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India is a diverse country, where each state celebrates every season with their traditional dishes. In winters Punjabis make makki ki roti and sarson ka saag, rasam in down South, Undhiyon in Gujrat, nolen gurer sandesh, a bengali sweet. Kashmiri Pandit Cuisine has variety of  winter special dishes apart from the famous Rogan Josh, dum aaloo, kashmiri saag and may more. Since in Kashmir, its very cold, hence lots of spices are used in the Kashmiri kitchens. So lets relish the delectable hot winter and spicy treats from Kashmir (Kashmiri Pandit Cuisine).

1. Nene Chokteh

Picture credit: www.matamaal.com

This dish gets its name from words ‘nene’ meaning mutton and ‘chokteh’ meaning lip smacking. True to its name, small boneless mutton pieces are shallow fried on high flame in mustard oil with cumin seeds and aesofatida. Once the mutton becomes dark brown,  aromatic spices such as kashmiri red chili powder, good amount of dry ginger, cloves, brown cardamom and black pepper are added. Till the mutton becomes soft and tender, water is added accordingly. Once done its served with garnishing of whole dry red chili. Since there are so many spices used in the dish, it helps to keep the body warm. Hence it is a popular dish in the valley of Kashmir during winter. This goes well with rice.

2. Nadur and Adrakh Monde

Picture credit: https://www.spiceroots.com/lotus-root-fritters-nadir-monji-kashmiri/

In Kashmiri ‘Nadur’ is the word for lotus stems , ‘adrakh’ for ginger root and ‘monde’ for tikki (cutlet). This mouthwatering and spicy dish is an amazing combination of lotus stems and dry ginger powder. Lotus stems are first washed, scraped and pound coarsely in mortar and pestle. Next salt, dry ginger powder, Kashmiri red chili powder is added to it and then made into the shape of tikki/cutlet.  once the tikki is formed, it is shallow fried in mustard oil served hot. It is a nice side dish and best eaten with dal. Dry ginger powder is an amazing anti – inflammatory and helps increasing metabolism, therefore is widely consumed in winters.

3. Hokhegad

Picture Credit: www.matamaal.com

In Kashmiri ‘hokhe’ means dried and ‘gad’ means fish. As the name suggests the fish is cooked well till dry with aromatic blend of spices. Firstly. the fish is soaked in lukewarm water for about 5 minutes and then washed properly and after that the head and tail is chopped off. Fish is then shallow fried in mustard oil with cumin seeds ans aesofatida. Next Kashmiri red chili powder, dry ginger powder, salt and cloves are added.Once the fish starts crackling, which is also known as ‘chear’, water and fennel seed powder is added to it. Continue to cook till it emits warm aroma and flavors are absorbed. Garnish this delectable dish with whole dried red chili and serve hot.

4. Warmuth Gogji

Picture credit: www.matamaal.com

‘Warmuth’ is a variety of  black beans in Kashmir and ‘Gogzi’ is Kashmiri word for turnip. This mouth watering vegetable is a unique combination of black beans and turnips. Black beans, big chunks of turnips, kashmiri red chilli powder, cloves, dry ginger powder, turmeric, bit of fennel seed powder, salt and mustard oil are pressured cooked for abour 3-4 minutes. Vegetable is cooked in the steam itself. Once done, Kashmiri Tikki masala which has about 12-15 masalas (kashmiri red chili powder, aesofatida, cloves, cinnamon, green cardamom, black cardamom, coriander seeds and many more) is added to it and is given a boil or two till the gravy becomes little thick. It is served with whole dried red chili and served hot.

5. Monje Suyen

Picture credit: www.matamaal.com

This is an unusual combination of ‘monje’ meaning kohlrabi also known as German Turnip, ‘ganth gobhi’ in hindi and ‘suyen’ meaning mutton. In cooker mustard oil, cumin seeds, aesofatida, mutton, big chunks of kohlrabi (inclusive of leaves, stems and the round part), green cardamom, brown cardamom, bay leaf, and good amount of cloves are fried till the color of mutton changes to brown. Once done dry ginger powder and turmeric powder are added enough so that the color of the dish becomes deep yellow. Next 2 – 3 whistles are given so that mutton becomes soft and tender. When done, the dish is given a boil so that everything is blended well, flavors are absorbed completely and emits an amazing aroma.

Hope you all enjoyed the spicy treats from Kashmir.

P.S. I have written this article with the input from Ms. Nalini Sadhu, owner of Kashmiri restaurant Matamaal in Gurugram, Haryana. Her website is http://www.matamaal.com/

The post Winter and Spicy treats from Kashmir appeared first on Food Delight.

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Food Delight by Ekta Agarwal - 2M ago

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Spinach is a green leafy vegetable from Amaranthaceae family. It is native to central and western Asia.

China is the largest producer of spinach which represents 85% of global supply. USA being the second largest producer of this herb. in Hindi, it is called palak, palakura in telugu, cira in malayalam and saka in bengali. There are 3 main varieties of spinach namely:

Savoy

It has dark green, crinkly and curly leaves.

Flat or Smooth Leaf

This variety has broad smooth leaves. These are easier to clean than savoy.

Semi Savoy

They are hybrid variety Slightly crinkly, texture like savoy, yet not difficult to clean.

Spinach is the powerhouse of nutrients and low in calories. Here how it is beneficial to our health:

  • This herb has glycoglycerolipids which tumor blood supply blockers. Hence it helps in prevention of cancer.
  • It is rich in lutein and also contains zeaxanthin which prevents risk of cataract.
  • Spinach has an antioxidant known as alpha lipoic acid which lowers glucose and increases insulin sensitivity.
  • It has high content of Vitamin K, which lowers the risk of bone fracture.
  • Since it is high in fiber and water, it is good for healthy digestive tract.
  • Spinach has large quantities of Vitamin A, which helps to moisturize the skin and hair.
  • It is also rich in iron, which prevents hair loss and improves eye sight.

How to store spinach

Remove the stalks from the leaves. Wash them properly and dry the leaves on a towel. Once dried, store them in an air tight container and refrigerate. The leaves of spinach will be remain fresh for a week.

You can use it invariety of recipes. Here is the recipe of Green Herb Salad.

 

The post Spinach appeared first on Food Delight.

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Food Delight by Ekta Agarwal - 3M ago

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Here is a fact about Coconut Water! Coconut water has high amount of potassium. It lowers blood pressure & cholesterol. Coconut tree in our garden. #coconut #coconutwater #organic #inourgarden #detox #coconut  tree

  

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Food Delight by Ekta Agarwal - 3M ago

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Here is a fact about Mint! Mint has more than 600 varieties, out of which 30 varieties are cultivated! Here it is mint from our garden! #mint #organic #pudina #refreshing #herbs #foodstagram

  

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Food Delight by Ekta Agarwal - 4M ago

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 A warm salad is a great opening for the cool winters. It peps up the spirits with warmth and leads to good appetite. Presenting Moroccan Carrot Salad…

Ingredients:

4 small English carrots
2 garlic cloves, chopped,
Pinch of sugar
1/4th tsp cumin powder or to taste
Juice of lemon a (little less than half lemon)
1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 1/2 tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tbsp chopped coriander
Salt and pepper to taste

Method:

1. Thinly slice carrots. Cook them by either steaming or boiling in salty water till tender but not soft. Drain well, keep aside for few minutes to  dry. Put them in the serving bowl.

2. Add sugar, cumin powder, lemon juice, olive oil and red wine vinegar to the carrots and mix them well. Next add cilantro and season with salt and pepper as per taste. Serve warm and enjoy!

The post Moroccan Carrot Salad appeared first on Food Delight.

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A new article on Fooddelight.in has been published.

Indian household is known for its culture and food. India being a diverse country has lots of variety in food which includes masalas, chutneys, tempering, preserving, pickling, etc and the common ingredient for all the above mentioned list is Spices. Truly said “Variety is the spice of life”. And that makes Indian cuisine distinct from others as they enhance flavor and color of the dishes. Spices are dried parts of plant/herb namely buds, barks, roots, seeds and berries. So here are few essential spices in an Indian kitchen….

Spices are different from herbs as herbs are fresh flowers, leaves, stems of plants used for flavoring and garnishing. About 75% of world’s production of spices is done by India. In fact Ministry of Commerce and Industry even has a organisation devoted to spices of India, named as Spices Board India.

Spices are an integral part of Indian cooking, so let’s go to the spice land in an  Indian Kitchen.

Turmeric: It is an ancient spice, originated in Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia. It is a flowering plant and has non woody stem above the ground. Turmeric has modified stems that send roots and shoots from the nodes. It has various names as Haldi in Hindi, Pasupu in Telugu, Haluda in Bengali, Arisina in Kannada.

Picture credit: www.freepik.com

Dried turmeric powder is mainly used as one of the ingredients for tempering in dishes. Turmeric Powder has warm, bitter, earthy flavor and has golden yellow color. It is used mostly in dishes to give color. Lot of people make turmeric curry, sweet turmeric rice, pickles, etc.

  • Turmeric also helps in treating common cold, cough, indigestion, skin sores, etc.

Dry Mango Powder: As the name says, unripe mangoes are cut in thin slices and then sun dried. These sun dried slices turn brown which look like thin woody slices and are then grounded. It is produced in India. This spice is fruity and is added to give tangy flavor in the dishes.

Picture credit: www.shutterstock.com

In Hindi it is called as Amchur, Ambya Pudi in Konkani, Mavinakai Pudi in Kannada, Mangai Thool in Tamil, etc. Amchur has many health benefits and is of medicinal value.

  • It is high in Vitamin A, E, C and antioxidants.
  • It helps in dig detoxification of skin and hair

Red Chilli Powder: This spice is dried, ground fruit or Red Chilli Pepper. It is traditionally made by sun drying red chillies and then grinding them. It has sharp, spicy and strong flavor. It is a very common spice in Indian cooking. Not only in Indian, but it is also used commonly in Chinese, Thai, Korean, Mexican, American and Portuguese cuisines too.

Picture credit: www.freepik.com

It is also called Lal Mirch Powder in Hindi, Lal Mirchya in Marathi, Mulakupodi in Tamil, Erra Mirapa Kayalu in Telugu and Lal Marchu in Gujarati. This spice is commonly used in marinating vegetables, cottage cheese, meats, etc. In Indian cuisine it is added to make the dishes spicer as it adds spicy touch to tomato based curries.

Coriander Seeds: This particulate spice is the dried seed of Cilantro/Coriander crop. Seeds when crushed give lemony, citrus, nutty and warm flavor. These seeds then ground are used as a spice for tempering in many dishes. When roasted, the seeds’ flavor, aroma and pungency increases.

Picture credit: www.freepick.com

In Hindi it is called as Dhania, Dhanay in Marathi, Dhana in Gujarati, Dhaniyalu in Telugu, Kothamalliverai in Tamil and Kothamalli in Malayalam. Coriander seeds are the main ingredients of 2 major South Indian dishes Sambhar and Rasam. In many countries coriander seeds are used in pickling vegetables, soups, broths, etc.

  • Coriander stimulates appetite and helps lower blood sugar.
  • It also has anti inflammatory properties which helps in the treatment of arthritis.

Cardamom: This spice is native India, Pakistan, Nepal and Bhutan. Guatemala is the biggest exporter and producer of Cardamom followed by India. It is world’s 3rd most expensive spice by weigh, outstripped in market value only by Saffron and Vanilla. This spice is from the ginger family.

Picture credit: www.shutterstock.com

The other names for cardamom are Elaichi in Hindi, Veldoda in Marathi, Elakkai in Tamil, Elam in Malayalam, Elaychi in Gujarati and Yallakullu in Telugu. It is of 2 types green and black. Green cardamom has strong, unique taste with intensely aromatic, pine or sap like flavor where as Black cardamom has smokey, though not bitter with aroma and coolness similar to mint like flavor.

Cardamoms are very common in an Indian kitchen. Green cardamom is generally used in traditional Indian seeds, teas, etc. Black cardamom is mainly used in masalas and often used as garnish in Basmati rice. Internationally it is used in Finnish breads, baking, etc.

  • Cardamoms help in digestion, detoxification, treating cold and flu, blood pressure, cancer, etc.

Cloves: Cloves are native to Maluku Islands in Indonesia. India, Indonesia, Bangladesh. Madagascar, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Tanzania mainly harvest cloves. They have warm, sweet, pungent with bitter astringent flavour. Cloves can be used as whole or ground. They pair well with cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla, citrus flavours and all spice.

Picture credit: www.freepik.com

Cloves are also called as Laung in Hindi, Kirampu in Tamil, Lavangalu in Telugu, Lavangagalu in Kannada, Grampu in Malayalam, Lavinga in Gujarati and Lavanga in Marathi. They are primarily used as a spice and flavour for soups, garam masala, sauces, rice dishes, etc. They are generally removed before serving.

  • They are widely used as a painkiller in dentistry.
  • Since cloves are warm they help in treating cold, flu, vomiting , stomach coldness and morning sickness.

Mustard Seeds: They are small, round seeds of Mustard plant. The colour varies from yellowish white to black. The yellowish mustard seeds are spicer whereas  black mustard seeds are pungent and spicer than the other varieties. The main producers of Mustard seeds are Canada, Hungary, Great Britain, india, United States and Pakistan.

Picture credit: www.shutterstock.com

Mustard is one of the main ingredients used in tempering South Indian and Maharashtrian dishes. Also it one of the main ingredients of Panchphoran (5 spice) primarily used in Bengali cuisine. Mustard seeds are called Sarson or Rai in Hindi, Mohit in Marathi, Rai in Gujarati, Kadugu in Tamil, Aavaalu in Telugu and Kaduku in Malayalam. They are used for pickling and flavouring meats.

  • Mustard seeds are rich in minerals like Potassium, Calcium, Magnesium and Phosphorus. Scientific researches have shown that they are helpful in treating psoriasis and inflammation.
  • They also help in digestion, reliving cold, aches and pains, respiratory disorders.

Hope you all enjoyed reading about few common spices used in an Indian kitchen. But wait! We have more to know in coming articles.  As it is rightly said “Picture abhi baaki hai mere dost!” Till then enjoy the first trip to spice land. Ciao!!!

The post Essential Spices in an Indian Kitchen appeared first on Food Delight.

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Food Delight by Ekta Agarwal - 5M ago

A new article on Fooddelight.in has been published.

Indian household is known for its culture and food. India being a diverse country has lots of variety in food which includes masalas, chutneys, tempering, preserving, pickling, etc and the common ingredient for all the above mentioned list is Spices. Truly said “Variety is the spice of life”. And that makes Indian cuisine distinct from others as they enhance flavor and color of the dishes. Spices are dried parts of plant/herb namely buds, barks, roots, seeds and berries.

Spices are different from herbs as herbs are fresh flowers, leaves, stems of plants used for flavoring and garnishing. About 75% of world’s production of spices is done by India. In fact Ministry of Commerce and Industry even has a organisation devoted to spices of India, named as Spices Board India.

Spices are an integral part of Indian cooking, so let’s take a journey to the spice land in Indian Kitchen.

Turmeric: It is an ancient spice, originated in Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia. It is a flowering plant and has non woody stem above the ground. Turmeric has modified stems that send roots and shoots from the nodes. It has various names as Haldi in Hindi, Pasupu in Telugu, Haluda in Bengali, Arisina in Kannada.

Picture credit: www.freepik.com

Dried turmeric powder is mainly used as one of the ingredients for tempering in dishes. Turmeric Powder has warm, bitter, earthy flavor and has golden yellow color. It is used mostly in dishes to give color. Lot of people make turmeric curry, sweet turmeric rice, pickles, etc.

  • Turmeric also helps in treating common cold, cough, indigestion, skin sores, etc.

Dry Mango Powder: As the name says, unripe mangoes are cut in thin slices and then sun dried. These sun dried slices turn brown which look like thin woody slices and are then grounded. It is produced in India. This spice is fruity and is added to give tangy flavor in the dishes.

Picture credit: www.shutterstock.com

In Hindi it is called as Amchur, Ambya Pudi in Konkani, Mavinakai Pudi in Kannada, Mangai Thool in Tamil, etc. Amchur has many health benefits and is of medicinal value.

  • It is high in Vitamin A, E, C and antioxidants.
  • It helps in dig detoxification of skin and hair

Red Chilli Powder: This spice is dried, ground fruit or Red Chilli Pepper. It is traditionally made by sun drying red chillies and then grinding them. It has sharp, spicy and strong flavor. It is a very common spice in Indian cooking. Not only in Indian, but it is also used commonly in Chinese, Thai, Korean, Mexican, American and Portuguese cuisines too.

Picture credit: www.freepik.com

It is also called Lal Mirch Powder in Hindi, Lal Mirchya in Marathi, Mulakupodi in Tamil, Erra Mirapa Kayalu in Telugu and Lal Marchu in Gujarati. This spice is commonly used in marinating vegetables, cottage cheese, meats, etc. In Indian cuisine it is added to make the dishes spicer as it adds spicy touch to tomato based curries.

Coriander Seeds: This particulate spice is the dried seed of Cilantro/Coriander crop. Seeds when crushed give lemony, citrus, nutty and warm flavor. These seeds then ground are used as a spice for tempering in many dishes. When roasted, the seeds’ flavor, aroma and pungency increases.

Picture credit: www.freepick.com

In Hindi it is called as Dhania, Dhanay in Marathi, Dhana in Gujarati, Dhaniyalu in Telugu, Kothamalliverai in Tamil and Kothamalli in Malayalam. Coriander seeds are the main ingredients of 2 major South Indian dishes Sambhar and Rasam. In many countries coriander seeds are used in pickling vegetables, soups, broths, etc.

  • Coriander stimulates appetite and helps lower blood sugar.
  • It also has anti inflammatory properties which helps in the treatment of arthritis.

Cardamom: This spice is native India, Pakistan, Nepal and Bhutan. Guatemala is the biggest exporter and producer of Cardamom followed by India. It is world’s 3rd most expensive spice by weigh, outstripped in market value only by Saffron and Vanilla. This spice is from the ginger family.

Picture credit: www.shutterstock.com

The other names for cardamom are Elaichi in Hindi, Veldoda in Marathi, Elakkai in Tamil, Elam in Malayalam, Elaychi in Gujarati and Yallakullu in Telugu. It is of 2 types green and black. Green cardamom has strong, unique taste with intensely aromatic, pine or sap like flavor where as Black cardamom has smokey, though not bitter with aroma and coolness similar to mint like flavor.

Cardamoms are very common in an Indian kitchen. Green cardamom is generally used in traditional Indian seeds, teas, etc. Black cardamom is mainly used in masalas and often used as garnish in Basmati rice. Internationally it is used in Finnish breads, baking, etc.

  • Cardamoms help in digestion, detoxification, treating cold and flu, blood pressure, cancer, etc.

Cloves: Cloves are native to Maluku Islands in Indonesia. India, Indonesia, Bangladesh. Madagascar, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Tanzania mainly harvest cloves. They have warm, sweet, pungent with bitter astringent flavour. Cloves can be used as whole or ground. They pair well with cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla, citrus flavours and all spice.

Picture credit: www.freepik.com

Cloves are also called as Laung in Hindi, Kirampu in Tamil, Lavangalu in Telugu, Lavangagalu in Kannada, Grampu in Malayalam, Lavinga in Gujarati and Lavanga in Marathi. They are primarily used as a spice and flavour for soups, garam masala, sauces, rice dishes, etc. They are generally removed before serving.

  • They are widely used as a painkiller in dentistry.
  • Since cloves are warm they help in treating cold, flu, vomiting , stomach coldness and morning sickness.

Mustard Seeds: They are small, round seeds of Mustard plant. The colour varies from yellowish white to black. The yellowish mustard seeds are spicer whereas  black mustard seeds are pungent and spicer than the other varieties. The main producers of Mustard seeds are Canada, Hungary, Great Britain, india, United States and Pakistan.

Picture credit: www.shutterstock.com

Mustard is one of the main ingredients used in tempering South Indian and Maharashtrian dishes. Also it one of the main ingredients of Panchphoran (5 spice) primarily used in Bengali cuisine. Mustard seeds are called Sarson or Rai in Hindi, Mohit in Marathi, Rai in Gujarati, Kadugu in Tamil, Aavaalu in Telugu and Kaduku in Malayalam. They are used for pickling and flavouring meats.

  • Mustard seeds are rich in minerals like Potassium, Calcium, Magnesium and Phosphorus. Scientific researches have shown that they are helpful in treating psoriasis and inflammation.
  • They also help in digestion, reliving cold, aches and pains, respiratory disorders.

Hope you all enjoyed reading about few common spices used in an Indian kitchen. But wait! We have more to know in coming articles.  As it is rightly said “Picture abhi baaki hai mere dost!” Till then enjoy the first trip to spice land. Ciao!!!

The post Variety is the Spice of life appeared first on Food Delight.

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A new article on Fooddelight.in has been published.

Hyderabad popularly known as “City of Pearls” and “City of Nizams”, was historically a pearl and diamond trading center, thereby Hyderabadi Cuisine has Iranian, Persian, Turkish, Arabic and Marathwada influence. So, the city has many vintage eating joints which have been there for more than 4 decades and are still going strong. Listed below are few of them.

Hameedi Confectioners

This 110 year old sweet shop is famous for the Turkish sweet Jauzi Halwa. It was started by Mohd. Hussain who migrated from Turkey with his family. One day Nizam Mir Osman Ali Khan was passing through the market where his shop was located, to honor him all shops closed except his. This gained Nizam’s attention and he eventually tasted Jauzi Halwa prepared by Mohd. Hussain. He loved the halwa so much that he became official supplier of Jauzi Halwa to Nizam’s kitchen. After few years Nizam’s son got married to Sultan Hameed (then the King of Turkey). To honor Sultan Hameed , Nizam asked Mohd. Hussain to name his shop after Sultan Hameed.

Celebrities like Dilip Kumar, cricketer Mohd. Azharuddin, Tabu, Kashif and many more visit this place for its specialty. According to Mohd. Anees – Ul – Hussain, grandson of Mohd. Hussain, the flavour and taste of Jauzi Halwa is same as it was century back because the recipe has been changed. They have in house production of milk, ghee and malai (cream) and therefore the halwa is soft and flavorful. Saffron used in halwa is sourced from Kashmir and Iran. Everyday at least 150-200 kgs of halwa is sold and around 200 -250 customers come daily to have this delicacy. Currently there are 2 outlets and they plan to open 2-3 more in the city in coming months.

Grand Hotel

This was the first Iranian restaurant established in Hyderabad in 1935. There were 12 partners when introduced during the reign of Nizam. In 1951, Late Mr. Ali Kashani from Iran joined as a partner. His grandson Mr. Jaleel F. Rooz is now the sole owner of this restaurant. Celebrated artist Late M.F. Hussain was a frequent visitor. Many politicians, beaurocrats, etc have been coming here regularly for its famous Biryani and Bun Maska.

Mr. Rooz says “ The reason why people still come to Grand Hotel is we still maintain the taste, flavor and ingredients of biryani. Recipes have been documented and haven’t been changed since my grandfather’s time. Even now we make our own masalas for the biryani. Currently we have chefs who used to assist bawarchis then”. The average footfall per day is about 1500-1800. This restaurant does not have any branches nor do they plan to expand as they want to retain the iconic and vintage building. So to have a mouth watering and flavorful Biryani you know where to go!

Subhan Bakery

The famous and mouth – watering Osmania Biscuits (named after 7th Nizam Mir Osman Ali Khan) were first baked in Subhan Bakery. Late Syed Khater started this bakery in 1948. Initially he used to bake only sandwich bread. In 1950, his son Late Syed Subhan (bakery is named after him) started baking Osmania biscuits, Chand biscuits and Khara Biscuits. Mr. Subhan had an institution that Osmania Biscuits will sell well.

Mr. Syed Rehan, great grand son of Syed Khater says “ The recipe is the same since 1950. The USP is that they are baked daily, are soft with sweet and salty flavor and just melt in your mouth. Hence, it is still the best bakery for Osmania Biscuits. The average footfall per day is about 100-1500 on weekdays and 1500 and above on weekends. Since they want to maintain the quality and taste they don’t have any branch and they don’t want to expand. But due to popular demand Subhan Bakery has started distributing their biscuits to mom and pop stores and retail chains.

Taj Mahal Hotel

This vintage restaurant famous for “Button Idli Vada” was established in 1950 by Mr. Sundar Rao, his brother Mr. Babu Rao and his friend Rao. Initially it started as a small eatery serving South Indian Cuisine. Mr. Adarsh Rao, grandson of Mr. Sundar Rao says “People wanted to dip Idly and Vadas in sambar completely, but due to the size of the idlis and vadas , it was difficult. My father Mr. B. Chandrashekhar Rao and his brother Mr. B. Aditya Rao invented bite sized idlis and vadas, so that they could be dipped completely in sambar and the famous “Button Idli Vada” was born.

Mrs. Indira Gandhi, when she was the Prime Minister used to visit this place when in Hyderabad. The other celebrities who visited were Late M.F. Hussain and other politicians. Currently director of Bahubali: Mr. S.S. Rajmouli, former cricketer VVS Laxman, Manchu Family , actor Pawan Kalyan to name a few visit this place frequently.

When asked how they maintain the flavor of the famous Button Idli Vada Mr. Adarsh Rao says “The recipe has been the same since 1950. They have documented the recipe in a customized software so there is no chance of changing the recipe. The new chefs who are hired, are not allowed to experiment with the recipe. We have chefs who are working with us from my grandfather’s time.” The main ingredient used in Button Idli Vada is the masalas used in Sambhar. Masala is made fresh in their kitchen daily for about 20 – 300 litres of Sambhar. They have 5 outlets currently soon they plan to open an outlet at Hyderabad Airport. The average footfall daily at their oldest branch is 2000-2500 and in other outlets is 5000 – 6000. If you have a taste of South Indian palate, do visit Taj Mahal Hotel.

Karachi Bakery

The famous Fruit Biscuits of Hyderabad was first introduced by Mr. Khanchand Ramnani, a Sindhi who migrated from Karachi, Pakistan in 1953. Thus, the name Karachi Bakery.Lot of celebrities have been coming here for Fruit Biscuits. Currently there are 4 partners Mr. Vijay Ramnani, Mr. Rajesh Ramnani, Mr. Harish Ramanani and Mr. Manoj Ramnani, they are the 3rd generation in the business.

Mr. Girish, Operations Manager says “ Recipe has not been changed, thus we still have the same flavor. Each cookie and biscuit is made by hand, so you will notice that no two cookies or biscuits have same shape”. Currently there are 20 outlets in Hyderabad, 5 outlets at Delhi airport. They also have outlets in Mumbai, Bengaluru and Noida. The average footfall daily across all the outlets is 10,000 – 15,000. So to taste yummy Fruit Biscuits, this is the place!

The post Vintage Eating Joints of Hyderabad appeared first on Food Delight.

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Mithai is the Hindi word for Indian sweets like Jalebi, Barfi, Laddoos. India is a vast and diverse country. There many cultures and religions. Hence Mithais are important part of the Indian Cuisine. There about various kinds of Rabris, Laddoos, etc. So here it is Ebook “Mithais Of India” launched.

Thrilled to share that my 2nd ebook as one of the editors for FBAI (Food Bloggers Association Of India) Team is launched today. Presenting Mithais of India” this Diwali. This ebook has 43 recipes of traditional sweets from all over India contributed by Food Bloggers, Food enthusiasts, Celebrity Chefs and Home Cooks.

Book is launched at the time of Diwali, as no festival is complete without Mithais. Hence we the team at FBAI decided to launch our ebook.

COVER IMAGE CREDITS TO CELEBRITY CHEF SABYASACHI GORAI, WHO ALSO SUBMITTED HIS RECIPE IN THE E-BOOK.

Mr. Sameer Malkani, founder of Food Bloggers Association Of India gave me this opportunity to work on this project. My amazing team consisting of Sonal Solanki, Arpit Awasthi and Rachna Prasad who are foodies and food bloggers were the back bone of this project.

So let’s celebrate Diwali with Mithais Of India

 

The post Ebook “Mithais of India” Launched appeared first on Food Delight.

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A new article on Fooddelight.in has been published.

Hyderabad is famous for Charminar and is called “City of Pearls”. The city is equally famous for its cuisine which comes from the kitchen of the royal family of Nizams. One of the viceroys of Mughal dynasty was governing the Deccan Region, once the Mughal dynasty weakened Asaf Jah became independent and gave himself the title of “Nizam”. Hence the Nizami cuisine has Mughlai, Turkish, Arabic and Persian influences. Hyderabadi cuisine has so much to offer beyond Biryani, Mirchi ka Salan, Baghara Baingan. Nawab Mehboob Alam Khan, a renowned Food Historian and Culinary Expert says “ Cooking of Rice and meat, we owe it to the Central Asians. Hyderabad cuisine is of 4 types Banquet Food (Biryani, kebabs, etc), Everyday Food, Festival Food and Travel Food. The main stay of Hyderabad food is lamb.” So lets’s go on the journey of delectable delicacies from the kitchen of Nizams:

Marag

   

Picture Credit: http://www.instagram.com/ansariskitchen/

Marag is a spicy mutton soup with pieces of lamb, spiced with pepper served as a starter with Sheermal (a variety of milk bread) in Hyderabad. In Hyderabadi Muslim Weddings , Marag is a must in the spread of food. Mutton chunks with the bone are boiled in a pressure cooker along with spices such as salt, ginger and black pepper. After couple of whistles, dry fruit paste (consisting of almonds, cashews and pistachios) roasted in ghee is added to the broth in the pressure cooker. The soup is then cooked for 45 minutes to 1 hour and served hot.

Hyderabadi Nahari

   

Picture Credit: http://www.instagram.com/ansariskitchen/

Nahar in Urdu means “Morning”, hence the delicacy got its name and is generally served early in the morning. Nahari is a rich soup made of tongue and trotters of the lamb slow cooked with variety of spices. The meat is pressure cooked along with turmeric powder, onions and ginger garlic paste till tender. Once done Nahari Potli Masala, which has about 20 masalas (coriander seeds, bayleaf, sandalwood powder, stone flowers, star anise, dried rose petals, roots of betel plant, black peppercorns, dried vetiver roots and many more) is knotted in a muslin cloth and immersed in the above meat masala, is cooked on low flame till roasted well. Next the gravy with meat is tempered with little fried sorghum flour (jowar atta), milk, ginger garlic paste, red chilli powder, salt, cilantro and green chillies. It is garnished with fried crushed onions and served hot. Think how flavorful it would be! Just imagine!!

Shikampur

   

Picture Credit: http://www.instagram.com/ansariskitchen/

Shikam in Urdu means “Belly”. Shikampur is a minced meat cooked in form of a flat patty with the stuffing of hung curd and other spices. Mutton meat and Split Pigeon Peas (Toor Dal) are boiled with spices like cilantro, green chillies, mint, red chilli powder, garlic paste and salt till tender. The meat masala when ready is blended well and made into flat patties. A hole in patty is made and is stuffed with hung curd, onions, chopped coriander and salt and red chilli powder. Once done, the kebab is deep fried and served with garlic chutney.

Mulla Do Pyaza

Picture Credit: Chicha’s

World renowned Food Historian and Culinary expert of Hyderabadi food,  Nawab Mehboob Alam Khan says “In the past, say about 50-60 years back, people had to travel to villages, they had their lands and transportation was not up to the mark. Hotels didn’t exist, roadside eateries were not there. They were dependent on the food they used to carry along. The food must have shelf-life and should not get spoiled. The evolution of Travel Food took place in Hyderabad. The main approach is we used to cook without water. There are certain things which were avoided like water and citrus (Lime) because it causes fermentation.” This delicacy is mutton meat fried in ghee, tempered with salt, ginger garlic paste, red chillies and saffron. This fried meat is served with Roghan Roti. This roti is a special kind of roti as the dough kneaded ghee, milk, salt and sugar. A little fat than paratha and no longer than the size of palm. Roghan Roti is topped with fried meat and is garnished with small pieces of cottage cheese, coriander leaves, and lemon juice (optional) and chopped green scallions. Imagine how this dish would melt in the mouth!!!

Khichra

   

Photo Credit: http://www.instagram.com/ansariskitchen/

Khichra is similar to Haleem, yet different. Haleem is made with wheat, barley, mutton meat, lentils and spices. Whereas Khichra is made with mutton meat, lentils and spices alone. In a vessel mutton with ghee, bone marrow, salt, garam masala and red chilli powder is cooked overnight. There are five lentils which are cooked separately till soft and split. Once, the dals are done, they are added to the mutton meat which is being cooked. The pulses and mutton meat is then pounded and roasted with ghee together, till it turns into thick paste. Khichra is served hot with ghee on top.

I hope you all enjoyed reading about Hyderabadi Deccani dishes and would love to try them. So visit Hyderabad and indulge in the delicacies!!!

P.S. This article has been written by me with the inputs from Mr. Qutub Alam Khan, owner of Chicha’s Restaurant, Hyderabad and the book Hyderabadi Khasa written by Begum Parveen Khan. To know more about Hyderabadi Deccani Cuisine view the talk by renowned Food Historian and Culinary expert Mehboob Alam Khan.

The post Delicacies from the Kitchen of Nizams appeared first on Food Delight.

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