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SAN DIEGO – Luke Walton, Sacramento Kings coach and San Diego native, is being sued for sexual assault, TMZ reported.

According to a lawsuit obtained by TMZ, Kelli Tennant claims Walton forced himself on her in a Santa Monica hotel room after he asked her to come over to discuss a book she was writing. Tennant says the conduct happened before Walton was hired as head coach of the Los Angeles Lakers in 2016, TMZ reported.

Tennant says she had a longstanding business relationship with Walton, according to TMZ. She said she didn’t initially report the conduct but “was forced to continually interact with him because of her job,” TMZ reported.

Walton was named head coach of the Sacramento Kings one week ago, just days after parting ways with the Los Angeles Lakers.

Walton was born in San Diego and played basketball at University of San Diego High School, now Cathedral Catholic High School. He was hired as Lakers head coach after an NBA career that saw him play for the Lakers and Cleveland Cavaliers.

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MONTE NE, Ark. — An Arkansas family is calling for justice after finding their missing puppy hanging from a noose in the woods behind their home.

The family said they searched everywhere they could think of, including local animal shelters, after their beagle mix Chevy went missing from their yard during the afternoon of April 16.

Two days after Chevy went missing, Paula McNeil's children decided to check the woods behind their home one last time – that's when they found their beloved dog hanging from a noose on a tree.

"It's frightening to think that there is somebody close by here that could do this to a dog," McNeil said. "It's very scary to think what's in that person's mind."

McNeil said her kids are devastated.

"Think about it as if it was your dog and if it was your children that are traumatized and horrified, afraid for our other animals as well, we have five cats that live outside," McNeil said.

The Benton County Sheriff's Office is investigating the crime and whoever is responsible could face felony animal abuse charges.

"It's heinous. It's pure evil and whoever did this needs to be brought to justice," McNeil said.

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SAN DIEGO — A 28-year-old man was behind bars Monday on suspicion of stabbing a 26-year-old man at Lake Murray after allegedly getting into an argument with the victim’s family over a lost cellphone, police said.

The series of events began shortly before 6:35 p.m. Sunday by the lake just off Kiowa Drive in the San Carlos neighborhood, San Diego police Officer John Buttle said.

The 28-year-old man was having a picnic with his family when he lost his cellphone and used an application on another person’s phone to track his cellphone’s location, Buttle said.

The application showed that the cellphone was located in an area near the 26-year-old man and his family so the older man asked the victim’s family if he could check their backpacks, the officer said.

One of the victim’s family members was upset with the request and the two groups got into an argument, Buttle said.

“During the argument, the suspect pulled out a knife and started swinging it around and shouted a gang affiliation,” Buttle said.

The victim was stabbed several times in the torso, according to news reports.

The victim’s family chased the assailant into the water and refused to let him out until police arrived, Buttle said. Officers responded to the scene and took the man, whose name was not immediately available, into custody without incident.

The victim’s family drove him to a hospital, where he was treated for injuries that were not believed to be life-threatening, he said.

Two women in the assailant’s group were detained for questioning, then later released, Buttle said.

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SAN DIEGO -- Several monuments at Presidio Park were tagged with graffiti over the weekend.

People visiting the historic park in Old Town said they were disappointed to see statues, trees and a mural vandalized with spray paint. They also said a significant amount of trash was left behind following the Easter weekend.

Full story coming.

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WEST COVINA, Calif. — Monique Altamirano’s 11-year-old daughter, Denise Saldate, died of a severe allergic reaction to toothpaste, she told Allergic Living.

Denise, who had a severe dairy allergy, had recently been given a prescription toothpaste that unknowingly contained a milk-derived protein. The California girl’s parents were careful to check food labels for milk and other potential allergens but did not think to check the toothpaste, which triggered a deadly allergic reaction that did not respond to an epinephrine pen or inhalers, Altamirano told the magazine.

CNN has reached out to the family to confirm the report but had not heard back at the time this story was published.

Since her death this month, Denise’s story has been shared thousands of times on social media, and a GoFundMe page set up by her uncle has more than surpassed the initial goal of $10,000 for funeral costs.

As parents of children with food allergies hear about Denise’s story, Dr. David Stukus, a pediatric allergist and associate professor at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, emphasizes that the sequence of events described by Denise’s mother is extremely rare.

