Loading...

Follow Girls Leadership on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

6 min read 

By Clare Reynders, MEDIAGIRLS Editorial Volunteer

Middle school participants in our MEDIAGIRLS program tell us regularly they are addicted to YouTube, spending endless hours a day consuming favorite shows, music videos, DIY tips, and more. They are not alone: According to Brandwatch.com, YouTube is now the third most visited website, after Google and Facebook, and 400 hours of video are uploaded every minute! Many participants fantasize about being famous “YouTubers” with millions of fans, making billions of dollars.

Note: 96.5% of all of those trying to become YouTubers won’t make enough money off of advertising to crack the U.S. poverty line, but that’s another story. What we wanted to know is whether YouTube is more positive or negative for girls.

What are the empowering aspects of YouTube?

YouTube videos are accessible, varied, and shorter than an episode of a TV show, so girls say they’re more fun and easy to watch than TV. What also makes it so appealing is variety; you can basically find a video for anything you’re looking for because there are no TV executives beholden to advertisers. Instead, producers of any age can upload their ideas right onto YouTube, and we get to choose for ourselves what is worthy.

For Claire, an 8th grader on the MEDIAGIRLS Youth Advisory Board, “I love inspiring videos like those of Nathan Zed, because his videos always feel grounded and meaningful. The Game Theorists are a fun channel because they analyze games you love with science, and you get to learn all sorts of interesting things. I also am a big fan of Domics. He is a huge inspiration for me, his videos are never meanspirited and they make me smile.”

We love how many young YouTubers are using the platform to make the world a better place. For example, we’re seeing gutsy teens speak up for LGBQT+ rights; provide pro-tips for girls on how to survive the transitions to middle school and high school; share tips on how to start a business, create a pastry, repair a broken phone, take professional-looking photos, and become a ukulele player, just to name a few.

Risa, another 8th grade Youth Advisory Board member, used YouTube to learn hair braiding: “A few years ago, my summer camp counselor was amazing at hair braiding, and all the girls asked her to do their hair. I wondered what the hype was about, and asked her to do my hair. I fell in love with the braid she made, and spent hours every day on YouTube learning to master it and make other intricate braids. I started with simple French braids and ended up learning complicated ones like the ‘Inverted Dutch fishtail fauxhawk.’ I have done a lot of my friends’ hair since, and was recently asked to create braids for five high-school girls going to their prom, and I’ll make $200!”

Says Michelle Cove, founder and Executive Director of MEDIAGIRLS, I so appreciate seeing teen girls using the platform to help other girls, lift their spirits, and be authentic. I’ve seen so many girls on YouTube performing in poetry slams, competing in fierce dancing competitions, creating PSAs, teaching tutorials. There are so many incredible role models.”

The darker side of YouTube for girls

But this platform without gatekeepers is a double-edged sword. If everyone can put out videos, who’s keeping an eye on what is inappropriate and harmful for girls? For every inspiring creator, there is an overabundance of people who abuse the platform.

For instance, says Claire, “Recently, a hugely popular YouTuber (Logan Paul) went into a forest famous for suicide, and showed a dead body to his millions of fans. Not only could this be problematic for people who may have had suicidal thoughts, but the majority of his fans are kids that are being influenced by his behavior. The worst part is that he barely made a real apology, and just plugged his channel in the video. He also makes music videos that objectify women in a really gross way.” Logan has 17 million subscribers (and this is AFTER all the controversy caused many people to unsubscribe), and he often sets a terrible example for young people.

Says Amanda Mozea, Education Outreach Manager of MEDIAGIRLS, “I have become more and more aware that who becomes popular on YouTube is mainly tied to conventional beauty standards. Thumbnails (the preview image) are typically curated selfies – sexy and elegant, pouts on point, eyebrows snatched, contoured to perfection – drawing clicks towards them like magnets. Beauty gurus are almost always white; fashionistas are often uniformly size 00; hair tutorials are for girls with straight hair. Even in the Black, natural-hair community, loose curls on light-skinned, mixed girls dominate YouTube views. Basically, YouTube has a way of making lots of girls – girls of color, “plus-sized” girls, girls with curly and coily hair – feel invisible.”

Michelle Cove adds “We use YouTube for MEDIAGIRLS playlists (see below) with music videos compiled by girls that have positive lyrics. I’m struck by how many music videos are empowering on the surface with lyrics about being strong and independent, but the singers are dancing suggestively to get a guy’s attention or seduce the audience by pouting into the camera. It’s a clash of messaging, and confusing for girls.”

So where do we land with YouTube?

Like all forms of media, YouTube is a platform, not good or bad inherently, and depends on how we use it. There’s plenty of garbage out there, and we wish we could shield girls from many of the sexist, derogatory and mean-spirited content. But without question, YouTube can be inspiring, if girls find the right channels to watch. Young girls everywhere should be empowered to share their creativity with the world without focusing too much on fame or the more shallow aspects of YouTube culture. We have YouTube to thank for providing a space for kids to get creative while at the same time encouraging them to do so.

 

TRY THIS

 

  • Ask your girl(s) who her favorite YouTube influencers are and why.
  • Have her show you one or two of her favorite videos that she thinks are positive for girls. Ask her to explain why, and what kind of content she’d put out there for girls if she could.
  • Show her some empowering videos you like (see below for hints).
Favorite YouTubers to Check Out with Your Girls:

MEDIAGIRLS Girl-Power Playlists – Our Youth Advisory Board creates a compilation of favorite songs of the year with inspiring and positive lyrics for girls

Dodie Clark – a musician who writes great songs on her ukulele, collaborates with her talented friends, and speaks candidly about mental health and sexuality!

Lily Singh – Her hilarious sketches, funny celebrity collabs, and honest, candid persona make Lily one of the best YouTubers working right now.

Vi Hart – Makes math videos where she discusses interesting concepts through her incredible doodles! Her geometric doodles have filled many a page in my math notebooks.
Ingrid Nilsen – There seem to be thousands of “beauty guru” YouTubers out there, and Ingrid is unique for how positive and supportive she is.

Clare Reynders is a junior at Vassar College majoring in Media Studies with a minor in Women’s studies. She loves singing in her a cappella group, reading books, and, of course, empowering young women.

This piece was originally published on MEDIAGIRLS.ORG and is republished with permission. Michelle Cove is the Executive Director of MEDIAGIRLS®, a nonprofit organization that teaches girls how to critique the way girls and women are portrayed in pop culture with an emphasis on creating empowering content.

She is also an award-winning filmmaker, journalist, and author whose projects have been featured on numerous national platforms including “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” Katie Couric’s talk show “Katie,” “The Today Show,” The Washington Post, and The New York Times.

Visit www.mediagirls.org to learn more.

Read More from Girls Leadership on:

Media

The post #MediaMondayTip: Is YouTube more empowering or demoralizing for girls? appeared first on Girls Leadership.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

6 min read

This piece was originally published on lauraclydesdale.com and is republished with permission.

The headlines on the dangers of social media over the last few months are enough to cause us parents to lose our minds:

study of girls’ experiences with sexting found that over two-thirds had been asked to send explicit images. Other research compelled Facebook to issue a warning that ’passively consuming’ the News Feed will make you feel worse about yourself.  Further academic research on the dangers of social media tell us that our girls are more depressed, have less supportive friends and relatives, want to go to school less, and feel bad about their bodies the more frequently they use social media.

Before I build a moat around my daughter, I have one big question: Why isn’t anyone teaching me (and her) how to use social media as a tool for her power?

There are a lot of dangers to driving a car, but my parents taught me to drive a car rather than just lecture me about the risks. Of course they gave me lots of warnings. But I also received training before they handed over the keys with a smile and said “have fun and be safe!”

Why should social media be any different?

To make matters worse, no one is talking us off the ledge. Instead, they are piling on. At after-school events to train parents on social media, police officers counsel parents and kids that if they post certain things they can go to jail or be registered as a sex offender. Lawyers explain that if you make one wrong move on social media, that post or picture can follow you for the rest of your life, hurting your chances of getting into a college or getting hired by your dream company. This doesn’t even cover the warnings we get about cyberbullying, relationship aggression, and sexting your child could experience (or wield) if not careful.

Simply put, the advice to parents is control, limit, and stalk.

None of this advice is terrible, however, it’s all defensive. I have nothing against a good defense; however, if we only view social media as a dangerous community to protect against, our kids will disengage from discussing it with us. This attitude toward social media makes us look like dinosaurs who ‘just don’t get it.’

Dr. Lisa Hinkelman, founder and executive director of ROX (Ruling Our Experiences – a non-profit girls’ leadership organization), says the “control, limit and stalk” message is unfortunate because a prerequisite to successfully helping your girl navigate social media is an open line of communication.

She says, “Girls are much less likely to be open and communicative with people they feel may be judging their responses or decisions. If girls feel like there is a “right” answer or response, they are much less likely to share their true opinions and much less likely to engage in an authentic conversation.”

The other downside of being purely defensive is that it implies our girls are powerless.

Hinkelman, says “social media is not going anywhere and it is likely to continue to impact and influence our society in profound ways that we cannot even anticipate.  With the generational and technological divide impacting the way that parents and teens communicate with their peer group and with one another, we must actively work to create positive and prosocial ways to discuss, use and manage social media.

Hinkelman’s ROX is a co-curricular program that runs during the school day and is delivered by trained and licensed counselors and social workers. They offer programming that doesn’t just help girls take back control of their social media, but teaches girls skills to effectively navigate their world.

ROX believes social media is just one of many communities that require relationship building. Skills girls need to successfully navigate complex life situations are the same skills girls need to navigate social media. If a girl can’t trust their intuition, avoid coercion, and stand up for herself at school or in person, how is she going to have the strength to say, “I’m not sending you a naked picture!”?

ROX sees an opportunity to leverage the social media conversation and impact other areas of a girl’s life.  “How can we shift the conversation from seeing social media as a negative that must constantly be managed to something that has the potential to be a positive support in a girl’s life? We should use the opportunity to help foster the social connections that are so important to girls by encouraging support and collaboration over pressure and competitiveness,” says Hinkelman.

For instance, since girls often don’t speak their mind for wanting people to like them, could we teach girls to harness social media as an opportunity to practice this critical skill? It might be easier for them to stand for something on social media rather than doing it in person.

There are some simple things we can do as parents to start flipping the social media conversation on its head.

HINKELMAN SHARES AN ACTIVITY THAT CAN EASILY BE DONE AT HOME.

First, ask your girl to consider how she would describe herself in three words.

Next, have her brainstorm three words her closest friends would use to describe her.  Are there similarities or differences?

Finally, take a look at her social profiles. When friends (or strangers!) view her profile, social media feed, and online activity — what conclusions might they make?

When ROX asked 10,000 girls across the country to do the above exercise, many girls had similarities between these lists, however, more often than not, there were marked differences.

Hinkelman says, “The girls wanted to paint an image of being ‘pretty, fun and funny’ on social. Helping girls examine the way they personally view themselves and how, what and why they want others to develop specific opinions about them can create an interesting and illuminating conversation. For example, if a girl describes herself as happy, positive and hard-working, but her profile demonstrates criticism of herself or of other girls and is fraught with negative posts, a learning opportunity exists in this space.”

If a girl never has an opinion for fear of not being liked as a teenager, how will she have an opinion in the boardroom 20 years later? If we are not teaching girls how to do this in real life, how do we expect them to do it on social media?

We cannot discuss social media in a bubble, and we can’t only view it as a negative community to protect against. It is too intertwined with all of our other relationships and communities.

Now is the time for offense. Open a dialog with your girl and start shifting the power back into her hands.

Laura Clydesdale had an epiphany one day when she noticed her then 10-year-old daughter exhibiting some of the same career-derailing traits as many of her female clients. Did it really start this early, she wondered? Laura decided to leverage her 15 years of experience as a leadership development consultant and launched her popular girls leadership blog.

She is a regular contributor to the Washington Post, has appeared in the Chicago Tribune, Toronto Star, Parent.co and has also been featured on several radio shows and podcasts. Laura lives in Berkeley, CA with her husband and two children.

For more posts by Laura Clydesdale visit her blog here, or sign up for her newsletter.

You can follow her on Twitter at @l_clydesdale and can be contacted at laura@lauraclydesdale.com.

Read More from Girls Leadership on:

Parenting Media by Laura Clydesdale

Handling Tricky Situations Online is a Girl & Grown-up Workshop series that will be available starting in the 2018-2019 school year. Contact us here to bring this program to your community. Available in CA, CO, NJ, and NY.

