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Hypernature - Pleated Wood a collaborative -creation project between Else-Rikke Brun, Pernille Carpenter Hansen (below) and Lisa Gruenwaldt of Snedker  Studio using marbled ply to create a decorative pleated folding screen.


Pernille Snedker Hansen for MINDCRAFT13 - YouTube




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The Soft Chair frame designed by Danish design company 'TAKT'.  The soft chair is made of FSC- certified solid ash, a light wood with beautiful texture and pattern that adds a distinctive expression. The natural variation between dark and light wood veins, reflect seasonal changes when the tree was growing.

"Our chairs consider a more holistic environmental impact and are designed for a longer lifetime with easily replacable wearable parts. At the end of its life-cycle, the chair can be taken apart in its key materials allowing for easy, clean and effective recycling." TAKT


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Danish maker Line Depping's objects inspired by Japanese culture Gingo Fan and Combing Comb made from Oregon Pine.



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The Driftwood owls of Yamaneda Isuke.



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Today I share some beautiful tableware by Uda Masashi.



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The wonderous driftwood sculptures of Japanese artist Yamaneda Isuke.


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It is degrees show time again in Scotland and the first is always Duncan of Jordanston College of Art at Dundee. This is the work of Elena Cheltsova who has been exploring the theme of 'Relationships' for her Fine Art degree.
"The word 'relationship applies not only to people and other living creatures around us but objects both natural and man-made, materials from which we create and elements from which we are created. Passions that direct our lives and ideas that influence us. Material was the starting point of my exploration of the theme of relations.        Reflecting on the relations between Art and Craft I was curious to see how the manipulation of materials might lead to the appearance of ideas and how the ideas might be embodied into the materials and objects imbuing them with personality and sensibility. I study material relationships combining different properties in one object - textures, colours, temperatures. I am interested in using the old methods and techniques, such as throwing on a pottery wheel or wood joinery. The emerging objects form their own small world with a touch of humour - an important part of our life. They contain some of my family history and are a form of self-portrait. ‘Timetable’ represents the idea of four generations in one family that can gather together at a dining table (a leg for each generation united by the circle of the top). The spiral – the timeline, that can be continued endlessly both ways – suggests the length of present life passing through different ages. The endless column of the pots implies the idea of a shared meal and future generations." Elena Cheltsova 





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Charming hand carved bowls by Tomoya Kuze.


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Beautiful composite wood, miniature draws by Japanese furniture maker Ohtani Kagu.


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    Above: Cherry with gold leaf. Below: Holly vessels

Scottish craftswoman; Ruth Mae's turned bowls.



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