“This is the first time I’ve ever heard anything remotely like this,” said Stukus, who has been a pediatric allergist for 13 years.

“There are food proteins in many different medications and nonfood products,” he said. “But by and large, the type of food and the amount of food is not nearly enough to cause any reaction in the vast majority of people with food allergies.”

The specific toothpaste involved in Denise’s case is also not commonly used and had been prescribed by her dentist, according to her mother.

Common products already in the household are unlikely to pose an issue if kids have been using them and tolerating them, Stukus said.

Denise’s case is a rarity, he said. Such rare fatalities can serve as careful reminders that food allergies can be severe and require clear communication between caregivers, careful inspection of food labels and having epinephrine available at all times.

Yet Stukus added some perspective: People with food allergies have a greater chance of being struck by lightning than they do of dying from an allergic reaction to food, he said.

“We don’t want to trivialize this, because we want people to be careful, but we also don’t want them to be afraid to leave their house.”

Almost all deaths from an allergic reaction to food happen because the child or young adult had an underlying condition such as asthma that made the reaction more severe, and there’s almost always either a lack of or a delay in the administration of epinephrine, he said.

“We lack the details of this case to really understand truly what happened, but we do know that this tragic case should not immediately be applied to every single person with food allergy,” Stukus said.

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WASHINGTON — If Congress doesn’t act soon, tens of millions of Americans will only receive about three-quarters of their Social Security benefits when they retire.

Social Security’s trust funds will be tapped out by 2035, according to an annual report released Monday by trustees of the government’s two largest entitlement programs, the other being Medicare. That’s one year later than last year’s report projected.

The new projection doesn’t mean retirees will no longer get checks in 16 years. But the program will at that point only have enough revenue coming in to pay three-quarters of promised benefits through the end of 2093.

The trustees urged lawmakers to act quickly to assure Americans they’ll be able to get their full retirement benefits.

“Lawmakers have a broad continuum of policy options that would close or reduce the long-term financing shortfall of both programs,” wrote Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin along with three other trustees, including Alex Azar, secretary of Health and Human Services, in their report to Congress.

But lawmakers have long punted on addressing Social Security problems, which would likely entail raising payroll taxes, curtailing benefits or some combination of both.

During the 2016 campaign, President Donald Trump said he wouldn’t touch Social Security. He didn’t believe he’d need to since his plan to boost economic growth to at least 4% would take care of Social Security’s long-term solvency.

The strong economy has not mitigated the entitlement’s fiscal issues. And the federal government’s deficit has grown, in part because of the 2017 Republican tax cuts.

Also, for the first time since 1982, Social Security’s total cost is expected to exceed its total income in 2020 and continue that way through 2093. This is two years later than projected in last year’s report.

The program would be financed with a combination of interest income and drawing down on the trust funds’ assets until 2035 when the reserves are depleted. Social Security’s costs are expected to rise for the next 20 years as the large Baby Boom generation retires and then remain fairly constant.

At the end of 2018, the Social Security program provided benefits to about 63 million people, mainly retired workers, but also their dependents and their survivors, as well as disabled workers and their dependents.

The share of Americans 65 or older is projected to grow by more than a third between now and 2040, according to the left-leaning Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. This alone will boost Social Security spending from nearly 5% of the economy to about 6% in 20 years, where it is expected to remain.

This demographic shift, along with rising health care costs, will cause Medicare spending to jump from 3.7% to 6.5% of the economy over the same period.

In terms of Medicare, which covers nearly 60 million Americans, the trustees project that the trust fund for Part A, which covers hospital and nursing home costs for seniors, will be depleted in 2026, the same as last year’s projections. It will then only be able to cover a large share — but not all — of the benefits.

The trust funds for Medicare Part B, which covers doctors’ visits and outpatient services, and Part D, which offers prescription drugs coverage, will remain adequately financed into the “indefinite future.” They are paid for by a combination of enrollees’ premiums, which covers about a quarter of the cost, and money from general federal revenue. The law requires automatic financing of these benefits.

Medicare’s future has become a central focus of the 2020 presidential campaign, with several Democratic candidates looking to expand it to younger Americans or to create a universal health care system called Medicare for All.

The White House, administration officials and Republican lawmakers took the opportunity to blast the idea of broadening Medicare in their comments on the report.

