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Ever tried to use LinkedIn Profinder to get writing jobs?

When it first launched a few years ago, I had my doubts. In my experience, the best writing jobs don’t show up on job boards or listing services like LinkedIn Profinder.

Plus, to get the full benefit of LinkedIn Profinder, you have to pay. In order to break even, I needed an easy job worth $60. Is it worth it?

I decided to give it a shot. Initially things were slow. Some LinkedIn Profinder leads I received were decent.

But far too many were from clueless business owners who wanted a dirt-cheap copywriter or the person with an “incredible story” who wanted to write a memoir.

Sound familiar?

I got frustrated. But before giving up, I decided to take a closer look at how to use LinkedIn Profinder to get the right jobs. And it was worth the effort.

In the last two years, I’ve made nearly six figures writing for clients I’ve landed through LinkedIn Profinder.

Want to know how to use LinkedIn Profinder? These 4 hacks will help you get more writing jobs.

1. Improve your LinkedIn profile

Before you can start cashing in on LinkedIn Profinder leads, you need to beef up your LinkedIn presence.

Your profile is the primary way LinkedIn Profinder is going to recommend you to potential clients looking for a writer.

Here are some things to consider to improve your LinkedIn profile:

  • What’s your niche?
  • What industries do you want to work in and write for?
  • Are you connected with people in the niche industry you write for?
  • Does your profile showcase relevant writing samples related to your niche?
  • Have you updated your skills and experience to stand out as the writer in your niche?
  • Does your profile include testimonials or recommendations from your clients?
How the LinkedIn Profinder process works

One of the first things that happens with a LinkedIn Profinder lead, if it is a legitimate one (more on that in a moment) is the potential client looks at your profile.

They want to see if you really have the niche writing skills and experience they’re looking for. And they usually consider your profile and your connections, before inviting you to submit a proposal for their project.

  • Your connections matter: If you have 100 connections and they are all in the same field as your day job (if you still have one), new clients are much less likely to hire you, unless you are writing in the same field as your day job.
  • Full-time or part-time freelancer? Also, if your day job is listed as your job title, you won’t get offered the gig either. LinkedIn Profinder prospects want to hire freelancers who have the bandwidth and flexibility to meet their content needs. If you still have a day job, consider listing it as your second job, with freelancing as your full-time gig.

Tip: Follow Carol’s advice on how to set up your LinkedIn profile, and change your thinking about what LinkedIn is. If you use it as a platform for your writing career, it can be a useful tool to make connections and land more freelance work.

2. Master the LinkedIn Profinder proposal

When a LinkedIn Profinder user lists a job they want to hire a writer for, you may be invited to submit a proposal. What you say and how you respond can make the difference between landing a new client and getting passed over for another writer.

How to write an effective proposal

A lot of writers treat LinkedIn Profinder like a simple job board. They reply to proposals with a standard pitch that’s pretty boring. Don’t do that, OK.

I made the same mistake until I realized the template format doesn’t work for letters of introduction, and it doesn’t work for LinkedIn Profinder either.

Here’s what your LinkedIn Profinder proposal should include:

  • Your specific qualifications. Start by telling the prospect why you’re right for the job. Be specific. A list of your general qualifications isn’t enough. Keep it brief, and only highlight your skills and experience most relevant to the job.
  • A call to action. If you’ve ever worked in marketing, you know this is critical. In your proposal, tell the LinkedIn Profinder prospect what you want them to do (for many, it’s their first time using the platform to hire a freelancer). For example: Contact you with questions, provide additional project info for a more detailed proposal, set up a call to discuss ideas, etc.
  • Rates? Some LinkedIn Profinder requests want you to disclose your rates or bid on a project as part of your proposal (usually with very little information). My suggestion: Pitch yourself as the writer for the prospect without disclosing rates. When you get a bite, set up a call, get more details about what they want, and then negotiate your rate for the project.
3. Evaluate every LinkedIn Profinder offer

Writers often tell me they get nothing but crap jobs from LinkedIn Profinder. It’s true that a lot of them are bad, but sometimes the person posting the job has no idea how to write a job posting.

They need a writer for a reason, often more than one, but they don’t know enough about the writing process or content marketing to know what to ask for.

Here’s an example of how to evaluate an offer:

  • Review the LinkedIn Profinder lead. I got a LinkedIn Profinder offer for a single blog post for $100 about a health-related topic. It looked like a ho-hum one-off job, which isn’t ideal (you want clients with recurring content needs).
  • Take a closer look who posted the job. Then I realized the job was posted by a marketing manager for a fairly large health company. Their blog was anemic, and they were looking to beef it up.
  • Ask a few more questions. What this marketing manager really needed was a long-term writer and an overall content strategy, both things I knew I could provide.
  • Submit a detailed proposal. I sent a detailed proposal for the article, including some observations I’d made by looking at their website. As a result, I got the job, along with a few more assignments.
  • Develop the relationship. Eventually, they asked me to help them develop a content strategy for the company. This client ended up paying me around $3,000 a month for over a year, and I still write for them occasionally.
Don’t waste time on these types of leads

You should evaluate every LinkedIn Profinder lead you get. At first you might not receive very many. But as you develop your profile and make more connections, you’ll get more. And many of those will be low-ball jobs from people who don’t have money to pay pro rates and won’t use you long term.

Dismiss these types of leads right away:

  • A college student who wants someone to rewrite their resume
  • A first-time fantasy writer looking for someone to “help them finish their book”
  • A student who wants someone to write and/or edit their dissertation
4. Develop relationships

How do you develop relationships with LinkedIn Profinder prospects and clients like I did with the marketing manager for a health-related company? It’s pretty simple.

  • Pay attention and ask questions. Talk to the client about what they need, and things you see that would be helpful to them. Learn about them and their company.
  • Be available. Answer their emails and phone calls within a day or two. After a project is over, check in and follow up. Ask about the next project.
  • Offer advice, but be careful not to offer too much for free, or to be condescending. Sometimes clients really don’t know what they’re doing when it comes to content. Be gentle and kind, and share your expertise at the same time. It’s a great way to establish long-term clients and get referrals.
Move up, earn more with LinkedIn Profinder

LinkedIn Profinder can be a great source of income for you. It’s one source of marketing that helped me earn nearly six figures over the last two years.

To get the most out of it, work it like you would any networking event. Make connections. Master your elevator speech. Introduce people in your network to each other. Evaluate and respond to proposals.

Think long term, and it can be a great tool for increasing your income and improving your cash flow.

Do you use LinkedIn Profinder to get writing jobs? Let’s discuss in the comments.

Troy Lambert is long-time freelancer and author of “Writing as a Business: Production, Distribution, and Marketing” available early this fall. He works, lives, and plays in Boise, Idaho, with the love of his life and a few very talented dogs.

The post LinkedIn Profinder Hacks: 4 Steps to Get Great Writing Clients appeared first on Make A Living Writing.

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Have you been wanting to do some serious pitching — but haven’t gotten going, because you don’t know what to put in your cold email subject lines?

Many freelance writers have this question, I’ve learned. Fortunately, I’ve spent the past 8 years hanging out with about 12,000 writers inside my Freelance Writers Den community and reading our busy forums. At this point, I definitely have a strong sense of what email subject lines freelance writers use that grab attention and get their emails opened.

You’re right to care about what you put in your subject line, because let’s face it: If it isn’t amazing, your email will probably go unread.

Your pitch is going nowhere, no matter how stellar an article idea or content-marketing pitch you’ve got. It will never be opened and read.

To get better results, you’ll have to do one of two things — learn to write great cold email subject lines.

Fortunately, coming up with a headline that catches your target’s attention isn’t super-hard. There are proven formulas you can use here.

What are they? Here are my five basic cold email subject lines that get results:

1. Keep it simple

Who are you and why are you writing? Your subject line could simply fill your prospect in on the basics. It may seem uncreative, but a subject line like this can be pretty darn effective:

SUBJ: Freelance writer with an idea for you

The important thing this cold email subject line does for you is immediately signal to publication editors that you are not a PR person pitching them a client. You are a writer.

Editors love to hear from writers…and less love the endless stream of mostly very dull PR pitches they get. This may not be a standout opening line, but it’s serviceable.

2. Ask a question

People’s brains are intrigued by questions. That ol’ question mark tends to catch their eye. So you could do worse than using the subject line:

SUBJ: Do you use freelance writers?

You can bet if that editor or marketing manager does use writers, and has current needs, they’ll probably open that one up.

3. Go short

There’s been a revolution in thinking about the length of email subject lines in recent years. Writing very short subject lines became a full-blown trend after President Barack Obama’s ‘Hey’ email went seriously viral.

I want to say I think the very short subject line works better when it’s someone you already know. Ideally, someone super-famous like Obama. But I do see loads of marketers doing it for cold emails, too.

A few subject lines that are currently so popular that I’m assume they must be pulling big open rates:

SUBJ: Marketing

SUBJ: Quick question

SUBJ: Hi

I know…these seem a bit boring. But there’s a reality that many people have their email set up so that only the first 5-6 words of subject lines are immediately visible, anyway. Longer subject lines get cut off. Like this:

You can see immediately that the un-truncated email subject lines seem more effective and impactful, yes? So keeping your subject short is definitely something to consider.

My tip would be to go short, but not 1-2 words kinda short — not on cold emails, anyway.

4. Show your research

Over the years, I’ve found that the most reliable results in cold pitching come from taking a minute to study your targets publication or website. Then, you use what you find in your pitch.

As in:

SUBJ: Need help keeping your blog updated?

SUBJ: 1-year update story on the earthquake?

SUBJ: Time for new case studies?

These show that you’ve noticed what they’re lagging on in their business marketing, or what might be a natural next article for an upcoming edition of their magazine.

Doesn’t get into too much detail, but you can create these quickly, and it’s possibly enough to intrigue your target and get a click.

5. Reveal your idea

I’m sort of an overachiever, so I haven’t tended to use any of the cold email subject lines above, even though I know they can get reliable results.

Instead, I want to show what I have for my prospect, especially if it’s a publication editor. I think as a pro writer, it’s worth trying to stand out from the marketing crowd.

I do that by making my subject line the headline for my proposed article query or blog post. If I’ve written a strong headline that shows I understand the audience of this prospect, they should eagerly click on my email to read more.

Just a few examples of the many assignments I’ve gotten with the headline-subject line approach:

SUBJ: Meet the 8 Hottest Publicly Traded Marijuana Companies (Forbes blog)

SUBJ: Should You Franchise Your Business? (Delta Sky)

SUBJ: 40 Questions You Need to Ask Every Copywriting Client (Copyblogger)

Feel like that puts a stronger foot forward than the generic formulas, no?

What’s great about this subject-line approach is that it compels you to spend time really making your headline shine. After all, it’s going to be your calling card in your pitch, so you get serious about perfecting it.

Since headlines are super-important these days, that’s a great habit to cultivate.

What NOT to do

Now that you know how to create a viable cold email subject line, what should you not do? Two important things to know here:

Avoid exclamation marks

Did you notice that ‘4th of July sale!’ email subject line above? That retailer was lucky to get through the spam filters.

Gushy email subject lines have two big drawbacks: They are considered amateurish for professional writers (let your writing craft convey your enthusiasm, people) and are also frequently used by spammy email marketers.

As a result, many popular email clients (looking at you, AOL and Yahoo) spike off emails with exclamation marks in the subject. Avoid exclamations and stay out of the junk/spam/promotions folders.

Don’t send NO subject line emails

That is, your subject line is left blank.

I get these all the time, and I automatically delete without reading. Believe I’m not alone there.

There’s a reason many email clients give you a warning before you send a no-subject email. They do that because no-subject emails get few opens.

Many, many spammers send no-subject emails. That’s why I now auto-delete them all without reading. Let me assure you, this mystery does not intrigue people.

A word about emojis

You may be wondering: Should I put an emoji (or three) in my cold email subject lines?

I have mixed feelings here.

Some marketers are definitely starting to use emojis in their emails.

BUT.

I’m mostly seeing it used in two specific situations, when you’re emailing:

  1. People who opted in to get notices from you.
  2. A brand with a Millennial audience.

If you’ve got one of those situations, go for it, I say. Otherwise, for now, stay cautious.

Big tip: Watch the marketing of the brand you’re thinking of pitching. Do they use emojis in their own marketing? Then I’d give it a whirl.

Wait: Could you warm up your pitch?

If you hate sending cold pitches, maybe you want to take another tack. You could start by seeing if you could make your cold email pitch a little less cold.

Take the time to look at your target’s LinkedIn profile, for instance. See if you have any connections in common, maybe someone who could introduce or recommend you.

If not, perhaps you learn that you went to the same college as this prospect, or you belong to a group together. Maybe you could comment on a recent piece of company news they’ve posted on social media, or leave a comment on their blog.

Now, your email isn’t quite so cold. Your name in the ‘from’ field may ring a dim bell, or they may spark to the connection you have.

If you can turn your cold email a bit warmer, definitely do it. Shout-out to Ed Gandia here, who taught me this one — this email subject line can’t be topped for strong open rates:

SUBJ: [PERSON YOU KNOW] sent me your way

I’ve tried it, and it works every time. You might also try:

SUBJ: Go Bucks – fellow alum and freelance writer here

Or something along those lines. Make the personal connection, and you may find more of your emails get opened.

Create epic cold email subject lines

Now that you know the basics of how to warm up a cold email, and what to write (and not write) in a cold email subject line… how can you make your subject lines go one better?

Mix-and-match the ideas above! As in:

SUBJ: Freelance writer with an idea: [HEADLINE]

In other words, combining the generic ‘freelance writer with an idea for you’ with actually showing them your idea, right in the subject.

SUBJ: Do you use freelance writers? 3 blog headlines

Combining the question approach with the tease that you have headlines for them within.

SUBJ: Writer with ideas

Taking the ‘keep it short’ idea and injecting who you are

These are just a few combo ideas — the possibilities are endless.

Experiment to build cold-email confidence

I hope these email subject-line ideas give you confidence to crank out more email marketing. Now that you know what to say in your subject, try sending 100 pitches a month and see what happens. That’s what I get my coaching students to do, and cranking the numbers up that high seems to get reliably great results.

What do you use for cold email subject lines? Let’s share and discuss in the comments.

The post Cold Email Subject Lines That Get Writers Hired: 5 Proven Formulas appeared first on Make A Living Writing.

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Are you one of those freelance writers with a confidence problem?

You know…you think about pitching businesses and magazines, but you don’t actually do it, because you don’t think you’re good enough.

Or maybe you get a bite from a prospect, and then take forever to reply or book a call, because you’re afraid you’ll screw it all up.

Or maybe you’re stuck comparing yourself to other freelance writers who appear to be smarter, more creative, more successful.

Sound familiar?

If you’ve ever felt this way as a freelance writer, you’re not alone. But you’ll never achieve your freelance writing goals if you let fear and lack of confidence hold you back.

The truth is, even the most successful freelance writers have doubts, fears, and frustrations. But they know how to fight back, stay productive, and keep moving forward.

Ready to punch fear in the face, and give your freelance writing career a boost? Here’s how it’s done…

Meet the fearless freelancer Linda Formichelli

Linda Formichelli

Linda Formichelli is one of those fearless freelance writers who’s been writing for magazines and businesses for 20-plus years.

Sure, she’s had her fair share of ups and downs like a lot of freelance writers. But that hasn’t stopped her from a successful freelance career. Her work includes:

We recently caught up with Linda for a Freelance Writers Den podcast to find how to punch up your confidence level to be a more successful freelance writer.

Q1: How do you stay positive when freelancing gets hard?

Linda: Keep a brag file, and read it when you need it. When we’re feeling under-confident or even just kind of down and depressed, we tend to remember all the negative things that have happened to us. We forget all the positive things, and it causes this sort of downward spiral that keeps us stuck.

Q2: How do you organize a freelance writer’s brag file?

Linda: I keep a folder in my Gmail where I put every email from someone who compliments me. Mine has 420-something emails in it from editors and clients, my friends, even from my husband. When I’m feeling like I need a shot of confidence, I can look through a few of them. And pretty soon, I’m thinking:

“I remember this. You know what? I did something really cool. Somebody really liked this. I’m not a total loser.”

You could also blog or journal about your successes, compliments, or completed writing projects like your blog post that went viral, or your query letter that landed a dream assignment.

Every freelance writer should document their successes. Because, believe me, when you’re feeling fearful or down, or something negative happens, you are going to forget even the biggest positive events in your career. Reading your brag file can give you a shot of confidence to keep going.

Q3: What kind of mindset shift should freelancers make to boost confidence?

Linda: Remember, it’s not all about you. We tend to think the world sort of revolves around us. And when we get a rejection or a negative response from an editor or a client, we tend to translate that automatically into, “I suck.” But the truth is it’s almost always not about you.

Q4: How do you handle rejection or criticism from an editor?

Linda: Think about it like this. If an editor emails you and it sounds snippy, it’s probably not something you did. It’s more likely she had a fight with her kid, or didn’t get her coffee that morning, or didn’t get a lot of sleep.

  • If you get a rejection, it’s not usually because something you turned in really stinks. It’s usually because the magazine is going through a revamp, they fired all their editorial staff, or they don’t have any room in the issue it would be good for.

So the next time you feel too afraid to send your work, because you’re worried about what the editor will think, you need to remember she’s not thinking about you. She’s thinking about herself like everybody else. And when it comes to rejection, you need to remember there are a lot of reasons  for a rejection that have nothing to do with you at all.

Q5: What do you suggest if you’re always worried about making writing mistakes?

Linda: Try this. Purposely send out something with a typo in it. So many writers are afraid to get their work out there, because they’re worried they’ll make a mistake. But it just doesn’t matter that much.

You’ll start to realize how insignificant your small mistakes are. You can send an email out with a typo in it, and you’ll most likely hear nothing about it. Making small mistakes on purpose like this inoculates you against the fear of doing something wrong. It’s kind of freeing to realize a typo isn’t going to be a career killer.

Q6: Does the fake-it-till-you-make-it strategy work for freelance writers?

Linda: I know it sounds like a cliché, but it works. You don’t act the way you feel, you feel the way you act. So if you act like a confident writer, then the feeling will follow.

  • Imagine you’re not afraid of anything. What would you do differently in your writing career? You might send more queries, call more prospects, or negotiate better contracts. You’re going to feel fear, but if you do it anyway,  your confidence will naturally rise.
  • If you have trouble imagining what you do without fear, then ask yourself: What would a confident pro writer do? Shrink from writing a query or hit send and move on to another project? When you act like a pro writer, even though you’re afraid, your mind starts to realize things often end up in a positive way, and you’ll naturally lose your fear.
Q7: How do you get over the fear of in-person networking?

Linda: Freelance writers tend to be introverts. The idea of actually talking in person to someone who has the power to hire us is kind of scarey. So, a great way to get over your jitters before doing in-person networking is to practice with a friend. Ask a friend to spend some time with you in person and do some run-throughs.

  • Practice your elevator speech.
  • Get a few icebreakers ready.
  • Prepare a handful of questions to get people to talk about themselves.
  • Practice your handshake and body language.
Q8: What are you still scared of as a freelance writer?

Linda: I still get nervous before interviews, and I’ve done I don’t know how many interviews. I’ve written for 150 magazines, multiple times each, multiple interviews for each one. You’d think I would have gotten over it by now after all these years, but no.

Q9: What should you do if fear of failure and perfectionism is holding you back?

Linda: There’s no right way to do anything in writing or in anything else. It’s so subjective. If you are somewhere in the range of normal you are doing fine. If you’re not writing your pitches in crayon, and you’re not calling editors 20 times a day, you’re good. As long as what you’re doing is somewhere in that range of being not crazy, then your freelance career is going to be fine.

There’s not one one way to write a query letter or get work. A lot of writers think there is, and when they can’t figure it out, they don’t do anything at all. If the fear of not doing it right, or not knowing how to do it right is keeping you from putting your work out there, you need to stop that and just go for it.

Freelance confidence booster: Feel your fear and do it anyway

If you’ve been struggling with low-self confidence about your freelance writing career, get anxious about pitching editors, or worry you’re going to make mistakes, that’s perfectly normal. Even pro freelance writers with years of experience feel that way from time to time.

The secret to freelance writing success: Feel your fear. Punch it in the face, and do it anyway. You got this!

Need help improving confidence for freelance writing? Let’s discuss in the comments below.

Evan Jensen is the blog editor for Make a Living Writing. When he’s not on a writing deadline or catching up on emails, he’s training to run another 100-mile ultra-marathon.

The post Punch Fear in the Face: 9 Confidence Boosters for Freelance Writers appeared first on Make A Living Writing.

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Want to write for magazines?

It’s a great way to make a living writing if you pitch the right publications. How about $500 or more per assignment?

If you’ve been cranking out magazine stories for $50 to $150 a pop, you may be wondering if that’s really even possible. That’s often the going rate for local, regional, or small-circulation magazines.

If you want to write for magazines, and have limited experience, these are great places to get some clips, and earn some money, but it shouldn’t be your last stop.

Many consumer and trade magazines pay $500 or more per assignment. And the pitching process is pretty much the same as smaller pubs:

  • Identify a magazine you want to write for
  • Study the submission guidelines
  • Develop a solid story idea
  • Do a little research and interview a source
  • Write a killer query letter, and pitch your story idea to an editor

If you can do that, you’ve got the chops to get paid well to write for magazines. But you need to know where to look for those $500-plus assignments. Check out these 21 magazines to get started.

1. AARP, The Magazine

Here’s an interesting fact about the magazine published for readers over age 50. AARP has the highest circulation of any magazine in the United States, with more than 35 million subscribers.

That also means it pays well, on average $1/word or $1,500 per assignment. Publishes news, features, how-tos, and essays about money, health and fitness, food, travel, relationships, and more for over-50 readers.

AARP may be a tough magazine to crack for newbies, but it’s not impossible. Smart networking efforts and a solid story idea helped Freelance Writers Den member Willi Morris land an assignment with AARP, one of her dream clients.

Contact: Senior Editor George Mannes or Features Editor George Blooston

2. Alaska Beyond

Not all in-flight magazines openly publish writer’s guidelines, but Alaska Beyond is one that does. About 75 percent of this magazine is written by freelancers. Best way to break in: Pitch a short piece for “The Feed” department. Then you’re a lot more likely to land higher paying assignments (up to $700) for travel, news, and feature stories.

Contact: Editor Paul Frichtl

3. The Atlantic

If you want to write for The Atlantic, a magazine that covers news and analysis on politics, business, culture, technology, national, international and political life, read this by former Atlantic staffer Garance Franke-Ruta: “How (not) to pitch: A guide for freelance writers.”

FYI – The Atlantic is also open to working with new freelancers. It’s where Freelance Writers Den member Douglas Fitzpatrick landed his first magazine assignment as a newbie for a piece about the career trajectory of Donald Trump.

Want to write for The Atlantic? Study the magazine and pitch an idea with a query first. Pays $150 to $1,600 depending on assignment.

Contact: See department staff info here

4. Chatelaine magazine

Chatelaine is a popular monthly women’s magazine in Canada that covers health and fitness, finance, social issues, fashion, beauty, food, and home decor. It’s target audience is active women ages 25 to 54.

“The Health section covers the latest news and studies, gives fitness and workout tips and explores hot-button issues,” says Managing Editor Laura Brown. Query with a story idea first. Pays an average of $1/word or $1,500 per assignment.

Contact: Managing Editor Laura Brown

5. Delta Sky

If you’re interested in writing for custom pubs for airlines, pitch the in-flight magazine Delta Sky. Carol Tice happens to be a regular contributor, including a story in the November 2018 issue.

Pitch story ideas about food, sports, lifestyle, business, and travel (including international destinations). The current issue includes stories about destinations around the world like Seoul, Korea, Beijing, China, Grenada, and must-see places across the U.S.

Contact: Editor Sarah Elbert

6. Discover magazine

If you customized your search in Writer’s Market to find magazines that pay the highest rate, this is one that would rise to the top of the list. How about $2/word or $3,000 for a 1,500-word feature story.

This science-based magazines features stories about medical research, scientific breakthroughs, technology, physics, space travel, and even paleontology. Keep in mind it’s written for a lay audience, so academic language won’t get you an assignment.

Want to write for Discover? Here’s some advice from freelancer Susan Etchey: “The only way a new writer has a chance to get the attention of its editors is to have an explosive, compelling untold science story to tell.”

Contact: Senior Editor Gemma Tarlach or another member of the editorial team.

7. Early American Life

From colonization to life in the mid-1800s, this magazine features stories about history, architecture, antiques, crafts, and travel destinations for people interested in early American life.

In the most recent issue, you’ll learn about rolling pins from the Colonial era, the evolution of the bald eagle as America’s mascot, brewing in the 1700s, and more.

Know how to dig up the bones to pitch a story about early American life? It’s worth the effort. This pub pays an average of $500 to $2,000 per assignment.

Contact: Executive Editor Jenmarie Andrews

8. Earth Island Journal

If you want to write for Earth Island Journal, follow the first rule of writing for any magazine. Read it. Study back issues.

In the current issue, you’ll learn about Donald Trumps rhetoric about the environment, the trouble with hydroponic growing and our food supply, bee conservation, a curious new way to clean up trash, and more.

Pays an average of $1,000 per assignment for stories about science, technology, the environment, and people making a difference.

Contact: Editor Maureen Nandini Mitra

9. Eating Well

Get in line at the grocery story, and you might see this magazine on the news stand. But it’s not just a magazine filled with recipes, photos of tasty food, and tips for healthy eating.

There’s a lot more “meat” in the pages of Eating Well that explains the science behind the taste, textures, and flavors that make food delicious. If you can combine smart storytelling with science and food, write a query letter and pitch an idea. Eating Well pays an average of $1/word.

ContactAssociate Nutrition Editor Julia Westbrook or another member of the editorial team.

10. enRoute

Glamping, conservation efforts, fishing for a record-setting marlin, and a Canadian’s guide to the Louvre. Those are just a few of the the types of stories featured in Air Canad’s in-flight magazine enRoute.

“We engage our audience through intelligent writing, insight, humour and spot-on service journalism,” says Editor-in-chief Jean-François Légaré. Study the guidelines, back issues, and media kit before pitching a story idea.

Contact: Editor Caitlin Walsh Miller

11. Family Circle

How do you run a house, pursue a career, take care of kids, eat healthy, look good, and feel good? It’s the kind of answers you’ll find in the articles published in Family Circle magazine. It’s a national women’s magazine with a circulation of around 4.2 million readers, and a healthy budget to pay freelancers $1/word.

Need some story ideas? In the current issue, you’ll find stories about raising teenagers, the struggle to lose weight and keep it off, popular vacation spots for kids, and more

Contact: Associate Editor Caroline Mullen or another member of the editorial staff.

12. Forbes

Carol Tice spend over a decade writing about business, commerce, entrepreneurship, finance, and big businesses like Amazon and Microsoft. And it was the perfect proving ground for her to land a long-term gig writing for Forbes.

This business magazine is among the most recognized for publishing stories about the people, businesses, and trends in entrepreneurship, innovation, leadership, and more. And it’s good for freelancers. Forbes pays an average of $1/word and up.

In the most current issue, you’ll learn about tennis phenom Serena Williams smart investing strategies. You’ll get a behind-the-scenes look at the deal to build Trump Tower. You’ll be exposed to a new perspective on climate change truths that may impact everyone’s bottom line, and more.

Contact: Senior Editor Susan Adams or another member of the editorial staff.

13. Green Entrepreneur

Last year, Entrepreneur magazine launched GreenEntrepreneur.com, to give readers that latest news about entrepreneurship, business, technology and lifestyle aspects of the cannabis industry.

“Rarely does a new industry explode with the exponential success that the legal marijuana trade has experienced,” Entrepreneur Media President Bill Shaw, said in a press release.

If you want to write for Green Entrepreneur, study the guidelines and pitch a story idea about the cannabis industry. Pays up to $1.50/word.

Looking for story ideas? The latest buzz in Green Entrepreneur includes stories about a new weed vaporizor that may popularize smoking marijuana, a $400 million shopping spree spent on cannabis, the latest news about legalization, and more.

Contact: Executive Editor Jonathan Small

14. Hakai Magazine

If you want to write about archaeology, ecology, biology, geology, and oceanography of marine coastal environments, take a closer look at Hakai magazine.

You’ve got the chops to write for this magazine that pays up to $1/word if you have solid journalism experience, research skills, and the ability to interview sources.

“We are interested in great stories and strong voices,” says Editor Jude Isabella. “We tilt toward science and environmental stories, but we’re also interested in people and communities and how they interact with coastal ecosystems.”

Pitch short news stories about coastal environmental topics (500 to 800 words), or an in-depth feature (1,000 to 5,000 words).

If you can provide video (five minutes or less) or content for an infographic, to go with your story, your chances of acceptance go up.

Contact: Editor Jude Isabella

15. Hemispheres

The United Airlines in-flight magazine, Hemispheres, happens to be one of two in-flight magazines listed in Writer’s Market listed with a $$$ pay rate.

Translation: This magazine pays freelancers an average of $750 to $1,500 per assignment. Publishes stories about global culture, adventure, business, entertainment, and sports.

Inside the current issue, you’ll find stories about must-see-and-do activities in Chicago, insights on life, career and relationships from actress Kristen Bell, moon-landing anniversary celebration tips, and more.

Contact: Editor Ellen Carpenter

16. Kitplanes

This is what the Wright Brothers inspired more than 100 years ago:  build a plane from a kit, and fly it.

You might not think a highly-niche magazine with a small circulation (about 72,000 readers). But Kitplanes pays well enough to be included in this list, up to $1,000 per assignment.

Pitch story ideas about building and design, flight testing, construction techniques, personal experience, and features on the people and businesses who are involved in building personal aircraft.

Contact: Editor Paul Dye

17. LiisBeth

Before you pitch a story idea to this feminist-focused magazine that covers entrepreneurship, innovation, social issues, and the politics and policies of business, be sure to read the LiisBeth Manifesto.

If you can pitch a story idea that jives with that about people and businesses making a difference, you’re on your way landing an assignment that pays up to $1,500 U.S. You best bet for a well-paid assignment…pitch a story idea for a profile, how-to, or investigative feature.

Contact: Editor Margaret Webb

18. Popular Science

If science and technology writing for an educated lay audience is your niche, don’t waste another minute waiting to pitch Popular Science. It’s one of the oldest magazines still in existence with roots dating back to the late 1800s.

It’s got a circulation of about 1.5 million readers, and a healthy budget to pay freelancers. How about $2/word or $1,000-plus per assignment?

Need story ideas? In the current issue, you’ll read about new threats posed by the Zika virus, rapidly-evolving drone technology, a cookie-test kitchen in outer space, and more.

Contact: Senior Editor Rachel Feltman

19. Sierra

When Sierra magazine editor Jason Mark stepped into his new role a few years ago, he had just walked through Nevada’s Carson-Iceberg Wilderness, surrounded by massive wildfires. That solo experience shaped his mission to lead this magazine dedicated to causes to protect the planet, natural spaces, and outdoor recreation.

“I keep thinking about that trip to the Sierra, which seems emblematic of the challenges facing the environmental movement today,” says Mark. “We want to celebrate and enjoy the big, open spaces we love. At the same time, we have to be always on guard to protect those places. ”

This is the magazine for Sierra Club members. Pitch story ideas about outdoor adventure, environmental issues, and people on a mission to “explore, enjoy, and protect the planet.” Pays $1/word and up per assignment.

Contact: Editor Jason Mark

20. Smithsonian

Did you know the Smithsonian Institute includes 19 museums and galleries, the National Zoological Park, and 2.7 million square feet of indoor space? There’s a lot to know and a lot to learn about the past, present and future of science, technology, the environment, and even the universe.

And you can write about it for the Smithsonian magazine and get paid well. The Smithsonian pays freelancers $1-$3/per word, which means a $500 assignment is more than realistic. So how do you break into this magazine?

“There has to be something surprising and narratively interesting there,” says Senior Editor Jenny Rothenberg Gritz. “If the story is about the natural world, either the person you’re writing about has to be super charismatic and interesting, or something done about the issue has to be amazing.”

Contact: Associate Editor Thomas Stackpole or another member of the editorial staff.

21. The Sun

Here’s an interesting way to differentiate yourself as a news and literary magazine…no advertising. That’s the Sun’s approach to focus on great writing.

This magazine has been around for 40-plus years, and is looking for essays, interviews, and story ideas about political and cultural issues. The Sun pays up to $2,000 per assignment.

“We’ve been described in many ways,” says Editor and Publisher Sy Safransky. “Celebratory, fierce, unflinching, thoughtful, truthful, dark, darkly funny, tender.”

