Loading...

Follow Food Delight on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

A new article on Fooddelight.in has been published.

Indian household is known for its culture and food. India being a diverse country has lots of variety in food which includes masalas, chutneys, tempering, preserving, pickling, etc and the common ingredient for all the above mentioned list is Spices. Truly said “Variety is the spice of life”. And that makes Indian cuisine distinct from others as they enhance flavor and color of the dishes. Spices are dried parts of plant/herb namely buds, barks, roots, seeds and berries. So here are few essential spices in an Indian kitchen….

Spices are different from herbs as herbs are fresh flowers, leaves, stems of plants used for flavoring and garnishing. About 75% of world’s production of spices is done by India. In fact Ministry of Commerce and Industry even has a organisation devoted to spices of India, named as Spices Board India.

Spices are an integral part of Indian cooking, so let’s go to the spice land in an  Indian Kitchen.

Turmeric: It is an ancient spice, originated in Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia. It is a flowering plant and has non woody stem above the ground. Turmeric has modified stems that send roots and shoots from the nodes. It has various names as Haldi in Hindi, Pasupu in Telugu, Haluda in Bengali, Arisina in Kannada.

Picture credit: www.freepik.com

Dried turmeric powder is mainly used as one of the ingredients for tempering in dishes. Turmeric Powder has warm, bitter, earthy flavor and has golden yellow color. It is used mostly in dishes to give color. Lot of people make turmeric curry, sweet turmeric rice, pickles, etc.

  • Turmeric also helps in treating common cold, cough, indigestion, skin sores, etc.

Dry Mango Powder: As the name says, unripe mangoes are cut in thin slices and then sun dried. These sun dried slices turn brown which look like thin woody slices and are then grounded. It is produced in India. This spice is fruity and is added to give tangy flavor in the dishes.

Picture credit: www.shutterstock.com

In Hindi it is called as Amchur, Ambya Pudi in Konkani, Mavinakai Pudi in Kannada, Mangai Thool in Tamil, etc. Amchur has many health benefits and is of medicinal value.

  • It is high in Vitamin A, E, C and antioxidants.
  • It helps in dig detoxification of skin and hair

Red Chilli Powder: This spice is dried, ground fruit or Red Chilli Pepper. It is traditionally made by sun drying red chillies and then grinding them. It has sharp, spicy and strong flavor. It is a very common spice in Indian cooking. Not only in Indian, but it is also used commonly in Chinese, Thai, Korean, Mexican, American and Portuguese cuisines too.

Picture credit: www.freepik.com

It is also called Lal Mirch Powder in Hindi, Lal Mirchya in Marathi, Mulakupodi in Tamil, Erra Mirapa Kayalu in Telugu and Lal Marchu in Gujarati. This spice is commonly used in marinating vegetables, cottage cheese, meats, etc. In Indian cuisine it is added to make the dishes spicer as it adds spicy touch to tomato based curries.

Coriander Seeds: This particulate spice is the dried seed of Cilantro/Coriander crop. Seeds when crushed give lemony, citrus, nutty and warm flavor. These seeds then ground are used as a spice for tempering in many dishes. When roasted, the seeds’ flavor, aroma and pungency increases.

Picture credit: www.freepick.com

In Hindi it is called as Dhania, Dhanay in Marathi, Dhana in Gujarati, Dhaniyalu in Telugu, Kothamalliverai in Tamil and Kothamalli in Malayalam. Coriander seeds are the main ingredients of 2 major South Indian dishes Sambhar and Rasam. In many countries coriander seeds are used in pickling vegetables, soups, broths, etc.

  • Coriander stimulates appetite and helps lower blood sugar.
  • It also has anti inflammatory properties which helps in the treatment of arthritis.

Cardamom: This spice is native India, Pakistan, Nepal and Bhutan. Guatemala is the biggest exporter and producer of Cardamom followed by India. It is world’s 3rd most expensive spice by weigh, outstripped in market value only by Saffron and Vanilla. This spice is from the ginger family.

Picture credit: www.shutterstock.com

The other names for cardamom are Elaichi in Hindi, Veldoda in Marathi, Elakkai in Tamil, Elam in Malayalam, Elaychi in Gujarati and Yallakullu in Telugu. It is of 2 types green and black. Green cardamom has strong, unique taste with intensely aromatic, pine or sap like flavor where as Black cardamom has smokey, though not bitter with aroma and coolness similar to mint like flavor.

Cardamoms are very common in an Indian kitchen. Green cardamom is generally used in traditional Indian seeds, teas, etc. Black cardamom is mainly used in masalas and often used as garnish in Basmati rice. Internationally it is used in Finnish breads, baking, etc.

  • Cardamoms help in digestion, detoxification, treating cold and flu, blood pressure, cancer, etc.

Cloves: Cloves are native to Maluku Islands in Indonesia. India, Indonesia, Bangladesh. Madagascar, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Tanzania mainly harvest cloves. They have warm, sweet, pungent with bitter astringent flavour. Cloves can be used as whole or ground. They pair well with cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla, citrus flavours and all spice.

Picture credit: www.freepik.com

Cloves are also called as Laung in Hindi, Kirampu in Tamil, Lavangalu in Telugu, Lavangagalu in Kannada, Grampu in Malayalam, Lavinga in Gujarati and Lavanga in Marathi. They are primarily used as a spice and flavour for soups, garam masala, sauces, rice dishes, etc. They are generally removed before serving.

  • They are widely used as a painkiller in dentistry.
  • Since cloves are warm they help in treating cold, flu, vomiting , stomach coldness and morning sickness.

Mustard Seeds: They are small, round seeds of Mustard plant. The colour varies from yellowish white to black. The yellowish mustard seeds are spicer whereas  black mustard seeds are pungent and spicer than the other varieties. The main producers of Mustard seeds are Canada, Hungary, Great Britain, india, United States and Pakistan.

Picture credit: www.shutterstock.com

Mustard is one of the main ingredients used in tempering South Indian and Maharashtrian dishes. Also it one of the main ingredients of Panchphoran (5 spice) primarily used in Bengali cuisine. Mustard seeds are called Sarson or Rai in Hindi, Mohit in Marathi, Rai in Gujarati, Kadugu in Tamil, Aavaalu in Telugu and Kaduku in Malayalam. They are used for pickling and flavouring meats.

  • Mustard seeds are rich in minerals like Potassium, Calcium, Magnesium and Phosphorus. Scientific researches have shown that they are helpful in treating psoriasis and inflammation.
  • They also help in digestion, reliving cold, aches and pains, respiratory disorders.

Hope you all enjoyed reading about few common spices used in an Indian kitchen. But wait! We have more to know in coming articles.  As it is rightly said “Picture abhi baaki hai mere dost!” Till then enjoy the first trip to spice land. Ciao!!!

The post Essential Spices in an Indian Kitchen appeared first on Food Delight.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Food Delight by Ekta Agarwal - 1w ago

A new article on Fooddelight.in has been published.

Indian household is known for its culture and food. India being a diverse country has lots of variety in food which includes masalas, chutneys, tempering, preserving, pickling, etc and the common ingredient for all the above mentioned list is Spices. Truly said “Variety is the spice of life”. And that makes Indian cuisine distinct from others as they enhance flavor and color of the dishes. Spices are dried parts of plant/herb namely buds, barks, roots, seeds and berries.

Spices are different from herbs as herbs are fresh flowers, leaves, stems of plants used for flavoring and garnishing. About 75% of world’s production of spices is done by India. In fact Ministry of Commerce and Industry even has a organisation devoted to spices of India, named as Spices Board India.

Spices are an integral part of Indian cooking, so let’s take a journey to the spice land in Indian Kitchen.

Turmeric: It is an ancient spice, originated in Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia. It is a flowering plant and has non woody stem above the ground. Turmeric has modified stems that send roots and shoots from the nodes. It has various names as Haldi in Hindi, Pasupu in Telugu, Haluda in Bengali, Arisina in Kannada.

Picture credit: www.freepik.com

Dried turmeric powder is mainly used as one of the ingredients for tempering in dishes. Turmeric Powder has warm, bitter, earthy flavor and has golden yellow color. It is used mostly in dishes to give color. Lot of people make turmeric curry, sweet turmeric rice, pickles, etc.

  • Turmeric also helps in treating common cold, cough, indigestion, skin sores, etc.

Dry Mango Powder: As the name says, unripe mangoes are cut in thin slices and then sun dried. These sun dried slices turn brown which look like thin woody slices and are then grounded. It is produced in India. This spice is fruity and is added to give tangy flavor in the dishes.

Picture credit: www.shutterstock.com

In Hindi it is called as Amchur, Ambya Pudi in Konkani, Mavinakai Pudi in Kannada, Mangai Thool in Tamil, etc. Amchur has many health benefits and is of medicinal value.

  • It is high in Vitamin A, E, C and antioxidants.
  • It helps in dig detoxification of skin and hair

Red Chilli Powder: This spice is dried, ground fruit or Red Chilli Pepper. It is traditionally made by sun drying red chillies and then grinding them. It has sharp, spicy and strong flavor. It is a very common spice in Indian cooking. Not only in Indian, but it is also used commonly in Chinese, Thai, Korean, Mexican, American and Portuguese cuisines too.

Picture credit: www.freepik.com

It is also called Lal Mirch Powder in Hindi, Lal Mirchya in Marathi, Mulakupodi in Tamil, Erra Mirapa Kayalu in Telugu and Lal Marchu in Gujarati. This spice is commonly used in marinating vegetables, cottage cheese, meats, etc. In Indian cuisine it is added to make the dishes spicer as it adds spicy touch to tomato based curries.

Coriander Seeds: This particulate spice is the dried seed of Cilantro/Coriander crop. Seeds when crushed give lemony, citrus, nutty and warm flavor. These seeds then ground are used as a spice for tempering in many dishes. When roasted, the seeds’ flavor, aroma and pungency increases.

Picture credit: www.freepick.com

In Hindi it is called as Dhania, Dhanay in Marathi, Dhana in Gujarati, Dhaniyalu in Telugu, Kothamalliverai in Tamil and Kothamalli in Malayalam. Coriander seeds are the main ingredients of 2 major South Indian dishes Sambhar and Rasam. In many countries coriander seeds are used in pickling vegetables, soups, broths, etc.

  • Coriander stimulates appetite and helps lower blood sugar.
  • It also has anti inflammatory properties which helps in the treatment of arthritis.

Cardamom: This spice is native India, Pakistan, Nepal and Bhutan. Guatemala is the biggest exporter and producer of Cardamom followed by India. It is world’s 3rd most expensive spice by weigh, outstripped in market value only by Saffron and Vanilla. This spice is from the ginger family.

Picture credit: www.shutterstock.com

The other names for cardamom are Elaichi in Hindi, Veldoda in Marathi, Elakkai in Tamil, Elam in Malayalam, Elaychi in Gujarati and Yallakullu in Telugu. It is of 2 types green and black. Green cardamom has strong, unique taste with intensely aromatic, pine or sap like flavor where as Black cardamom has smokey, though not bitter with aroma and coolness similar to mint like flavor.

Cardamoms are very common in an Indian kitchen. Green cardamom is generally used in traditional Indian seeds, teas, etc. Black cardamom is mainly used in masalas and often used as garnish in Basmati rice. Internationally it is used in Finnish breads, baking, etc.

  • Cardamoms help in digestion, detoxification, treating cold and flu, blood pressure, cancer, etc.

Cloves: Cloves are native to Maluku Islands in Indonesia. India, Indonesia, Bangladesh. Madagascar, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Tanzania mainly harvest cloves. They have warm, sweet, pungent with bitter astringent flavour. Cloves can be used as whole or ground. They pair well with cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla, citrus flavours and all spice.

Picture credit: www.freepik.com

Cloves are also called as Laung in Hindi, Kirampu in Tamil, Lavangalu in Telugu, Lavangagalu in Kannada, Grampu in Malayalam, Lavinga in Gujarati and Lavanga in Marathi. They are primarily used as a spice and flavour for soups, garam masala, sauces, rice dishes, etc. They are generally removed before serving.

  • They are widely used as a painkiller in dentistry.
  • Since cloves are warm they help in treating cold, flu, vomiting , stomach coldness and morning sickness.