The post How To Help Your Girl Take Back Control Of Her Social Media appeared first on Girls Leadership.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

5 min read

Target and CVS are paving the way for ad campaigns that do not digitally retouch their models. CVS has gone so far as to say that by 2020, all beauty brands that are carried in their stores will have to state when a model’s appearance has been digitally altered. Target is running a swimsuit campaign in which no photo retouching occurs. Do campaigns like this make a difference for girls? We turned to the MEDIAGIRLS’ Youth Advisory Board, a group of strong-minded and thoughtful teen girls, to tell us their reactions. Spoiler alert: These campaigns do make a difference.

Kakazi: I think campaigns like this make all the difference. If girls can see other girls who look like them, it makes them more comfortable. Girls with stretch marks, regular waists and a couple pimples are normal girls. It’s good for girls to see other normal girls considered beautiful. In this way, they can work on any body image issues from the outside in by understanding that there need not be ANY body image issues since we’re all beautiful.

Risa: I think this makes a big difference for girls. Having hundreds, thousands, even millions of girls everywhere seeing these ads with normal women will make girls realize that they are gorgeous and normal just the way they are, boosting their self-esteem.

“Women who look like actual women should be a norm throughout every commercial, magazine, and runway.”
– Annie, age 15

Annie: In a world of impossible body standards showcased 24/7 in the media, it is incredibly important that we see representation of different body types, especially ones that haven’t been touched up or Photoshopped. While the CVS and Target campaigns are fantastic in this regard, the whole point of having “real looking” models is invalidated if we stop there. We can’t allow brands to congratulate themselves on running one body-type-diverse advertising campaign as something “special.” These types of images need to permeate our society until they become the norm, because it shouldn’t have to be astonishing to see non-edited depictions of women in the media. In order for girls to see a new definition of beauty, one where words like “skinny,” “tall,” and “perfect”— and “white,” for that matter— aren’t a requirement, modeling and advertising as a whole need to be redefined. Women who look like actual women should be a norm throughout every commercial, magazine, and runway. Campaigns like those of CVS and Target can only have an impact if they become a regular occurrence, not a token “diverse” advertisement that allows a brand to say, “Look how groundbreaking we are!” For this reason, we need to hold CVS, Target, and every brand accountable so that they continue redefining norms of beauty. When women and girls alike are exposed to images of models who look like them, they stop striving to be beautiful and realize that they already are. We can applaud CVS and Target for the movement that they are sparking— as long as they continue to fan the spark.

“Nobody enjoys the feeling of seeing someone in an advertisement and wanting to be like them, but no matter what you do, knowing you’ll never get there.”
-Hannah, age 13

Hannah: It is so important that brands are using less and less Photoshop. Brands are embracing what women really look like, not the Photoshopped versions of them that society wants us to be. In my opinion, this makes a huge difference for females because nobody enjoys the feeling of seeing someone in an advertisement and wanting to be like them, but no matter what you do, knowing you’ll never get there. The reason being is that it is impossible. Usually, (99.9999% of the time, not exact) humans can’t look like that, but society makes us think that’s what we all should look like to the point where sometimes, girls are starving themselves and hurting their health to look like the women in the advertisements. With big companies ditching Photoshop, girls and women can see true people on the advertisements and they don’t need to feel like they have to be something that they can’t, and feel good about their bodies without comparing themselves to impossible standards.

Olivia: I believe that decreasing the amount of Photoshopping that girls see daily is so important. Constantly seeing unrealistic body images affects girls whether or not they know it. Having these extreme expectations can really hurt a young girl whose body is still developing and growing. When we see these images, our unconscious impulse is to think about how our own bodies compare. It hurts to see that we look different than what society is telling us is ideal. These campaigns will hopefully make a difference in how girls and women views themselves and all of the women around them. Seeing our bodies being celebrated is a huge confidence booster for girls, and I hope that more and more companies continue to choose this path.

Sasha: I do think that Target and CVS changing their marketing to be more authentic will have an impact on girls because as we’re well aware, ads and media affect a lot of women and girls’ self-worth. Ads that are photoshopped perpetuate this idea of a naturally perfect body which is harmful to the majority of women and girls who don’t look that way. By changing their marketing Target and CVS are helping to make media more positive, and in turn hopefully make women and girls feel more positive about themselves.

Claire: We are bombarded, the moment we walk into a store, with messages about our bodies, whether it’s positive or negative. It breaks us down, and can seriously affect our self-esteem. CVS and Target showing real people without any Photoshop is a brave step toward a future that doesn’t shame a young girl for having stomach rolls, or not filling out her bikini. I think that it’s crucial they have done this, and that other brands follow their model, as girls and women are often told that their value is in what they look like. Trying on clothes at the store – at least for me – can be an extremely stressful endeavor. When you look nothing like the women modeling in those clothes, it can feel there is one type of body, one type of attractive, and one type of woman. None of these are true, and if we can get the message out there, it could be that a whole generation would feel better about themselves.

“We are bombarded, the moment we walk into a store, with messages about our bodies….It breaks us down, and can seriously affect our self-esteem.”
– Claire, age 13

Amari: I definitely think this makes a huge difference for girls. When photos in magazines, billboards, websites, and on social media are Photoshopped, girls create this unrealistic ideal image for themselves when, in reality, nobody looks like that. But now, with these new anti-Photoshop campaigns, society’s “ideal image” will slowly but surely change overtime to say that everyone is beautiful and you don’t need to change to be someone you’re not. In addition to CVS and Target, I also know that ASOS stopped using Photoshop on bikini models, as well. I think this is really great and hopefully more companies will start to follow in their footsteps.

TRY THIS:

CVS and Target’s campaigns are at the forefront of a new wave of the anti-Photoshop movement. Get a girl in your life thinking about these campaigns and the greater movement that they symbolize with these questions:

1. Can you tell if ads are digitally altered?

2. If so, how do you feel when you see ads that are digitally altered?

3. What do you think of the comments in this post? Do you agree or disagree, and why?

4. Do you think campaigns like this will make lives better for girls? How?

This piece was originally published on MEDIAGIRLS.ORG and is republished with permission. Michelle Cove is the Executive Director of MEDIAGIRLS®, a nonprofit organization that teaches girls how to critique the way girls and women are portrayed in pop culture with an emphasis on creating empowering content.

She is also an award-winning filmmaker, journalist, and author whose projects have been featured on numerous national platforms including “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” Katie Couric’s talk show “Katie,” “The Today Show,” The Washington Post, and The New York Times.

Visit www.mediagirls.org to learn more.

Read More from Girls Leadership on:

Media

The post #MediaMondayTip: How to discuss – and celebrate – Photoshop-Free campaigns with your girl(s)! appeared first on Girls Leadership.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Girls Leadership by Dorothy Ponton, Digital Marketing M.. - 1M ago

As we write this, 5th graders from all over the world are getting ready to join us at camp for the first time. Together, they’ll build a brave space and safe community, one where they take risks, like shouting their poems into the Pacific ocean, or creating original plays in three hours starring themselves. During their time together they will break through their comfort zone to help each other succeed on the high ropes course. They’ll discover their voice, and their strengths, who they are as leaders, and how they can create change in their world.

In our Summer Overnight Program, each girl chooses a creative project. Guided by professional teaching artists, girls play, improvise and create unique works of art. These projects allow the girls to recognize, honor, and celebrate their voices through creative media.

Apply to Summer Program

TOOLS TO SMOOTH THE TRANSITION TO MIDDLE SCHOOL

If your middle schooler isn’t considering camp this summer, there are many ways for her to practice using her voice. Let her choose a leadership muscle she’d like to exercise. It might be learning to master conflict and healthy friendships, or practicing self-compassion to let go of perfectionism. Perhaps she’ll dive into reading about characters who step outside their comfort zone and try new things. Or she can take a break from screens, visit museums (for free), and find her voice through creative expression. The following tools were created by or sourced from Girls Leadership curriculum.

READ ABOUT BRAVE GIRLS

Books for brave middle school girls

Girl power books for middle school girls

Book Notes: Recommendations for Teens

BUILD HEALTHY FRIENDSHIPS

9 Tools for Middle Schoolers to Master Conflict

Want to raise empowered women? Start in middle school.

LET GO OF PERFECTIONISM

A Powerful New Tool for Girls’ Courage & Confidence – Self-Compassion

The Promise of Self-Compassion for Stressed-Out Teens

The post The leadership skills girls need before entering middle school. appeared first on Girls Leadership.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Originally published on Modern Mom

Last week, I spoke with the founders of Girls Leadership, whose mission it is to equip girls with the skills to exercise the power of their voice. In our discussion, we spoke about the importance of actively teaching social justice, particularly to girls. We are in a unique time period, one in which we are beginning to see a turn-of-the-tide on many levels. In order to leverage this change, however, we need to nurture the next generation, and draw on the lessons we learned last week from young women like Emma Gonzales, Naomi Wadler, and Edna Chavez.

When I started doing talks about resilience, I often referred to the next generation of “teacup children” whose parents had protected them for so long that when they leave the nest and face their first challenge on their own they shatter like teacups. Then I attended my first Nexus Youth Summit, filled with young people whose resilience and creativity gave me hope that they could truly change the world. Last weekend, the nation and the world saw evidence at The March for Our Lives of what I saw at Nexus.

Several years ago, in response to the Sandy Hook shooting, I wrote this poem:

Lives Defined

There are events that change us. They permanently change who we are and who we will be.
These are the events that compel us to search our souls.
These are the events that force us to face who we truly are.
These are the events that push us to our limits and test to see just how far we can go.
These are the events that expose our vulnerability and emphasize our interdependence.
In the hours and days following these events, we cannot comprehend the change that has taken place.
In the weeks and months that follow, we begin to recognize our new reality.
Through the years, we may even begin to heal and find a new sense of purpose, one that before would never have been possible.
But never, never will we be the same again.
And it is through these the lens of these events that we will forever tell the rest of our story.

In my work, I define resilience as our response to challenge, good, bad, big, or small. The reason this is important is that it is through small challenges that we learn to handle those greater challenges, the ones that may someday define who we become.

When we face any challenge, our brains need to make a decision: fight, flight, freeze…or action. Increasingly, we are seeing people respond in ways that represent our “fight-flight-freeze” response, which presents as depression, anxiety, addiction, and violence. This results from a lack of resilience: they have not learned how to respond to challenge in a productive way. The students at Parkland, on the other hand, faced one of those moments, and they were prepared.

The March for Our Lives was impressive in many ways, but what struck me most was their focus on social justice. The Parkland students did not make it about themselves, but rather recognized that their challenge was part of a much larger issue, one of which they had been largely sheltered, but others had lived everyday. I was particularly struck by the speech by Naoimi Wadler who eloquently led us into her world to experience the true nature of the problem.

Contrast this with the “teacup children.” Those who have been sheltered from a world beyond their own, who are raised with the purpose of becoming “happy.” Why do they shatter? Because our brains need more than that. Our brains evolved to reward those who serve a purpose, so that is the path to happiness. Long ago, Viktor Frankl advised that,

“Success, like happiness, cannot be pursued; it must ensue, and it only does so as the unintended side-effect of one’s personal dedication to a cause greater than oneself or as the by-product of one’s surrender to a person other than oneself.”

We need to proactively teach our children the tools that they need to handle challenges. We need to teach them about social justice issues and give them an opportunity to be heard. We need to instill confidence in them that they are active members of our society who need to develop the skills necessary to be independent thinkers.

We need to nurture programs like Girls Leadership’s Summer Overnight Program that brings girls together from around the country to learn about their identity, how that identity is shaped by our culture, and the skills to equip them to create change at every level: personal, social, and societal. Because, as we saw at the March for Our Lives, and I saw many years ago at Nexus, this generation has the potential to change the world, we just need to teach them to exercise the power of their voice and then get out of their way.

About the Author

Donna Volpitta, Ed.D., is the founder of the Center for Resilient Leadership. Her Resilient Mindset Model, which draws on the latest research in neurology, psychology and education, has been applied to areas of leadership from parenting to corporate management. Dr. Volpitta is co-author of the book The Resilience Formula: A Guide to proactive–Not Reactive-Parenting and co-creator of the Nametags Education Program. In all of her work, Dr. Volpitta provides practical strategies and numerous ways to apply the model.

Read More from Girls Leadership on:

Parenting

The post Why Social Justice Matters & What We Can Learn from Emma Gonzales, Naomi Wadler, & Edna Chavez appeared first on Girls Leadership.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Girls Leadership by Hilary Wermers - 2M ago

“We equip girls with the skills to exercise the power of their voice.”

Last May, I was thrilled to be preparing for my third summer as a Girls Leadership Summer Program Staff member. Whether I was delivering morning announcements to a full cafeteria audience, leading discussions on anger or body positivity in workshop, or performing a Beyonce lip sync during staff talent night, Girls Leadership was the place where I felt liberated to use my full, booming voice. My greatest joy was in seeing campers find and use their own voices. As the incoming Director of Residential Life, I was busily preparing trainings for the residential staff and planning evening activities for the participants, all aimed at celebrating the power of our collective and individual voices.

Unfortunately, while I was looking forward to the summer with joyful anticipation, I was struggling to use my own voice in the present. For months, I had been plagued with pain in my right leg and hip. I quietly mentioned it to my yoga teacher as an aside, needing alternatives for poses that had previously been within my practice. I murmured a request for physical therapy to my doctor at the end of an appointment when driving and sitting at my desk had become painful enough to require daily pain medication. I hushed my friends’ concern when I developed a limp. I suffocated my voice by denying my pain and diminishing my body’s messages.

There were so many reasons, it seemed, to deny and silence my pain.

It wasn’t that bad. Tylenol and ibuprofen helped. The seat in my car must be causing it, get a lumbar pillow. The physical therapist I saw insisted that my IT band was suffering from the seated nature of my job. I needed to stand more, walk more, stretch more. The underlying message of these excuses was, “I’m too fat.” My fatness, I’d been told since puberty, in doctor’s offices, and in media, would be the ultimate enemy to my health. This shame-filled silencing of my pain was actually the greatest threat to my health.

My body was desperately trying to deliver a message: “I am in pain. I need attention. I am not OK.” I was diagnosed with osteosarcoma, a rare bone cancer, on the day I was supposed to arrive at Mount Holyoke for Summer Program in June 2017. A tumor had been growing in my right femur for some time, and I required immediate and intensive treatment.

On learning of my diagnosis, I couldn’t contain the power of my voice. Hearing the harsh reality of my diagnosis–the validation of my pain–I yelled, sobbed, and screamed. I said over and over, to friends and to family and to myself, “I have cancer.” I wrote lists of questions for my newly acquired oncologists and surgeons, and I asked every one of them. Acknowledging my pain reconnected me to the power of my voice. Though I didn’t get to spend Summer 2017 with Girls Leadership, I felt the power and importance of our work in this unique and trying circumstance.

We talk a lot at Girls Leadership about taking up space.

This is one of the skills we work to equip girls with, allowing them to exercise the power of their voice. To be physically, emotionally, and vocally present, rather than shrinking away. To teach this, we play games that make us look and feel goofy. We practice eye contact. We make noise and laugh. These games were always my favorite part of the day at Summer Program. Our voices live in our bodies, and games like WHOOSH! were often the key to unlocking even the quietest voices. Listening to our bodies is how we are able to take up space, whether it’s feeling the shape of the WHOOSH and giving voice to that or noticing and saying that our body needs attention.

Pain and fear can make us shrink, and this shrinking extends to our voice. I encourage you, even in times of pain or fear, to take up space. Give voice to your body’s messages rather than silencing them.

The post My Pain, My Voice appeared first on Girls Leadership.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

It’s hard to believe it, but this is our last month of Girl & Grown-Up Book Club for this year. We hope you have enjoyed reading together, that you learned from the variety of characters we met along the way, and, most importantly, that you connected with each other through sharing and laughter. We’ll be back with more books next school year!

This month, we’ll read about characters who are willing to take great risks to achieve great things. The word ambition is not yet used to describe women and girls as often as it should be, but the girls in these stories set difficult goals and work hard to reach them. They do so despite setbacks, disappointments, and others telling them their dreams are impossible.

Not a member yet? Sign up for our Girl & Grown-up Book Club. It’s FREE! Get toolkits with meeting guides and discussion questions for all previous years delivered right to your inbox, instantly. Toolkits for this year’s books will be emailed each month.

Take me to the Book Club Sign Up!

Sometimes, the first – and scariest – step we take toward our dreams is simply saying what it is that we want. It’s one thing to harbor secret dreams in our heads, it’s quite another to admit our dreams out loud where other people might hear them. If we announce, for example, our intention to be a pilot, as Ida Mae does in Flygirl, someone might laugh at us, or tell us why it won’t happen. It feels much safer to keep our dreams to ourselves. While secret dreams might be safe, they also rarely become real.

While you read this month’s books, you might take the opportunity to talk about your dreams, and ask the girl in your life about hers. Encourage dreams both big and small. One question you could ask is,

“What do you think the first step toward your dream is?”

Every wonderful thing that anyone has ever accomplished started off as a dream.

You could also share this wonderful video of a young spoken-word poet from New York City who began performing her poetry in Manhattan when she was fourteen years old. In this speech, she talks about discovering her love of spoken-word poetry, and deciding to work toward that goal. She didn’t keep her dream a secret, but instead put it out into the world so it could become real.

All around us, there are examples of people who took great risks so that their dreams would come to fruition. Notice them; point them out to the girls in your life. They are reminders of what’s possible.

We’ll be back next year with more recommendations and discussion guides for grades 2-8! Until then, stay in touch and keep reading. For book ideas, try checking out our Book Club archives, our Even More Books archives, browse on A Mighty Girl’s website, or check out some of the notable books from the American Library Association.

Please keep an eye on your Inbox for our end-of-year Book Club survey. We would appreciate it if you could take a few minutes to fill it out. It really helps us create the best program we can!

Thank you, and happy reading.

2nd/3rd Grades

The Magnificent Mya Tibbs: Spirit Week Showdown by Crystal Allen

Buy or borrow a copy of this book and read it before your next book club meeting.

About the book
Mya Tibbs is determined that she and her best friend Naomi will win the Spirit Week contest, receive VIP tickets to the Fall Festival, and live happily ever after. When Mya gets paired with Mean Connie Tate, instead, her plans seem to be ruined. Not only that, but Naomi is furious with her and spreading ugly rumors about her all over the school.

