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The Roadmap To Your Childs Oral Health

Learning healthy habits when a child is younger is crucial to their oral health as they become adults. Otherwise, having to re-learn them as you get older results in frustrations and difficulties in having a normal functioning lifestyle. It works the same with your oral health! Having the recommended routine for brushing, flossing, and dental appointments will not only save you time, and money- but your overall sanity too! The more healthy routines you have embedded in your life, the less you have to worry about later down the road. Here are some great ways to get your kid’s oral health care foundation started on the right foot:

Babies

Believe it or not, you can start good habits during this stage of life! Newborns don’t have teeth for the first couple months so you don’t need a toothbrush yet. Wiping their gums down with a clean soft cloth with get them used to their gums being rubbed and washed. Once teething starts, around 6 months, you can give them a soft toothbrush to teeth on so it isn’t foreign to them when you start brushing their new little teeth. Make sure not to give them anything other than water so they don’t run the risk of having bad bacteria growing in their mouth overnight. Encouraging them to drink from a sippy cup by their first birthday will help their jaw form the way it needs to at this age.

Little Kids

This age is when it is important to make oral care fun! Let them try brushing their own teeth after you’ve already done it initially and set up a fun chart- they may even enjoy the dentist office if they can be proud of how well they can clean their teeth and show it off to their oral care team! The 2nd set of baby molars are usually grown in by 3 years old so having their first dental appointment done by then is important so the dentist can make sure their teeth are growing incorrectly. The earlier a preventative plan can be put into action, the better off their adult teeth will be. You will want to discourage pacifier use and thumb sucking by age 3 so the shape of their mouth and teeth can grow in the way they are supposed to. If pacifier use and thumb sucking continue too long it can affect speech and eating habits. It is also recommended to use fluoride free toothpaste until they learn how to spit instead of swallow the toothpaste- most kid-friendly kinds of toothpaste have fun designs and characters on them to make it more exciting.

Big Kids

Your child’s teeth will start to fall out during this point in their lives (6-12 years old). Their premolars start to grow in around age 10. It’s a great time to see if they need sealants and have your dentist check their bite and jaw formation to see if there needs to be an orthodontist consultation done. Keeping their appointments regular will help keep their mouth in great shape and also will help them be comfortable with being at the dentist office. This is usually a time when if braces are needed- it’s the best time for them to have them. They tend to have a shorter treatment time and you can help them become more independent in their oral health care by making them a brace care kit that they can be fully responsible for.

Teenagers

Their adult teeth should be all grown in and a sealant check should be done to make sure the originals are still protecting their teeth properly. This is also the time wisdom teeth start to come in- this does not need to be a bad experience! If you are making your kids routine dental checkups and cleanings 2 times a year, then their dentist probably already has an eye on their wisdom teeth and can start evaluating when would be the best and least inconvenient time to get them out if they need to come out at all!

Keeping dental appointments, brushing and flossing 2 times a day and having a healthy diet are going to be the most effective ways to help your child have a good foundation for their oral health care. The amount of time it takes to teach good oral care habits is sometimes hard to handle, especially if you are in a hurry trying to get ready for the morning or just plain exhausted at the end of the day. In the end it’s beyond worth it- they will be thankful that you spent the time and energy to pass down one of the greatest habits you could and their smile will say it all.

Schedule Your Kiddo’s Visit Today!

The post The Roadmap To Your Childs Oral Health appeared first on Foothills Pediatric Dentistry.

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Brushing, flossing, and using mouthwash are a powerful trifecta when it comes to the home care for supporting excellent oral health. However, many parents ask whether mouthwash is safe for young children.

Of course, it depends on the child’s ability to master rinsing and spitting without swallowing. Often that skill is present around the age of 6. If they can do that, then generally speaking, yes, mouthwash is safe. And, it is effective in helping to prevent tooth decay, reduce plaque, freshen breath, and fight gingivitis.

Tips for Introducing Kids to Mouthwash

While mouthwash is safe for kids who meet the requirements mentioned above, you should still be careful and deliberate in how you introduce your child to this new part of their oral care routine. Below are some proven tips for success.

  • Confirm the child’s understanding of “rinse and spit.” Before using mouthwash, have your child stand at the sink and rinse and spit with a small amount of water.
  • Use a kid-friendly mouthwash. Mouthwash formulated for kids has none of the alcohol found in adult mouthwashes. And, it comes in flavors kids like such as bubble gum, grape, and others.
  • Use an ADA-approved mouthwash. Look for the American Dental Association’s seal of approval on a mouthwash bottle. It’s your sign that the product has been thoroughly tested and approved.
  • Make sure your child only uses their own mouthwash. Although a child shouldn’t swallow mouthwash of any kind, if they believe that their bottle and yours are interchangeable, they run the risk of consuming alcohol. Be sure they understand that this rule applies if they are sleeping at a friend or relative’s house as well.
  • Supervise mouthwash use initially. It is important that you watch your child use mouthwash for two reasons. First, you want to be sure they are using it correctly—the right amount, for the right time (30-60 seconds), and then spitting all of the mouthwash out. Second, you want to know that they are using mouthwash in addition to brushing and flossing, not as a substitute for brushing and flossing.

The New Tool in Their Oral Care Toolkit

Rinsing with mouthwash is another way for a child to keep their mouth clean and healthy. Along with brushing, flossing, and regular dental cleanings and checkups, it is a great addition to their oral care toolkit. If you have questions about kids and mouthwash, we’re happy to answer them! Contact us at your convenience.

We’re proud to provide pediatric dental services along the Colorado Front Range in Lafayette (303.604.9500), Longmont (303.702.9501), and Thornton (303.452.9502). Contact us to make an appointment or learn more about our practice.

The post Is Mouthwash Safe for Young Kids? appeared first on Foothills Pediatric Dentistry.

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Suckling is instinctive in babies, as they need it for nursing. Very quickly they pair that behavior with feelings of comfort and contentedness. Soon after, they discover that sucking their thumb or a pacifier provides similar positive feelings when they are stressed or bored.

In the period before a child’s permanent teeth come in, thumb sucking is not a problem. After that time, however, it can start to have a negative impact on their oral health.

How Long-Term Thumb Sucking can be Harmful

The longer a child’s thumb sucking continues, the more likely it is to cause damage. This can include:

  • Narrowing of the palate (the roof of the mouth)
  • Improper alignment of existing teeth
  • Issues with the eruption of new teeth
  • Changes to swallowing and breathing actions
  • Speech development challenges

Other issues, while not as serious, arise as well. For example, vigorous thumb sucking can produce painful sores on the thumbs. Also, thumb sucking can make a child more prone to illnesses as germs from the hands are transferred to the mouth.

Thumb Sucking: How Long is Too Long?

Some children will be ready to give up thumb sucking sooner than others, but in general, it is best to have eliminated the habit (including the use of a pacifier) by around 18 months of age. A good reminder is that if a child is frequently talking with their thumb or a pacifier in their mouth, it’s time to take action since this may affect speech development.

Tips for Saying “So Long!” to the Thumb

Here are some ways you can help your child let go of a thumb sucking habit:

  • As much as possible, resolve any anxieties that may be driving the habit.
  • Encourage other activities when your child seems bored.
  • Explain to them that it is time to eliminate the behavior and praise them when you see them resisting the urge to suck their thumb.
  • Help them develop self-awareness by gently asking, “Did you notice you are sucking your thumb now?”
  • If thumb sucking happens as your child falls asleep, provide alternate soothing such as soft music.
  • Give reminders confidentially, as embarrassment may create more of the anxiety that is driving the habit.
  • Be patient but persistent in addressing the issue.

Thumb sucking is a powerful urge in children, so it will take time to eliminate the behavior. But, the effort you devote to helping your child drop the habit will pay off with fewer oral health issues down the road.

We’re proud to provide pediatric dental services along the Colorado Front Range in Lafayette (303.604.9500), Longmont (303.702.9501), and Thornton (303.452.9502). Contact us to make an appointment or learn more about our practice.

The post How Thumb Sucking Affects Oral Health appeared first on Foothills Pediatric Dentistry.

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Many people think of flossing as something you do only when you have something stuck between your teeth. But, it’s really a practice you should make part of your oral care routine every day. Flossing cleans the spaces between your teeth in the same way that your toothbrush cleans the more accessible surfaces. It removes particles and plaque that if left between the teeth can lead to cavities and gum disease.

It’s important that children understand the value of flossing and that they shouldn’t consider it something you do on an as-needed basis. Flossing is every bit as important as brushing.

Did You Know?
Here are some flossing fun facts you can share with your kids:

  • Flossing every time you brush is a great idea, but you only need to floss once a day to keep your teeth cleaner and your gums healthier.
  • Brushing your teeth only cleans about 70% of their surface. Floss is intended to reach the rest.
  • A good flossing only takes 2-3 minutes, so a regular flossing habit won’t cut into a kid’s play time!
  • It’s important to use a clean section of floss between each pair of teeth. This prevents the transfer of bacteria from one spot to another. That means it’s fine to use a good, long piece of floss — typically 18 to 20 inches.
  • Floss comes in waxed and unwaxed versions. Waxed floss is designed to slip more easily between teeth that are close together.
  • When using unwaxed dental floss, you may hear a squeaking sound as it glides between teeth. This indicates that the plaque has been removed and the surfaces are clean.
  • Floss comes in a wide range of flavors, including everything from cotton candy to bacon!
  • Ideally you should floss and then rinse before you brush. This makes it easier for the fluoride in toothpaste to reach the between-teeth surfaces.
  • Using a toothpick to gently remove food from between teeth can be helpful, but nothing beats flossing for doing a complete cleaning between teeth.

Taking Advantage of All the Oral Health Tools

Flossing is a practice that can have an immediate and positive impact on a child’s oral health. While flossing daily is ideal, even starting at a few times per week can produce benefits and get a child moving in the right direction. If you or your child have any questions about flossing, don’t hesitate to ask!

We’re proud to provide pediatric dental services along the Colorado Front Range in Lafayette (303.604.9500), Longmont (303.702.9501), and Thornton (303.452.9502). Contact us to make an appointment or learn more about our practice.

The post 9 Fun Facts About Flossing! appeared first on Foothills Pediatric Dentistry.

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As important as a cleaning and checkup or other dental procedure is for a child, it is never going to be their favorite activity. That said, there is no reason it has to be something they look ahead to with fear or anxiety. There are a number of things you can do to make a trip to the dentist a more positive experience for your child.

How to Get Kids Excited About a Dental Appointment

Here are some proven ways to mold your child’s perspective on their dental appointments:

  • Take them to a pediatric dentist. While any dentist will work on children, pediatric dentists have specialized training, skills, and experience that help them make a child’s visit as stress-free as possible. From the office staff to the hygienist to the dentist, everyone is focused on helping kids and their parents have a positive experience.
  • Listen to their concerns. It’s common for parents to respond to a child’s anxiety about the dentist by saying something like, “Don’t worry. It’ll be fine.” But, a more effective approach may be to validate their feelings and say something along the lines of, “I can see you’re a little nervous about this, and I understand why. But, here are some things to keep in mind about how this process will go.”
  • Lead by example. Children tend to mimic the behavior of their parents. If in the days leading up to your appointment you talk about being eager to have your teeth and gums feeling clean and healthy, they are much more likely to feel the same way as their appointment approaches.
  • Get their input. Giving kids a small amount of control related to their dental cleanings or procedures can help them feel more at ease about them. For example, letting them choose the day of the week for the appointment is an easy way to give them a sense of autonomy and confidence.
  • Educate them. We tend to fear what we don’t understand. There are many resources available online that explain what happens at the dentist and why the different procedures are performed. Reviewing that information with them can help turn something mysterious into something that makes perfect sense.
  • Talk about the technology. The dentist office has some very cool machines and gear. Encourage your child to look around and ask questions about what things are and how they are used.
  • Pair the visit with a fun activity. This tried and true tactic gives kids something to focus on other than the appointment. Lunch out at a favorite restaurant, a visit to the zoo or museum, or going to the movies, when paired with each visit to the dentist, starts to create the positive association that “dentist day = fun day.”

Focused on Making Dental Care Fun

At Foothills Pediatric Dentistry, we focus on providing exceptional dental care in a relaxed and fun environment. Our young patients and their families know that when they come in for an appointment, our friendly staff will do all we can to make it a positive experience.

We’re proud to provide pediatric dental services along the Colorado Front Range in Lafayette (303.604.9500), Longmont (303.702.9501), and Thornton (303.452.9502). Contact us to make an appointment or learn more about our practice.

The post Making Your Child’s Dental Visit a Positive Experience! appeared first on Foothills Pediatric Dentistry.

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Your pediatric dentist uses a number of techniques to assess the health of your child’s teeth, jaw, and mouth. One of them is dental X-rays. X-rays are beams of electromagnetic energy that pass through an area of the body and are blocked to different degrees by materials of different densities. These differences are used to produce a black and white image of the area.

What is called digital radiography is the most advanced form of X-ray technology. Where X-ray images used to be created on film that had to be developed, today’s X-rays are saved as digital computer files that can be viewed immediately. To ensure that X-rays are safe, dentists use what is known as the ALARA principle, meaning that patients are exposed to radiation doses that are well below the allowable limits and are “As Low As Reasonably Achievable.”

Why Do Dentists Take X-rays?

X-rays provide dentists with a wealth of information about a child’s teeth and jaw that would not otherwise be available. This includes indications of tooth decay or problems with the structure of the mouth, and in the case of dental injuries, the extent of the damage.

ally important for children, as it allows the dentist to be proactive about any issues that are arising during this period of fast growth and development. Consequently, the American Dental Association recommends that X-rays be taken starting at the age of two and every 6 to 12 months thereafter.

The Different Types Of Dental X-Rays

Dentists use different types of X-rays for different purposes. Four of the most common types of x-rays are:

  • Bite-wing X-rays. Bite-wings give the dentist a good look at the crowns of the back teeth, and can be used to detect decay between the teeth. Typically one or two images are taken on each side of the mouth, producing a single image that shows both upper and lower teeth in one view.
  • Panoramic X-rays. These X-rays show the entire mouth in one image. They can be used to determine the position of teeth that have not yet erupted. Panoramic X-rays are often used to plan orthodontic treatments.
  • Occlusal X-rays. These images are used to assess tooth development and placement in children. They are larger than other X-ray images, and show nearly the full arch of teeth in either the upper or lower jaw.
  • Periapical X-rays. A periapical X-ray is used to look at one or two teeth at a time. It is similar to a bite-wing image, but it shows the entire length of each tooth, from crown to root.

Helping Maintain Your Child’s Picture-Perfect Smile

X-rays are just one of the many tools we use to ensure your child’s teeth, jaw, and mouth are as healthy as possible. By identifying potential problems early, we can resolve them quickly and efficiently so that your child has very positive dental care experiences.

We’re proud to provide pediatric dental services along the Colorado Front Range in Lafayette (303.604.9500), Longmont (303.702.9501), and Thornton (303.452.9502). Contact us to make an appointment or learn more about our practice.

The post How X-Rays Help Your Pediatric Dentist Diagnose & Treat appeared first on Foothills Pediatric Dentistry.

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There was a time when there were only a handful of toothpastes to choose from. Today, there are almost too many to count! As a parent, it can be difficult to decide which toothpaste type and brand to have your children use. However, there are some general guidelines you can follow to help you pick the right product.

What’s Best for Brushing?

As you choose a toothpaste for your child, keep the following in mind.

Look to the ADA

Created in 1931 and still the most recognized and trusted “stamp of approval” today, the ADA (American Dental Association) Seal of Acceptance is trusted by dentists and consumers alike to indicate that a toothpaste or any other dental product meets strict guidelines for safety and effectiveness. If a toothpaste bears this mark, you can be confident that it’s a good option.

Does it contain fluoride?

The ADA recommends using fluoridated toothpaste to help fight cavities. It is proven effective in cleaning and protecting teeth. That said, there are concerns about children consuming fluoride in the course of brushing their teeth. Be sure that they understand not to swallow toothpaste and that they rinse thoroughly after brushing.

Find the right flavor

While most adults would say they enjoy the flavor of a mint toothpaste, children sometimes feel that it is “too spicy” for them. Thankfully, there are many flavors available today, from berry to bubblegum. And, the more they like the flavor, the easier it will be to get them to brush!

Carefully assess abrasives

Some toothpastes contain abrasives with the idea that they will do a better job of cleaning teeth. But, use caution here. A toothpaste that is too abrasive can damage tooth enamel.

Talk with your dentist about “specialized” toothpastes

Generally speaking, a “standard” toothpaste will work just fine for most kids. Before selecting a product that is focused on a specific issue like tartar control, breath freshening, whitening, sensitivity, etc., be sure to talk with your dentist.

Don’t Forget Technique and Timing

It’s great that you are taking the time to choose the right toothpaste for your child. However, just as important as what they brush with is how and how often they brush. Be sure that your kids are brushing gently, cleaning all tooth surfaces, and giving a good effort for a full two minutes twice a day. They should also be flossing daily. With the right toothpaste, a little oversight, and lots of encouragement, kids can learn to love their oral care routine.

We’re proud to provide pediatric dental services along the Colorado Front Range in Lafayette (303.604.9500), Longmont (303.702.9501), and Thornton (303.452.9502). Contact us to make an appointment or learn more about our practice.

