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The 2020 Chevrolet Corvette was launched on Thursday night and has already set the world of sports cars ablaze. It's got a very interesting set of specifications that aims it squarely at Porsche's iconic 911 for about the price of Porsche's 718. It's unlikely that the interior or driving dynamics will be quite as refined as the Teutonic champion, but with 495 horsepower, an engine mounted in the middle of the car, an 8-speed dual-clutch, and a zero-to-sixty time in under 3 seconds, and a price tag starting under $60,000 will you really care?

In comparison to the 992 base Carrera specifications, the Corvette is up 125 horsepower, runs to 60 in 1.5 seconds quicker, and costs at least $31,000 less. That's an intense difference.

Chevrolet has had the Carrera in its sights since the 1960s, and the pair have been fighting it out on the street, and on the race track every since. While the Corvette has frequently had the upper hand on power and acceleration, the 911 has traditionally had a higher quality feel to the interior and a more engaging driving experience. In that way, the 911 has punched above its weight for quite a while. As the Corvette reached the upper limits of what was possible with an engine mounted ahead of the driver compartment, the engineers in Bowling Green decided to move the engine to keep up.

Both models have lots of history, tons of provenance, and an ability to lay down some serious lap times. Is this new Corvette enough to draw you away from the Porsche faithful? Weigh in below in the comments section with your choice and reasoning.

The post Will The New Mid-Engine Corvette Tempt You Away From Porsche? appeared first on FLATSIXES.

          
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Though the Widowmaker strikes fear into the hearts of many, this footage suggests it's not necessarily as fearsome as its reputation suggests. While it wouldn't be fair to call it a pussycat, this example looks approachable by a talented shoe. Granted, the car here is heavily modified and the man in the seat is one of the best instructors at the Nurburgring, but it shows that the classic 911 Turbo can be tamed with a delicate touch.

It looks slightly pushy at turn-in, but the car is planted and settled under throttle. It even leaps out of corners with a hint of oversteer here and there (4:29). Predictable enough, but its high-speed manners are what are the most surprising. It looks friendly—almost tame, and though the steering writhes around in Andreas Gülden's hands, it looks like the most laborious part of driving the car is rowing that shifter!

Onboard Nordschleife | Porsche Turbo 1976 - YouTube

Such a confidence-inspiring car is a huge asset during the 24 Hour Classic, where serious speed differentials separate the pros in faster cars from the hordes of playful amateurs in mildly modded E30s. As a result, quick decisions must be made frequently.

Gülden's negotiation of traffic is even more impressive than his stylish and understated driving. Huge traffic jams decorate the 16.12-mile course (7:34), and he can quickly switch his pace from banzai to drive-through lane at the drop of a hat. He can also pounce at the precise moment without compromising either's safety (11:12). He's the real deal alright.

He keeps his professional cool until he's cramped by a Golf at higher speeds (9:01). His gesticulation is justified; the oblivious driver ahead needs to provide the faster cars a way through—especially in the fastest sections of the track. Like a seasoned pro, he proceeds unfazed until his podium hopes are dashed with mechanical failure of some sort (12:32). To suffer something like that to happen in one of the Nordschleife's most intimidating corners and not panic deserves some sort of prize, though.

Not the hand gesture I would've picked, but it show remarkable composure in dangerous situations.

The post Ride Along For A Frantic Lap Around the ‘Ring in a 1976 Porsche Turbo appeared first on FLATSIXES.

          
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FLATSIXES.com by Jerry King - 5d ago

As long as everyone's happy.

The post Porsche Cartoon appeared first on FLATSIXES.

          
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We are about 2 months away from the official launch of Porsche's first all electric street car, the Taycan. In the lead up to the car's official public unveiling, Porsche trotted one out to Brooklyn, New York to give potential consumers and EV heads a look at the thing. Porsche has already signed Neel Jani to drive the company's Formula E racer in the 2019/20 season, and he was on hand to give the Taycan a proper flogging.

Jani on the drive: "Like our Formula E car, it has a Porsche drivetrain that is designed for performance and reliability. No matter whether it is a racing car or a series-production model, it is extremely important to drive many miles in the test phase and to gain experience with the vehicle.”

This is the Taycan's final appearance as a "prototype" following similar events in China and Great Britain.

The Taycan prototype makes a guest appearance at the Formula-E Finale in New York. - YouTube

The post The 2020 Porsche Taycan Makes An Appearance At The Formula E Finale In New York City appeared first on FLATSIXES.

          
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We've been compiling some amazing Porsche models on the internet for over five years now, and we've seen some pretty astonishing examples pop up now and again. This week we're feeling a bit down in the doldrums with all the greyscale paint jobs in Porsche dealers today. For that reason, we're looking for brightly colored cars to lift our spirits! Hopefully you've enjoyed our "curated" look at the Porsche market. Keep in mind, some of these Porsches could be great collection investments, while others might prove to do more financial harm than good.

INTERESTED IN HAVING YOUR PORSCHE FEATURED HERE?

Every other week, we feature 5 of our favorite Porsches for sale. That post is sent out to our mailing list of more than 17,000 Porsche owners and fans and is seen by tens of thousands of other readers who visit our site directly. If you're selling a Porsche on eBay and would like to see it featured here, just shoot us an email with the details and we'll be back in touch. Otherwise, feel free to check out all the other eBay listings we have on our Porsches for sale pages.

1. Speed Yellow 2007 Porsche 911 GT3 For Sale

Speed Yellow isn't exactly an uncommon Porsche color, but it just looks so good on the flanks of this 997 GT3 that I had to include it in this week's theme. It's bright and sunshiney, and if that Mezger-based engine doesn't put a smile on your face, you just might be dead. These are exploding in value right now, so you might be able to ride the wave upward. Then again, maybe the bubble will burst. What do we know? I do know that it looks spectacular with black wheels and Speed Yellow paint. Get it.

For more pictures, pricing, and information, check out the full listing on eBay

2. Saturn Yellow 1973 Porsche 914 2.0L For Sale

Saturn Yellow is a pretty rare and exotic color when it comes to 914s, and this minty clean 2-liter seems like it would be a great buy for someone out there. 914s handle better than their 1970s VW-sourced parts should give them any right to, but they are lightweight and well balanced and sure footed. This would make a great first Porsche or fiftieth. Grab it before it explodes even further in value. Just make sure you can handle the less-than-sonorous Type 4 exhaust note. And maybe replace

For more pictures, pricing, and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

3. Pastel Orange 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS For Sale

Okay, if you're going to go for a bold Porsche, you may as well get it in a bold color. Pastel Orange is a very nice shade, and it looks especially good in stark contrast to the GT2 RS' black and carbon accents. There isn't much that hasn't already been said about the GT2 RS, so I guess you just have to know that this car has 129 miles on the odometer. Go get it!

For more pictures, pricing, and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

4. Viper Green 1978 Porsche 911 Carrera RS Recreation Backdate For Sale

If you can't pick up a 2.7 RS on its face, you may as well settle for the next best thing. This is a 1978 911 that has been backdated with proper metal fenders, fiberglass hood, ducktail, and bumpers, so it probably weighs quite a bit less than the car it's based upon. And the 3-liter under the ducktail makes a good bit more power than the 2.7 liter in an OG RS. In a way, this is better than the original, and several orders of magnitude less expensive. Settle for this one.

For more pictures, pricing, and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

5. Pastel Yellow 1997 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet For Sale

It's still the middle of summer, and there is plenty of time to get in on the top-down driving in a bright and shiny sports car. This bright yellow 993 Cab is an eye catcher. Even more eye catching is the bright blue leather interior. It's a weird combination, but I kind of really like it. It's a nice low-mile example, and appears to be in quite good shape, so maybe it's worth the near-$60k buy it now price. What do you think?

For more pictures, pricing, and information, check out the full listing on eBay.

The post Our Favorite Porsches For Sale This Week: Volume 140 appeared first on FLATSIXES.

          
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The folks over at RM Sotheby's are preparing to sell an incredibly significant piece of Porsche history. Namely, the Porsche Type 64 race car that was the very first car to wear the Porsche name. In the video below, put out by the auction house this afternoon, you can see the Type 64 in action, driving around Willow Springs race track in California, driven by none other than Porsche's two biggest fanatics, Jeff Zwart and Patrick Long. They discuss the car's significance and what it means to them. It's a short and sweet video that is worth watching. I've seen the Type 64, but watching it zoom around a race track is next level cool.

The Porsche Type 64 will be offered during the Saturday evening session of RM Sotheby’s 2019 Monterey auction. It will be one of the more than 180 auction lots sold therein. To see more information about the car, as well as more auction-ready photographs, click here.

The Type 64 was originally built for the Berlin to Rome race, but World War II broke out just a month after the car's completion. The first of three cars planned, this one was appropriated by Dr. Bodo Lafferentz, the head of the German Labour Front, who promptly damaged it in a heavy crash. The second car was commandeered by a few U.S. Army soldiers, who cut the roof off the car and rallied it around until the engine blew up, then they scrapped it. The crashed car was ultimately returned to Porsche where it was rebodied with the sheetmetal planned to be used for car #3. That third car was never built, and this is the only car of its kind remaining.

Monterey 2019: Porsche Type 64 – An Origin Story - YouTube

The post Now Is Your Chance To Bid On The First Porsche Race Car appeared first on FLATSIXES.

          
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Yes, removing the Mezger is that daunting.

The one chink in the Mezger's armor is its flimsy coolant pipes. For such a bulletproof motor, it seems strange that Porsche just glued the coolant pipes on. Though press-fitted, these coolant lines are known to pop off under high RPM load. Hoovie's lousy luck meant his first trip to Heartland Motorsports Park was interrupted by his own lines popping off. Fortunately, this did not prompt a spin down the front straight, nor did it cook the motor. It was embarrassing though, and as it turned out, quite pricey to mend.

Fixing My Dead 911 Turbo Requires Removing the Engine-- But It Could Be Worse - YouTube

The Mezger motors that see the track will sustain higher temperatures and loads which are prone to make these lines disengage from the coolant console, and ensuring they stay in place during hard cornering and high revs requires a costly fix. While the cheaper band-aid fix would only set him back a few hundred dollars, the sensible approach costs ten times that. After dropping the engine, the hoses need to be pinned or welded in place, and the especially prudent drivers will replace the problematic OEM plastic elbows with stainless steel units.

The process of removing the engine is more labor intensive than dropping an M96. Turbos, intercoolers, head shields, and all the other forced induction ancillaries take a bit more time and effort. The starter and turbo inlets need to come out too, since they won't clear the CV axles. With a few minor wiring hurdles cleared, the Mezger can be freed from its cramped confines. However, the process takes Hoovie and Wizard nearly two whole days to complete—which is why he was quoted nearly three large.

Here's Why It Costs $3000 to Fix My Porsche 911 Turbo's Coolant Pipe - YouTube

If there's one piece of uplifting news here, it's that BBi Autosport decided to help by offering to fix the busted water pipe situation. BBi, as well as a host of other Porsche-centric shops, can weld the coolant pipes in place for what should be a permanent fix. If you have any Mezger-powered Porsche, be it a Turbo or a GT3, you can preemptively have this work done, so it doesn't come apart and leave you stranded without coolant. If you can remove your motor to get the "coolant console" out, as Mr. Hoover has, it'll help save you a ton of labor.

Now you know. Let his misfortune save you a ton of time and money!

The post What It’s Like When A 996 Turbo Goes Under the Knife for New Coolant Pipes appeared first on FLATSIXES.

          
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Understated but sporting a very special.

The elusive TAG V6-powered 930 has become stuff of legend—more myth than reality. Hearsay about a small batch of these development mules have circled around the internet, with only a few grainy photos as evidence to their existence. For fans of Porsche and F1, this wedding of greats is something truly special to finally see in action—like spotting an elusive white whale.

Fans of '80s Formula 1 will no doubt recognize the trademark throaty burble of the TAG TT1 P01. The 80-degree, 1.5-liter V6, force-fed by two KKK turbochargers and soaring to 12,600 rpm, made as much as 1,100 horsepower in qualifying trim. While not the most powerful as the contemporary Honda, Renault, and BMW engines, the Porsche-TAG engine was one of the most successful.

F1-engined Porsche 930 TAG debuts at FOS - YouTube

In an era dogged by unreliability, this motor was one of the more robust. Rather than peak power, Porsche chased reliability and a seamless chassis-engine integration. This foresight resulted in this motor three drivers’ championships, two constructors’ championships, and an astounding 25 wins from its 68 races.

Though justifiably conservative with the 930, it's still extremely quick down the front straight.

It was also extremely light at just 320 pounds without turbos, intercoolers, or exhaust. When thrown in the rear of the 930, it brought the total to 2,425 pounds. This car was used as a development mule to get the most out of the motor at the time, though this example was detuned slightly. Rather than running full boost and revs, they dropped both for a total of 510 horsepower at 9,000 rpm. Remember, these motors — sometimes referred to as "grenades" — were boosted at 50+ psi in race trim, so some changes were needed for reliability's sake.

F1-powered, road-legal Porsche 930 TAG Turbo by Lanzante: 1.5-litre V6 Turbo Sound! - YouTube

Lanzante will be building 11 of these at the price of $1.45 million a pop. Even with the restrained run and poor camera work, it still looks like it's worth every dollar. Time to start searching through the couch for any misplaced coins.

The post This Is What An F1-Powered 1986 Porsche 930 Sounds Like appeared first on FLATSIXES.

          
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Though not quite shaped like a Coca-Cola bottle, this 962 has the right curvature and color to get anyone's attention.

Devotees of IMSA GTP: get your checkbooks open. Bruce Canepa has recently announced the sale of a classic 962—one which helped pave the way for the model in mid-eighties American road racing.

As the second 962 sold to privateers, 962-102 brings plenty of history along with it. Formerly raced by Bob Akin and Hans Stuck Jr., in their hands this two beauty to pole position and track record at the 1985 12 Hours of Sebring, as well as an admirable 4th overall at the 1985 24 Hours of Daytona.

After its racing career finished in 1985, Roger Penske toured it as a show car. However, for Penske's purposes, he wrapped it in Miller livery, replacing one beverage sponsor for another. When Penske's focus shifted to IndyCar, 962-102 sat under a tarp in a climate-controlled garage until 2005, when its formal restoration began.

With its greatest finish coming at the 1985 24 Hours of Daytona, the car cemented itself as an iconic member of IMSA GTP.

Between Jim Torres, Gunnar Racing, and its most recent owner, the Coca-Cola liveried car has been a centerpiece at Rennsport Reunion over the last decade. In recent years, it's benefited from the fastidious care of the skilled folks at Canepa.

Maintained regularly and supported by Canepa during vintage racing for more than half a decade, this Porsche 962 is an excellent addition to any motorsport collection. Driven by motorsport champions, recognized worldwide and restored to drive and impress, this 1984 Porsche 962-102 represents a special time for Porsche in their motorsport history.

RACING HISTORY

1984

May 20th - 500KM Charlotte - 44th
May 28th - 1 Hour Lime Rock - 12th
July 8th - 6 Hour Watkins Glen - 15th
July 29th - 3 Hour Portland - 11th
August 26th - 500 mile Road America - 6th
September 9th - 500KM Pocono - 6th
September 16th - 500KM Michigan - 30th
September 30th - 500KM Watkins Glen - 18th
November 25th - 3 Hour Daytona Finale - 51st

1985

February 3rd - 24 Hours of Daytona - 4th
February 24th - 3 Hour Miami - 18th
March 23rd - 12 Hour Sebring - 53rd
April 14th - 500KM Road Atlanta - 17th
April 28th - 600KM Riverside - 4th
May 19th - 500KM Charlotte

A striking shade of red and a seat once occupied by champions makes this 962 special.

The post Enjoy: Canepa Puts Coke-Liveried IMSA 962 up for Sale appeared first on FLATSIXES.

          
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Porsche introduced the world to the mid-engine 911 back in 2017, and it has blown the world away with Porsche's sports car efforts since. It won Le Mans in 2018, it's netted more than a couple championships both in the IMSA series here in North America, as well as the FIA WEC international series. The switch to a mid-engine layout was made with aerodynamics in mind, allowing Porsche to engineer a larger and more effective rear diffuser for the car. Ahead of the start of the 2019/2020 FIA WEC season, which runs from September at Silverstone through next June at Le Mans, Porsche has launched a new 911 RSR to combat the updated and ever present threat of Ferrari, Aston Martin, and occasionally Corvette.

Here's a walk through of everything that Porsche changed from the 2017 RSR to the 2019 RSR.

Dimensions: 

The 2019 spec 911 RSR has gained about 4 pounds over the outgoing car, which is the base weight as per the regulations. Part of this is due to the car's increase in exterior dimensions. The 2019 911 RSR is 36mm longer at 4593mm total (less splitter, rear wing, and diffuser). All other dimensions remain the same as the outgoing car, except the rear track width has grown by 2mm, and the wheelbase has shrunk by 3mm. That's a small enough difference to barely warrant mention.

The biggest difference between the old car and the new one is the brand new 4.2-liter engine, which replaces the existing 4-liter. Total power is rated the same, as the RSR is forced to use a restrictor to keep outright power around 550 horses. The difference here is in the power delivery, as the new engine moves its powerband down the spectrum, allowing for a wider useable throttle map and earlier torque delivery.

The Front: 

2017 RSR

2019 RSR

At the front you will instantly notice a revised front cooling duct with larger and wider openings, plus a new front splitter. The front air relief ducts have also changed, moving further back on the cowl. The fuel filler is now out of the airflow and pushed to one side of the car.

The Rear: 

2017 RSR

2019 RSR

The new car retains much of the same styling at the rear, though the diffuser has been changed around a bit, and the rear bumper fascia extends further down than the existing car's does. The new tail lights look thinner and more 992-esque.

Side: 

From the side you can see the major bodywork changes of the 2019 RSR, including a new side exhaust exit on the side of the car just in front of the rear wheel, and the massive new engine air inlets behind the door. The new exhaust outlet will likely allow the diffuser to be even more effective, as the pipes won't be blocking the airflow.

Inside: 

2017 RSR

2019 RSR

Porsche worked extensively with its factory racers to develop a new cockpit that works better for their racing needs. New active and passive safety systems have been added to keep racers as safe as possible. The new steering wheel moves much of the car's control systems within a finger's reach, rather than over on the center console where the driver has to pull a hand off the wheel to adjust. A larger and easier to read screen sits in the middle of the wheel to keep the driver informed. And, of course, the center-mounted collision warning system gives drivers better warning of fast approaching LMP1 or DPi prototypes coming up from behind. Again, as before, the seat is rigidly mounted and the steering wheel/pedal assembly are adjustable toward the driver.

2019 Porsche 911 RSR GTE world debut at Goodwood Festival of Speed - YouTube

Comments on the new car:

“We never rest on our laurels. We’ve extensively analysed all factory and customer campaigns with the Porsche 911 RSR. Our engineers noticed room for improvement in a number of areas. We have made significant progress in the development of our car for the next three-year homologation period, especially in the complex areas of driveability, efficiency, durability and serviceability. Ninety-five percent of the car is new. The only components that we’ve kept unchanged from the predecessor are the headlights, brake system, clutch, driver’s seat and parts of the suspension. Tests so far have run excellently. We’re already looking forward to the first races of the 2019/2020 FIA WEC season.”

“We’ve been working on the concept of the new Porsche 911 RSR since 2017. The first designs were created using CAD software. In August 2018, the best racing nine-eleven to date completed its first kilometres on the factory’s own test track in Weissach. Another milestone was our long-run in March 2019 at Le Castellet, where we included the works teams from both the WEC and IMSA. We covered more than 6,000 kilometres over 30 hours without any technical hiccups. The drivers and engineers were very satisfied. The car received its racing homologation on 1st of July.” says Pascal Zurlinden, director of GT factory motorsport.

Technical data Porsche 911 RSR model year 2019:

Concept
• Single-seater race car for the FIA GTE category (USA: GTLM)

Weight/dimensions
• Base weight: ca. 1,245 kg
• Length: 4,593 mm (without splitter, rear wing, diffuser)
• Width: 2,042 mm (front axle) / 2,050 mm (rear axle)
• Wheelbase: 2,513 mm

Engine
• Water-cooled six-cylinder boxer, positions in front of the rear axle; capacity 4,194 cc, stroke 81.5 mm, bore 104.5 mm; ca. 378 kW (515 hp) depending of restrictor; 4-valve technology; direct fuel injection; dry sump lubrication; single mass flywheel; power output limitation via restrictor; electronic throttle; side-exit exhaust system.

Transmission
• Weight-optimised six-speed sequential constant-mesh gearbox; two-shaft longitudinal layout with bevel gear; shifting via electronic shift actuator; shift paddles on the steering wheel; magnesium gearbox casing; multi-disc self-locking differential with visco unit; three disc carbon race clutch.

Body
• Weight-optimised bodyshell in aluminium-steel composite design; removable roof hatch; FT3 fuel cell in front of the car; welded-in roll cage; seat pursuant to FIA 8862-2009; rigidly mounted to the chassis; six-point safety harness for use with HANS®; longitudinally adjustable pedalry; aerodynamically-optimised and quick-release body components made of CFRP; rear wing with “swan neck” mounts; four-post air jack system with safety pressure valve; electronically activated fire extinguisher system; heated windscreen.

Suspension
Front axle:
• Double wishbone front axle; four-way vibration damper; with coil spring setup; anti-roll bars, adjustable by blade position; electro-hydraulic power steering.

Rear axle:
• Integrated rear-axle subframe with double wishbone axle; four-way vibration damper; with coil spring setup; anti-roll bars, adjustable by blade positions; electro-hydraulic power steering; tripod drive shafts.

Brakes
• Two independent brake circuits for front and rear axle, adjustable via balance bar.

Front axle:
• One piece aluminium six-piston racing callipers with quick release coupling; internally ventilated steel brake discs, 390 mm diameter; race brake pads; optimised brake cooling ducts.

Rear axle:
• One piece aluminium four-piston racing callipers with quick release coupling; internally ventilated steel brake discs, 355 mm diameter; race brake pads; optimised brake cooling ducts.

Wheels / Tyres
Front axle:
• One piece forged light alloy wheels, 12.5Jx18 offset 25 with centre lock nut and wheel nuts; Michelin slick 30/68-18.

Rear axle:
• One piece forged light alloy wheels, 13Jx18 offset 37 with centre lock nut and wheel nuts; Michelin slick 31/71-18.

Electrics
• Cosworth Central Logger Unit; CFRP multi-functional steering wheel with integrated display; shift paddles and quick release; Collision Avoidance System; controlled alternator in connection with LiFePo4 battery; LED headlights; LED taillights plus rain light; illuminated car number and leader light system; black light inside cockpit; electric adjustable wing mirrors with memory function; tyre pressure monitoring system (TPMS); drink system; air conditioning system; membrane switch panel on centre console with fluorescent labelling.

The post Here’s Everything Porsche Changed About The New 911 RSR appeared first on FLATSIXES.

          

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