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A new analysis found resistance training to be effective.

Adding weights to a regular exercise routine has been shown to add muscle tone, decrease injury risk, and improve bone health. But its effects might also extend beyond the physical, as new evidence suggests that regular strength training may both ward off and fight symptoms of depression.

That evidence comes from a meta-analysis, published earlier this month in JAMA Psychiatry, that examined the results of 33 randomized, controlled studies on depression and strength training — referred to as resistance exercise training in the paper. The studies included both males and females of varying ages, more than 2,000 participants in total.When the results of the studies were aggregated, the researchers found that resistance training significantly reduced the incidence of depression. Regardless of whether participants had met a clinical cutoff for depression at the beginning of a study, the analysis showed, they were less likely to be depressed at the study’s conclusion if they had been assigned to a weight training group. The results were significant even when the researchers controlled for age, gender, or improvements in muscle mass — so even participants who saw few physical changes from strength training still tended to see improvements in mood.The study didn’t attempt to examine exactly how resistance training helps depression, says lead author Brett Gordon, a doctoral student at the University of Limerick, but he pointed to several psychological and physiological factors that could be responsible for the link.“Psychological mechanisms (could) include the expectancy of improved mental health following exercise, as well as social interaction and social support during exercise,” he says. He emphasized that more research was needed to confirm the exact mechanism.Some past studies have suggested that forms of aerobic exercise like running, swimming, or biking may be as effective as conventional therapies in alleviating depression. The current study didn’t measure the efficacy of resistance training against that of medication, but Gordon says head-to-head studies comparing it to antidepressants and other empirically validated treatments, like Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, are critical for a more complete understanding of its impact on depression. A 2017 analysis, conducted by the same group of researchers, found that weight training was also an effective treatment for anxiety, and the current review adds to a growing body of evidence that exercise — in a variety of forms — is beneficial to mental health, experts say.“This is a well-designed and conducted meta-analysis showing consistent evidence on the effects of resistance training on depressive symptoms,” says Felipe Barreto Schuch, who studies exercise and mental health at the Centro Universitário La Salle in Canoas, Brazil. Schuch, who was not involved in the study, points to a similar meta-analysis he led earlier this year, which concluded that various forms of physical activity were linked to decreased depression risk. “Therefore, both aerobic and anaerobic forms should be encouraged,” he says.Gordon and his co-authors note that many of the studies included in their meta-analysis failed to report in-depth details of the intensity, duration, and type of strength training used by participants. Future trials would ideally quantify these factors in order to get a better sense of what “dose” of exercise is most effective for treating depression, Gordon says.The World Health Organization (WHO) currently recommends that adults between the ages of 18 and 64 engage in 150 minutes of moderate-intensity or 75 minutes of high-intensity aerobic exercise each week. “At the moment, the best advice is to engage in any and all exercise types, and strive to achieve at least WHO physical activity guidelines,” Gordon says. For strength training, he suggests incorporating the American College of Sports Medicine’s guidelines, which for healthy adults includes working major muscle groups on two to three non-consecutive days each week.

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Female Bodybuilder Lisa Auckland Bodybuilding Pose - YouTube

Contest weight : ~150 lbs
Off season weight: 160-ish !
Height: 5’4”
Best lifts (in competition): Bench press 275 lbs; squat 400 lbs; deadlift 410 lbs

Current Residence: Maryland, USA

Education: Doctorate in Pharmacy, highest honors- University of Maryland; Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, Magna Cum Laude- Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University; Associate in Science Summa Cum Laude- Thomas Nelson College, Hampton, Virginia.

Occupation: Pharmacist, Certified Specialist in Poison Information.

Personality: fun-loving, energetic, multi-faceted, scholarly. Always challenging myself and others.

Favorite entertainment: Comedy in any form. I love to laugh !!

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Dominating yet another opponent in yet another final, the United States women’s soccer team claimed its fourth Women’s World Cup title on Sunday, beating the Netherlands, 2-0, in Lyon, France, to repeat as world champions.

Megan Rapinoe and Rose Lavelle scored second-half goals for the United States, which needed more than an hour to solve a tenacious Netherlands defense but eventually, rush after rush, found a way through. Rapinoe broke the dam with a penalty kick in the 61st minute, and Lavelle sealed the victory with a driving run up the center in the 69th.

“It’s surreal,” said Rapinoe, who was named the tournament’s outstanding player. “I don’t know how to feel. It’s ridiculous.”

It was the second straight World Cup title for a dozen of the American players, who claimed their first championship in Canada four years ago. It also cemented their status as the gold standard in women’s soccer, even as Europe — led by teams like the Netherlands — mounts a sustained assault on their crown.

The tears flowed freely after the win: from striker Alex Morgan, who tied for the tournament lead with six goals; from defender Kelley O’Hara, who was forced from the game at halftime after a scary head-to-head collision; and from the Dutch, who fought the Americans harder, and kept even with them longer, than any team at this World Cup.

Image
Coach Jill Ellis, center, led the team to a record fourth title.CreditFrancisco Seco/Associated Press

The Netherlands was the only team to keep the United States off the scoreboard in the first half in France but like all the other teams before them — Thailand, Chile, Sweden, Spain, France and England — they could not hold off the Americans forever.

“They put their heart and soul into this journey, and I can’t thank them enough,” United States Coach Jill Ellis, hoarse and on the verge of tears herself, said minutes after the game. Ellis became the first coach to win consecutive Women’s World Cup titles; her team has not lost a game in the event since 2011 (13-0-1), and will be favored to reclaim its Olympic championship next summer in Tokyo.

Plans were already underway, team officials said, for a parade and celebration of the team’s championship in New York sometime this week.

After the team received their winner’s medals from dignitaries that included FIFA’s president, Gianni Infantino, and France’s president, Emmanuel Macron, the World Cup trophy was raised into a cloud of gold and blue confetti by Carli Lloyd, the 36-year-old who starred in the 2015 triumph but was reduced to a bit player long before she entered Sunday’s final as a late substitute. Lloyd’s status showed her to be the latest example of a star nudged aside by progress, a victim of the seemingly endless stream of great American players who have driven the program forward for a generation, but her reduced role did nothing to diminish her joy — or that of her teammates, who were soon making snow angels in the fallen confetti as they lingered on the podium.

The Americans won the first World Cup in 1991 in China, then took the second in a transformational 1999 tournament on home soil. For decades, the team and its stars have been leaders in the fight to grow the women’s game, and to ensure more resources — and more money — flow to those to compete in it. The current team sued its own federation for gender discrimination earlier this year, part of a longrunning fight for pay equity from U.S. Soccer, but never blinked in its quest to win another world title only a few months later.

Those concurrent campaigns, perhaps more than anything, defined how the United States team in its current form has been a social force as much as a sporting one: that the pro-American crowd inside the Stade de Lyon on Sunday chanted “Equal Pay!” as the game ended was no accident. That the Americans were celebrating another championship at the time was not, either.

Rapinoe’s opening goal came after Morgan was kicked in the shoulder by Netherlands defender Stefanie van der Gragt in the penalty area, a rare loss of composure by the Dutch team. Rapinoe, Ellis’s preferred penalty taker, calmly stepped up and buried her attempt to the right of goalkeeper Sari van Veenendaal, who barely moved as the ball rippled the back of the net.

It was appropriate, somehow, that the goal was set up after a short break for a video-assistant review, the replay system that was a source of consternation throughout the tournament. The referee, Stephanie Frappart of France, had missed the initial foul that created the penalty; alerted by a review official, she took a second look on a sideline television and promptly whistled a foul, and a penalty kick. It was the 33rd video review of the tournament, and the 29th time the second look changed a decision on the field.

Stymied for an hour, the Americans — who had been among those who had pressed for the use of the system — were suddenly in front. When Lavelle’s charge up the middle, turning a backpedaling defender and firing a hard, low shot, provided an insurance goal minutes later, there was a sense — even with 20 minutes to play — that the Americans’ latest title was secure.

Van Veenedaal, who almost single-handedly kept the game scoreless in the first half with several diving, sprawling saves, was named the tournament’s outstanding goalkeeper. Rapinoe, whose World Cup included a brief social-media fight with President Trump after a video of her emerged saying that she would not visit the White House if her team claimed the trophy, won the Golden Boot as the top scorer as well as the Golden Ball as the tournament’s outstanding player.

Alex Morgan and Carli Lloyd held the World Cup Trophy.CreditRichard Heathcote/Getty Images
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Peering over a copy of Us Weekly, I assessed the germs floating around the infirmary’s waiting room. There wasn’t a safe seat in the house. I was in the trajectory of patient zero’s phlegmy cough, and perilously positioned next to the human snot factory’s incessant sniffs and sneezes. If I wasn’t ill already, I would be by the time I left—I just knew it.This particular visit was for a bump I found on the back of my neck. Convinced it was meningitis, I rushed to the doctor’s office only to learn it was my vertebrae, not a life-threatening illness. This was one in a series of panic-provoked, WebMD misdiagnoses.

Anxiety was an unwelcome tenant in my brain that, despite years of eviction notices, wouldn’t leave.

That’s because I suffered from anxiety. It was an unwelcome tenant in my brain that, despite years of eviction notices, wouldn’t leave. That’s also the case for millions of Americans. “About 20 percent of Americans meet the criteria for a generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) diagnosis,” says Kristin Taylor, PhD, a licensed clinical psychologist specializing in the treatment of anxiety disorders. This statistic does not represent other forms of anxiety disorder such as panic, OCD, social phobias, illness anxiety, and PTSD.

I realized that to manage my anxiety, I needed a set of tools. Anti-anxiety medication, while literally life-saving for some people, wasn’t where I wanted to begin. So I experimented with a three-pronged program for my body and mind. First, I practiced daily healthy habits like cardio, strength training, eating three meals a day, and getting eight hours of sleep each night. Secondly, I logged my progress. Lastly, I connected with a cognitive behavioral therapist who guided me through an extensive set of exercises to help with catastrophizing, positive self-talk, and exposure.

I realized that to manage my anxiety, I needed a set of tools.

This approach allowed me to start regaining ownership over my brain and body—and, in time, my workouts became my go-to guard against panic attacks. “Creating healthy habits is a great starting point for coping with GAD,” Dr. Taylor says. “Fitness doesn’t come with a lot of side effects or cost-related restrictions.” So why not try using your body to help your mind?

Here’s my fitness-driven, tension-taming trifecta—it might help you, too.
1. Take a breather

Worrying makes us woozy. Anxiety triggers shallow, rapid breathing, which causes hyperventilation and lightheadedness. “Exercises that have a breathing component like meditation are very helpful for anxiety reduction,” Dr. Taylor says.

Try this easy and effective breathing technique: Position your hands on your chest and stomach. Inhale deeply through the nose, filling your belly with fresh, soothing air. Hold for 1–2 counts, then exhale fully through the mouth. Expel negative thoughts out of your body with each exhale. Repeat 2–3 times each day.

Woman Running

2. Run wild

Running rescued me from anxiety. I’d always paid attention to my health, and logging miles affirmed that my body was healthy and strong. If I could endure strenuous exercise, I knew I was in good shape. Regular cardio exercise has similar effects on the brain as taking antidepressants. For best results, aim for 3–5 days of aerobics weekly. Have sore knees or another issue that makes running a bad fit? A scenic bike ride, hike, or long walk will work just as well.

3. Relax those muscles

I’m hyper-aware of the sensations my body experiences. Before I started my three-pronged approach, when something felt off, my mind would jump to the worst-case scenario. I’d get a harmless tension headache, for instance, and I’d be convinced that it was a brain tumor. Bizarre, I know.

So here’s how I learned to ease my mind by relaxing my muscles. Progressive muscle relaxation is a technique of systematically tensing and relaxing muscles, which research shows can help ease the physical symptoms of worry when practiced regularly.

Here’s how to do it: Get comfortable and slowly inhale and exhale, concentrating on the rhythm of your breaths. Begin from the top of your body and work your way down. Hold each muscle contraction for 10 seconds, focusing on the tension in each area your body, then slowly release. Elevate your eyebrows. Clamp your jaw. Squeeze your shoulders up to your ears. Tighten your stomach muscles. Clench your glutes. Curl your toes.

Since I started using these three tools, my life has improved considerably. I have more energy, I experience fewer anxiety attacks, and (this is big!) I’ve removed WebMD as my iPhone browser’s homepage. While I know that anxiety can always return, this stress-reducing system has transformed me from a worrier into a warrior.

Here’s how to network if you have anxiety (yes, it can be done). Plus, more about those calming weighted blankets people are talking about.

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Twenty-four-year-old Zhoei Teasley is not the woman she once was.

Three years ago, Zhoei began a transformation she didn’t expect would take her to the place she’s at now.

Three years ago, Zhoei began taking steps to reclaim a life she was rapidly losing.

Briefly, after finishing school in Tennessee, Zhoei moved out to California to work for a rocket company as a welder. Subsequently, Zhoei was sexually assaulted for a period of 8 months by some of her male coworkers, prompting her to take a leave of absence from work, and then eventually forcing her to leave altogether. Consequently, Zhoei lost her apartment and moved back in with her parents. But more significantly, Zhoei was left in a psychologically compromised state. That is, her “experience”, had resulted in severe PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder), depression, and chronic/acute stress.

“I ended up being highly medicated, which resulted in severe weight loss”, said Zhoei.

Zhoei was roughly 94lbs during this time, and was rapidly losing more weight as her psychological condition worsened.

“I was scared. I wouldn’t eat, sleep, change, or brush my teeth for months. I wouldn’t shower either. I would only shower with my mom in the bathroom. I was so scared of being naked, of feeling vulnerable”, said Zhoei.

But somehow, Zhoei managed to start getting herself to the gym.

She began lifting for “therapy”, and she began lifting heavy whenever she was angry, which Zhoei seemed to imply was often.

“Some days I would be at the gym for up to six hours”, said Zhoei.

However, Zhoei didn’t really envision her future in fitness until she saw a picture of American IFBB Pro Fitness/Figure Competitor and 2013 Olympia Champion, Dana Linn Bailey.

“When I saw her picture I said, “I want that body””, said Zhoei.

Zhoei began a supplement regimen and started focusing on getting the nutrition she needed.

Fast forward 3 years and I’d say she’s damn near her goal- Zhoei currently maintains a weight of approximately 150lbs, and it’s nearly all muscle.

But possibly more important, Zhoei now describes herself as “better”. While that might not mean she’s completely conquered all of her psychological obstacles, she’s arrived at a place where she no longer relies on medications or seeks psychiatric treatment.

“I fell in love with training, and it gave me the structure I needed. Lifting gave me my life back”, said Zhoei.

Though she admits depression is still her biggest obstacle, which is only heightened by the realities of prep life, it’s clear even just sitting across from her that she’s no longer plagued by an overwhelming feeling of fear. In fact, I’d even go so far as to say that Zhoei appears to be very sure of herself.

And that’s probably because Zhoei is no stranger to hard work. Having endured sexual assault and its aftermath as well as having been raised on a farm, where lifting, shoveling, hauling, etc. are daily activities, work, perseverance, and resilience are qualities Zhoei dons every day. It’s evidenced both in her physique and in her vision.

“I want nothing short of Ms. Olympia’s spot. I made it, and I’ll keep making it. I want to dominate, I don’t want to just compete”, said Zhoei.

Zhoei is looking forward to broadening her horizons as a Nutrishop Northridge athlete, and is also looking towards opening her own gym in the near future, where she’ll have the opportunity to build others up – much like her self – through lifting.

I think there’s no question Zhoei will have it all.

Zhoei is currently training 7 days a week, hitting a fasted cardio session every morning, followed by a 60-80 min lifting session, and then another cardio session post workout/before bed.

Catch Zhoei on stage at the USA’s in 5 weeks.









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Olympic gymnast Aly Raisman spoke with reporter Morty Ain about what it was like to take it all off for ESPN The Magazine’s Body Issue and how much work goes into a one-and-a-half minute routine.

I guess I’m considered “older” for a gymnast. I’m 21 and I’ll be 22 in the Olympics year [2016 Rio Games]. If I make the team, I’ll be the oldest U.S. gymnast. My body is a little bit more achy than it was before, but at the same time I feel like I’m smarter now and able to understand the recovery process. I always joke that I’m 21 going on 50.

I’m not sure training seven hours a day is completely healthy. That’s why gymnastics is a young girl’s sport. But I should be fine. It’s not like I’m going to be doing this until I’m 30 or 40. I’ll let you know in 10 years if I have arthritis and everything [laughs

That’s when I’m most comfortable: sweating in a gym, covered in chalk. I spend the majority of my days in a leotard. Most girls are used to wearing heels and dresses, and I’m used to being in a leotard with no makeup on. I love that. It’s kind of all I’ve ever known.

I totally pulled a Jennifer Lawrence. A lot of the Olympians went to the Golden Globes, and I was walking down the stairs and I totally tumbled down the stairs in front of all the male Olympians. I’m really clumsy. I can do anything on a 4-inch-wide beam, but when I walk down the street in sneakers, I’ll trip and fall on my face.

After one Olympics, most people are just burnt out. They just kind of want to be done. After 2012, I took a full year off. [Teammate] Gabby Douglas and I did. We needed a break. It’s just repetitions after repetitions. There’s no offseason. But at the same time, you always have to keep your goals in the back of your mind.

I should be more proud of myself, but I’m such a perfectionist. At the last Olympics I got two golds and a bronze, but I think more about the fact that I didn’t medal in the All-Around than the fact that I did really well. That kind of pisses me off — I always think that it’s never good enough. I almost fell and put my hand down; it was stupid, I never make that mistake on the beam. I’ll have a second chance at it, but I think about it all the time. I wish I didn’t have to learn that valuable lesson at the Olympics.

We train our whole lives for that one moment. You work your whole life for a minute-and-a-half beam routine. I work out six days, 32 hours a week for the dream of competing at the Olympics again. I’m always eating healthy, always going to bed early. Everything I put into my body is for the purpose of gymnastics.

My coaches always tell me I’m chicken. I’m really afraid to do a lot of stuff in gymnastics. It looks easy or fun, but when you’re trying to learn all these crazy skills, it can be a little terrifying. When I actually think about how narrow the beam is or how high the bars are or how much it hurts to fall, that’s what freaks me out.

Every day is a challenge. Even though at the 2012 Olympics we were so happy to win the gold medal, every day is not like that. I think people don’t understand that; people don’t see that side of the sport — the frustration, how much it takes a toll on your body, and mentally as well.

“You work your whole life for a minute-and-a-half beam routine. I work out six days, 32 hours a week for the dream of competing at the Olympics again. Everything that I put into my body is for the purpose of gymnastics.” ~ Aly Raisman

Outside the gym, I’m super messy. In the gym, everything has to be perfect. All the girls at training camp fight over who doesn’t have to room with me because I’m so messy [laughs]. I’ve been rooming with Gabby a lot, and Gabby will get so annoyed with me.

I can do rope climbs without using my legs, only my arms. Before the last Olympics, I would put a 10-pound weight between my legs and climb the rope all the way to the ceiling.

You can always spot the gymnast. They are so ripped and so strong. Even if I was just wearing a T-shirt, my arms would just be more muscular than other girls’. If we were playing sports, I would just crush them. Even now, when I race against a guy, I always think it’s fun to beat them because they get so upset.

I don’t hear anything during a competition. I’m so focused, I can block out everyone except for my coaches and my teammates. When I was competing in the London Olympics during the beam final, there were thousands of screaming people in the stands, but the only voice I could hear was [teammate] McKayla Maroney. She was talking me through the beam routine the whole time.

Yeah, I got drug-tested at Access Hollywood. It was so weird. I was part of the USA drug-testing pool at the time. You have to give them an hour, every single day, when they can randomly test you. It was the final week of Dancing With the Stars, so I text them the night before: “I’m going on Access Hollywood at 8:30 a.m.” So [the testing official] came right at 8 o’clock. It was like they purposely wanted to be at Access Hollywood. I was also tested at Game 6 of the 2013 Stanley Cup finals. They weren’t allowed to come into the arena because you need a ticket, so I had to leave the arena and go across the street. It’s Game 6 of the Stanley Cup! Am I just going to have them come in the stall with me?

I’ve never had an eating disorder, and I’m proud of that. I think gymnastics in the past had a bad reputation for that, but it’s not an issue anymore. I’ve never seen an issue among the girls on the national team.

I think imperfection is beauty. Instead of being insecure about my muscles, I’ve learned to love them. I don’t even think of it as a flaw anymore because it’s made me into the athlete that I am.

Courtesy of: ESPN

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“How To Meet, Date and Seduce Athletic Women” by Lori Victoria Braun

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If you ask us the female athlete body type is the most attractive of all body types. I am sure this is not a big surprise coming from TheAthleticBuild.com. We have painstakingly researched female athlete after female athlete to come up with the 50 hottest for 2017. It was a tough job but someone had to do it.

50 Jessica Ennis

Jessica Ennis is a British track athlete who won the gold medal in the heptathlon in the 2012 Olympics. If having ripped abs were an Olympic event she probably would have won a medal for that as well.

49 Camila Giorgi

Camila Giorgi is an Italian professional tennis player of Argentinian decent. She won her first WTA title this year and has won 5 singles ITF titles in her career.

48 Ronda Rousey

Ronda is the current UFC Women’s Bantamweight Champion, as well as the last Strikeforce Women’s Bantamweight Champion. She also won an Olympic medal in Judo at the Summer Olympics in Beijing in 2008. She is disliked by many for her trash talking and lack of class. Since being defeated she has been a lot more low key though.

47 Ellen Hoog

Ellen is a member of the Netherlands field hockey team that won gold in the 2012 Olympics.

46 Hilary Knight

Hilary Knight is a professional hockey player, Olympic Silver Medalist for the USA, MVP of the Canadian Women’s Professional hockey league, four-time World Champion and three-time All American in the sport of women’s hockey…and she looks good doing it!

45 Lielani Mitchell

Lielani Mitchell plays for the New York Liberty in the WNBA.

44 Grete Sadeiko

Grete Sadeiko is a track and field athlete at Florida State University in the heptathlon. She is also the current girlfriend of Robert Griffin III.

We aren’t even gonna lie about this one. Calling her a pro athlete is quite a stretch. She plays golf some, she models a lot more than she golfs it seems. But she does look pretty damn good so we left her on the list even with a suspect athletic career.

43 Voula Papachristou

Voula is a Greek triple jumper. She won two gold medals at the European Athletics U23 Championships and represented Greece at the 2011 World Championships in Athletics.

42 Whitney Miller

Whitney Miller is Miss United States 2012, she is also a professional wake surfer on a journey to earn a Jiu Jitsu Blackbelt.

41 Serena Williams

You know who she is, especially if you like booty.

40 Ali Krieger

Ali is a US womens soccer player. She is currently playing for the Washington Spirit of the National Women’s Soccer League.

39 Julie Johnston

Julie is another member of the US womens soccer team who are very well represented on this list. She also plays defender for the Chicago Red Stars.

38 Elena Delle Donne

Elena Delle Donne is a professional basketball player with the Chicago Sky in the WNBA. She played in college at the University of Delaware, she was a consensus First Team All-American and National Player of the Year candidate in her junior and senior seasons.

37 Sarah Backman

Sarah Backman is a Swedish 8 time world champion arm wrestler. This means she can probably beat you in arm wrestling, with looks like that we doubt you will hold it against her.

36 Silje Norendal

Silje Norendal is a Norwegian snowboarder. She was a gold medalist in the 2013 European X Games.

35 Rachel Wray

Don’t get this Rachel Wray confused with that annoyingly perky girl on TV with all the recipes. This Rachel Wray is a former cheerleader with the Kansas City Chiefs turned MMA fighter. She trains with former Strikeforce star Jason High and ex-WEC fighter LC Davis.

34 Ashlyn Harris

Ashlyn is a goalie for the United States women’s national soccer team as well as the Washington Spirit.

33 Caroline Wozniacki

Caroline Wozniacki is a Danish professional tennis player. She is currently the 8th ranked player in the world according to the WTA and even more importantly 33rd on this list.

32 Anastasia Ashley

Anastasia is a pro surfer and spokesmodel from Southern California.

31 Lindsey Vonn

Lindsey Vonn is an alpine skier on the US Ski Team. Vonn won the gold medal in downhill at the 2010 Winter Olympics, the first ever in the event for an American woman. She has also won six consecutive World Cup season titles in the downhill. She is also just as famous for dating Tiger Woods which still seems like a weird couple.

30 Maria Sharapova

Maria Sharapova is a Russian professional tennis player who as of October 6, 2014 is ranked number 2 in the world by the Women’s Tennis Association. Since Anna Kournikova left the sport she has basically taken over as the hot blond of pro tennis, although she isn’t the highest ranked tennis player on this list.

29 Hope Solo

Hope is the goalie for the USA soccer team. She is a two time Olympic gold medalist.

28 Melanie Adams

Melanie is an Australian pole vaulter and 2012 Olympian. She also does some modeling, big surprise huh?

27 Lolo Jones

Lolo Jonesis an American track and field and bobsled athlete who specializes in the 60 and 100 meter hurdles. She won three NCAA titles and garnered 11 All-American honors while at LSU. She is probably most famous for tripping over a hurdle in the 100m hurdle event at the 2008 Olympics, an event she was favored to win. She is easy to look at though so we forgive her.

26 Sloane Stephens

Sloane Stephens is an American professional tennis player whom is currently ranked World No. 33 by the Women’s Tennis Association.

25 Antonija Misura

Antonija Misura is a Croatian professional basketball player. Let’s face it, she is probably the only reason anyone would watch Croatian women’s basketball.

24 Michelle Jenneke

Michelle Jenneke is an Australian hurdler and model, who won a silver medal for the 100 m hurdles at the 2010 Summer Youth Olympics. She is probably known more for her bouncy dance warm-up she does shown here. We actually find the warm up routine pretty annoying and it makes us want to see her get beat. She is hot though.

23 Alana Blanchard

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Follow us on Facebook! Female bodybuilding is the female component of competitive bodybuilding. It began in the late 1970s when women began to take part in bodybuilding competitions.
Contents
History Origins

Female bodybuilding originally developed as an outgrowth of not only the late nineteenth-century European vaudeville and circus strongwomen acts, Bernarr Macfadden‘s turn of the century women’s physique competitions, and the weightlifting of Abbye “Pudgy” Stockton, but also as an outgrowth of the men’s bodybuilding. The contest formats of men’s events during the 1950s to the mid-1970s had often been supplemented with either a women’s beauty contest or bikini show. These shows “had little to do with women’s bodybuilding as we know it today, but they did serve as beginning or, perhaps more properly, as a doormat for the development of future bodybuilding shows.” Physique contests for women date back to at least the 1960s with contests like Miss Physique, Miss Body Beautiful U.S.A., W.B.B.G. and Miss Americana, I.F.B.B.. Maria Elena Alberici, as listed in the Almanac of Women’s Bodybuilding, won two national titles in one year: Miss Body Beautiful U.S.A. in 1972, promoted by Dan Lourie and Miss Americana in 1972, promoted by Joe Weider. Mr. Olympia, Arnold Schwarzenegger was a judge at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in New York when Maria Elena Alberici (aka) Maria Lauren won Miss Americana.[4][5] It was not until the late 1970s, after the advent of the feminist movement and female powerlifting events that women were seen as capable of competing in their own bodybuilding competitions.

1977-1979

Prior to 1977, bodybuilding had been considered strictly a male-oriented sport. Henry McGhee, described as the “primary architect of competitive female bodybuilding”, was an employee of the Downtown Canton YMCA, carried a strong belief that women should share the opportunity to display their physiques and the results of their weight training the way men had done for years. The first official female bodybuilding competition was held in Canton, Ohio, in November 1977 and was called the Ohio Regional Women’s Physique Championship. It was judged strictly as a bodybuilding contest and was the first event of its kind for women. Gina LaSpina, the champion, is considered the first recognized winner of a woman’s bodybuilding contest. The event organizer, McGhee, told the competitors that they would be judged “like the men,” with emphasis on muscular development, symmetry, and physique presentation. In 1978, McGhee organized the first National Women’s Physique Championship, along with the short-lived United States Women’s Physique Association (USWPA), which he formed to help organize women interested in competing in bodybuilding. The USWPA became defunct in 1980.

On August 18, 1979, promoter George Snyder organized a “female bodybuilding” contest known as The Best in the World contest, which was the first IFBB-sanctioned event for women that awarded prize money to the top finishers, with the winner receiving $2,500. It was considered the forerunner for the Ms. Olympia competition. Although sanctioned as a bodybuilding contest, women were required to appear on stage in high heels. Doris Barrilleaux found the Superior Physique Association (SPA) in 1978, the first women’s bodybuilding organization run for women and by women. She also began publishing the SPA News, a newsletter dedicated exclusively to female bodybuilding. SPA disseminated information to women about contests and proper training and dieting. On April 29, 1979, SPA held Florida’s first official women’s contest in which thirteen women competed. The contest was held in Brandon Florida and promoted by Megas Gym and Doris Barrilleaux. The winner of the show was Laura Combs. She also began publishing the SPA News, a newsletter dedicated exclusively to female bodybuilding. SPA disseminated information to women about contests and proper training and dieting. On April 29, 1979, SPA held Florida’s first official women’s contest in which thirteen women competed. Also in 1979, the IFBB formed the IFBB Women’s Committee; Christine Zane was appointed the first chairperson to serve as head of the newly formed committee. One of the significant differences between the SPA and the IFBB was that while the IFBB was organized and run by men, the SPA was run by women and for women.[3]

More contests started to appear in 1979. Some of these were the following:

Although these early events were regarded as bodybuilding contests, the women wore high-heeled shoes, and did not clench their fists while posing. Additionally, they were not allowed to use the three so-called “men’s poses” — the double biceps, crab, and lat spread. The contests were generally held by promoters acting independently; the sport still lacked a governing body. That would change in 1980.

1980-1983 Golden Era

The 1980s of female bodybuilding has been regarded as the golden era and the height of female bodybuilding. The early 1980s signified a transition from the fashionably thin “twiggy” body to one carrying slightly more muscle mass. The National Physique Committee (NPC) held the first women’s Nationals in 1980. Since its inception, this has been the top amateur level competition for women in the US. Laura Combes won the inaugural contest. The first World Couples Championship was held in Atlantic City on April 8. The winning couple was Stacey Bentley and Chris Dickerson, with April Nicotra and Robby Robinson in second. Bentley picked up her third consecutive victory in the Frank Zane Invitational on June 28, ahead of Rachel McLish, Lynn Conkwright, Suzy Green, Patsy Chapman, and Georgia Miller Fudge.

In 1980, the first Ms. Olympia (initially known as the “Miss” Olympia), the most prestigious contest for professional female bodybuilders, was held. Initially, the contest was promoted by George Snyder. The contestants had to send in resumes and pictures, and were hand-picked by Snyder based on their potential to be fitness role models for the average American woman. The first winner was Rachel McLish, who had also won the NPC’s USA Championship earlier in the year. The contest was a major turning point for the sport of women’s bodybuilding. McLish turned out to be very promotable, and inspired many future competitors to start training and competing. Stacey Bentley finished in fifth place, in what turned out to be her final competition. Also in 1980, the American Federation of Women Bodybuilders was also founded, representing a growing awareness of women bodybuilders in America. Winning competitors such as Laurie Stark (Ms. Southern States, 1988) helped to popularize the federation.

Rachel McLish became the most successful competitor of the early 1980s. She lost her Ms. Olympia crown by finishing second to Kike Elomaa in 1981, but regained the title in 1982. A new major pro contest, the Women’s Pro World Championship, was held for the first time in 1981 (won by Lynn Conkwright). Held annually through 1989, this was the second most prestigious contest of the time. McLish added this title to her collection in 1982. George Snyder lost the rights to the Ms. Olympia in 1982, and after this the contestants were no longer hand-picked, but instead qualified for the Ms. Olympia through placings in lesser contests. Women’s bodybuilding was officially recognized as a sport discipline by the 1982 IFBB Congress in Brugge, Belgium.

As the sport grew, the competitors’ level of training gradually increased as did the use of anabolic steroids (most of the competitors in the earliest shows had very little weight training experience or steroid usage), and the sport slowly evolved towards more muscular physiques. This trend started to emerge in 1983. With McLish not competing in the big shows, Carla Dunlap took both the Pro World and Ms. Olympia titles. Dunlap possessed a more muscular physique than either McLish or Elomaa, and though she never repeated her successes of 1983, she would remain competitive for the rest of the decade.

1984-1989 Cory Everson’s reign

In 1984, a new force emerged in women’s bodybuilding. Cory Everson won the NPC Nationals, then defeated McLish to win the Ms. Olympia. At 5’9″ and 150 pounds, Everson’s physique set a new standard. She would go on to win six consecutive Ms. Olympia titles from 1984 to 1989 before retiring undefeated as a professional, the only female bodybuilder ever to accomplish this.

During this period, women’s bodybuilding was starting to achieve some serious mainstream exposure. Pro competitor Anita Gandol created a stir by posing for Playboy in 1984, earning a one-year suspension from the IFBB. Erika Mes, a Dutch competitor, posed nude for the Belgian issue of Playboy in September 1987, also earning a one-year suspension. Lori Bowen, winner of the 1984 Pro World Championship, appeared in a widely broadcast commercial for Miller Lite beer with Rodney Dangerfield. Additionally, competitors Lynn Conkwright (1982) and Carla Dunlap (1984) were included inABC‘s Superstars competition.

In 1985, a movie called Pumping Iron II: The Women was released. This film documented the preparation of several women for the 1983 Caesars Palace World Cup Championship. Competitors prominently featured in the film were Kris Alexander, Lori Bowen, Lydia Cheng, Carla Dunlap, Bev Francis, and Rachel McLish. At the time, Francis was actually a powerlifter, though she soon made a successful transition to bodybuilding, becoming one of the leading competitors of the late 1980s and early 1990s. The main theme of..

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Brie Larson is gearing up for her starring role in Captain Marvel, and apparently she’s method acting. By which we mean strength training at the gym like a real-life superhero.

The actress took to Instagram to show off what nine months of intensive training can do to a person’s body—and she looks incredibly strong and inspiring.

To quote the Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt theme song, females are strong as hell.

Also, FYI in case you want to know more about this movie—it’s set in the ’90s (YASSSS), and is about Carol Danvers—better known as Captain Marvel—a pilot who gains superpowers after getting into an accident. Naturally she ends up fighting an alien war, as ya do.

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