Mustard Seeds: They are small, round seeds of Mustard plant. The colour varies from yellowish white to black. The yellowish mustard seeds are spicer whereas  black mustard seeds are pungent and spicer than the other varieties. The main producers of Mustard seeds are Canada, Hungary, Great Britain, india, United States and Pakistan.

Picture credit: www.shutterstock.com

Mustard is one of the main ingredients used in tempering South Indian and Maharashtrian dishes. Also it one of the main ingredients of Panchphoran (5 spice) primarily used in Bengali cuisine. Mustard seeds are called Sarson or Rai in Hindi, Mohit in Marathi, Rai in Gujarati, Kadugu in Tamil, Aavaalu in Telugu and Kaduku in Malayalam. They are used for pickling and flavouring meats.

  • Mustard seeds are rich in minerals like Potassium, Calcium, Magnesium and Phosphorus. Scientific researches have shown that they are helpful in treating psoriasis and inflammation.
  • They also help in digestion, reliving cold, aches and pains, respiratory disorders.

Hope you all enjoyed reading about few common spices used in an Indian kitchen. But wait! We have more to know in coming articles.  As it is rightly said “Picture abhi baaki hai mere dost!” Till then enjoy the first trip to spice land. Ciao!!!

The post Variety is the Spice of life appeared first on Food Delight.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

A new article on Fooddelight.in has been published.


Mithai is the Hindi word for Indian sweets like Jalebi, Barfi, Laddoos. India is a vast and diverse country. There many cultures and religions. Hence Mithais are important part of the Indian Cuisine. There about various kinds of Rabris, Laddoos, etc. So here it is Ebook “Mithais Of India” launched.

Thrilled to share that my 2nd ebook as one of the editors for FBAI (Food Bloggers Association Of India) Team is launched today. Presenting Mithais of India” this Diwali. This ebook has 43 recipes of traditional sweets from all over India contributed by Food Bloggers, Food enthusiasts, Celebrity Chefs and Home Cooks.

Book is launched at the time of Diwali, as no festival is complete without Mithais. Hence we the team at FBAI decided to launch our ebook.

COVER IMAGE CREDITS TO CELEBRITY CHEF SABYASACHI GORAI, WHO ALSO SUBMITTED HIS RECIPE IN THE E-BOOK.

Mr. Sameer Malkani, founder of Food Bloggers Association Of India gave me this opportunity to work on this project. My amazing team consisting of Sonal Solanki, Arpit Awasthi and Rachna Prasad who are foodies and food bloggers were the back bone of this project.

So let’s celebrate Diwali with Mithais Of India

 

The post Ebook “Mithais of India” Launched appeared first on Food Delight.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

A new article on Fooddelight.in has been published.

Ramadan is the holy month of Islam. Muslims all over the world observe fast from dawn to dusk. They forgo food and water. As we all know at sunset Muslims break the fast by consuming dates first. According to the history of Islam Prophet Mohammad used to break fast with dates as it was the only fruit available in the Arabian Deserts. But do you know the scientific reason behind this practice and why dates are the ideal fast breakers during Ramadan?

Dates are commonly known as Date Palm as it comes from Palm family. According to the researches, since 4000 BC the date palms are in cultivation. Date Palm is the most ancient cultivated tree in the world. It is believed that they are native to Arabia and Persian Gulf.

There are more than 2000 varieties of dates known, some of them are Khudri, Safawi, Barhi, Saghai, Zahidi, Kholas, etc.

Why Dates are first consumed to break the fast?

  • During Ramadan headaches and dizziness are very common due to low blood sugar. Dates when consumed on an empty stomach help in boosting  instant energy as it consists of sugars.
  • Since dates are also high in Potassium, which is a major mineral to maintain the electrolyte balance, hence helps in rehydration after day long fasting.
  • Dates have lot of fibre, so they help in relieving constipation and proper digestion after heavy meals are consumed at Iftar.
  • Dates are high in iron, therefore they help in carrying oxygen in blood.
  • Dates are high in Magnesium. Potassium and Vitamin B6, therefore they also help in regulation electrical impulses. Thus maintaining steady heartbeat and reducing the chances of a stroke.

The most common varieties of  dates used in Ramadan to break the fast are:

Ajwa 

Photo credit: www.islamhashtag.com

Ajwa  dates have rich history. They are native to Saudi Arabia and are believed to be the fruits of the oldest tree in the world. It is believed Prophet Mohammad used to break the fast with these and planted the first Ajwa date palm in Madinah. Ajwa Dates are dark in colour and tend to be dry, soft and fruity. They have capacity of preventing and curing heart diseases. Seed powder of these dates are effective for the treatment of blocked heart arteries. They also help in reducing cholesterol levels (LDL) and triglycerides in the blood.

Medjool 

Photo credit: http://jodates.org/medjool-dates

Medjool Dates as called “King of Dates” as they are available all over the world. These dates are native to Jordan. They are soft compared to dry and semi dry varieties of dates. They have caramel like flavour with deep brown skin colour. Medjool are rich in Potassium, and thus help in preventing muscle cramps. They are natural sweetners and are high in minerals like Magnesium, Manganese, Copper and Calcium, therefore they help in strengthening bones as well.

Amber 

Photo credit: https://edukan.pk/

Amber dates are native to Madinah, Saudi Arabia. They are soft, fleshy unlike Ajwa which are dry. Amber have dark brown to brownish black skin. They are famous for their size as they are the largest of Madinah dates. Amber dates have sweet cinnamon flavour.

Mabroom 

Photo credit: https://www.alfirdousnatural.com/

Mabroom Dates are native to Saudi Arabia. They are semi transparent and dark brown in colour. They are similar to Ajwa which are soft and dry. In comparison to Khudri  Mabroom are less sweet. They have high content of antioxidants and minerals, thus are high in energy. Because of low glycemic index, Mabroom are suitable for diabetic patients.

Sukkari 

Photo credit: https://ae.pricena.com/

Sukkari dates are cultivated in Al Qaseem region, Saudi Arabia. Sukkari is an Arabic word, which means sugary. They are very sweet and need not be soaked before consuming. They are also known as “Queen of Dates” as these are soft, chewy and golden in colour. They help in curing digestive disorders, fatigue, tooth decay, lack of energy, drowsiness, dizziness,etc.

I enjoyed knowing the reason behind breaking of fast by Dates in Ramadan. Hope u did too. Ramadan Kareem!

The post Dates: The Ideal Fast-breakers during Ramadan appeared first on Food Delight.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

A new article on Fooddelight.in has been published.

I went to The Haven International Coffee House, SEctor 72, Noida on 19th April 2018. Ambience was amazing. Once you enter this place it gives a feel of being welcomed. This cafe is one of it’s kind where everything is brewed fresh on daily basis. We ordered few things and they were really very nice and reasonably priced.

   

1. Lime Mint Tea: It is a unique blend of brewed speciality Black Tea (loose leaf) infused with Mint Tea, Ice and Lime Juice. It gave a beautiful brewed golden colour which I could not resist tasting it. The strong flavour of tea, mint, lime juice is just apt and vey well balanced.

2. Red Bicycle Caramel Frappe: This frappe is a unique combination of freshly brewed Indian coffee beans (sourced from Chikmanglur) , in house syrup (made by infusing cinnamon, honey, vanilla and nutmeg), ice cream and ice. The flavours of spices are amazing when combined with coffee. It perfect for people who enjoy spices like nutmeg and cinnamon. So basically it is the burst of flavours.

3. Caramel Mocha Frappe: Those who love Caramel, Chocolate and Coffee, this frappe is for you. Freshly brewed Indian coffee beans, blended with caramel syrup, ice cream, chocolate syrup and ice definitely is a must try. This frappe is garnished with an caramel syrup on top making it appetising. Perfect balance of all the flavours.

4. Mocha Frappe: Freshly brewed indian coffee beans paired with chocolate syrup, ice cream and coffee is nice. Garnished with Chocolate syrup is pleasing to your eyes. Well blended frappe.

5. Paneer Pesto Sandwich: Freshly baked bread with Pesto sauce, Tomatoes, Lettuce and Paneer. F Pesto Sauce consisting of olive oil, basil, almonds and garlic is amazing. The flavour of each ingredient is distinct yet blended well. Fresh pesto sauce is made as per order. The quantity of the sandwich is perfect for 2-3 people.

The post The Haven International Coffee House, Sector 72 Noida appeared first on Food Delight.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview