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Powering a 13W CFL light bulb using a 3V battery - YouTube

Recently we stumbled upon this cheap high voltage converter on Amazon which claims a boost from 3-6V to 400kV.

Although really skeptical about the 400kV claim, a lot of comments indicated that it did boost at the very least to 10kV so we got one of these to test it out.

    Schematic diagram for lighting up a CFL using the high voltage converter

                          Using a 1.5V battery to power the circuit

                              Using a 3V battery to power the circuit

And boom! There we go, that’s how you light up a CFL light bulb using a 3V battery!

If you do have access to a plasma globe or a tesla coil, things become a little bit more simpler:

                  Wireless (but not free) means to power a CFL light bulb

The way CFL light bulbs works is by exciting the electrons in the lamp and when they return to the ground state they radiate ultraviolet light. This emitted light is converted to visible light when it strikes the fluorescent coating on the glass.

So it really does not matter how you decide to excite the electrons to the higher energy state. It might be a high voltage converter, a tesla coil, a plasma globe, etc but all you need is a device that will kick those electrons inside the bulb from their ground state to the higher excite state. That’s all you need!

Have a great day!

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This is a question we have been asked over a hundred times.

And many a times from teachers and educators who have told us that they were hesitant to share our content to a younger audience because it had a curse word and requested an another means to share the same content.

After months of ‘Yup, we will do that soon’, we finally managed to back up all our tumblr content on to our sister blog - ‘Ecstasy Shots’.

(we are still working on the formatting of the backed up posts which are a bit off, but they are available)


How does this work?

We will continue to post on Tumblr. But whenever we post on Tumblr, a backed up version of the post should appear on Ecstasy Shots! within a day or so that you can share it anybody.

We understand that this may not be the optimal solution, but nevertheless hopefully this addresses the issue at hand.

Thank you. Have a great day!

FYPhysics!

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Plasma globe meets Aluminum foil | 240 fps

Plasma globes are really cool! in this post we take a sneak peak at what happens when you bring a Aluminium foil near a plasma globe/plasma lamp at 240 fps.

Check out our raw video here (watch it with sound):

Plasma globe meets Aluminium foil | 240fps - YouTube

Have a great day!


Some useful links on the plasma globe:

- Physics of the plasma globe by @physicshigh (Check out this video to understand why arcs are produced when you touch the globe and also how a plasma globe works in general)

- The reason why it produces arcs is due to a phenomenon called Capacitive Coupling and is a bit involved. But we will explore that in a future post. In the meantime, you can find a great explanation about it here.

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When you search for videos online of plucking a string on an instrument such as the guitar, a surprising number of searches lead you to videos such as the following:

This is not how plucked strings look like! This also does not have anything to do with harmonics of the instrument as well.


The reason why you are seeing those shapes on the guitar is due to the rolling shutter effect on your camera.

But if you do want to see how plucked strings look like, the following videos would be your best bet:

Motion of Plucked String - YouTube
Slow Motion (raw footage) - YouTube

Have a great day!


Links:

What is Rolling Shutter?

DIY: Tutorial running you through how you can recreate the effect on a guitar for yourself


————-

* This note was made in response to a question asking whether the gif is an accurate representation of how guitar strings worked. Thanks for asking!

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Flow(#1): Buoyancy - YouTube


Buoyancy

In the first post of our fluid mechanics series : ‘Flow’ we explore the concept of Buoyancy. Click here to check out the post exploring the physics of Buoyancy.

Have a great day!


* Check out the video description on YouTube on the details of how buoyancy is related to each clip in the video

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Flow [Trailer] - YouTube


Flow

Premiering in the summer of 2019 is a web series that we have been working on titled ‘Flow’ which is aimed at expressing the beauty of Fluids through the looking glass of a slow motion camera.

Here is a trailer to the upcoming series. Hope you guys enjoy it!

FYPhysics! & Ecstasy Shots!

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Hello everyone, we will back to regular posts on FYPhysics! from the summer of this year (~June 2019).

We are currently spending more time doing research on topics that we would like to explore in the future.

And this time off is crucial since it allows us to get a bigger perspective on where we are steering this blog and adjust our sails accordingly.


We would like to hear your thoughts and suggestions

Your suggestions, thoughts and ideas on how to improve our content is highly appreciated. Please feel free to drop them in the comments and we will strongly consider them.

Thanks for hanging around and supporting us. In the meantime , feel free to check out our previous content on our updated homepage

Have a great day!

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Bending light using heat: DIY Airplane edition

These images were captured from an airplane overlooking San Fransisco. But there’s something interesting going on here and something you can try the next time you are flying.


Right near the the middle of the image you should be able to notice a haze in the image. This is due to the exhaust from the engine.

Hot air is less dense than cold air.

And this creates a gradient in the refractive index of the air. 

The turbulence of the air emanating from the exhaust gases also has a direct correlation to the degree of distortion of the image.

More the turbulence, more the distortion.


Although the above image is from a commercial aircraft, the effect is even more dramatic in fighter jets.

Have a great day!


* The term that is used to describe this phenomenon is ‘Heat Haze’. You can read more about this  here.

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Wingardium Leviosa: Muggle version

A friend of mine suggested that maybe muggles could use science to match up with the rest of the magic world.

And I totally agree!

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fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

This week NASA released the first-ever image of shock waves interacting between two supersonic aircraft. It’s a stunning effort, requiring a cutting-edge version of a century-old photographic technique and perfect coordination between three airplanes – the two supersonic Air Force T-38s and the NASA B-200 King Air that captured the image. The T-38s are flying in formation, roughly 30 ft apart, and the interaction of their shock waves is distinctly visible. The otherwise straight lines curve sharply near their intersections. 

Fully capturing this kind of behavior in ground-based tests or in computer simulation is incredibly difficult, and engineers will no doubt be studying and comparing every one of these images with those smaller-scale counterparts. NASA developed this system as part of their ongoing project for commercial supersonic technologies. (Image credit: NASA Armstrong; submitted by multiple readers)

How do these images get captured?

It may not obvious as to how this image was generated because if you have heard about Schlieren imaging what you have in your head is a setup that looks something like:

But how does Schelerin photography scale up to capturing moving objects in the sky?


Heat Haze

When viewing objects through the exhaust gases emanating from the nozzle of aircrafts, one can observe the image to be distorted.

Hot air is less dense than cold air.

And this creates a gradient in the refractive index of the air

Light gets bent/distorted



Method-01 : BOSCO ( Background-Oriented Schlieren using Celestial Objects )

You make the aircraft whose shock-wave that you would like to analyze pass across the sun in the sky.

NASA (BOSCO) Live - YouTube

You place a hydrogen alpha filter on your ground based telescope and observe this:

                  Notice the ripples that pass through the sunspots

The different air density caused by the aircraft bends the specific wavelength of light from the sun. This allows us to see the density gradient like the case of our heat wave above.

We can now calculate how far each “speckle” on the sun moved, and that gives us the following Schlieren image.


Method-02: Airborne Background Oriented Schlieren Technique

In the previous technique how far each speckle of the sun moved was used for imaging. BUT you can also use any textured background pattern in general.

An aircraft with camera flies above the flight like so:

The patterned ground now plays the role of the sun. Some versions of textures that are commonly are:

The difficulty in this method is the Image processing that follows after the images have been taken. 

And one of the main reasons why the image that NASA has released is spectacular because NASA seems to have nailed the underlying processing involved.

Have a great day!


* More on Heat hazes

** More on BOSCO

*** Images from the following paper : Airborne Application of the Background Oriented Schlieren Technique to a Helicopter in Forward Flight

**** This post obviously oversimplifies the technique. A lot of research goes into the processing of these images. But the motive of the post was to give you an idea of the method used to capture the image, the underlying science goes much deeper than this post.

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