The post Tips for Picking the Right Toothpaste appeared first on Foothills Pediatric Dentistry.

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Here come the holidays! And with them, an abundance of sugary treats. But those sweets aren’t the only challenges to your child’s oral health at this time of year. From foods that can cause tooth damage  to busy schedules that make it harder to stick to brushing and flossing routines, you need to be careful or your kids can receive unwanted “gifts” this season.

Taking the Time to Take Care of Your Teeth

Below are some reminders about how your child can keep their teeth clean and their mouth healthy around the holidays (or anytime!):

  • Choose fruit to appease a sweet tooth. Yes, you want to let your child enjoy some holiday treats. But, if you alternate those indulgences with servings of fruit, they get the “sweet” they’re craving without quite so much sugar.
  • Encourage more water consumption. Drinking plenty of water is a good oral health tip at any time of year. And around the holidays, having your child drink more water, especially after eating a sweet snack, helps rinse away sugar so it doesn’t contribute to the development of cavities.
  • Remind them to be careful what they bite. Candy canes, nuts, and other hard foods can damage a tooth or injure gums if you bite down on them the wrong way. Be sure your kids use caution, and enjoy these items (especially the candy) in moderation.
  • Push the veggies. It’s tempting to let your child skip over the vegetable tray and head right for the dessert table at this time of year. However, those veggies can not only help control their appetite for sweet treats by filling them up, the vitamin A in many vegetables helps strengthen tooth enamel.
  • Use the right tool for the job. While your child’s teeth are handy for opening a stubborn package, they definitely are not meant for that job. Every year around the holidays dentists see patients for tooth damage and injuries to lips, tongue, and gums from this kind of activity. Use scissors instead.
  • Have them hum a holiday favorite while they brush. It can be hard for a child to gauge how long they’ve been brushing when they’re eager to do more celebrating. Have your kids hum a favorite carol (or two) while they brush and floss to ensure their teeth get the attention they need.

Happy, Healthy Holidays!

There’s no reason a child can’t enjoy the holidays and maintain good oral care practices at the same time. And the benefits of following the tips above will have a positive impact on their overall oral health throughout the year.

We’re proud to provide pediatric dental services along the Colorado Front Range in Lafayette (303.604.9500), Longmont (303.702.9501), and Thornton (303.452.9502). Contact us to make an appointment or learn more about our practice.

The post Holiday Oral Health Tips for Kids appeared first on Foothills Pediatric Dentistry.

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The healthy habits we learn when we are young tend to stick with us throughout life. Good oral health care is one of the most important of these. That’s why it’s crucial to introduce children to brushing and flossing in a way that makes it fun and gives them a sense of accomplishment.

Putting Kids on the Path to Good Oral Hygiene

While taking care of their teeth and gums is something kids need to do every day, there’s no reason it has to feel like a chore. Here are some steps you can make brushing and flossing fun:

Start early
Even before a baby has teeth, you should get them comfortable with the concept of oral care. You can do this by gently cleaning their gums with moist gauze or a washcloth. When the first tooth appears, you should begin brushing it for your child.

“Monkey in the mirror”
To help kids develop an awareness of the cleanliness of their teeth you can join them in making funny open-mouth faces in front of the mirror. As you enjoy a good laugh, you can both observe whether your teeth and gums look clean and healthy, and you can point out that brushing and flossing will help with this.

Model the right behavior
Invite your kids to watch you perform your own oral care, grinning the whole time as you brush and floss. Afterward, be sure to tell them how fresh and clean your mouth feels and comment on how bright your smile is. Your kids look up to you, and your example will go a long way in encouraging them to establish healthy habits.

A gradual handoff
At approximately three years of age, kids can start to take responsibility for their own oral care to a degree. However, you should not expect a child to handle oral care completely unassisted yet. A transition period where you slowly let them take charge will help prevent resentment and failure. Slowly transfer responsibility for independent brushing from you to them over a period of months. As they become more proficient, be sure to tell them that you’re allowing them to take over because they are doing such a great job!

Talk about the importance of proper nutrition
It’s important for kids to know that in addition to brushing and flossing, eating a healthy, low-sugar diet can play a big role in having a healthy mouth. Drinking lots of water (especially in place of sugary juices or soda) is essential as well. Here again, you should model this behavior by eating and drinking the right things yourself.

Frame dental visits as an adventure
Always talk about visits to the dentist in positive terms — friendly people, cool tools, etc. And be sure to visit the dentist regularly so that your kids see this as part of their normal routine.

Share the good news
Have your child tell family and friends that they had a fun visit to the dentist. Be sure to let these people know that “Did you have any cavities?” is not the best question to ask, as it implies that cavities (and consequently the procedure to take care of them) is something to be concerned about. Ask them instead to focus on how great it is that your child is taking good care of their teeth and gums.

Looking ahead to a Lifetime of Good Check-ups
Helping your child establish good oral health habits is easy if you are consistent and you focus on making oral care fun and enjoyable. They may not thank you now, but years down the road they’ll understand what a gift you’ve given them!

We’re proud to provide pediatric dental services along the Colorado Front Range in Lafayette (303.604.9500), Longmont (303.702.9501), and Thornton (303.452.9502). Contact us to make an appointment or learn more about our practice.

The post Teaching Your Kids Healthy Eating & Oral Health Habits appeared first on Foothills Pediatric Dentistry.

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Kids are curious, adventurous, active explorers. And while that’s exactly what they need to be to learn about their world, sometimes those adventures lead to accidents and damage to their teeth, gums, lips, or tongue. While these incidents can be alarming to kids and parents alike, knowing how to manage them can help keep everyone calm.

What to do When Injuries Occur

Follow these procedures to ensure the best outcome for any dental emergencies you encounter:

  • Loosened tooth. Keep the tooth in place using gentle pressure. Stop the bleeding with gauze or paper towel, and use a cold compress on the cheek or chin to reduce swelling. Administer over-the-counter pain relievers as needed following the directions on the package and get the child in to see the dentist as soon as possible.
  • Dislodged permanent tooth. If you are able to retrieve the tooth, hold it by the crown (avoid touching the roots) and rinse it carefully with warm water. Do not remove any tissue attached to the tooth. If possible, reinsert the tooth in the socket in its natural position. However, only do so if it won’t result in further damage to gum tissue. If reinsertion is not possible, put the tooth in a glass of milk if available, or water with a pinch of salt. Administer over-the-counter pain relievers for pain as needed and get the child to the dentist immediately. The more quickly you get assistance, the more likely the tooth can be saved. Note: You should not attempt to reinsert a baby tooth, as there is a risk of damaging the permanent tooth below.
  • Chipped/broken tooth. Collect any pieces of tooth you can find and rinse them gently with warm water. Have the child swish warm water in their mouth and let it drain out without spitting. Address bleeding if there is any with gauze or paper towel. Use a cold compress outside the mouth to keep swelling down. Contact your dentist promptly.
  • Toothache. Have the child gently rinse their mouth with warm water. If you think food trapped between teeth may be causing the pain, free it gently with dental floss. Use a cold compress to minimize swelling. DO NOT follow the old (and incorrect) advice about holding an aspirin on the gums in the painful area. This can damage the gums! Administer over-the-counter pain relievers as needed and as directed. Contact your dentist.
  • Lost filling. If a child loses a filling, you should get them in to see the dentist as soon as possible. Until that time, you can use a piece of sugarless gum to fill the opening. If the child is experiencing pain, use over-the-counter pain relievers as needed and according to the directions.
  • Soft tissue injury. If a child suffers an injury to lips, cheek, gums, or tongue, there will likely be significant bleeding. First, reassure them that this is normal and they will be OK. Control the bleeding by applying gauze to the injury site for 15 to 20 minutes. A cold compress used outside of the mouth in the affected area may help as well. If the bleeding doesn’t stop or there is a significant injury that may require stitches, see your dentist or doctor promptly, or go to an emergency room.
  • Broken jaw. If you suspect a child may have sustained a broken jaw, hold their mouth closed by gently tying a towel or bandana under their chin and over the top of their head, and go to an emergency room immediately.

Be Prepared to Take Action

Taking the scare out of a frightening pediatric dental incident is all about being prepared and reacting calmly and confidently. Using the tips above, you can handle an emergency like a pro and ensure that any physical damage and emotional trauma is minimized.

We’re proud to provide pediatric dental services along the Colorado Front Range in Lafayette (303.604.9500), Longmont (303.702.9501), and Thornton (303.452.9502). Contact us to make an appointment or learn more about our practice.

The post Tips for Handling Common Pediatric Dental Emergencies appeared first on Foothills Pediatric Dentistry.

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