“The report also underscores the recklessness of proposals to dramatically expand Medicare, which amount to a total government takeover of healthcare that would eliminate private sector options and actually jeopardize seniors’ access to healthcare, while further straining the federal budget,” said White House press secretary Sarah Sanders in a statement.

“Instead of trying to expand Medicare into a universal entitlement that even covers wealthy Americans of working age, as some have proposed, we need to fulfill Medicare’s promise to our seniors,” Azar said, noting that the President wants to extend Medicare’s solvency by lowering prescription drug costs and basing provider payments on value rather than on services rendered.

Government watchdogs urged Congress policymakers to set aside their partisan differences and protect benefits for current and future retirees.

“Efforts should be taken now and phased in over time to slow the growth of health costs in Medicare and restore sustainable solvency to Social Security,” said Maya MacGuineas, president of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget. “But every day that passes, the problem gets bigger and the solutions become more difficult to implement.”

One bright spot in the report: The trustees dramatically revised their estimates for the lifespan of the Disability Insurance Trust Fund. It now won’t be depleted until 2052, two decades later than projected last year. The number of people on federal disability and new applications have been on the decline in recent years.

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FLORA VISTA, N.M. — A leader of an armed militia that has held hundreds of migrants at the border previously claimed the group was training to assassinate Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama, according to court documents unsealed on Monday.

FBI agents visited Larry Mitchell Hopkins’ Flora Vista, New Mexico, residence in November 2017 after learning of the alleged statement. Witnesses also reported seeing members of the militia with firearms at the home, the probable cause statement said.

The FBI recovered nine weapons and ammunition during the search, according to court papers.

The 69-year-old Hopkins — who is also known as Johnny Horton Jr. — was charged Monday with being a felon in possession of firearms and ammunition stemming from the 2017 search, according to a criminal complaint.

Hopkins, who was arrested on Saturday, made his initial court appearance on Monday in a federal courtroom in Las Cruces.

The leader of United Constitutional Patriots was prohibited from possessing firearms or ammunition because he had been previously convicted of at least three felonies, including criminal impersonation of a peace officer, according to the criminal complaint.

The US Attorney’s Office declined to say why Hopkins was charged more than a year after his residence was searched.

Hopkins’ attorney Kelly O’Connell said his client pleaded not guilty, according to CNN affiliate KTSM.

O’Connell said the guns and ammunition did not belong to Hopkins.

The court document also details what witnesses alleged when they contacted the FBI about Hopkins and the militia.

Reports to an FBI tip line in October 2017 alleged “militia extremist activity” in Flora Vista, according to an FBI agent’s probable cause statement.

Hopkins was identified as the group’s so-called commander and his home was its “base,” court papers said.

Witnesses reported seeing about 20 militia members “armed with AK-47 rifles and other firearms” at Hopkins’ residence, according to court papers.

“Hopkins also allegedly made the statement that the United Constitutional Patriots were training to assassinate George Soros, Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama, because of these individuals’ support of Antifa,” according to court papers.

Soros is a billionaire investor and philanthropist.

The court papers didn’t say when Hopkins allegedly made the statement.

The armed group had reportedly detained migrants near Sunland Park, New Mexico, federal prosecutors said.

Last week, videos posted online purported to show migrants being held by the militia before being turned over to the US Border Patrol. In the footage, people wearing full military fatigues can be seen with handguns strapped to their sides, wearing gloves and black masks.

The footage has prompted a condemnation from the American Civil Liberties Union of New Mexico, which in a letter likened the militia’s actions to kidnapping.

A spokesman for the group previously said their actions were legal, “comparing the detention of the migrants to ‘a verbal citizen’s arrest,'” according to a report from The New York Times.

O’Connell said the group believes “they are helping to enforce the laws of America on immigration.”

Hopkins faces a maximum sentence of 10 years in jail if convicted. He will remain in custody while he awaits a preliminary hearing set for April 29.

The-CNN-Wire
& © 2019 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

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SAN DIEGO — A volley of gunshots fired at an unoccupied parked truck near a Southcrest elementary school Monday led to a brief lockdown of the campus and a police search of the area for the outstanding suspects.

The shooting happened at around 1:30 p.m. near Cesar Chavez Elementary School, where someone inside a vehicle opened fire on a truck parked near South 40th and Alpha streets, according to police.

San Diego police officers responded but were unable to locate a victim or suspect, Officer Billy Hernandez said, though several shell casings were located at the scene.

The school was placed on lockdown for about half an hour, according to San Diego Unified spokesman Maureen Magee. The lockdown was lifted around 2 p.m., and students were allowed to leave campus at their regularly scheduled departure time of 2:10 p.m., with the assistance of campus police, Magee said.

The shooting happened at around 1:30 p.m. near Cesar Chavez Elementary School, where someone inside a vehicle opened fire on a truck parked near South 40th and Alpha streets, according to police.

San Diego police officers responded but were unable to locate a victim or suspect, Officer Billy Hernandez said, though several shell casings were located at the scene.

The school was placed on lockdown for about half an hour, according to San Diego Unified spokesman Maureen Magee. The lockdown was lifted around 2 p.m., and students were allowed to leave campus at their regularly scheduled departure time of 2:10 p.m., with the assistance of campus police, Magee said.

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SAN DIEGO — The local nonprofit Kathy’s Legacy Foundation donated $20,000 to the San Diego Humane Society Monday to celebrate a new partnership between the two organizations to support victims of domestic violence.

With the grant, the Humane Society will launch a domestic violence support program for victims and their pets. Domestic violence victims often stay in dangerous situations because they’re concerned for the fate of their pets if they attempt to escape, according to Humane Society President and CEO Gary Weitzman.

The Humane Society plans to collaborate with local domestic violence and women’s shelters to provide temporary animal care, pet food and necessary resources to ensure each pet’s safety.

“We’re going to be launching our program to find domestic violence solutions for people that are seeking refuge in those circumstances,” Weitzman said. “We’re going to make sure that their animals are safe, that people understand that they have a place they can bring their animals … and that they themselves can then seek safety, as well.”

The foundation was formed after the 2011 murder of Kathy Scharbarth, a victim of domestic violence whose dog, Lady, witnessed her murder, according to Ginny Scharbarth, Kathy’s mother and the foundation’s co-founder and executive director. The foundation works to support domestic violence victims and their pets from harm and trauma.

“For all the pets, for all the Ladys out there, we would like to have a program that would support them and the victim so that they will leave their situation and not feel like they can’t leave because of their pets,” Ginny Scharbarth said.

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SAN DIEGO -- Four juveniles accused with two young men of assaulting and robbing a teenager at a South Bay restaurant last week, leaving him with a broken wrist, pleaded not guilty to assault charges Monday.

The four are charged with assault likely to cause great bodily injury.  Prosecutors say if they are convicted, it could count as a strike against the teens under California’s three-strikes law.

The four teens, along with Aldrin Uy, 19, and Kent Bernard Pasunting, 18, are accused in the April 11 attack on the 16-year-old victim at Cotixan Mexican Food in Chula Vista. The defendants allegedly cornered the victim, punching and kicking him as he was seated and continuing to attack him as he fell to the ground.

A chair was also thrown at him during the melee, which allegedly stemmed from an ongoing feud originating from a dispute on social media between the victim and one of the juvenile suspects, police said.

Uy and Pasunting pleaded not guilty to assault and battery charges last Thursday and were being held in lieu of $100,000 bail each.

The four minor defendants appeared in San Diego juvenile court this morning for a detention hearing -- the juvenile court equivalent of an arraignment. They asked to be released from custody, but remain at a juvenile detention facility. A restraining order was also filed to prevent the defendants from coming near the victim, who was with his girlfriend at the eatery in the 1300 block of East Palomar Street when he was confronted, beaten and robbed.

The boy was unable to positively identify his assailants, but video footage of the attack "was shared on social media and gained significant media attention," Capt. Phil Collum said. "All six suspects were identified, in part, by the video."

School officials and the management of the restaurant also helped police track down the suspects, according to Collum.

Last Tuesday, investigators arrested Pasunting and Uy for their alleged roles in the crime. Both had attended Mark Twain High, a continuation school with a campus at Morse High School.

The other four suspects, who range in age from 15 to 17, also were taken into custody last Tuesday. They all attended Morse High School prior to being suspended following the fracas at the restaurant.

Their names were withheld because they are minors.

The crime "appeared to be related to an ongoing online dispute between the victim and one of the juvenile attackers," Collum said. "The dispute began last month, when the victim and suspect got into a heated exchange on social media over comments made to one of the victim's friends."

One of the minors will be in court Wednesday for an evidentiary hearing, while the other three defendants will return to court May 1 for a readiness conference.

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