Loading...

Follow Yours for Good Fermentables ™ on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

The vast majority of lakes in Georgia are not naturally formed, but man-made. *

One such of the latter is small Lake Erin, in Henderson Park, of suburban Tucker, Georgia. On 8 March 2016, I played the photographer there.

-----more-----
  • * "The land that makes up present-day Georgia had few natural lakes before European settlement, and most impoundments, formed by beavers and debris dams from high flows, were relatively small."
    The lack of glacial retreat, land slope, and local geology provided conditions for large and small rivers and streams but not for lakes. The natural water bodies that occur in Georgia are primarily located in the southern part of the state in the Coastal Plain, where sinkhole lakes and isolated wetlands in natural shallow depressions largely fed by rain and shallow groundwater, called Carolina bays, form. Hence, the majority of lakes in Georgia that are now enjoyed for recreational, industrial, municipal, and federal government uses are made by people.
    New Georgia Encyclopedia

  • Pic(k) of the Week: one in a weekly series of photos taken (or noted) by me, posted on Saturdays, and often, but not always (as is the case today), with a good fermentable as the subject.
  • See the photo on Flickr: here.
  • Camera: Olympus Pen E-PL1.
  • Settings: 45mm | 1/800 | ISO 200 | f/5.0
  • Commercial reproduction requires explicit permission, as per Creative Commons.

  • For more from YFGF:
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

And what is so rare as a day in June?

A new production brewery opened its doors last weekend in Tucker, Georgia, a suburb city of Atlanta. Nice, but not necessarily unusual. As of 1 January 2018, there were 6,372 breweries in the United States, according to the [U.S.] Brewers Association. I mention this because of an out-of-the-craftbeer-mainstream character to the event.

The brewery, Tucker Brewing, was pouring only three beers: a bright zesty pilsner, an amber lager, and a hefeweizen.

TKR Pilsner specs:
  • 4.8% alcohol by volume (abv).
  • 25 International Bittering Units (IBUs).
  • Pilsner malt.
  • Hallertau Merkur, Hallertau Perle, and Hersbrucker hops.
  • Lager yeast.
Not a 'great' beer, as in drop everything, run, don't walk. But it's not an IPA, or murky or sour or flavored with ephemera. It's a tasty beer right out of the starting gate, a difficult achievement and the brewery promises more such German-inspired beers to come. (There's a Helles in the conditioning tank.)

On the same weekend that Tucker Brewing opened its doors, another in the metropolitan Atlanta area closed its: Abbey of the Holy Goats, in Roswell, Georgia. That juxtaposition brings to mind the requisites of new brewery success. I believe that those are:
  • You need money: a brewery is a business.
  • You need expertise: a brewery is a factory.
  • You need 'it': an artist's soul helps.
  • You need a full pint of Gambrinus' luck.
I don't know if this Tucker Brewing is in possession of all of these. But there is one more thing needed for survival: chutzpah. And they do have that. And a large beer garden.

-----more-----
  • The yellow sunburst next to the beer is a reflection of the brewery's logo affixed on the wall behind the bar. It's reversed and upside-down from its actual order of "TKR," designating, of course, Tucker.
  • "What is so rare a day in June? Then, if ever, come perfect days" is a poem by 19th-century American poet and abolitionist, James Russell Lowell.

  • Pic(k) of the Week: one in a weekly series of photos taken (or noted) by me, posted on Saturdays, and often, but not always, with a good fermentable as the subject.
  • See the photo on Flickr: here.
  • Camera: Olympus Pen E-PL1.
  • Settings: 20mm | ISO 200 | 1/20 | f/5.6
  • Commercial reproduction requires explicit permission, as per Creative Commons.

  • For more from YFGF:
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
On 25 June 1944 —a fortnight before the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied Normandy, France— the Fredericksburg (Virginia) Free-Lance Star published a story by the overseas American war correspondent Hal Boyle. It was one of many for Boyle —who would later win the Pulitzer Prize for his wartime reporting— but this particular dispatch described the World War II condition of booze in London, England.

At his blog "Beer et. Seq.," Gary Gillman has summarized the account, in wry style. His story —"Blondes, Taxis, and the West End"— includes Boyle's description of what he and the American GIs thought of British milds and bitters of the time.
Seeking to explain mild ale and bitter beer to Americans, Boyle said mild is like mixing your beer with rainwater and sugar. And bitter is like mixing it with rainwater and quinine. (Today he might say the IPA that is the rage around the world is like mixing Bud with vodka and grapefruit juice).

Given that American lager in this period was still fairly bitter, it shows that English beer – pale or bitter ale – easily outstripped it. Since no unusual bitterness was detected in mild ale, one can assume its bitterness was about equal to mid-century American lager.


The weakness of British beer was remarked on, something I’ve discussed before as noticed by an Australian journalist. He stated the government must have pondered long and hard to get the stimulant/austerity balance exactly right. The American soldier’s reaction was typically popular and idiomatic: it’s like our beer if you drink it and get hit in the head with the bottle.

-----more-----
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Modes of transportation,
Decatur, Georgia, on the tracks.
Still life (at the moment).

A scene I've wanted to photograph but never had. That is, until 30 May 2018, when, in my car and with my camera, the traffic signal held its red just long enough.

-----more-----
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

For American Mild Month, I visited Good Word Brewing in downtown Duluth, Georgia (about twenty miles north of Atlanta). One of its draft mainstays is Rocksteady, which it describes as an
English Mild. This English bad guy has hints of tobacco, toffee, and a touch of leather.

Co-owner Todd Dimattio told me that he rotates one of his yeast strains between this mild ale and another of his IPAs. "Is that to keep the mild ale yeast viable?" I asked. "No," Dimattio replied. Between in-house and off-the-premises, Rocksteady is one his top sellers.

For this day and age, the brewpub does indeed brew hoppy beers and 'sours.' In fact, a patron at the bar said that one of the latter tasted like a fruity, puckering lemonade.

But this Rocksteady Mild —ruby red, not hazy, tasting like a suggestion of toasted bread with a schmear of Nutella, more-ish at only 3.4% alcohol-by-volume (abv)— was (is) a rare thing of 'sessionable' beauty. Rock on, Mild!

-----more-----
  • What's a Mild Ale? "A restrained, darkish ale, with gentle hopping and a clean finish" and lower-than-expected alcohol. Read more.

  • Pic(k) of the Week: one in a weekly series of photos taken (or noted) by me, posted on Saturdays, and often, but not always, with a good fermentable as the subject.
  • See the photo on Flickr: here.
  • Camera: Olympus Pen E-PL1.
  • Settings: 20mm | ISO 400 | 1/60 | f/1.7
  • Commercial reproduction requires explicit permission, as per Creative Commons.

  • For more from YFGF:
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

For one brief moment, the rosebush blooms splendidly in spring. Thereafter, only thorns.

Here, observing that with an inexpensive CCTV lens (created for small closed-circuit security cameras) but retrofitted with a C- mount adaptor to fit the (micro four thirds) camera.

Why do I mention that? Observe those bokeh balls to the upper left.
Bokeh (bō-kā):
the blurred quality or effect seen in the out-of-focus portion of a photograph taken with a narrow depth of field. Good bokeh is smooth and pleasing, whereas bad bokeh produces a jagged and discordant effect, largely dependent on the construction of the lens. From the Japanese, boke, for "blur, haziness."
Merriam-Webster

-----more-----
  • Pic(k) of the Week: one in a weekly series of photos taken (or noted) by me, posted on Saturdays, and often, but not always (as is the case today), with a good fermentable as the subject.
  • See the photo on Flickr: here.
  • Camera: Olympus Pen E-PL1.
  • Settings: 35mm | ISO 200 | 1/320 | f/1.6
  • Commercial reproduction requires explicit permission, as per Creative Commons.

  • For more from YFGF:
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

These are photos of the same 'craft' beer. On the left, an IPA, on draft at a brewery. On the right, the same IPA, insouciantly poured on draft at a pub less than one mile away. Somewhere in Georgia, USA.

By the way: happy American Craft Beer Week, 14-20 May 2018!

-----more-----
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Hydrangea macrophylla —also called bigleaf hydrangeas and mophead hydrangeas and French hydrangeas— are a staple of the American South, such as this one in Atlanta, Georgia, the petals of its inflorescence only beginning to turn blue, on 7 May 2018.

-----more-----
  • Pic(k) of the Week: one in a weekly series of photos taken (or noted) by me, posted on Saturdays, and often, but not always 9as si the case today), with a good fermentable as the subject.
  • See the photo on Flickr: here.
  • Camera: Olympus Pen E-PL1.
  • Settings: 45mm | ISO 200 | 1/13 | f/6.3 | 16mm extension
  • Commercial reproduction requires explicit permission, as per Creative Commons.

  • For more from YFGF:
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

They came to meet as far as Decatur, and the Three Taverns Craft Brewery, Decatur, Georgia, on Sunday afternoon, 8 April 2018.

-----more-----
  • The proprietors based the name of their brewery on a passage from the New Testament of the Christian Bible: Acts of the Apostles 28:15.
    And from thence, when the brethren heard of us, they came to meet us as far as Appii forum, and The three taverns: whom when Paul saw, he thanked God, and took courage.

  • Pic(k) of the Week: one in a weekly series of photos taken (or noted) by me, posted on Saturdays, and often, but not always, with a good fermentable as the subject.
  • See the photo on Flickr: here.
  • Camera: Olympus Pen E-PL1.
  • Settings: 20mm | ISO 200 | 1/1000 | f/2.5
  • Commercial reproduction requires explicit permission, as per Creative Commons.

  • For more from YFGF:
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

When in Piedmont Park, on 14 April 2018, the beer snob did as other Piedmont-Parkers did, at the Atlanta Dogwood Festival, in Atlanta, Georgia.

Cerveza Pacífico Clara: almost innocuous except for a slight metallic taste as if dripped through cardboard. Produced by Anheuser-Busch InBev / Grupo Modelo, in Mexico.

PS. "Clara" means "clear, in Spanish. Q.E.D.

-----more-----
Read Full Article
Visit website

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview