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POWAY, Calif. -- People are already raising concerns about a controversial golf course and plans to develop the land into an agricultural community and housing development.

Last November, the StoneRidge Country Club closed after a proposal to build condos on the land was shut down by voters. Now, new developers have come up with a plan they hope voters will go for. Wednesday night, they held a three-hour open house meeting where residents could stop by to look at the plans and ask questions.

Developer and longtime Poway resident Kevin McNamara said he and his partners want to build Farms at Stoneridge, a 160-home development.

“It’s single-family homes designed for older people and younger families. Most of the houses are single-story,” McNamara said.

Along with the homes, McNamara said there would be community gardens, a barn, trails and even a butterfly farm. Not to mention pools, tennis courts, a wedding venue and beer and wine garden.

“It’s going to be a real nice place to live and a community that will be focused on the organics, the gardening,” McNamara said.

Residents FOX 5 spoke with have mixed opinions about the idea.

“I was coming here very open-minded and excited and I’m heartbroken,” Mary Beth Allen said. “What I was anticipating was open space and community area. To me,  it's a very small area and it’s just a huge housing project."

Resident Dale Long said he is skeptical about some things but is intrigued by the idea.

“It could be a good deal," Long said. “[If] we want to keep our kids in Poway or in San Diego County we’re going to have to build housing."

Though many people at Wednesday's meeting did not argue about the need for homes, they did voice concerns about the number of homes, traffic, safety and disturbing the peace and quiet. Developers said those are things they are working to address.

Developers told FOX 5 they will present their plan to the city by the end of the month and that the proposal will likely be put on the 2020 ballot.

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ENCINITAS, Calif. — Advocates of pedestrian and bicyclist safety and friends of Roberta Walker, a recently injured bicyclist, spoke out at Wednesday’s Encinitas City Council meeting.

The main focus was a call to action on the long-discussed Leucadia Streetscape plan, which would add roundabouts, bike lanes and sidewalks to a stretch of North Coast Highway 101, including the area Walker was struck.

“We know that somebody is going to die soon in Encinitas because we maintain consciously roadways that kill people,” said one man.

Walker herself was a staunch defender of pedestrian and cyclist rights and also executive director of the Cardiff 101 Main Street Association. As of Wednesday evening, friends shared Walker had undergone two brain surgeries and remained in a medically induced coma.

After many pleas from the public, the council voted unanimously to put forth an interim safety plan. It is still unclear what the plan will include.

Council members were all in agreement the Streetscape project needs to move along as quickly as possible. Still, city staff reported the project has some hoops to jump through including full support from the North County Transit District.

According to city staff, if all goes accordingly, the project could break ground by late summer or fall 2019.

There is also a ride for Walker scheduled for Saturday at 10 a.m. starting at the Leucadia Post Office. Ride organizers say it’s about peacefully demonstrating a rider’s right to safety on the road “like Roberta always did.”

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SAN DIEGO – A 20-year-old woman spoke out Wednesday against San Diego State basketball player Jalen McDaniels, accusing him of using his phone to secretly record sexual activity between them when he was a senior in high school near Seattle three years ago.

“He said he wanted to give me a birthday kiss and that led to other things and that is the day that the video was taken,” Gwen Gabert told FOX 5. “I had no idea that he was doing that.”

Gabert says the then 17-year-old McDaniels shared the video with friends.

“I was just mortified,” Gabert said. “I was humiliated. I was so embarrassed and I just could not believe what happened.”

Gabert says her life turned upside down.

“I just started self-harming,” Gabert said. “I became extremely depressed, I had really bad anxiety. I developed PTSD and in April of 2017 is when I actually tried to take my own life two times.”

“Jalen has been running from this for far too long,” Gabert’s attorney Joan Mell said. “It’s time for him to own up, take responsibility.”

Mell has filed a civil suit against McDaniels on behalf of Gabert and a second woman.

“Realizing he did it to another girl in such a different way, he was hiding in the closet and she was with another boy,” Gabert said.

Through his attorney Jeremy Warren, McDaniels is denying the allegations.

“What is unfortunate is that whatever happened and whatever was alleged wasn’t fully dealt with way back when it happened,” Warren said.

Warren says after two criminal investigations, no charges were ever filed. But Mell says the King County District Attorney’s office could not get the evidence it needed because San Diego State police turned the matter over to the school’s athletic department and then Coach Steve Fisher.

“Coach Fisher shouldn’t have been put into the position,” Mell said. “I don’t know why law enforcement thought it appropriate to defer it to the coach as though it’s an athletic matter. It’s not. It’s a law enforcement matter.”

San Diego State University issued the following statement Wednesday evening:

San Diego State University and SDSU Athletics takes all allegations of misconduct seriously. First and foremost, we recognize that this is a difficult time for the individuals and loved ones of all those involved. The University is committed to helping students make the best possible decisions. Cultivating a campus culture that promotes human dignity, civility, and mutual respect is foundational to the University’s values, and all students are held to that high standard.