As Spirit Week continues, her best friend is acting mean and her enemy is acting like a friend! Mya is confused and desperate to figure out this conundrum so she can fix her friendships and get to the Festival! With her unsinkable spirit, her lucky cowgirl boots, and a supportive family at her side, she knows she can accomplish anything.

This book was published in 2016, and received a starred review from Kirkus Reviews.

About the author
Crystal Allen published her first book How Lamar’s Bad Prank Won a Bubba-Sized Trophy in 2011, which received a starred review from Publisher’s Weekly. She’s also written a novel called The Laura Line and two books about Mya Tibbs.

Ms Allen now lives in Texas with her husband and two sons. For more information, visit crystalallenbooks.com.

4th/5th Grades

Stella by Starlight by Sharon M. Draper

Buy or borrow a copy of this book and read it before your next book club meeting.

About the book
Twelve-year-old Stella and her family live in a segregated North Carolina town. One night, Stella and her brother Jojo happen upon a Ku Klux Klan gathering in the middle of the night. This discovery brings racial tensions in the town to a boiling point. Several of the black men in the town decide to vote in the upcoming election, even though members of the white community threaten to retaliate with violence. When they do, Stella, her family, and friends stick together, coming together over food, stories, and laughter. And, every night, Stella takes her notebook to the front porch and writes down her stories. At first, writing is hard and she worries she’ll never amount to anything. But, as she finds her voice, her writing helps her make sense of the world that she hopes, someday, to change.

This story is set in the historical period of the Great Depression, and poignantly shows how people have always had to stand up for justice, and always will.

Stella by Starlight was inspired by the true story of Ms Draper’s grandmother. It was published in 2015, and has earned many distinctions, including the Charlotte Huck Award from the National Council of Teachers of English. It was on Kirkus’ Best Middle-Grade Books of 2015 list and the New York Times included it on its list Notable Children’s Books of 2015.

About the author
Sharon M. Draper is a teacher and a writer who has received many awards and recognitions for her work in both areas, including the National Teacher of the Year award and the ALA’s Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime literary achievement. She addresses audiences all over the world, and represented the United States at the Book Festival in Moscow.

Ms Draper has written many, many award-winning books for children of all ages, as well as titles for teachers. Her book Out of My Mind has been on the New York Times Bestsellers list for over two years (and counting!). For more of Ms Draper’s wonderful stories, visit sharondraper.com.

6th/7th/8th Grades

Flygirl by Sherri L. Smith

Buy or borrow a copy of this book and read it before your next book club meeting.

About the book
All Ida Mae thinks about is flying, just like her daddy did. But because she is black, and a woman, she knows her dream is impossible. Then, when the United States joins World War II, they create the WASP – the Women’s Airforce Service Pilots. Ida Mae wants to join so badly she’d do almost anything, even use her light skin to pass as white. Lying about who she is creates a strain with her friends and family and a heaviness in Ida Mae’s heart. She has to find a way to be true to who she is while doing the one thing she loves above all else.

Flygirl was published in 2009. It earned a starred review from Booklist, was an ALA Best Book for Young Adults, and was included on the Washington Post’s Best Kids’ Books of the Year.

About the author
Sherri L. Smith was born in Chicago, IL. She has written several young adult novels. Her first book, Lucy the Giant, was selected as one of the American Library Association’s Best Books for Young People and one of Bank Street College’s Best Children’s Books of the Year. She now lives in Los Angeles. For more information, visit sherrilsmith.com.

Disclosure: the links to buy or download books may contain affiliate links. There is no additional cost, and Girls Leadership may get a commission if you click through and purchase.

The post Girls Leadership Book Club: Crystal Allen, Sharon M Draper, Sherri L Smith appeared first on Girls Leadership.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

5 min read

By Clare Reynders, MEDIAGIRLS Editorial Volunteer

“The Talk,” or discussing sex and romance with your girls, is often fraught with anxiety and awkward moments for parents, educators and, of course, girls. But at the end of the day, we need to educate kids and keep them safe as they grow up. The #MeToo movement has completely shifted the cultural conversation around dating, romance, and sex, and it’s clear we need an overhaul of sex education for both boys and girls. In this post, we focus on girls because, well, that’s our specialty. Every girl is different, and you will, of course, make the call of exactly when to have these discussions, and what feels appropriate to share. Below is the information we think young women most need, and we’ve included songs, TV shows, and movies to accompany each lesson. Far from being the enemy, media content can be an incredibly useful way to open conversations.

  1. Focus more on “yes.”

Discussion about love and sex should start with safety and anatomy, but it should go well beyond that. Even when our girls are in the kissing-only stage, we need to teach them how to think about what is a “yes” and feels right. In so many #MeToo stories, we’ve heard about how difficult it is to speak up during an intimidating situation. All the emphasis is on girls and women saying “no,” which is important; but another mindset that’s more positive and specific is “yes means yes!” Anything but an enthusiastic yes should be considered a “no” by both parties involved. With that, we need to teach girls how to identify and ask for what they want to say yes to!

So many stories in pop culture show girls in junior high and high school figuring out how to land and please the “hot” guy. We hardly see any role models of girls speaking up for what they want (i.e. “I like to be kissed more like this”). Girls need to understand that they are allowed to, and should, figure out what they enjoy physically. This can even start with something as innocent as, “I like holding hands like this,” or “I like kissing when it’s softer/firmer/whatever.” How is their partner supposed to know what they like if girls don’t even know themselves?

Girls should be empowered to know and say what they want without worrying it makes them “aggressive” or “bossy,” or even “slutty.” Doing so will help them become more empowered and confident as they get older and become sexually active. This will also help turn the tables to even out any power imbalance that exists in male-female interactions.

MEDIAGIRLS convo-starting recommendations:

 

Song: “Love Myself” by Hailee Steinfeld, a pop song that lets girls everywhere know that they should be their own No. 1 priority.

TV show: “The Fosters” (available on Netflix), in which teen girls like “Callie” and “Marianna” regularly consider what feels right them for sexually in realistic ways.

  1. Let’s introduce joy to the conversation.

Although learning about the dangers of pregnancy and STDs is an integral aspect of sex education, it shouldn’t be the only one (just like we shouldn’t always focus on “no”). Sex education at many schools, if even offered, is often a “scared straight” program, in which girls hear about teen pregnancy horror stories and scary STD symptoms.

Girls should instead be taught that, although there are dangers and risks involved in romantic encounters, it’s not all negative and should be positive. Young women should be secure and confident in the fact that romantic encounters can be fun, intimate, and feel good, especially if one is safe, paying close attention to how she is feeling, and choosing partners that feel trustworthy. Learning about safety precautions should not be anxiety-provoking; it should instead give them the security to enjoy themselves.

MEDIAGIRLS convo-starting recommendations:

 

Song: “Confident” by Demi Lovato, in which Demi sets an amazing example by taking control of the conversation and celebrating who she is and what she wants.

TV show (for older teens): “The Bold Type,” a fun teen dramedy for older teen girls that features open discussions about the importance of female pleasure and a powerful final episode about sexual assault.

  1. Keep “the talk” ongoing in your house.

Girls should know that being intimate with a partner when they’re older is a choice that comes with many emotions and feelings. Sexual activity, especially for women, has often been associated with shame, and we should teach our girls that it’s nothing to be ashamed of. Instead, they should be confident enough to discuss it with their future partners and be honest about what they want. It’s important to let them know how to have open, honest communication with their partner, and that type of conversation can be practiced with you.

What girls want, and don’t want, to do in terms of intimacy will change over time; and so should your conversations. Talking openly with girls (even if it means you taking several deep breaths) encourages them to be curious, participate in the conversation, and ask questions, much like they would be when learning about any other subject. There should no longer be “The Talk,” but a whole series of talks. That’s how we will get young women to participate regularly with both young women and young men in the cultural conversation surrounding sex and romance.

MEDIAGIRLS convo-starting recommendations:

 

Song: “Let’s Talk About Sex” by Salt-N-Pepa, a great throwback tune (sampled by more recent artists) that celebrates honest discussion about relationships.
TV show: “Jane the Virgin” (available on Netflix) features a strong, honest, admirable protagonist, who engages in frank talk about sexuality from a female perspective, and strong mother-daughter relationships.

TV show: “Gilmore Girls” (available on Netflix): While critics argue that mom “Lorelai” is sometimes too enmeshed with teen daughter “Rory,” there is no denying the power of the open, support conversation these two characters showcase.

Clare Reynders is a junior at Vassar College majoring in Media Studies with a minor in Women’s studies. She loves singing in her a cappella group, reading books, and, of course, empowering young women.

This piece was originally published on MEDIAGIRLS.ORG and is republished with permission. Michelle Cove is the Executive Director of MEDIAGIRLS®, a nonprofit organization that teaches girls how to critique the way girls and women are portrayed in pop culture with an emphasis on creating empowering content.

She is also an award-winning filmmaker, journalist, and author whose projects have been featured on numerous national platforms including “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” Katie Couric’s talk show “Katie,” “The Today Show,” The Washington Post, and The New York Times.

Visit www.mediagirls.org to learn more.

Read More from Girls Leadership on:

Media

Peggy Orenstein’s Book, Girls & Sex

The post #MediaMondayTip: How to have “The Talk” with our girls in the age of #MeToo appeared first on Girls Leadership.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

4 min read

“An underpinning of all of our lessons during the summer, and in general, is social change. We are intentional about creating specific time and space to reflect on how to create social change, and to recognize the steps of social change. At the reunion for our Overnight Summer Program, we explored this through the concept of anonymous extraordinaries. It highlighted all of the individual leadership that takes place before and around a social change agent like a Martin Luther King Jr.” says Cora Garner, our Summer Program Director.

One of the most powerful moments of this reunion weekend was the lesson about “anonymous extraordinaries” where we reflected on how all of us are part of creating social change on a daily basis in small and large ways. The girls watched a Ted Talk by Natalie Warne, who was instrumental in creating a successful campaign for Invisible Children as a teen, where she shares,

“Anonymous extraordinaries are people who work selflessly and vigorously for what they believe in. People who are motivated by conviction and not recognition.”

The girls took time to identify the anonymous extraordinaries who have enabled them to have various opportunities in their lives. They reflected on who created their schools, community centers, and the programs they get to participate in. Often times they did not know the identity of the person(s) who laid the foundation for an experience and this fueled curiosity and a desire to increase their awareness around the anonymous extraordinaries who came before.

Once the girls expanded their sphere to recognize the many nameless anonymous extraordinaries who have influenced their lives, they were also able to gain a new perspective on those closest to them.

“I just realized how much my mom is an anonymous extraordinary. She’s an activist, she shares things with me, and I know I need to listen to her more,” shared one of our seventh-grade participants.

We then encouraged the girls to think of ways that they themselves were anonymous extraordinaries.

It was difficult for them to name these things at first.

There was a long moment of silence as the girls gave themselves the permission to call themselves anonymous extraordinaries and own how they are influential changemakers. Then bravely and powerfully they started to share how they are creating change in their communities:

  • role modeling using their voice for younger girls,
  • creating empowering programs in their schools,
  • using their voices in their communities to create change and awareness around sexual assault, racism, and other forms of oppression.

The girls celebrated each other for their extraordinariness and recognized that together they are creating meaningful change.

AN ACTIVITY TO BUILD LEADERSHIP HABITS: Anonymous Extraordinaries

A habit you can start at home is recognizing the big and small contributions of young changemakers in your community. Have your own anonymous extraordinary discussion with your girls!

Materials:

  • Computer or phone with internet access
  • Pieces of paper
  • Pen or Pencil

**Note: This activity can be done in a group setting or as a discussion between you and your girl. If discussing as a pair, you may elect to have a conversation about the questions in lieu of journaling.

Instructions

Play Natalie Warne’s Ted Talk

Background: Natalie Warne did not let being too young stop her from running a successful campaign for the Invisible Children project. In this talk, she calls on young people everywhere not to let age stop them from changing the world. When she was 17, Natalie Warne learned about the Invisible Children Project — a campaign to rescue Ugandan children from Joseph Kony’s child armies. As an intern for Invisible Children, she led a nationwide campaign for the project. She successfully got the campaign featured on the Oprah Winfrey show, a victory that dramatically raised the profile of the movement.

Large Group Reflection: (15 minutes)

  • What are your initial reactions to the Ted Talk?
  • The Ted Talk mentions the concept of, “Anonymous Extraordinaries.” What does this mean to you?

Pair Reflection: Give girls a few minutes to reflect and journal on the following question. (15 minutes)

  • Who are anonymous extraordinaries in your life?
  • Talking Point: Share examples of anonymous extraordinaries in your life, if needed. Encourage girls to stretch outside of common examples like their parents or best friend. If needed, ask: What is something in your life you enjoy? Who are some of the people responsible for making that thing possible or allowing you to have that opportunity? If they don’t know, they will be encouraged to find out!

Self-reflection: Give girls a few minutes to reflect and journal and then large group share-out. (10 minutes)

  • We are all anonymous extraordinaries. Where are you an “anonymous extraordinary?
  • Where do you want to become an “anonymous extraordinary?”
  • Talking point: Recognizing the extraordinariness of their own lives can be challenging for the girls. Some questions you can ask to help: What are some things that you do that bring joy to others? In what roles/environments have you noticed yourself stepping up as a leader? Remember that these can be small moments like, “I always offer to help my teacher clean up after an activity in class.”

Natali Rivers is Girls Leadership’s New York Program Manager

We are accepting applications for our 2018 Summer Overnight Program for girls entering grades 6 -12.

Apply Now

The post How To Create Leadership Habits appeared first on Girls Leadership.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

This month, Girls Leadership book clubs will read books about girls who know who they are, and decide to be true to themselves. Whether that means having difficult conversations or resisting the pressure to change, these characters choose to be uniquely them, rather than change to fit someone else’s idea of who they should be. These three characters all use the written word to explore their identities, express themselves, and make sense of the world.

Not a member yet? Sign up for our Girl & Grown-up Book Club. It’s FREE! Get toolkits with meeting guides and discussion questions for all previous years delivered right to your inbox, instantly. Toolkits for this year’s books will be emailed each month.

Take me to the Book Club Sign Up!

As you read, talk with your girls about the pressures that these characters might feel to conform to what others want, and how they reject that pressure. This conversation might lead to a general talk about general pressures to change and conform, and where those pressures come from – peers, media, even us grown-ups.

You could share this wonderful quote from Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s 2015 commencement address at Wellesley College:

“Please do not twist yourself into shapes to please. Don’t do it. If someone likes that version of you, that version of you that is false and holds back, then they actually just like that twisted shape, and not you. And the world is such a gloriously multifaceted, diverse place that there are people in the world who will like you, the real you, as you are.”

For older kids and grown-ups, I recommend this moving Ted Talk by Caroline McHugh, founder and CEO of IDOLOGY. Ms McHugh herself is an inspiring example of individuality, and the stories she tells about people living their largest, fullest versions of themselves might prompt you to ask yourself what it means to be you.

Happy reading.

2nd/3rd Grades

Lola Levine Is Not Mean by Monica Brown

Buy or borrow a copy of this book and read it before your next book club meeting.

About the book
2nd grader Lola Levine has strong opinions – about her favorite color (purple), her favorite animal (cats), and her favorite sport (soccer). Lola plays soccer at every opportunity, including with her classmates every recess. One day, Lola accidentally kicks another player while trying to stop a goal. Despite Lola’s sincere apologies, her classmates and school principal exclude her from playing sports. The other kids call her “Mean Lola Levine” for her competitive attitude on the field.

Lola insists that she’s not mean, only competitive. With the support of her family and her best friend Josh, she works her way back into the game, still wearing her favorite shirt, the one that says, “My goal is to stop yours.”

This is the first title in the Lola Levine series, in which there are currently six books. It received a starred review from Kirkus Reviews.
About the author
Monica Brown is a Professor at Northern Arizona University. She wrote the award-winning picture book Waiting for the Biblioburro, and the Marisol McDonald bilingual picture book series, as well as a series of bilingual picture book biographies. Lola Levine is based on her own experiences growing up as a part-Peruvian, part-Jewish, soccer-loving kid.

4th/5th Grades

The First Rule of Punk by Celia C. Pérez

Buy or borrow a copy of this book and read it before your next book club meeting.

About the book
There are a million ways that Malú disappoints her mom. She’d rather wear ratty tee-shirts and jeans than dress up, chooses loud punk over Mexican ranchera music, and takes her food vegetarian (hold the cilantro). When her mom moves them to a new town, she follows her dad’s advice (first rule of punk: be yourself) with varying degrees of success. Through the ups – she forms a punk band – and the downs – her band gets banned from school – Malú expresses herself through handmade zines. The zines lend a fun graphic element to the book, and give us another window into Malu’s world.

This debut novel received many starred reviews, and has been featured on “Best of” lists including Kirkus Review’s Best Middle-Grade Books of 2017, School Library Journals’s Best of 2017, and the New York Public Library’s Best Books for Kids 2017.

About the author
Celia C. Pérez is a librarian, punk listener, and long-time zine maker living in Chicago. The First Rule of Punk is her first book for young readers.

6th/7th/8th Grades

The Hired Girl by Laura Amy Schlitz

Buy or borrow a copy of this book and read it before your next book club meeting.

About the book
Joan Skraggs loves tales of sweeping romance. She knows she doesn’t belong on a Pennsylvania farm, doing chores from sun-up to sun-down, in a house surrounded by a father and brothers who don’t even try to understand her. When her father denies her the opportunity to attend school, the fourteen-year-old runs away to Baltimore, where she transforms herself into an eighteen-year-old named Janet Lovelace. There, she encounters the Rosenbachs, and becomes a hired girl in their wealthy household.

Set in 1911 and written in diary format, The Hired Girl is a funny and heartfelt story about a girl whose life unfolds in funny, heart-breaking, and altogether surprising ways. This book received the Scott O’Dell Award for Historical Fiction and the National Jewish Book Award.

About the author
Laura Amy Schlitz lives in Baltimore, where she works as a school librarian. She has written several novels for young readers, including Newbery Medal winner Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! Voices from a Medieval Village, Newbery Honor book Splendors and Glooms, and The Night Fairy, which was a 2016 Girls Leadership Girl & Grown-Up Book Club selection for 2nd and 3rd graders.

Disclosure: the links to buy or download books may contain affiliate links. There is no additional cost, and Girls Leadership may get a commission if you click through and purchase.

The post Girls Leadership Book Club: Monica Brown, Celia C. Pérez, Laura Amy Schlitz appeared first on Girls Leadership.

Read Full Article
Visit website

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview