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He started making videos on the Gameboy when he was just 16, and now 10 years and 150,000 subscribers later he wants to build a retro gaming brand that showcases the best retro products that you can get your hands on. We had the privilege of meeting Brandon a few months ago in London at YouTube Space to film some content on the much loved replica arcade machines known as Quarter Arcades, and within our many discussions he mentioned creating a website dedicated to providing high quality and enjoyable content for those of us interested in retro gaming products. Not necessarily Gameboys (although that is featured) but more along the lines of new, modern products that has just hit the shelves, such as the Play Date or the LDK Horizontal. He has previously spent the last two years working with GamesRadar and PCGamer where he was producing the brands video content but he also mentioned how the incredible team behind these brands helped him learn about building and sustaining a loyal community. This when he soon realised the lack of a large trustworthy retro gaming websites that covers the latest retro gaming products and a place that retro enthusiasts can come to discover, learn and discuss about all the latest retro gear on the block. This is why just a few days ago he launched a new website and brand called Retro Dodo. Currently Brandon is running this brand solo but he plans to grow a small team to produce content for you all in the next 12 months. Already a couple of other YouTube influencers in the retro community such as Elliot Coll from The Retro Future has sparked up interest to join the team and we could possibly see a knowledgeable, enjoyable crew behind this brand in no time. “I am a big fan of finding retro products for me to play with but I can’t seem to find a hub that showcases and talks about these products exclusively. I have to go to different YouTube channels, scout terrible chinese websites and visit big gaming sites that aren’t very knowledgeable on the subject to get my dose. So I thought I’d build this brand and give those with the same interests as me the ultimate space to discover and learn about just that” Brandon Saltalamacchia, Founder of RetroDodo .com. Not only has Brandon been growing his community on YouTube but he has also built another brand in the Van Life community, again, something he is very passionate about and is currently kitting out an old 1985 VW Bus for that community. Van Clan was founded by him in 2017 and has already become one of the fastest growing van life brands around with over 300,000 followers, so if anyone can do this, it’s him and we can’t wait to see what this new bright minded entrepreneur can do. “We have IGN for console gaming, we have PCGamer for PC enthusiasts and we have GamesYouLoved for retro news, but where’s the site for retro products? This is where RetroDodo comes into the mix, a site primarily for retro things to buy, not necessarily play”. Making content for the retro niche community for sometime now means he certainly has the knowledge, expertise and contacts to pull this off, and having a small community behind him to support him, and give him advice, he has an advantage over any big publishing house. That’s why we want to support him, Brandon will be up against large publishing companies looking to sap the profits from this community, but having someone that was born and raised in this community make a brand to tackle the big dogs is something we can’t help but love. If you want to support Brandon be sure to follow him on his twitter @ iambrandonsalt   and his new retro website @retro_dodo, he and the future team are always open and willing to hear advice, if you have ideas, hit him up. We really do think this could be a great brand in the next couple of years and it’s worth following him now to be one of the founding followers and watch what could be the next go to retro site other than GamesYouLoved, but obviously, we’re the No.1 source. Sorry Brandon, we’re just too good! HaHa
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Remember a time when you played PAC-MAN as a kid but always wanted the experience of having one at home but never had the money or space? Well now is that time! Today (Tuesday 7th August 2018)  Numskull Designs  have annouced a team up with BANDAI NAMCO Entertainment for the first in a series of Quarter Arcades exclusives!  It is totally BANDAI NAMCO Entertainment official, fully playable, highly collectible (limited) 1/4 scale replica stays true to the original arcade cabinet, with everything from its artwork, button/joystick sizes, and coin-mechanism shrunk down proportionately, so you get an authentic arcade experience that can be conveniently played on a desk, or displayed with pride on your shelf. We love the idea of having a series of scaled replicas that are true form to the original cab and having them official is key for us. A stamp of approval. There are 3 other machines already teased in the release today too so even though PAC-MAN is the one you can preorder I am getting excited for the others already! These are Galaga, Ms PAC-MAN and Galaxian.   For PAC-MAN itself - here is the teaser video showing PAC-MAN in a ¼ Scale Arcade Cabinet - it in all it's glory: We understand there will also be a further video coming over from the  Numskull Designs  team soon - when this is available it will also be on our channel - so watch out for that.  Apart from the look of the machine which is totally exact to the original made in 1980s the team at Numskull working with BANDAI NAMCO Entertainment have delivered a tech spec to make any gamer and collector proud. This is the full set up for the tech side:  • Official BANDAI NAMCO Entertainment licensed product: 1/4 scale playable replica of the original 1980s PAC-MAN arcade cabinet • Quarter Arcades #1: First of the series – collect them all to build your own miniature arcade! • Releasing as a ‘Collectors Edition’: Limited to only 10,000 units! • Includes exclusive ‘PAC-MAN’ coin and ‘Collectors Edition’ packaging: - once they’re gone, they’re gone • Realistic replica: Everything from the artwork, shape, wooden shell and buttons are precise replicas • High-quality: Made for durability, playability, and portability, playing the original arcade ROM Specific details and sizing: • Height x 430mm – Width x 160mm – Depth x 210mm • 5 inch full-colour TFT screen with 4:3 ratio • 3-watt built-in speaker with volume control • Built-in rechargeable lithium battery for portable use • Micro USB powered (1.8m cable included) • LED backlit marquee banner • Reverse air vents with wire mesh • Replica wooden shell with metal details • 100% accurate emulation running the original arcade ROM on a bespoke emulator FIRST LOOK AND REVEAL - PLAY EXPO LONDON - 11th - 12th August We are excited now also to announce there will be first hands on and look at the machine in a special Quarter Arcade stand at Play Expo London THIS WEEKEND too. So if you're into your retrogaming and the arcades we will be there too to see this in all its glory. Come have a chat all things PAC-MAN. Tickets here:  http://bit.ly/playexpolondon Get your PAC-MAN preorder in here: www.quarterarcades.com
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As a kid growing up in the 90s I was bombarded with references to hypothetical technological breakthroughs that would occur in the future, such as hoverboards and Total Immersion Video Games. By Steffan Le Prince - follow on twitter here:  https://twitter.com/LeRinse These were to be found in popular culture at the current time, as well as from the previous decade. When new gaming products came out back then which were marketed as “Virtual Reality” I was immensely excited. I remember I imagined that I would be playing as a Ninja Turtle fighting hordes of “The Foot” on the gritty streets of Manhattan, viewing all the action from a truly first person view through the eyes of Leonardo, looking down at my blue bandaged, katana wielding mutant turtle arms. I also winced at the thought of the pain of being struck by enemies, as bizarrely/ through the pop culture speculation I must have imagined that either a) it would be so realistic as to result in my brain being fooled into stimulating pain receptors, similar to feelings and sensations felt when dreaming or b) that part of the immersive experience would actually involve some kind of virtual pain s(t)imulation transferred by some kind of peripheral. This may not have been as ridculous as it sounds since coincidentally channel 4 recently advertised a VR peripheral of this nature, more on that later. The reality of the equipment available in the 90s was of course very VERY different. ^ Stuff of nightmares. The R-Zone Not quite the Virtual Boy. If you thought that was bad and you have never seen this, oh boy you are in for a treat. This was basically Tiger’s rip-off of the VB. Available at a low budget, for $30 it could have been yours at launch. The “R-Zone”. I still own it after finding it lurking in the gloomy depths of the garage in my mum’s old house. It is akin to having one of those Tiger LCD handheld games strapped to your face, complete with red calculator/ Casio watch graphics instead of black. The red lines brilliantly shining at your retina (unlike the VB only one eye is treated to a screen). The gameplay is the same as those handheld games, with licensed but disappointingly rendered titles such as Virtua Cop and Daytona (the 2 games I have for it). I installed new batteries (tiny screwdriver required) and sure enough the device still works, albeit with no functioning sound, which may have been a blessing. Strangely when I filmed the gameplay the “graphics” were sharper on the film which could have to do with the fact that the game is in front of one eye when wearing the headset. It functions via light shining through the actual cart, sort of like magnifying a tiny version of one of their normal handhelds. It took some time to get it working properly, you have to angle the screen just right and to start with I had nothing, then I had a really blurry picture and thought something was wrong, but no that's just what it's like. Virtua Cop - move crosshairs left, right up and down and shoot the bad guys. For some reason there are 2 buttons that reload, one that fires and one that does nothing. Daytona - you have to press the start button a million times before it decides to begin the game. You only use the d-pad to move left and right. The other buttons do nothing as far as I could figure out. You have to try and avoid being crashed into by the other cars. I will not be in any rush to play on this system again any time soon. I did also retrospectively have the chance to play the Virtual Boy at Play Expo Blackpool 2014. It has the same familiar red lines but with better “graphics”, more Game Boy than Game & Watch. Mario Tennis on Virtual Boy With both eyes covered it was slightly more immersive, like having said Game Boy strapped to your face - at least you couldn't also see your surroundings simultaneously and the controller wire was not annoyingly dangling in front of the screen! With the R-Zone it was disappointing to see the mess in the surrounding room, further reminding me of my chores to do completed, whereas we tend to play games to escape the humdrum of day to day life. What It’s Like, 2018 I had the opportunity to try out some cutting edge VR arcade machines (woot, return of the arcades?) in January at a place called VR Star in Bristol, the first of it’s kind in Europe. Here are some brief summaries of the games experienced, I don't know the real names of the games: Tron Bike This was a futuristic hoverbike racing game complete with physical bike to pilot. Hydaulics were implemented, a cool feature for getting “air”, I felt like it could have propelled me higher/more vigorously (oh behave) for a more thrilling experience. The techno soundtrack was banging and it was immersive enough to make me flinch and recoil slightly when trying to drive past lasers without being hit. Rollercoaster Sim This involved sitting in a motorised egg shaped one person pod, similar to old skool simulators found in some arcades back in the 90s - but with the VR headset. I hated this, I felt too awful to precisely remember what the graphically represented scenery was like however I do recall it was very clear that I was having a passive experience with a headset on, limited to having the ability to use the field of vision feature. I certainly wasn’t going to be screaming and putting my arms in the air or laughing and saying “oh my god that was insane we have to ride again!”. The sickness was motion sickness instead of g force loop tha loop stomach upset. I wouldn't play this again, I forced myself to keep the headset on until the end but in hindsight I should have just tapped out. Max Payne Stylee This was a first person shooter complete with bullet time, on a treadmill wearing shoes with wheels on them. Looking down at my hands, I could see the guns and feel the triggers. No pain was felt apart from slight bruising from the harness after getting too into it. Most similar to how I imagined it. Graphics are such that you still know you are playing a game (you couldn’t wake up on the machine thinking it was real - we haven’t gotten to that stage...yet). The movement is nothing like really running/walking and you have to do an unnatural shuffle run for more effective movement. This was hands down my favourite of the experiences I tried in the time I had, there were various more which I didn't have time to try. ^ The future? I don't know what the establishment’s policy is on taking photos so I didn't take any but I hope to take some next time I visit, it was entertaining and immersive to the extent that I'd look forward to a revisit. The Future Future When I saw the advert mentioned previously on Channel 4 for a VR peripheral neck band, which amongst other things claimed that it constricts around your neck to add fear and pain to an immersive experience, I suckered myself into not realising it was a hoax even though they have pursued such antics previously with fake product recall ads advertising TV show Humans via shock factor and exploiting our innate inquisitive nature. However with this one they went to the extent of apparently creating a fake website for the product as well as fake reviews of the product by well known YouTube channels. Something real like this, along with better graphics, could be how my delusional ideas in the 90s may no longer be of fiction in the near future, where the experience fools your brain into thinking it's really real. I would have never predicted that these virtual reality experiences which kind of flopped back then would make a comeback. We are on the right track, I mean it’s already now possible to have a VR lightsaber fight which is a childhood dream realised in itself. By Steffan Le Prince - follow on twitter here:  https://twitter.com/LeRinse   Other Links: https://www.instagram.com/dadprofessor/ https://www.facebook.com/stefflerinse Website:  http://www.dadprofessor.co.uk/
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Just before Christmas 2002, you may have clocked eyes on a memorable, attention-grabbing advert for a game that is now unfortunately little known. It shows heavily bandaged characters - identified only by the names “Dragon,” “Bandicoot” and “Hedgehog” – in hospital with boomerang-related injuries. They then become nervous as an unseen character walks past them. “There’s a new hero in town” is said in voiceover, “and he’s not going to let anyone stand in his way.” This new hero is revealed as Ty the Tasmanian Tiger, a bipedal, Australian-accented thylacine dressed in flowery shorts and wielding two boomerangs – and the eponymous star of the advertised game for Playstation 2, Xbox and Gamecube. R of the final product, this was a bold and striking way of revealing this new character - predicting right from the off he was to join, and even overthrow, the pantheon of the great video game heroes.   The fate of the series also makes this spot sadly ironic: Ty’s impact was big enough to merit two sequels, but not enough to make him an iconic mascot. It’s a shame he was built up too much and too early on, because there is far more to the game than its somewhat boastful introduction. Australia has previously served as design inspiration for the makers of Crash Bandicoot, and while Ty the Tasmanian Tiger follows suit in basing its settings and cast on the many different environments and wildlife found down under, it does well for the most part to step out of Crash’s shadow. In addition to Ty, the supporting cast is made up of anthropomorphic Australian animals - the best of these is the grouchy Cockatoo Maurie, while also featured prominently are bilbies, dingoes, koalas and Tasmanian devils among others. One prominent character is a cassowary by the name of Boss Cass, who serves as villain in the game’s wonderfully nostalgic set-up. Ty has to stop the nefarious bird from taking over the world by finding five mystical talismans, which will, at the same time, free the other missing Tasmanian Tigers. Armed with one of a varied array of twin boomerangs, you guide Ty across nine pseudo-open world levels set in five locations – rainforest, reef, billabong, the outback and snowy mountains – completing missions in return for the tokens that will help reveal the location of the talismans, Thunder Eggs. Although it re-uses locations, each level is nicely varied and makes uses of its design and sound elements to make every world feel unique. In the very best of these, you are greeted at the top of the level by a Lyrebird called Lenny, who takes it upon himself to guide you through what seems like a straightforward space - but you soon realise that his help is actually more of a hindrance. Every level has nine challenges where you will be rewarded with a Thunder Egg on completion, and the more you collect, the more worlds open up and the closer you get to the ultimate goal. These missions are the right level of challenging for a game of this kind, and while you can progress without collecting everything, doing so earns rewards that can make the journey far easier. Admittedly, there isn’t much here that more seasoned players will find testing, but it’s the uncomplicated simplicity of Ty the Tasmanian Tiger that makes it enjoyable. In the true style of the country it is set, this is a seriously easygoing game. Its style of gameplay will have some familiarity to every player and makes it highly accessible. Though it stays well within its comfort zone, this also makes it hard to disagree with. Where it succeeds most is in its presentation. Its cartoony tone, well-constructed characters, beautiful environments used to their full potential and inventive, high-energy soundtrack all combine to make Ty’s world fun to explore. Ty the Tasmanian Tiger’s reviews were favourable but unenthusiastic, yet enough copies were sold to merit a second game in 2004 and a third the following year. The sequels changed the collect-em-up platformer format in favour of open-world set-up with a variety of different missions - in doing so they proved overcomplicated by trying to do far too much. Ty 2 and 3 overreached, while the first game’s more modest ambitions are what made it work so well. Even though it did not reach the heights as the games marked in its first trailer advert, Ty the Tasmanian Tiger is a highly enjoyable game that gets the tone and feel spot-on and anyone will find to be a welcome hark back to games of days gone by. Written and submitted by Jack Ford .
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He started making videos on the Gameboy when he was just 16, and now 10 years and 150,000 subscribers later he wants to build a retro gaming brand that showcases the best retro products that you can get your hands on. We had the privilege of meeting Brandon a few months ago in London at YouTube Space to film some content on the much loved replica arcade machines known as Quarter Arcades, and within our many discussions he mentioned creating a website dedicated to providing high quality and enjoyable content for those of us interested in retro gaming products. Not necessarily Gameboys (although that is featured) but more along the lines of new, modern products that has just hit the shelves, such as the Play Date or the LDK Horizontal. He has previously spent the last two years working with GamesRadar and PCGamer where he was producing the brands video content but he also mentioned how the incredible team behind these brands helped him learn about building and sustaining a loyal community. This when he soon realised the lack of a large trustworthy retro gaming websites that covers the latest retro gaming products and a place that retro enthusiasts can come to discover, learn and discuss about all the latest retro gear on the block. This is why just a few days ago he launched a new website and brand called Retro Dodo. Currently Brandon is running this brand solo but he plans to grow a small team to produce content for you all in the next 12 months. Already a couple of other YouTube influencers in the retro community such as Elliot Coll from The Retro Future has sparked up interest to join the team and we could possibly see a knowledgeable, enjoyable crew behind this brand in no time. “I am a big fan of finding retro products for me to play with but I can’t seem to find a hub that showcases and talks about these products exclusively. I have to go to different YouTube channels, scout terrible chinese websites and visit big gaming sites that aren’t very knowledgeable on the subject to get my dose. So I thought I’d build this brand and give those with the same interests as me the ultimate space to discover and learn about just that” Brandon Saltalamacchia, Founder of RetroDodo .com. Not only has Brandon been growing his community on YouTube but he has also built another brand in the Van Life community, again, something he is very passionate about and is currently kitting out an old 1985 VW Bus for that community. Van Clan was founded by him in 2017 and has already become one of the fastest growing van life brands around with over 300,000 followers, so if anyone can do this, it’s him and we can’t wait to see what this new bright minded entrepreneur can do. “We have IGN for console gaming, we have PCGamer for PC enthusiasts and we have GamesYouLoved for retro news, but where’s the site for retro products? This is where RetroDodo comes into the mix, a site primarily for retro things to buy, not necessarily play”. Making content for the retro niche community for sometime now means he certainly has the knowledge, expertise and contacts to pull this off, and having a small community behind him to support him, and give him advice, he has an advantage over any big publishing house. That’s why we want to support him, Brandon will be up against large publishing companies looking to sap the profits from this community, but having someone that was born and raised in this community make a brand to tackle the big dogs is something we can’t help but love. If you want to support Brandon be sure to follow him on his twitter @ iambrandonsalt   and his new retro website @retro_dodo, he and the future team are always open and willing to hear advice, if you have ideas, hit him up. We really do think this could be a great brand in the next couple of years and it’s worth following him now to be one of the founding followers and watch what could be the next go to retro site other than GamesYouLoved, but obviously, we’re the No.1 source. Sorry Brandon, we’re just too good!
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A handful of arcade classics land on your PS4 thanks to our friends at Konami. Before we start here , yes we know....why are we reviewing a PS4 release on a retrogaming website?  Well your answer is that these are some classic retro games you can now play on your PS4 without having crack open cartridge or console you've been keeping unopened for years in your collection. Konami have released this anniversary collection and bundled it with some classic games. Of course someone can always think of that they coud have chosen a better line up but hey, we are happy witth it and had some fun playing it too. The games include  Nemesis (Gradius) , Twinbee , Scramble, Salamander, Typhoon, Haunted Castle, Vulcan Venture and Thunder Cross. The game also comes with a museum section with some nice retro trivia and within the game screens are some nice additional graphics . Listen we are not gonna review these games for you as like any real retrogamer you should know that Scramble is a 1981 classic, simply a side scroller shoot em up which has pretty much made it onto every format. We liked Typhoon and its hectic fighter jet action and remember this being a smash hit on the C64 with a joystick!  We dont need to tell you anything else about the games on this collection exept that there are nice little touches like having to insert coins by pressing your controller buttons before you play, and hearing the press start sound effect!   We will say one thing though the games are clean and crisp and sound great through the PS4 an our smart tv.  The game will cost you around £15 on the Playstation store and if you would like some retrogames in digital format this is for you....although we would love to see Konami bring out a compilation with some more popular games.......Track and Field maybe!!!
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I loved 1980’s and 1990’s big box PC games so much.Not just the games of course, which gave me a door through which I could visit other times and strange worlds; but I loved the boxes themselves. Article by Bhaal_Spawn Of course, most packaging aimed at children and adults tries to invoke mystery and wonder with clever use of happy imagery, hyperbole and promises. But as a reader of computer game review magazines, I already knew exactly what I wanted when walking into a computer game store. The magic had already been sown before I ever picked up a game to read the list of features on the back, so I didn't look at game boxes like that. The boxes for the games I owned took on different meanings. They were treasurer chests, full of the promise of adventure, carrying maps and weighty tomes to digest in the back of mum’s car. Opening them was a ritual of discovery - from the breaking of the shrink wrap seal, the shake to hear what was inside, to the creak as you lifted the lid. Some I saw as works of art, with their stylised imagery showing not what the game looked like (they didn’t even try) but as my imagination had told me the game would look like. Many even took inspiration from movie posters or fantasy novels and were so beautiful I felt they should be put on display in a gallery.   For example, some computer game boxes used bold contrasts or compliments of colour to hold your attention, like the rich greens and oranges of Dark Forces, the bright reds of Ultimate Doom or the deep purples of TIE Fighter. Some of these I thought were so pretty I affixed them to my wall with blu tack (alongside some drawings of my celebrity crushes, which I will never admit to). They were too nice to simply be squirrelled away! Fantasy games like Eye of the Beholder worked for me too because they used art work which reminded me of classical paintings; they were so detailed they somehow seemed to have been inspired by real events, as if the artist had themselves been stood on a blackened and rain swept moor, painting the wizardry and nightmarish creatures first hand. In others, it was the symbolism of the design which was important. Ultima 7’s box was famously a simple black monolith, meaning the game box itself echoed the antagonist’s chief weapon in the game, the Black Gate. It didn't look classically beautiful or rich in detail. Yet gazing at this featureless slab evoked feelings of emptiness and foreboding – exactly the same as the creeping sense of dread the game instils in you as you uncover a plot of murder and religious fundamentalism. There is plenty of beauty in that. During the 80'a and early 90's I was a budding artist (meaning as a pre-teen I loved to draw as much as fighting digital space ships), and would always draw a wide variety of things which I loved and which inspired me. Transformers comics, my mum’s cats or scenes from my favourite movies. I was a mini production line of fan-art, and chief among all this was my computer game fandom. I would use pastels and pencils to create box art and turn it into posters. Or small pictures to frame.  (TIE Fighter, drawn in pastels 1998) (XCOM, drawn in pencil 1998)] The games I loved the most have always inspired me to create and they still do. Although, as a fine artist I still only really draw what I see, they creativity they inspire in my allow me to use my love of games and art together. I still produce fan art from games I love to this day, in pencil, crayon and biro, although if I could still have the space to put my old PC game boxes up on the wall or in glass cases, I would!  (Skyrim, drawn in biro 2017) (Doom, drawn in 5B pencil 2018)] Bhaal_Spawn  - Self portrait illustration Matilda's art can be found here:  https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/YavinPaints Follow her on Twitter here:  https://twitter.com/Bhaal_Spawn
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There was this chip shop in south London.  It’s not the chip shop I’m going to talk about, but it’ll do for the beginning of this story. I was visiting a relative, my Aunt to be precise. Her son, a lot older than me was an Amiga freak, just like me he’d taken to all things Amiga. I like to think I had the upper hand on the gaming knowledge since I had a Master System and Mega Drive (borrowed) along with other relics from the 80’s. Article by Daniel Major - aka     https://twitter.com/guyfawkesretro One enjoyment on this monthly trip into the big, weird place they called London was this chip shop. They did amazing Savaloy’s that were battered. Along with hefty portion of chips smothered in salt and onion vinegar washed down with a Tizer (I love a Tizer ) there was an arcade cabinet in the corner, next to the picture of a half naked woman eating a Pukka Pie, as was tradition in the early 90’s. It was CABAL. An amazing game, full of action and explosions. It was the whole reason I looked forward to my trip. As normal, I turned up with my fiver to last me the day hanging around with my cousin and the bald chubby guy who ran the chippy establishment. My cousin had been berating me all morning, winding me up and saying things like ‘CABAL has gone, it fried itself’. I was not impressed, nor did I believe such blasphemes chit chat, the only reason I was here was to play CABAL and maybe eat too many chips.  We arrived as usual, I had my money in hand ready to order the usual and slid over to the cabinet to get me some TAD Corp Japan action hen to my absolute horror and dismay, it’d gone. Vanished. Off to arcade heaven apparently. It’d been replaced. But replaced with what, exactly? I crack open the Tizer, chomped on the battered Savaloy and looked on in horror as I see a big green guy, orange hair and all fighting against a sumo wrestler in what looked like a bathroom with loads of rope in it. What the hell was this. I wanted my CABAL back. Then. I studied it. Listened. Waited for the demo screen to roll over. The music… that man punching the other dude who doesn’t actually appear in the game. My cousin jumped in, with his friend who were so excited they kept missing the slot, attempting to put some money in. It was loud. Hey both nervously chose there characters. Some chap in a red dressing gown with golden hair called Ken, another guy with a white Dressing gown looking like the Karate Kid. That music. The aeroplane zooming across the screen. JAPAN! ROUND ONE. FIGHT. I was hooked. What was I witnessing? It was big, loud and fast. It didn’t look like anything I’d seen before. The punching noises. The uppercuts. ROUND 2. FIGHT! I was now so hyped I was squishing my chips into a well formed potato shape, as nature intended. I didn’t get a go that day. My time wasn’t here, but another Chip Shop near my home. There was cab office I’d hung around in, odd, yes – but they had many, many arcade machines including Road Blaster and Joust, eventually CABAL mad it’s way into the office. I was in the very smelly cab office one afternoon, I’d been sent out the bakers for some rolls and decided that I was going rebel and pretend I wasn’t interested in corn beef rolls. The usual crowd wasn’t here. This was odd to me, as the cab office actually made up for the lack of local arcade. A driver had told me that they’d taken delivery of ‘the latest thing’ next door in the chippy and they were in there. To be honesty, the chips were crap and they didn’t sell Tizer so I rarely wondered in here. I decided to investigate further and to my amazement, they had it. They had Street Fighter 2. My mum didn’t need those rolls for lunch. She could wait. I had enough to whip in for two goes on the machine. I wouldn’t be in trouble if I explained to her that ‘Oh, yeah the rolls, erm, well I beat Blanka instead’. I did beat Blanka. My mum didn’t get her rolls. I was grounded. But I’d found my new favourite chip shop. Article by Daniel Major - aka     https://twitter.com/guyfawkesretro
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Following after the success of Sandeep Rai’s (known as 2 Old 4 Gaming on Twitter and YouTube) PlayStation Vita: Year One book last year, Andrew Dickinson took it upon himself to write a book dedicated to his favourite console, the Sega Dreamcast. As of 31st March 2001, it gained an enormous cult following throughout the years (in a similar fashion to the Playstation Vita). Article by Wing See Li  xFlowerstarx  from Twitter It launched in PAL regions (UK and Europe) on 14 th October 1999 and its official final game release is May 2002. The book promises to provide the backers and its audience an insight of the Sega Dreamcast’s launch and the first year of the console.  So far the project has garnered 3444 out of 6,000 and 233 backers.  All of the backer tiers are as follows in order: ‘It’s Thinking…’, ‘Dreamy’, ‘Dream Bigger’, ‘The Dream’, ‘Double The Dream’ and ‘More Than A Dream’.  If you’re curious about the book specs and why wouldn’t you be? Here they are below: 104 page paperback 115gsm silk paper stock Art direction by Steve Novakovic-Thone Illustrations by Eric Pavik Foreword by Sandeep Rai Speaking of the book, Dreamcast: Year One is the first instalment of the trilogy. These three books will give the fans a history of the console from its conception to 31 st March 2000. Along with the history of the console is an interview section that contains interviews with well-known members of the Sega Dreamcast community in the UK from the past until present day such as Caspar Field (the former editor of DC-UK ), Tom Charnock (founder of ‘ The Dreamcast Junkyard ’) and Bernie Stolar (the former president of Sega of America). Last but not least, the book boasts a library section that showcases retrospectives of the games, focusing solely on the PAL releases. Excluding the other international releases, Andrew will be taking the PAL release of a game as the main one of the series. Furthermore, there will be a gallery showing all of the box art for the PAL releases (and some of the North America and Japan only releases) and a timeline with an overview of the period inside the book.       The list of games which are confirmed to be featured in the first book are as follows: Sonic Adventure Power Stone Crazy Taxi Soul Calibur Toy Commander House of the Dead 2 Sega Rally 2 Sega Bass Fishing Virtua Fighter 3tb Blue Stinger Armada Godzilla Generations If your favourite game isn’t in the list then fear not as Andrew Dickinson offer twelve backers a golden opportunity of a lifetime to write a 100 words retrospective about their game of choice. Since the ‘More Than A Dream’ backer tier is limited, as with everything else in life, first come, first served. In addition to a once-in-a-lifetime chance of being able to write a retrospective, the backer’s name, a portrait of his or her picture will be illustrated by the book’s artist, Eric Pavik , and his or her social media or Twitter handle will be included in the book and a digital copy of the portrait will be sent to the backer.      At the time of writing, three slots out of twelve slots have already been taken according to the ‘More Than A Dream’ backer tier.  According to the Kickstarter campaign , Andrew is aiming to deliver all of the copies of the book on October 2019 to celebrate the 20 th anniversary of the Dreamcast launch in the UK and Europe. If you’ve read Sandeep Rai’s PlayStation Vita: Year One book before, you’ll feel right at home with Andrew Dickinson’s upcoming Dreamcast: Year One – Unofficial Book . The book will be 104 pages long and A5 in size in regards to the pages. This is to keep the postage costs to a minimum. Unlike PlayStation Vita: Year One , Andrew’s Dreamcast book will lack a deluxe digital version. He planned both digital and physical versions of the book to contain the same amount of content. More content will be added to the book depending on how much this Kickstarter project have funded so far. Just be aware the first batch of the books will be in limited quantities. More copies will be available for purchase later but after all of the Kickstarter copies have been delivered to every backer. There may be a second run of this book in the midst of a future Kickstarter campaign (but it depends on how the current Kickstarter project will fare). Though, everyone’s copies will be marked as the first edition.    Most importantly, bear in mind this Kickstarter project will be funded if it reaches its goal by Friday 5 th April 2019 at 11:59 am BST (British Standard Time). Depending on the progress of this Kickstarter campaign, there might be stretch goals. If 100 shares of this Facebook post , 100 retweets of this tweet and 100 likes of this Instagram image are gathered successfully, Andrew will insert a round 75x75mm vinyl sticker of the cover image with each physical pledge free of charge.   Tomb Raider: Homecoming It feels like not too long ago, I helped Peter Connelly , the Tomb of Ash website team and his team to promote Tomb Raider: The Dark Angel Symphony (as it capitalises on the phenomenal success of The Tomb Raider Suite ) and yet here I am as I come full circle to write about Tomb Raider again. Tomb Raider: The Last Relevation, to be precise. I’m honoured to announce I’m confirmed to write a retrospective about the game, even if it’s 100 words. Writing for a magazine is one thing, but contributing to a book is another. As the title implies, it feels like homecoming. I may not be a fan of the Tomb Raider series but it’s one of the many video game franchises that help shaped my life. Article by Wing See Li ( xFlowerstarx  from Twitter) Social Media Links: Kickstarter: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/dreamcastyearone/dreamcast-year-one-unofficial-book Twitter: https://twitter.com/oddment84 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/oddment84   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oddment84/
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In a large, ageing building in the middle of Sheffield's Castlegate district, lies a new museum. Between the disused remains of a Co-op store and a thrift shop, only the sign on the corner entrance of it gives any indication of what's inside. Article by Ted >  https://twitter.com/Tedward618 The National Videogame Museum, formerly known as National Videogame Arcade has just recently re-opened at it's new digs after moving from the original Nottingham location, due to the complex nature of it's layout and the maintenance it required. It was a shame to see it go, being nearby Nottingham myself, but I was hopeful for what the future would bring. Just over 3 months after the closing party in Notts, the doors were opened to the public for the first time on Saturday 26th of November 2018. As I'd been there on the last day at the old venue, of course I had to be there for the reopening as well, despite the longer journey it would take to it! I turned up around half an hour after the doors were opened, and after mentioning I was writing this blog for GamesYouLoved to the reception, I got a nice welcome from the Manager who I had a nice chat to about the new venue and the plans for it. After a quick few minutes being filmed on their DDR cab by the local BBC crew for a video, I had a look around the place. What's there is a mix of old exhibitions from the Nottingham location mixed with some new stuff too; almost all of the arcade machines they previously had lined up against the wall, cabinets featuring various pieces of gaming artefacts and memorabilia from over the years. There's certainly some interesting things in there - including GameCube and N64 dev kits, a rare Casio Loopy console, odd and forgotten handhelds including the infamous Game Child, and of course the Sonic statue, a staple of their reception area in Notts. There'd be no fun in a gaming museum if no games were on offer to play, and of course thankfully NVM has them in droves. Themed console pods scattered around the room offer different games, one such being the "Music Box" featuring music/rhythm games and an Initial D reference to boot. Some of the more unusual games featured are where NVM is at its best. There's a really fun digital pinball table of sorts called INKS, an app pinball game put in a real replica pinball table. It works surprisingly well and was just really cool to see. Other unique experiences offered include a simple snowball fight game coded by one of the place's own employees. The arcade games on freeplay are also all good choices- games like Sunset Riders, Street Fighter Third Strike, Ms Pac-Man Space Invaders, and Dancing Stage Fusion are all present. These were definitely the games most popular with people on the opening day, and I'm glad that they've now got a decent amount of them - there was nowhere near this many during the first year in Nottingham, which seemed a bit wrong when the name was "National Videogame Arcade". However a few games they had previously were not present- mostly deluxe Sega titles, like Star Wars Trilogy and Gunblade N.Y.- as well as Initial D 3, this being notable having apparently been almost completely fixed back in September at Nottingham, where it was visible in the reception area as seen below. Was a bit disappointing to see, and I hope it's out on the floor soon enough.  It wasn't only the arcade games, however. Areas around the corners were looking a little bare, including the very back area, which was sectioned off and I assume isn't ready to be open yet. But what's there was still great - the stuff that was put together in just 3 months time is fine. And great things can be done with the space available, including exhibits about Sheffield's gaming heritage. Having already housed some nice ones in Nottingham (the history of the Dizzy series, Football Manager, Monument Valley), I'm interested to see what they can bring to Sheffield, which has had a decent game development scene and heritage over the years. They'd be crazy not to have a special exhibition space one day on Sumo Digital, who have developed many notable games, including the PS2 and Xbox ports for OutRun 2, the Sonic and Sega All Stars Racing games, and LittleBigPlanet 3. So overall, there's definitely room for improvement, but what's here is already good. Like it did at its 3 year stay in Nottingham, I hope the NVM gets so much better with time, and will go on to become a great place for gaming fans to come to, just as it was in Nottingham. Hope you enjoyed reading  Article by  https://twitter.com/Tedward618 See also:  http://tedsegablog.blogspot.com/2017/06/the-rise-and-fall-of-london-trocadero.html Information on NVM:  www.thenvm.org

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