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Take It Personal (Ep 45: Redman Tribute Part 1) - SoundCloud
(8865 secs long, 2831 plays)Play in SoundCloud

Redman is one of a kind. I really can’t think of another rapper like him. Not in style, not in sound and definitely not with his personality. As I told Redman during our interview, it’s hard to name another rapper of as likable as him.

Redman is ridiculously funny, constantly entertaining and his energy is through the roof. Not to mention, he is honest to a fault. You have to love those qualities in a person, let alone a rapper. In terms of rapping tho, he’s been doing this officially since 1990. That’s almost 3 decades! Most rappers don’t have that kind of longevity and certainly most haven’t been able to maintain a career without their skills deteriorating. If you listen to Redman today, he’s as sharp as he was back when he debuted with EPMD. During this 2-part tribute, we pay homage to Redman aka Funk Doctor Spock aka Mr. Reggie Noble. We cover the classics, the remixes and both the hip-hop and R&B collabos. We got all the Def Squad collabos too. We cover the joints with Cypress Hill, KRS-One, Boyz II Men, Wu Tang, D’Angelo, LL Cool J all the way to MC Eiht.

A rapper of this magnitude deserves a proper tribute, which is why we decided to make this into a 2-parter. On Part 2, we feature our Redman interview, as well as few more necessary mixes to help properly celebrate his career. You can currently stream that interview on our Vevo channel www.youtube.com/watch?v=EfOs8fo0nIk if you don’t wish to wait for part 2. Part 1 is just a taste, so stay tuned as we got more dope shit in store for our Redman tribute.

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Take It Personal (Ice Cube Tribute) - SoundCloud
(2102 secs long, 581 plays)Play in SoundCloud

Ice Cube was the best rapper from 1990-1992. I don’t feel that’s up for debate. Some may point out his work on Straight Outta Compton, but it’s hard to overlook Slick Rick in 1988. In 89, while Cube was prepping the release of his debut album with The Bomb Squad, The D.O.C. took home both the MVP and Rookie of The Year honors. But after that, it was all Ice Cube and he had one hellava run.

That 3-year run solidified him among the very best in hip-hop history. If you’re wondering who took the honors of after that, I’d have to give it to Snoop (93), then Nasty Nas (94), then Big (95). But let’s get back to Ice Cube, aiight? Ice Cube released 3 consecutive classic albums, 4 if you want to count his EP (Kill at Will). And it’s not like he just put out consecutive classics like Redman, Scarface, Jay-Z or ATCQ, I’d argue that AmeriKKKa’s Most Wanted and Death Certificate are the TWO best back-to-back debut and sophomore releases by any rapper, ever. The magnitude of those releases can’t properly be articulated. They were flawless. They were influential. The had this tremendous impact too, and not just in hip-hop, but in the world we live in. These album helped mold us, even shape the way we think about certain things. It gave us insight on issues we had no idea about.

Ice Cube, like Slick Rick, was as fantastic storyteller and his ability to carry a story was truly special. The Predator is classic material, but not in the same vein as the previous efforts. Lethal Injection was the last really great Cube album. I know nostalgic is a muthafucka and we always have a soft spot for our favorites but if we’re being honest with ourselves, the Ice Cube we knew and loved had taken a great detour after 1993. After his movie dominance, it only made sense Hollywood would take him away from music, which explains why his next album didn’t drop until half a decade later.

You have great rappers but if they don’t have the right producer their work can fall on deaf ears (see what I did there?). The Bomb Squad and Sir Jinx were monumental in making Ice Cube as great as he was during this era. We don’t cover everything on this mix outside of those prime years and while this was originally featured on West Coast Classic II (Episode 15), there was plenty more Ice Cube played throughout our 17+ hour West Coast Classic tribute series. I know people are quick to say Dr. Dre, Snoop and Pac, but in my eyes, Ice Cube is the most important rapper to come from the west coast. If he isn’t among your top 10 rappers of all-time, you either don’t know (new jack Hype Beast sissy) or simply forgot. After you listen to our Ice Cube Tribute Mix, you’ll have no other choice but to include him in your list.

DL Link

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Take It Personal (Ep 44: Beats, Baseball & Brews Pt. 2) - SoundCloud
(9494 secs long, 388 plays)Play in SoundCloud

Episode 44 is a continuation of our Beats, Baseball and Brews theme. On part 2, we talked to actor, director and sometimes rapper, Stu Stone. We delve into his recent film “Jack of All Trades,” and discuss the nostalgia of baseball cards, rapping with Jamie Kennedy, acting in Donnie Darko and touring Iraq with Paul Wall. And since Stu is from T-Dot, we had to play some Canadian hip-hop this episode. We also have throwbacks from Black Moon, Artifacts, Krown Rulers, Wee Bee Foolish, Big Daddy Kane, Das EFX, Showbiz & AG, Heltah Skeltah and Fat Joe. Plus, new music by DJ Premier, Your Old Droog and Horror City.

This was a fun episode with a panel of discussion, great music and special guest Rhymecology dropped a gem on us. Please remember, our shows are available on takeitpersonalradio.com, where you can stream or download them directly. We post all the track listings there too. Take It Personal can be heard on Spotify, iTunes, Google Play, iHeart Radio, SoundCloud, Stitcher, PlayerFM and anyplace that hosts great podcasts. We also have an exclusive VEVO channel where you can stream our exclusives interviews like Redman, Murs, Erick Sermon, DJ Premier, KRS-One, Slug and Pharoahe Monch. To all of you who listen, support and motivate us, we can’t thank you enough!

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Redman - Take It Personal (Interview) - YouTube

We could write-up a colorful description to entice you to listen, but we’re talking about Redman. If you know how Take It Personal does interviews, you know we cover just about everything. We ask the questions most don’t and know sh*t most don’t. Reggie Noble is charismatic, energetic, honest, informative, appreciative and in typical Redman fashion, HILARIOUS in this interview! VEVO is the only place you can hear our exclusive Redman interview and later this month we’ll be releasing our REDMAN TRIBUTE show as well. Remember for more info, all of our shows and downloads, you can check us out @ TakeItPersonalRadio.com.

Show love:
https://ambrosiaforheads.com/2019/05/redman-method-man-def-jam-month-tour-audio/

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Murs - Take It Personal (Interview) - YouTube

DL Show
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Take It Personal (Ep 43: Beats, Brews & Baseball) with Murs - SoundCloud
(12318 secs long, 3634 plays)Play in SoundCloud

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Take It Personal (Miami Bass Tribute) - SoundCloud
(4976 secs long, 1444 plays)Play in SoundCloud

The Miami Bass movement was extremely prominent in the 80s and 90s, thanks to legendary artists like 2 Live Crew, MC Shy D, Planet Patrol, Gucci Crew, Anquette, Poison Clan and Clay D. The DJ’s also played a significant role in the movement as well, like Mr. Mixx, DJ Magic Mike, DJ Laz, Uncle Al, Jam Pony Express, Felix Sama, Power Supply and Jealous J (Jim Jonsin). While most people think Uncle Luke when talking about Miami Bass, the scene was so thick as Andre would say. Before you had Pitbull, Flo Rida, Kodak Black, Rick Ross, Ace Hood, DJ Khaled, Stitches, Lil Pump or XXXTENTACION, you had this great music featured on our 1 hour and 23 minute mix. We know our core audience is prominently east coast (bias) and we all know where hip-hop started. If you’re a fan of Take It Personal, you’ll know we cover everything and take pride in showcasing music from all over. But it’s important to listen, understand and appreciate what other regions like the South have to offer. We don’t expect you to love everything we play, but everything played on this tribute was played for a reason. This is an extensive timeline of Miami Bass themed music and while the Miami sound evolved and featured less bass as the years went on, all these tracks capture an important time in music, especially in the MIA. This is our Miami Bass Tribute. We hope you all enjoy it!

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Episode 41 is the 2nd installment of our Southern Tribute. On this episode we pay homage to the legendary Scarface, U.G.K. and the Miami Bass movement of the 80s and 90s. This extra-large show also features music from 2 Live Crew, DJ Magic Mike, Poison Clan, MC Shy D, Rick Ross, Eightball & MJG, Devin The Dude, Young Buck, Lil Wayne, Slim Thug, Trae The Truth, Jeezy, Big Boi, Trick Daddy and many more. Stay tuned for part 3, where we continue to show the South love, while focusing on No Limit, Cash Money and Swisherhouse Records. Not to mention, we got some nice surprises for ya before we take you out with the fader!

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Episode 40 is the first installment of our Southern Tribute. This has been in the making for awhile now, but like our West Coast Classics, tackling an entire coast is not easy. On part 1, we set the tone with some favorites before we take a ride down to Houston to celebrate the Geto Boys. They are arguably, the most influential Southern rap group of all-time. After posting up in H-Town, we head north to East Point, home of Outkast. Andre and Big Boi didn’t put the south on the map, but they did put everyone on notice.

When the east and the left coast were dominating hip-hop, the south was all but forgotten. Then, a group named Organized Noize became responsible for ushering in the Dirty South movement and the rest is history. There is a lot to cover and we’re just getting started. On upcoming episodes we’ll be covering Miami bass and labels like Rap-A-Lot, No Limit, Wreckshop, Swishahouse, Cash Money, Suave House, Slip-n-Slide and Hypnotized Minds to name a few. For now, sit back, relax and enjoy the long ride!

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Episode 39 features good music along with The Good People. They just released their new album “Good For Nuthin” and it’s already being heralded as Album of The Year by many. We chop it up with both Saint and Emskee and discuss the album, their come-up and drop a few joints off the new album too. We also have bangers from Real Live, Smoothe Da Hustler, Al Tariq, PMD, Sir Menelik, Killarmy, Chino XL and ridiculous DJ 360 remix, plus new music by Da Buze Bruvaz, Justo The MC, Pharoahe Monch and an exclusive by Apathy!

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