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Valentine’s Day is upon us, and my social media feeds are brimming with romance-inducing recipes. From Keto to Paleo, via Vegan and Whole-30, there seems to be something for everyone. Unless … unless, like me, you’re simply looking for something un-restrictively indulgent and delicious, all rolled into one sinful dish.

I guess I’ve got this niche covered: what’s more mouth-watering than dulce de leche, full of Latin passion (and sugar)? Dulce de leche is such a brilliant addition to cakes and desserts – from the Uruguayan dessert Chajá to strawberry cupcakes:

You can buy dulce de leche in many Latin food stores, but other countries have their own versions, too, such as this Russian version, which I found in my local Berlin supermarket:

You can make your own dulce de leche following my recipe here, or, even simpler, using a pressure cooker and a tin of condensed milk:

Place the tin into your pressure cooker on the tray or on a scrunched up tea towel, cover the tin with water and bring it to boil. Simmer it for 15-20 minutes according to your pressure cooker’s instructions, then remove it from the heat and leave to cool, in the hot water. Don’t rush this process, as this is when the Mallard reaction, which gives dulce de leche its unique taste and texture, takes place. The next day you’ll be rewarded with a tin (or two) full or caramelised bliss.

I know it’s February, and it’s cold outside – but that doesn’t mean I can’t crave ice cream. Especially when it’s as velvety and creamy as this. And if it leaves you shivering, well, isn’t that the perfect excuse to snuggle up…? Happy Valentine’s!

Dulce de Leche Ice Cream makes 1 l / 1 pts
  • 1 tin (10 oz / 300 ml) dulce de leche
  • 1 tin (12 oz / 340 ml) evaporated milk
  • 14 oz / 400 ml milk
  • 4 egg yolks
  • 1 tsp vanilla essence
  • 1 pinch – 1/4 tsp salt

In a large casserole, bring the dulce de leche, evaporated milk and the milk to boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for ca. 30 minutes stirring regularly.

When the liquid has been reduced to about 2/3, remove the casserole from the heat. In a small bowl, beat the egg yolks until almost white and creamy. Even with an electric mixer this can take up to 10 minutes.

Add the dulce de leche mix to the egg yolks, as well as the vanilla essence and the salt, and beat until it is fully incorporated. You need some salt to balance the sugar, but if you’re after a salty kick, add up to a 1/4 tsp of salt. Pout the mix back into the casserole and bring slowly to simmer, stirring continuously to prevent the mix from curdling. When the custard begins to thicken and you see small bubbles forming, remove it from the heat, pour it into a jug or similar, cover with cling film and leave to cool. Once it has fully cooled down, follow the instructions of your ice cream maker to churn this into perfection.

Serve with love – I’ll be bringing this tub of indulgence to this week’s Fiesta Friday party over at Angie‘s, who will be supported by her co-host Jhuls @ The Not So Creative Cook.

Happy Valentine’s!

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New Year, new country, new resolutions. Having moved back to Germany after almost two decades in the UK, it feels more like a new adventure than a homecoming. The first step to getting used to a new place, I think, is to explore the local cuisine, from curry sausages, potatoes with most meals, to pickles in all shapes and forms – a journey I will share with you, one dish at a time.

I’ll start with this surprisingly unknown delicacy from Dresden: the Eierschecke. When you search for traditional German cakes you’ll find Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte, Marmorkuchen, Donauwellen and various types of cheesecake, but you’ll be lucky to come across this layered egg fest in all its custard glory.

German-style cheesecakes are made with quark, a curd cheese that is popular across central Europe, from the Austrian Topfen to the French fromage frais, but the Eierschecke’s final airy custard layer takes cheesecakes to new heights. 

If you’re not planning to visit Dresden in the near future, why not try this at home? The recipe is surprisingly straightforward, despite the various layers, and the final cake looks stunning. What’s keeping you?

Dresdner Eierschecke

for a 20x40cm / 11x17in baking tray

for the custard:

  • ½ l or 1 pint milk
  • 2 egg yolks (keep the whites for the top custard layer)
  • 1 vanilla pod or 3 tsp vanilla extract
  • 3 tbs sugar
  • 6 tsp corn starch

for the yeast base:

  • 250g plain flour
  • 50g unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 40g sugar
  • 100-120 ml milk, lukewarm
  • 7g yeast (2¼ tsp)
  • 1 egg
  • 1 pinch of salt

for the quark layer:

  • 500g quark (20% or 40%)
  • 1/3 of the custard
  • 1 tbs sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 lemon – zest and 2 tsp of the juice
  • 1 pinch of salt

for custard layer:

  • 6 egg whites
  • 4 egg yolks
  • 1 tbs sugar
  • 2/3 of the custard
  • 1 pinch of salt

Start by preparing the custard. In a heavy pan, slowly heat the milk. If you are using vanilla pods, cut the bod lengthwise into half and scrape out the seeds. Add both the seeds and the pods to the milk. When the milk begins to rise, take it off the hob and leave to cool.

Separate the eggs and keep the whites for later. Use an electric mixer or similar to whisk the egg yolks and the sugar until they are almost white and creamy.

Add vanilla essence, if you are using it, and the corn starch, one heaped teaspoon at a time, then slowly pour in the warm milk. Keep whisking until the milk is fully incorporated. Discard the vanilla pod and pour the mix back into the pan. Heat the custard slowly, stirring continually to prevent it from either burning or curdling. The moment it starts thickening, take the custard off the hob, pour it into a bowl and place clingfilm directly on the surface of the custard to prevent it from forming a skin. Leave to cool.

In a large bowl, mix the yeast with the milk before adding the remaining ingredients. Knead continually to incorporate all the ingredients and until the dough is smooth and begins to come off the sides of the bowl. Cover and leave to rise in a warm place, such as a cold oven, for around 30 minutes or until it has doubled in size.

Grease your tin or line it with baking paper and heat your oven to 180C /350F. Don’t use the fan assisted mode, it doesn’t work that well with this type of cake. Once your dough is ready, spread it evenly over the base of your tin.

For the quark layer, mix the quark with roughly 1/3 of the cold custard, using an electric whisk or similar. When it is completely smooth, add the remaining ingredients and mix until everything is fully incorporated. Spread evenly on top of the dough.

For the custard layer, separate the remaining eggs. Make sure you use a very clean bowl and whisks to beat the egg whites, adding a pinch of salt. Beat until white peaks are forming, then set aside.

In a second bowl, whisk the yolks with the sugar until creamy and white. Add the custard and keep beating until smooth. Carefully fold in the egg whites and spread evenly on top of the quark layer.

Bake for 50-60 minutes or until golden. The cake is ready when you push your finger softly into the surface of the cake and it bounces back. Leave to cool before serving.

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Sometimes you just need to have your cake and eat it. 

The other day I stumbled across the picture of an apple cake, which Christie of A Sausage Has Two had posted on her Facebook page. I absolutely had to have a slice ofChristie’s Omi’s apple cake, and pronto.

The quickest and easiest type of German cake is the Rührkuchen, literally  ‘stir cake,’ a type of sponge cake made from flour, butter, sugar, eggs and baking powder and whatever else you fancy. You stir it, bake it and eat it. We usually enhance Rührkuchen with vanilla sugar and lemon zest, and occasionally cocoa powder for a chocolate version. Adding fruit adds another dimension to it, as do the ground almonds I have started using to give myself the illusion that I am feeding my children a healthy and balanced cake diet.

For this recipe, I grind the whole almonds, this gives the finished cake an earthy and more ‘mature’ edge than the skinned ground almonds you can buy in the shops. The only ‘real’ effort are the apples: you need to de-core them and slice them, but there is no need to go quite as thin as I did, especially if you’ve got a perfectionist streak! Those incredibly instagrammable rose-patterned apple cakes are a right faff as you need to steam the slices beforehand to allow you to roll them up, and my test-run led to strongly worded comments regarding the limited chewability of the pretty pink apple peel.

My team of testers were all under 7, which is hardly a representative sample. You might as well go for it.

All in all it’s a fail-safe and reasonably healthy cake, moist and not too sweet. An apple a day and all that …

Apple and Almond Cake

makes one 9″ cake

  • 3-4 cooking apples (ca. 600g)
  • the juice and zest of 1 unwaxed lemon
  • 100g whole almonds, finely ground
  • 125g unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 125g caster sugar
  • 175g plain flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 2 eggs
  • 150ml milk
  • 1 tbs vanilla essence
  • a few raisins (optional) (soaked beforehand in a little rum – you’re worth it!)
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 tbs caster sugar
  • 30g almond flakes
  • 1 tbs apricot jam (optional)

Peel, de-core and slice the apples as thinly as you feel comfortable with, sprinkle the lemon juice over the sliced apples to prevent them from browning.

Grease your baking tin carefully, perhaps sprinkling a few breadcrumbs onto the butter to prevent the cake from sticking to it. Preheat your oven to 175C / 350F.

Mix the ground almonds with the butter, sugar, flour, baking powder, eggs, milk and the vanilla essence until it comes together in a soft smooth batter. Spoon the batter into the tin and spread it out evenly, then add the raisins if your children don’t object to them.

Mix the cinnamon with the spoonful of sugar and sprinkle it over the apple slices before laying out the apples across the surface of the cake. Leave a bit of space around the rim and don’t push them in too deeply: the dough will raise and fill the spaces between the slices.

Sprinkle the flaked almond slices over it and bake for 70 min on the bottom shelf.

When the cake is baked, remove it from the oven. In a small pan, heat the apricot jam with 5 tbs of water until the jam is fully dissolved. While the cake is still very hot, brush the jam thinly over the apple slices to give them a lovely finish.

That’s it – the cake is ready, and hopefully as delicious as Christie’s Omi’s!


Quick and Easy Apple and Almond Cake
 
Prep time
30 mins
Cook time
70 mins
Total time
1 hour 40 mins
 
By: Ginger&Bread
Recipe type: Cake
Cuisine: German
Makes: 12 slices
Ingredients
  • 3-4 cooking apples (ca. 600g)
  • the juice and zest of 1 unwaxed lemon
  • 100g whole almonds, finely ground
  • 125g unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 125g caster sugar
  • 175g plain flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 2 eggs
  • 150ml milk
  • 1 tbs vanilla essence
  • a few raisins (optional) (soaked beforehand in a little rum - you're worth it!)
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 tbs caster sugar
  • 30g almond flakes
  • 1 tbs apricot jam (optional)
Instructions
  1. Peel, de-core and slice the apples as thinly as you feel comfortable with, sprinkle the lemon juice over the sliced apples to prevent them from browning.
  2. Grease your baking tin carefully, perhaps sprinkling a few breadcrumbs onto the butter to prevent the cake from sticking to it. Preheat your oven to 175C / 350F.
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As the country is gripped by a Siberian cold wave (cue the muffled sound of real Siberians chuckling at the comparison), we crave calories. Ignore health warnings and a looming obesity crisis, our bodies tell us, forget your good intentions and instead have a slice of cake.

My friend Anita’s answer to this dilemma is not to cut out indulgent food, but to layer it with goodness. Almonds are high in fat, release their energy slowly, boost brain power and – incidentally – seem to reduce your appetite. What’s not to like? For this recipe I’ve substituted some of the flour with ground almonds, skins and all, for that extra goodness.

The result? The deliciously earthy almond flavour is subtle enough not to raise any suspicions with the kids, who resent obviously healthy ‘alternatives’ to their favourite treats. I particularly loved the crunchy texture: it makes the dough slightly more difficult to work, and you have to be careful not to overwork the crumbles, but the result is so convincing that I can’t wait to try it with other pâte sucrée-based recipes such as my red currant cake or apple cake.

For this cherry crumble you will need the most German of ingredients, pitted sour cherries in a light juice-like syrup. You can find these in many Eastern European markets or in Lidl and Aldi stores. Unlike Amarena cherries, the syrup is much lighter and less sweet, a bit like fruit juice. My mum used to make tons of these preserves every summer: for each pound of pitted sour cherries you mix a pint of water and a cup of caster sugar and bring it to boil. Add the cherries, fill them into air-tight jars, sterilise them and they’ll be ready to use whenever you feel like it.

If you can get hold of the cherries, give this cake a try – the tartness of the fruit creates a wonderful contrast to the nutty crumbles, whilst the almonds are quietly boosting your brain … or so I hope!

Cherry and Almond Cake

for a 6″ round cake tin

for the Pâte sucrée:

  • 50g whole almonds, finely ground
  • 150g plain flour
  • 100g unsalted butter
  • 80g caster sugar
  • 1 egg

For the cherry filling:

  • 1 jar pitted sour cherries (ca. 680g)
  • 1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 3 tbs corn starch

For the almond crumbles:

  • 75g unsalted butter
  • 50g whole almonds, finely ground
  • 100g plain flour
  • 75g plain sugar
  • 1 tbs vanilla essence

Grind 100g of whole almonds very finely. In a large bowl, mix 1/2 of the ground almonds with the remaining ingredients, ideally using a spatula or similar to avoid the dough being overworked:

Shortcrust pastry or pâte sucrée must not get warm to retain its lovely texture; it doesn’t matter if your dough is not completely smooth, simply form it into a ball, wrap it in cling film or tinfoil and place it in the fridge for at least 1 hour.

Grease your cake tin (I used a fluted quiche tin) and pre-heat the oven to 180C / 350F.

For the filling, decant the liquid through a sieve into a small saucepan, then pour 1/4 of it into a cup or similar and set aside. Bring the remaining liquid to simmer. Mix the syrup in the cup with the corn flour until it is completely smooth. When the syrup in the saucepan reaches boiling point, add the cinnamon and then the cornflour-mix, stirring continually until it thickens. Add the cherries, give it a good stir and remove the saucepan from the heat to let it cool down.

Melt the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Once it is fully melted, remove the saucepan from the hear and set it aside. Mix all the dry ingredients for the crumble thoroughly before adding the vanilla essence.

Dust your work surface with a little flour and roll out the cold dough. I actually roll it out between two lightly floured sheets of baking paper, which makes it much easier to handle the delicate dough. Place the dough into your cake tin and press the pastry into the sides. Cut off the extra dough and prick the bottom with a fork. Fill the base with the cherries.

Pour the melted butter over your crumble mix and crumble it up with your fingers. Work quickly and don’t overdo it: the almonds are slightly crumblier than plain flour and you don’t want to end up with crumbs! Crumble the mix over the cherries and place the cake on the bottom shelf of your oven. Bake for 45 minutes.


Cherry and Almond Cake
 
Prep time
2 hours
Cook time
45 mins
Total time
2 hours 45 mins
 
By: Ginger&Bread
Recipe type: Cake
Cuisine: German
Makes: 10 slices
Ingredients
  • For the Pâte sucrée:
  • 50g whole almonds, finely ground
  • 150g plain flour
  • 100g unsalted butter
  • 80g caster sugar
  • 1 egg
  • For the cherry filling:
  • 1 jar pitted sour cherries (ca. 680g)
  • ¼ tsp ground cinnamon
  • 3 tbs corn starch
  • For the almond crumbles:
  • 75g unsalted butter
  • 50g whole almonds, finely ground
  • 100g plain flour
  • 75g plain sugar
  • 1 tbs vanilla essence
Instructions
  1. Grind 100g of whole almonds very finely.
  2. In a large bowl, mix ½ of the ground almonds with the remaining ingredients, ideally using a spatula or similar to avoid the dough being overworked: shortcrust pastry or pâte sucrée must not get warm to retain its lovely texture; it doesn't matter if your dough is not completely smooth, simply form it into a ball, wrap it in cling film or tinfoil and place it in the fridge for at least 1 hour.
  3. Grease your cake tin (I used a fluted quiche tin) and pre-heat the oven to 180C / 350F.
  4. For the filling, decant the cherry liquid through a sieve into a small saucepan, then pour ¼ of it into a cup or similar and set aside. Bring the remaining liquid to simmer. Mix the syrup in the cup with the corn flour until it is completely smooth. When the syrup in the saucepan reaches boiling point, add the cinnamon and then the cornflour-mix, stirring continually until it thickens. Add the cherries, give it a good stir and remove the saucepan from the heat to let it cool down.
  5. Melt the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Once it is fully melted, remove the saucepan from the heat and set it aside. Mix all the dry ingredients for the crumble thoroughly before adding the vanilla essence.
  6. Dust your work surface with a little flour and roll out the cold dough. I actually roll it out between two lightly floured sheets of baking paper, which makes it much easier to handle the delicate dough. Place the dough into your cake tin and press the pastry into the sides. Cut off the extra dough and prick the bottom with a fork. Fill the base with the cherries.
  7. Pour the melted butter over your crumble mix and crumble it up with your fingers. Work quickly and don't overdo it: the almonds are slightly crumblier than plain flour and you don't want to end up with crumbs! Crumble the mix over the cherries and place the cake on the bottom shelf of your oven. Bake for 45 minutes.
3.5.3229

How are you coping with the cold? Have you any fail-safe recipes to help you stay warm? Are you stuck indoors like us, hiding from the Beast from the East? My cure for cabin fever is Angie’s Fiesta Friday blog party: great company, lots of delicious food, practically calorie-free (unless you’re inspired to make the recipes yourself) – and all from the comfort of your own sofa.

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Meatballs, patties, hamburgers – small balls of meat, stuck together with egg and breadcrumbs, are part and parcel of most European childhoods. The difference is not so much what you put into them but how you serve them! In Sweden, as, incidentally, in most Swedish furniture chains that specialise on cheap and cheerful flat-packed furniture, meatballs generally come in a light gravy and with a side of mashed potatoes and lingonberry jam. Despite there are being no official guidelines, this is definitely what most non-Swedes imagine Swedish meatballs to look like. And why not?

I am sure that many Swedes today get their meatball fix from the frozen section of their supermarket. A few pricks with a fork and – voilá! – the microwave will have whipped up a decent version. But seriously, nothing beats homemade, especially when it is that easy.

In terms of meatballs, feel free to use your own tried-and-tested version: I’ve replaced half of the dry bread I would normally use with oats, to give the meatballs a slightly more earthy taste, and replaced my usual chopped parsley with some dried thyme and a pinch of allspice. It’s almost Christmas anyway, at least according to our local supermarket. There’s no stopping you from frying them in more fat for a neater finish, or baking them in the oven for a healthier version.

For the sauce you’ll need some stock. Beef is my favourite, but chicken will do. Start reducing it before you begin with the meatballs as it gives the finished sauce a stronger flavour. Trust me,  it’s so much nicer than any of the ready-made stuff!

The final, magic ingredient are the lingonberries. You can get them in said furniture warehouse or in various other Scandi-inspired shops and they’re well worth it: tart and sweet, a bit like cranberries, and cranberry sauce would work just as well.

Köttbullar – Swedish Meatballs

serves 4

for the meatballs:

  • 1/2 cup oats
  • 1 slice of dry white bread, cut into small pieces
  • 1/2 cup warm milk
  • 500g minced beef
  • 250g minced pork
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 2 eggs (medium)
  • 1/2 tsp dried thyme
  • pinch of allspice
  • salt, pepper
  • 2 tbs cooking oil, to fry

for the sauce:

  • 250ml beef or chicken stock, reduced from around 350ml
  • 1 tbs plain flour
  • 60ml water
  • 80ml single cream
  • salt, pepper, to taste
  • 1/4 punch of parsley, chopped
  • Lingonberry sauce
  • mashed potatoes

To reduce the stock, simply pour it into a medium-sized pan and bring it to boil. As it boils, the liquid evaporates and leaves you with a concentrated and intensively-flavoured jus. Keep an eye on it because you don’t want it to evaporate completely!

Soak the oats and the bread in the warm milk for 5-10 minutes. In a bowl, mix the remaining ingredients lightly, using your hands, adding a little milk or more oats if necessary. Don’t overmix: you want your meatballs to be light and springy!

Preheat your oven to 80C / 180F and warm up a serving plate.

Heat the oil in a large frying pan. I form them as I pop them into the pan, which makes it slightly more complicated to brown them evenly but it saves me washing up more plates. Once they are nicely browned and cooked through, remove them from the pan and place them on the serving plate in the oven. Cover with aluminium foil and keep them warm.

Pour out any surplus fat before adding the concentrated stock to the pan and bring it to boil: you need to keep stirring to incorporate all the bits of meat still stuck to the pan, which will give your sauce the necessary depth. After a few minutes, pour the liquid through a fine sieve into a smaller saucepan ans bring it to simmer.

In a small bowl, mix the flour with the water until you have a smooth mix. Add this to the stock and keep simmering it for a few more minutes.

Add the cream and season, then pour it over the meatballs and serve, adding a little of the chopped parsley to make it look more healthy. Oh, and don’t forget the lingonberries and the mashed potatoes!

I’ll be bringing these meatballs over to Angie’s Fiesta Friday, which I am co-hosting this week, together with the wonderful Suzanne @ apuginthekitchen. If you haven’t visited Fiesta Friday before, head over and see the wide range of dishes the different guests bring along. Or even better: join us by adding your link.

Don’t forget to link your post to FiestaFriday.net and our blogs, so we can feature you. If you’re new to Fiesta Friday, please read the guidelines.

Hope to see you over there – Happy Fiesta Friday!

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Following the election in the U.S., I came across an interesting opinion piece in the Washington Post, in which the author suggests to use the next couple of years to grow heirloom tomatoes, practise yoga and go to beer tastings, leaving politics to those who voted for it.

What a great idea, I thought to myself, and one that could be easily adapted to post-Brexit Britain.  Admittedly, our efforts to grow tomatoes in this climate have not been very successful, but we have plenty of red currants from our one bush, so many that I had frozen a few portions for the winter.

Red currants are incredibly easy to grow and a rather versatile berry: their tartness makes them an ideal accompaniment for meat dishes as well as an ingredient in a cake. In German they are called ‘St John’s berries’ as they ripen around midsummer, St John’s day. Although you can eat them fresh, we use them in jellies and syrups, as well as jams and cakes. Cakes and pastries from continental Europe – especially from the northern part – tend to be less sweet than their British or American counterparts, and the following cake is a good example of a surprisingly light and refreshing dessert – last not least because of the hazelnut sponge.

The sponge is made from a mix of ground hazelnuts and bread crumbs, held together with sugar and eggs. It’s moist and it’s earthy, as well as incredibly light. A thin layer of red currant jelly – or ligonberry jelly, cranberry jelly, too, would work well here – is all that stands between the nuts and the only lightly sweetened whipped cream filling.

Red Currant and Hazelnut Layer Cake

for a 20cm / 8in cake tin

  • 4 eggs, separated
  • 180g caster sugar
  • 100g ground hazelnuts
  • 45g cornflour
  • 50g fine breadcrumbs
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 jar red currant jelly (or ligonberry or cranberry jelly)
  • 300 mls whipping cream
  • 2 tsp vanilla sugar

Heat the oven to 160C / 320F and line a 20cm / 8in cake tin with baking parchment.

In a medium-sized bowl, whip the egg whites to form stiff peaks, adding 2-3 tsp of the caster sugar once the egg white is beginning to stiffen.

In a second bowl, beat the eggs yolks with the remaining sugar to a creamy consistency, adding a tablespoon of warm water if necessary.

Add the remaining dry ingredients – hazelnuts, cornflour, breadcrumbs and baking powder – onto the mix, then add the egg whites. Using a rubber spatula (my favourite) or a wooden spoon, fold them all in very carefully so as not to lose any of the lightness of the egg whites.

Fill the mix into your prepared tin and place it on the bottom rung of your oven.

Bake for 35 minutes, then cover with aluminum foil and bake for another 10 minutes. Check with a toothpick or similar to make sure it is baked through.

Leave the cake to cool for a bit before removing the parchment paper.

Whip the cream until firm, adding the vanilla sugar once it has firmed up a little. If you are planning to make the cake in advance, check out Suzanne‘s method to stabilise whipped cream, which I have used in for cupcakes here. and here.

Spread a thin layer of the jelly on each of the sponge layers before adding the whipped cream.


Cover the rest of the cake with the remaining cream and leave the cake to rest in the fridge for around two hours before serving.

I have decorated my cake with a handful of the frozen red currants, making it look very christmassy and crisp. If you’re using ligonberries you might be able to do something similar, whereas with cranberries I’d rather not put them on raw. Stewed for a little, with some sugar, rum and orange peel, however, you’d get a lovely texture – and taste! – giving you an exceptional dessert for a Christmas dinner!

 

Red currants, hazelnuts and cream layer cake
 
Prep time
4 hours
Cook time
45 mins
Total time
4 hours 45 mins
 
By: Ginger&Bread
Recipe type: Dessert
Cuisine: German
Makes: 12 slices
Ingredients
  • 4 eggs, separated
  • 180g caster sugar
  • 100g ground hazelnuts
  • 45g cornflour
  • 50g fine breadcrumbs
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 jar red currant jelly (or ligonberry or cranberry jelly)
  • 300 mls whipping cream
  • 2 tsp vanilla sugar
  • berries etc. to decorate
Instructions
  1. Heat the oven to 160C / 320F and line a 20cm / 8in cake tin with baking parchment.
  2. In a medium-sized bowl, whip the egg whites to form stiff peaks, adding 2-3 tsp of the caster sugar once the egg white is beginning to stiffen.
  3. In a second bowl, beat the eggs yolks with the remaining sugar to a creamy consistency, adding a tablespoon of warm water if necessary.
  4. Add the remaining dry ingredients - hazelnuts, cornflour, breadcrumbs and baking powder - onto the mix, then add the egg whites. Using a rubber spatula (my favourite) or a wooden spoon, fold them all in very carefully so as not to lose any of the lightness of the egg whites.
  5. Fill the mix into your prepared tin and place it on the bottom rung of your oven.
  6. Bake for 35 minutes, then cover with aluminum foil and bake for another 10 minutes. Check with a toothpick or similar to make sure it is baked through.
  7. Leave the cake to cool for a bit before removing the parchment paper.
  8. Whip the cream until firm, adding the vanilla sugar once it has firmed up a little.
  9. Spread a thin layer of the jelly on each of the sponge layers before adding the whipped cream.
  10. Cover the rest of the cake with the remaining cream and leave the cake to rest in the fridge for around two hours before serving.
3.5.3226

Whatever the occasion, it’s a great cake that can be easily adapted to suit your needs. Whether it’s to round off a homely Thanksgiving dinner, the finishing touch of a Christmas meal, or simply a way to keep you busy for a few years or until any storms have calmed down, this cake is a sure winner.

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