class.
      Step 3Click on "Classwork."
      Step 4
      Click the purple + sign.
      Step 5
      You will have five options. Click "Assignment."
      Step 6
      On iPad: Click the paper clip. 
      Step 7Click "Drive"
      Step 8
      Select the Glitter in Third classroom resource that you made a copy of.

      Step 9
      Fill out the rest of the information for your students (instructions, due date, etc.)
      Step 10
      Click the eyeball button. Select "Make a copy for each student."
      Step 11
      Click the paper airplane button. Your assignment is now posted and ready for your students.
      Resources featured in post available at Glitter in Third on TPT
       
      Want to pin it to save for later? 
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       What to do when your students cannot drag-&-drop or type on Google Slides
      Are you using a digital resource from Glitter in Third and you are not sure why your students are unable to drag-&-drop or type on Google Slides? Read the steps below and take a peek at the pictures to help you out. It is an easy solution and a very common mistake.
      Common Google Classroom questions
      Is this not what you are looking for? Here are other frequently asked questions that may help you!
      What to do when your students cannot move the drag-&-drop pieces or type on Google Slides
      Don't worry, it is an easy solution! Make sure that your students are in EDIT mode, not PRESENTATION mode. 

      Not sure which mode that you are in? Look at the pictures below to see the differences.
      Presentation mode
      Presentation mode will look like the picture below. Notice that there is no toolbar.
      Edit mode
      Edit Mode is how your students will be able to drag-&-drop and type on the Google Slides. You will notice that there is a toolbar, and the slides are on the left-hand side of the screen. There is also a small triangle that will take you into presentation mode. 
      Questions?
      Do you still have questions? Feel free to email me at Glitterinthird@gmail.com.
      Resources featured in post available at Glitter in Third on TPT
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      Multiplication & division picture books
      Are you teaching multiplication and division? Have you used math picture books? I love using picture books in math to introduce a topic, or during math centers to reinforce real-life math application. You can read more about how to use math picture books in your elementary classroom HERE, including introduction lessons, math centers, literacy centers, and even writing.

      Below, I highlight a few of my FAVORITE multiplication and division picture books. Then, you will find a complete guide to multiplication and division picture books that you can use in your classroom. All book links are Amazon Affiliate links (I get a tiny commission if you purchase a book from the link, which goes toward this blog's site maintenance), but you can find the same books at your local book store!
      My favorite multiplication & division picture books
      Now...for My Next Number! by Margaret ParkI LOVE this story. It comes with a song CD as well. This book is perfect when you are beginning to discuss times tables. It is full of songs that are easy to memorize and will help your kids learn their multiplication facts. This book is a great way to introduce the times tables. You could even play one song a day before each math lesson. Before they know it, the times tables songs will be stuck in the kiddos' heads and their facts memorized!
      The Doorbell Rang by Pat Hutchins (division)
      I read this book as a child... and loved it. My students still love it. Basically, two friends are about to eat a plate of cookies when a couple friends arrive. Then a few more. Then a few more. Each time the doorbell rings, the cookies need to be split up again and again. The division concept is well done in this story, and this is the perfect book for a division introduction. Draw out the story on the board as you go along to show how the cookies are split up over and over. Or if you really want to go all out, copy the story and use real cookies for a lesson that your students will never forget!
      Amanda Bean's Amazing Dream by Cindy Neushwander
      This sweet story is about a little girl who loves to count things, but needs a faster way to do so (like the tiles on the walls, books at library, etc). She suddenly realizes that multiplication is the answer. I chose this story because it is a way for students to see that multiplication be solved in various ways and concepts, not just memorization. For example, it discusses both repeated addition and arrays. This is a great book to introduce these other conceptual ways to visualize multiplication. 
      More multiplication & division picture book ideas
      Still looking for more picture book ideas? Below, I compiled a list of some of the best multiplication and division picture books that you and your students may enjoy in your classroom! 
      Multiplication math picture books
        Division math picture books
        Need more multiplication and division lesson and activity ideas?
        I have a variety of multiplication and division digital resources that you may find useful in your classroom lessons along with these multiplication and division picture books. You can find these lessons and more on Glitter in Third on TPT.
        Want to pin this post to save for later?

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         Math picture books
        Have you used math picture books in the classroom? We often think of reading and math as the two BIG building blocks in elementary school. We work hard in reading all morning long, and then we work hard in math. But - why are these two subjects so vastly separated? Create a bridge between the two and integrate both math and reading seamlessly into one another by using math picture books.

        Some students like math, but many dislike it. I always have more students in my classroom that love to read over doing a math problem any day of the week. Bring instant engagement and a new understanding of math into the classroom by using math picture books! Draw those avid readers into math by incorporating literature into your explanation and discovery of mathematical concepts.

        Below, I introduce math picture books and how you can easily implement them into your classroom. Plus, you can view an extensive list of math picture books that you can check out at your school library or purchase at a book store! 
        Why teach math with picture books?Enjoyment
        Do you have a student in your classroom that vocally "hates math?" Maybe more than one? Math picture books can make a world of difference for these students. Kids and adults enjoy stories. Math picture books are another way for students to approach and understand math, while getting enjoyment out of the story and connections with the character or plot.
        Real-life connections
        I find that real-life connections in math is NOT something that is innate in students (or adults!). We often can't recognize how or when we would use a specific skill or mathematical concept. Math often feels so segregated from our actual lives when students are huddled over a math journal practicing long division. Math picture books are a fantastic resource for students seeing math being used in the real world. Characters  in the story often have a problem, and use math to solve that problem. Reading about these characters often gives students an "a-ha!" moment regarding when they might run into a need to use math in the real world. 
        Verbal-language connection
        Students will build their language and reading skills while learning math. They will need to use context clues to decipher new vocabulary. Drawing conclusions over information in the story. Making inferences based on their schema and background knowledge. Practicing reading strategy skills at the same time they are learning math? Priceless. Increase kids' literacy skills while building up their math foundation. 
        When during the day can I use math picture books?
        Introducing a new topic
        Not sure how to create an engaging lesson to introduce area/perimeter? Grappling with how on Earth to make subtraction exciting? Math picture books are SO GOOD for a new unit introduction. Read the book aloud, then ask students what they notice about the book. What happened in the book? What problems were the characters trying to solve? You will be surprised how many instant real-life connections that students will be able to recognize. Books stick in kids' brains more than doing problems in a math notebook, so throughout the unit you can reference parts in the story where the math concept was used.
        Math center/math rotation/literacy center/literacy rotation
        Are you using math centers in your classroom? In my classroom, I use a math station format. You can read all about it  to learn more- click here! An easy math center that your students will love is to have a math literature center. Throw a few math picture books that you checked out from the school library into a basket, and you are good to go! Students can grab a book during the center to read. I personally love kids reading simply to enjoy reading, but if you prefer to have additional accountability with your group of kiddos, you could ask students to write a quick snippet on an index card or in their math journals regarding how the book relates to the concept that you're studying. What an easy and no-prep math center!
        Writing
        YES, you can use math picture books in writing! Read a couple of math picture books as a read aloud, then have students create their own math picture books that demonstrate the concept that you are studying. This is a great way to integrate your curriculum and a multitude of subjects!
        What are some math picture books I can use?
        I created blog posts that center on each math subject to make it easier for you to view and plan upcoming lessons. Click on each link to read the blog post that goes into details on each!

        Conclusion
        If you have not used math picture books in the classroom, here is your challenge. Pick one math picture book on this list and try it out. Then, leave me a comment letting me know how it went! 

        If you have used math picture books in the classroom, let me know how you use them and what your favorites are! Leave me a comment down below.
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        Fraction picture books
        Are you looking for fraction picture books? I love using picture books in math to introduce a topic, or during math centers to reinforce real-life math application. You can read more about how to use math picture books in your elementary classroom HERE, including introduction lessons, math centers, literacy centers, and even writing.

        Below, I highlight a few of my FAVORITE fraction picture books. Then, you will find a complete guide to fraction picture books that you can use in your classroom. All book links are Amazon Affiliate links (I get a tiny commission if you purchase a book from the link, which goes toward this blog's site maintenance), but you can find the same books at your local book store!
        My favorite fraction picture books
        Fractions in Disguise
        This book is a MUST READ. Fractions in Disguise centers on equivalent fractions, simplifying fractions, improper fractions and mixed numbers. The main character, George Cornelius Factor (GCF... get it?!) is on the hunt for a certain fraction that has been disguised by the evil Dr. Brock (who often turns fractions like 3/6 into 1/2 or 6/12). GCF must figure out how to find the hidden fraction using his math skills. This book is SO FUN, and the author jam packs so much great information and mathematical concepts into it. Your students will want you to read this one again and again!
        Lion's Share
        This book is so sweet, and a good way to incorporate some character education into your fraction lessons. A mouse is invited to a lion's birthday party. After the cake is all passed around to the lion's friends, there is no cake left for the mouse! The other party attendees decide they will each make the mouse a cake - but it gets out of hand quickly. Lots of good vocabulary in this book as well to discuss with students.
        Twinderella
        Twinderella: A Fractioned Fairy Tale focuses on the concepts of halves and doubling. The book focuses on Cinderella and Tinderella, two sisters who use math skills to figure out how to get to the ball and live "happily ever half'ter". I love how the female lead enjoys doing math, but it is a great twist on the old fairy tale!
        More fraction fun picture book ideas
        Still looking for more picture book ideas? Below, I compiled a list of some of the best fraction picture books that you and your students may enjoy in your classroom! 
          Need more fun fraction lesson and activity ideas?
          I have a variety of fraction digital resources that you may find useful in your classroom lessons along with these fraction picture books. You can find these lessons and more on Glitter in Third on TPT.
          Want to pin this post to save for later?
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          Geometry picture books
          Are you looking for geometry picture books? I love using picture books in math to introduce a topic, or during math centers to reinforce real-life math application. You can read more about how to use math picture books in your elementary classroom HERE, including ideas for introduction lessons, math centers, literacy centers, and even writing.

          Below, I highlight a few of my FAVORITE geometry picture books. Then, you will find a complete guide to geometry picture books that you can use in your classroom. All book links are Amazon Affiliate links (I get a tiny commission if you purchase a book from the link, which goes toward this blog's site maintenance), but you can find the same books at your local book store!

          My favorite geometry picture books
          I Spy Shapes in Art by Lucy Micklethwait
          Find all sorts of polygons using real-life art from artists like Georgia O'Keefe and Matisse. This book would work especially well if you used a document camera to zoom up on each picture, then kids could label the projected image with post-its that identify each shape. This book also will get students interested in art. In the past, students have excitedly told me about the paintings and collages they saw while at an art museum that are similar to ones in the book and the polygons that they identified!
          If You Were A Quadrilateral by Marcie Aboff
          This book works great introducing quadrilaterals to students. Quadrilaterals is a daunting sounding word, so a fun and brightly colored picture book helps the idea "click" with students a bit more is much appreciated! The book talks about real-life objects that are quadrilaterals - from yoga mats to checkerboards. Students will love the fun pictures, and afterward you can do a quadrilateral hunt around your classroom!
          Sir Cumference and the Great Knight of Angleland by Cindy Neushwander
          Your students will LOVE this story! It focuses on the son of Sir Cumference, Radius, who wants to become a knight. The way for him to become a knight is to solve angle puzzles. This book has tons of math vocabulary that you can discuss as you read as well. This is a fabulous introduction read-aloud before starting angles!
          More geometry picture book ideas
          Still looking for more picture book ideas? Below, I compiled a list of some of the best geometry picture books that you and your students may enjoy in your classroom! 
          3D shapes
            AnglesCirclesBasic geometryGeometry mathematiciansPolygons
            Symmetry
            Tangrams

            Need more geometry lesson and activity ideas?
            I have a variety of geometry digital resources that you may find useful in your classroom lessons along with these geometry picture books. You can find these lessons and more on Glitter in Third on TPT.
            Want to pin this post to save for later?

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            Choosing literature circle books for 3rd-grade
            I get a lot of questions from teachers about choosing literature circle books for 3rd-grader students. These teachers have their literature circle packets ready. These teachers are pumped. These are prepares for their students to dive into book discussions and practice their analytical skills. But the million dollar question is- what books should their third-graders read?

            In this blog post, I break down everything about literature circle books, including where to find cheap books in bulk, choosing the right literature circle books, and a list of literature circle book ideas for your low, on-level, and high ability readers. Keep reading to learn more!
            Choosing books for literature circle
            Choosing literature circle books can be tough. Let's face it - there are a lot of books in the world, which means that there are a lot of options. It can be tricky to know if you have should choose books that you KNOW your students will love (Big Nate, Wimpy Kid, Harry Potter), or branch out with books that students might not instantly connect with upon seeing the cover. But you know what? I 100% recommend branching out. Once they get started with the book, their worlds will click. Students already are drawn to certain books, so give them a taste of different authors and genres that could get them hooked to something new. Use literature circles as a way of getting new types of books into your students' hands. Go for those classics and award-winners, as well as new books that may still be in the shadows.
            Where to find cheap books in bulk