An investigation completed by local municipal authorities in Washington state concerning the events that preceded the current student-athlete’s enrollment at the University resulted in no charges. At this time, there will be no change in the individual’s status at the University. The University will continue to monitor the situation.

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SAN DIEGO — The U.S. House Committee on Education and the Workforce canceled a hearing on minimum wage hikes Wednesday in light of a report about homophobic and sexist blog posts by one of the scheduled witnesses — a San Diego State University professor.

Economics professor and Center for Health Economics and Policy Studies Director Joseph Sabia was scheduled to testify Wednesday morning before the committee against a federally mandated $15 minimum wage. According to Politico, the committee scrubbed the hearing at the 11th hour due to the discovery of blog posts written by Sabia when he was a doctoral student at Cornell University in the early 2000s.

The blog posts have since been deleted, according to Politico, but can still be found via the internet archival website Wayback Machine.

“In gay sex, we have an activity that is clearly leading to disastrous health consequences,” Sabia wrote in one post, an attempt at a metaphor for campaigns against high-fat foods. “What rational person would engage in this sort of activity? There is only one solution — let’s tax it.”

In another post, Sabia suggests that young women on college campuses “are encouraged to be whores.”

“I regret the hurtful and disrespectful language I used as a satirical college opinion writer 20 years ago,” Sabia said in a statement Wednesday. “I am a gay man in a long-term, committed relationship and these charges of homophobia deeply hurt both me and my family.”

According to SDSU, Sabia had planned at the committee hearing to cite his research showing that minimum wage hikes do not lead to higher poverty rates but would lead to higher prices and “substantial” job losses.

“The language and sentiments expressed in these posts are counter to the values of any institution which supports the principles of diversity and inclusion,” according to a statement from the university. “SDSU unequivocally rejects any sentiment which seeks to undermine or devalue the dignity of any person based on their gender, orientation, ability or any other difference among people which has been an excuse for misunderstanding, dissension or hatred.”

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SAN DIEGO — A San Diego police officer was taken to a hospital after his patrol car collided with a pickup truck Wednesday night in La Jolla.

The crash happened around 7:30 p.m. near the intersection of Draper Avenue and Pearl Street.

The officer was not seriously injured, according to authorities.

An investigation is underway.

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MONTEREY, Calif. — Divers swimming in the cold, murky waters of Monterey Bay, California, say they’ve spotted a fish that’s a long way from home. It’s called a barred knifejaw, and it’s native to Japan, Korea and China.

The distinctive black-and-white striped fish, also known as a striped beakfish or Ishi Dai in Japan, has been spotted several times in the kelp beds at Breakwater Cove near Monterey.

“It can’t be mistaken for any local fish,” said Nicholas Ta, who has been diving in the Monterey area almost daily for five years. “Other fish are kind of camouflaged and they kind of match the environment around them.”

Scientists believe the fish made the 5,000-mile trip across the Pacific Ocean in debris from the 2011 tsunami caused by a 9.1-magnitude earthquake in Japan.

Debris from a ‘tsunami invasion’

The tsunami washed huge amounts of material out to sea and created debris fields that became habitats for marine life. When that debris got swept up in the currents that flow around the Pacific, the critters went along for the ride.

“These currents circle around and around and then just depending on local conditions the water may move on shore,” said Jonathan Geller, a scientist at California’s Moss Landing Marine Laboratories.

In the last seven years a number of boats, docks and other items have washed up on the western coastline of North America.

Geller was one of the co-authors of a paper in Science Magazine documenting 289 living Japanese coastal species that reached the shores of Hawaii and North America over a six-year period.

“This fish stands out because it looks quite alien in our water and it’s definitely a species we haven’t seen here before this event,” Geller told CNN, adding that many of the other species found looked like they belong.

“Divers or people visiting the beach may not notice anything that looks unusual to the untrained eye,” he said. “But in fact, some of these creatures could have been part of this tsunami invasion event.”

California divers first spotted the fish four years ago

Ta first saw the fish in December 2014 but didn’t know what it was. His friend Dennis Lewis helped him identify the barred knifejaw and they looked for it on future dives.

There were a few more sightings in 2015 and then nothing until October. Ta shot new video of the fish last month.

He said the fish looks pretty healthy and doesn’t have any cuts or torn fins.

“It’s most likely the same fish from 2011,” Rick Starr, who’s also a scientist at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, told CNN.

Starr said the waters of Monterey Bay are about 9 degrees F (5 degrees C) cooler that what the fish are used to in Japan.

Fish from warmer areas can survive the cold, but they often can’t reproduce.

“People have seen multiple fish, it’s not just one, but they’re all the same size indicating that they’re not offspring,” Starr said. “We’re not seeing multiple different size classes, so the best guess right now is that these fish are all older fish that haven’t reproduced.”

Starr said that means they are not likely to become invasive and disrupt the Monterey Bay ecosystem.

Ta told CNN he’s only seen the fish swimming alone or schooled with some local opaleye. He doesn’t know if there are other banded knifejaws hanging around, but he’s hopeful. “I want to believe,” he said.

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SAN DIEGO -- Longtime rivals face off when the Kansas City Chiefs and Los Angeles Chargers meet in Week 15's edition of Thursday Night Football on FOX 5.

Sports Director Troy Hirsch and Hall of Famer James Lofton preview the battle between two teams separated by only one game atop the AFC West standings.

Our coverage starts with the NFL on FOX Pregame show at 4:30 p.m. Make sure to stick around after football for a special edition of FOX 5 News.

The @Chargers travel to Arrowhead Stadium to face the @chiefs in an AFC West showdown on the season finale of Thursday Night Football!

It's all going down on FOX this Thursday at 7:30pm ET/ 4:30pm PT! pic.twitter.com/PTHwcx5ExQ

— FOX Sports: NFL (@NFLonFOX) December 13, 2018

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WASHINGTON — Melania Trump spent part of Wednesday flying over areas of Virginia and the Atlantic Ocean in a V-22 Osprey, becoming the first first lady to do so.

The Osprey is a massive military flight machine that can fly longer ranges like a plane while also having the ability to land and take off like a helicopter, a maneuver that came in handy when Trump paid a visit to the USS George H.W. Bush, the Navy’s 1,092-foot long warship, which is powered by two nuclear reactors.

Trump’s appearance on the aircraft carrier was the last of three military-themed events in which the first lady took part in the span of about five hours, first to Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling, outside of Washington, where she boarded the V-22, and then on to Joint Base Langley-Eustis, in Hampton, Virginia, for a tour and a meet-and-greet with military families.

“When preparing for this stop, I learned that this base is more than 100 years old, and has a long history of excellence,” said Trump in prepared remarks to the approximately 600 servicemembers at Langley-Eustis.

“I also learned that the airmen and soldiers in this room have stepped up after natural disasters, like Hurricane Michael, and that many of you have recently returned home from deployment. I am honored to be able to say welcome home and thank you for answering the call of duty,” she added.

According to a statement from the base, Trump’s audience Wednesday were “children from Burbank and Bethel Manor Elementary schools, Airmen from the 63rd Air Base Wine, 1st Fighter Wing and 192nd Wing, and Soldiers from the 7th Transportation Brigade from JBLE- Eustis.”

Trump spent time high-fiving a group of kids who were waiting for her arrival.

“What are you asking Santa for Christmas?” Trump asked, to which a handful of the children responded: “Puppies!”

Trump also received a personal tour of the Air Force’s F-22 Raptor fighter jet, part of the stealth fleet.

The first lady’s visit to the USS George H.W. Bush was closed to the media.

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Sgt. Gary Wilson

SAN DIGEO — A San Diego-based Marine Corps drill instructor who died in a motorcycle accident four weeks ago was honored by the military Wednesday for rescuing two women from a fiery freeway crash two months before his death.

Sgt. Gary Wilson of Fairfield, Connecticut, was awarded a posthumous Navy and Marine Corps Medal during a memorial service attended by hundreds of fellow service members, friends and family members at Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego. His son, Ian, accepted the commendation, the highest noncombat decoration awarded for heroism by the Department of the Navy.

Wilson, who died in a motorcycle accident on Interstate 15 in Temecula on Nov. 16, received the award in recognition of his lifesaving actions on state Route 163 in the Miramar area late last summer.

The 33-year-old serviceman was riding his motorcycle on the northern San Diego freeway on the morning of Sept. 18 when he came upon the scene of a pileup that left one car burning. He stopped, pulled two women from the wreckage and helped get them out of harm’s way.

During the memorial service, USMC Lt. Col. David Becker, commanding officer of 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, said Wilson had “positively affected thousands of lives.”

“Former President Ronald Reagan once said that some people spend an entire lifetime wondering if they made a difference in this world,” Becker said. “Marines don’t have that problem, and Sergeant Wilson doesn’t have that problem.”

The West Coast Drill Instructors Association has donated a brick displaying Wilson’s name to be added to the Drill Instructor Monument at the recruit depot near Lindbergh Field where he was stationed.

“We extend our deepest condolences to the family and friends of Sergeant Wilson,” said Brig. Gen. Ryan Heritage, commanding general of MCRD San Diego. “Our thoughts and prayers are with them during this difficult period. This is truly the loss of a fine Marine, and he will be missed greatly.”

Wilson enlisted in the Marine Corps in March 2010. He was assigned to the recruit depot as a drill instructor in March 2016 after service in Okinawa, Japan, and at Camp Pendleton.

His personal awards include two Good Conduct Medals, three Sea Service Deployment Ribbons, a National Defense Service Medal and a Global War on Terrorism Service Medal.

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