            Yay, you are eager to begin to organize your literature circles. BUT - what happens if you need a large set of books but don't want to spend all your hard-earned dineros stocking up on books? Below is a list of ways to find cheap books in bulk so that you can keep your pocketbook zipped!
            Ask your librarian, reading specialist, and/or principal
            Without a doubt, try this option first. I used to buy everything for my classroom myself, but one day I asked the reading specialist if she could order a couple copies of a specific book for me. I was shocked when she said that she has funds for the reading room, but teachers never tell her what books that they want! Same thing with the librarian and gifted resource teacher. Many of these positions have funds for books, and many times have extra money that they are not sure yet where to put it to use. Always, always, always ask. The worse that can happen if they cannot order the books for you, but most likely they will be able to help you out. Never assume!
            Bargain section in book store
            My local Barnes & Noble always has a huge sale section with lots of great and cheap finds. If you are a member, they also have pop-up sales every so often that you receive emails for. You can snag a lot of books for a low price if you keep your eyes peeled!
            Donor's Choose
            I have personally never done Donor's Choose, but all my teachers friends that have done it have many success stories! You can get a project like literature circle books funded fairly quickly, especially when posting the link on your Facebook or Instagram so that friends and family can donate as well.
            Join the Scholastic Reading Club
            If you aren't currently a Scholastic teacher, you need to sign up NOW! These are the old-school fliers that you send home with students, or you can have parents do it digitally to minimize work needed from you. Students/parents buy books, and YOU get all the points and perks from their order. With the points, you can buy free books. The Scholastic Teacher Store also has great deals, you can get books for only $1 and they often have free shipping days as well. 
            Search the school
            Compile books from around your school to create your literature circle book sets. Check out the books in the library. Ask other teachers for copies. Send home a note to your students' parents asking if anyone has certain books. You will be surprised how many teachers have the exact book that you are looking for, and more than willing to let you borrow it!
            Team up with another class
            This is one of the easiest ways to accomplish your literature circle books without spending much money. Join up with another class. Together, you can utilize all of the previous tips, as well as check out books from your local library or grab a few from your classroom library/scrounge together a couple extra copies to make a full set. This is way less work for you, because let's face it, teachers have enough work as it is. I always do this with other teachers on my team. Then, we can take turns doing our literature circles and dramatically decrease spending any money.
            How to do literature circles
            I previously wrote about how to do literature circles in your classroom in two different blog posts. One blog post focused on a paperless literature circle, and the other blog post focused on using a packet.
            Digital literature circles
            Go digital with paperless literature circles that are run through Google Classroom. This results in decreased teacher prep - no more giant, packets taking up previous space in your students' pocket folders. You know what else? You do NOT need to be 1:1 with technology to have students do this! It is an easy literacy center that students can rotate on and of devices for. Check out the blog post here and the resource available on TPT here.
            Paper packets
            If you aren't ready for digital literature circles, this is a great option. I break down all the steps in my blog post, from how to create the groups, to assigning pages, to utilizing roles. Check out the blog post here and the resource available on TPT here
            Literature circle books for 3rd Grade 
            Below is a list of fantastic literature circle books for your third-graders. These will also work well in fourth-grade or even fifth-grade, depending on the level and ability of your students. Always pre-read the books before selecting for students to make sure that they are appropriate for your set of students. All the following links are Amazon Affiliates link, meaning I get a small commission with no fee to you if you purchase one of the books. However, you can easily buy ALL these books at your own local book store near you!
            Literature circle books for low ability readers
            A Mouse Called Wolf by Dick King-Smith
            Frindle by Andrew Clements
            How to Eat Fried Worms by Thomas Rockwell
            Socks by Beverly Cleary
            Superfudge by Judy Blume
            The Chocolate Touch by Patrick Catling
            The Whipping Boy by Sid Fleischman
            Literature circle books for on-target readers
            Charlotte's Web by E.B. White
            Third Grade Angels by Jerry Spinelli
            Shiloh by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
            Stone Fox by John Reynolds Gardiner
            Stuart Little by E.B. White
            The Borrowers by Mary Norton
            The Great Gilly Hopkins by Katherine Paterson
            The Jacket by Andrew Clements
            Literature circle books for high ability readers 
            A Single Shard by Linda Sue Park
            Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
            The Egypt Game by Zilpha Keatley Snyder
            Conclusion
            I would love to hear what YOUR favorite literature circle books in the classroom are. Have your students read any of the ones on my list?

            Try introducing one of the books listed that is new to you into your literature circles. Then, let me know how it goes by leaving me a comment down below!
            Resources featured in post available at Glitter in Third on TPT
                   


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