And it shows in recent articles on food inequalities in the U.S., an outsider’s view from inside the commercial fishing industry, the uncanny sense for home that dog’s have, and more.

Contact: Senior Editor Andrew Snee or another member of the editorial staff.

Get paid to write for magazines

If you’re looking for magazines that pay $500 or more per assignment, this isn’t even the tip of the iceberg. Lots of magazines pay pro rates.

  • Check Writer’s Market (print or online) for more. Skip over the magazines that pay low rates, and focus those that pay $1/word or more.
  • Get in touch with the editors at custom pubs and trade magazines. These mags frequently work with freelance writers and pay pro rates, but aren’t as easy to find as consumer pubs in Writer’s Market.
  • Keep on pitching. Then work through the process to study the magazine, develop a story idea, and write a killer query letter. If you can do this for magazines that pay lower-rates, you can do it for bigger magazines that pay top dollar.

What well-paying magazines do you write for? Tell us in the comments below.

Evan Jensen is the blog editor for Make a Living Writing. When he’s not on a writing deadline or catching up on emails, he’s training to run another 100-mile ultra-marathon.

The post Write for Magazines: 21 Publications That Pay $500+ Per Assignment appeared first on Make A Living Writing.

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Want to write for magazines?

It’s a great way to make a living writing if you pitch the right publications. How about $500 or more per assignment?

If you’ve been cranking out magazine stories for $50 to $150 a pop, you may be wondering if that’s really even possible. That’s often the going rate for local, regional, or small-circulation magazines.

If you want to write for magazines, and have limited experience, these are great places to get some clips, and earn some money, but it shouldn’t be your last stop.

Many consumer and trade magazines pay $500 or more per assignment. And the pitching process is pretty much the same as smaller pubs:

  • Identify a magazine you want to write for
  • Study the submission guidelines
  • Develop a solid story idea
  • Do a little research and interview a source
  • Write a killer query letter, and pitch your story idea to an editor

If you can do that, you’ve got the chops to get paid well to write for magazines. But you need to know where to look for those $500-plus assignments. Check out these 21 magazines to get started.

1. AARP, The Magazine

Here’s an interesting fact about the magazine published for readers over age 50. AARP has the highest circulation of any magazine in the United States, with more than 35 million subscribers.

That also means it pays well, on average $1/word or $1,500 per assignment. Publishes news, features, how-tos, and essays about money, health and fitness, food, travel, relationships, and more for over-50 readers.

AARP may be a tough magazine to crack for newbies, but it’s not impossible. Smart networking efforts and a solid story idea helped Freelance Writers Den member Willi Morris land an assignment with AARP, one of her dream clients.

Contact: Senior Editor George Mannes or Features Editor George Blooston

2. Alaska Beyond

Not all in-flight magazines openly publish writer’s guidelines, but Alaska Beyond is one that does. About 75 percent of this magazine is written by freelancers. Best way to break in: Pitch a short piece for “The Feed” department. Then you’re a lot more likely to land higher paying assignments (up to $700) for travel, news, and feature stories.

Contact: Editor Paul Frichtl

3. The Atlantic

If you want to write for The Atlantic, a magazine that covers news and analysis on politics, business, culture, technology, national, international and political life, read this by former Atlantic staffer Garance Franke-Ruta: “How (not) to pitch: A guide for freelance writers.”

FYI – The Atlantic is also open to working with new freelancers. It’s where Freelance Writers Den member Douglas Fitzpatrick landed his first magazine assignment as a newbie for a piece about the career trajectory of Donald Trump.

Want to write for The Atlantic? Study the magazine and pitch an idea with a query first. Pays $150 to $1,600 depending on assignment.

Contact: See department staff info here

4. Chatelaine magazine

Chatelaine is a popular monthly women’s magazine in Canada that covers health and fitness, finance, social issues, fashion, beauty, food, and home decor. It’s target audience is active women ages 25 to 54.

“The Health section covers the latest news and studies, gives fitness and workout tips and explores hot-button issues,” says Managing Editor Laura Brown. Query with a story idea first. Pays an average of $1/word or $1,500 per assignment.

Contact: Managing Editor Laura Brown

5. Delta Sky

If you’re interested in writing for custom pubs for airlines, pitch the in-flight magazine Delta Sky. Carol Tice happens to be a regular contributor, including a story in the November 2018 issue.

Pitch story ideas about food, sports, lifestyle, business, and travel (including international destinations). The current issue includes stories about destinations around the world like Seoul, Korea, Beijing, China, Grenada, and must-see places across the U.S.

Contact: Editor Sarah Elbert

6. Discover magazine

If you customized your search in Writer’s Market to find magazines that pay the highest rate, this is one that would rise to the top of the list. How about $2/word or $3,000 for a 1,500-word feature story.

This science-based magazines features stories about medical research, scientific breakthroughs, technology, physics, space travel, and even paleontology. Keep in mind it’s written for a lay audience, so academic language won’t get you an assignment.

Want to write for Discover? Here’s some advice from freelancer Susan Etchey: “The only way a new writer has a chance to get the attention of its editors is to have an explosive, compelling untold science story to tell.”

Contact: Senior Editor Gemma Tarlach or another member of the editorial team.

7. Early American Life

From colonization to life in the mid-1800s, this magazine features stories about history, architecture, antiques, crafts, and travel destinations for people interested in early American life.

In the most recent issue, you’ll learn about rolling pins from the Colonial era, the evolution of the bald eagle as America’s mascot, brewing in the 1700s, and more.

Know how to dig up the bones to pitch a story about early American life? It’s worth the effort. This pub pays an average of $500 to $2,000 per assignment.

Contact: Executive Editor Jenmarie Andrews

8. Earth Island Journal

If you want to write for Earth Island Journal, follow the first rule of writing for any magazine. Read it. Study back issues.

In the current issue, you’ll learn about Donald Trumps rhetoric about the environment, the trouble with hydroponic growing and our food supply, bee conservation, a curious new way to clean up trash, and more.

Pays an average of $1,000 per assignment for stories about science, technology, the environment, and people making a difference.

Contact: Editor Maureen Nandini Mitra

9. Eating Well

Get in line at the grocery story, and you might see this magazine on the news stand. But it’s not just a magazine filled with recipes, photos of tasty food, and tips for healthy eating.

There’s a lot more “meat” in the pages of Eating Well that explains the science behind the taste, textures, and flavors that make food delicious. If you can combine smart storytelling with science and food, write a query letter and pitch an idea. Eating Well pays an average of $1/word.

ContactAssociate Nutrition Editor Julia Westbrook or another member of the editorial team.

10. enRoute

Glamping, conservation efforts, fishing for a record-setting marlin, and a Canadian’s guide to the Louvre. Those are just a few of the the types of stories featured in Air Canad’s in-flight magazine enRoute.

“We engage our audience through intelligent writing, insight, humour and spot-on service journalism,” says Editor-in-chief Jean-François Légaré. Study the guidelines, back issues, and media kit before pitching a story idea.

Contact: Editor Caitlin Walsh Miller

11. Family Circle

How do you run a house, pursue a career, take care of kids, eat healthy, look good, and feel good? It’s the kind of answers you’ll find in the articles published in Family Circle magazine. It’s a national women’s magazine with a circulation of around 4.2 million readers, and a healthy budget to pay freelancers $1/word.

Need some story ideas? In the current issue, you’ll find stories about raising teenagers, the struggle to lose weight and keep it off, popular vacation spots for kids, and more

Contact: Associate Editor Caroline Mullen or another member of the editorial staff.

12. Forbes

Carol Tice spend over a decade writing about business, commerce, entrepreneurship, finance, and big businesses like Amazon and Microsoft. And it was the perfect proving ground for her to land a long-term gig writing for Forbes.

This business magazine is among the most recognized for publishing stories about the people, businesses, and trends in entrepreneurship, innovation, leadership, and more. And it’s good for freelancers. Forbes pays an average of $1/word and up.

In the most current issue, you’ll learn about tennis phenom Serena Williams smart investing strategies. You’ll get a behind-the-scenes look at the deal to build Trump Tower. You’ll be exposed to a new perspective on climate change truths that may impact everyone’s bottom line, and more.

Contact: Senior Editor Susan Adams or another member of the editorial staff.

13. Green Entrepreneur

Last year, Entrepreneur magazine launched GreenEntrepreneur.com, to give readers that latest news about entrepreneurship, business, technology and lifestyle aspects of the cannabis industry.

“Rarely does a new industry explode with the exponential success that the legal marijuana trade has experienced,” Entrepreneur Media President Bill Shaw, said in a press release.

If you want to write for Green Entrepreneur, study the guidelines and pitch a story idea about the cannabis industry. Pays up to $1.50/word.

Looking for story ideas? The latest buzz in Green Entrepreneur includes stories about a new weed vaporizor that may popularize smoking marijuana, a $400 million shopping spree spent on cannabis, the latest news about legalization, and more.

Contact: Executive Editor Jonathan Small

14. Hakai Magazine

If you want to write about archaeology, ecology, biology, geology, and oceanography of marine coastal environments, take a closer look at Hakai magazine.

You’ve got the chops to write for this magazine that pays up to $1/word if you have solid journalism experience, research skills, and the ability to interview sources.

“We are interested in great stories and strong voices,” says Editor Jude Isabella. “We tilt toward science and environmental stories, but we’re also interested in people and communities and how they interact with coastal ecosystems.”

Pitch short news stories about coastal environmental topics (500 to 800 words), or an in-depth feature (1,000 to 5,000 words).

If you can provide video (five minutes or less) or content for an infographic, to go with your story, your chances of acceptance go up.

Contact: Editor Jude Isabella

15. Hemispheres

The United Airlines in-flight magazine, Hemispheres, happens to be one of two in-flight magazines listed in Writer’s Market listed with a $$$ pay rate.

Translation: This magazine pays freelancers an average of $750 to $1,500 per assignment. Publishes stories about global culture, adventure, business, entertainment, and sports.

Inside the current issue, you’ll find stories about must-see-and-do activities in Chicago, insights on life, career and relationships from actress Kristen Bell, moon-landing anniversary celebration tips, and more.

Contact: Editor Ellen Carpenter

16. Kitplanes

This is what the Wright Brothers inspired more than 100 years ago:  build a plane from a kit, and fly it.

You might not think a highly-niche magazine with a small circulation (about 72,000 readers). But Kitplanes pays well enough to be included in this list, up to $1,000 per assignment.

Pitch story ideas about building and design, flight testing, construction techniques, personal experience, and features on the people and businesses who are involved in building personal aircraft.

Contact: Editor Paul Dye

17. LiisBeth

Before you pitch a story idea to this feminist-focused magazine that covers entrepreneurship, innovation, social issues, and the politics and policies of business, be sure to read the LiisBeth Manifesto.

If you can pitch a story idea that jives with that about people and businesses making a difference, you’re on your way landing an assignment that pays up to $1,500 U.S. You best bet for a well-paid assignment…pitch a story idea for a profile, how-to, or investigative feature.

Contact: Editor Margaret Webb

18. Popular Science

If science and technology writing for an educated lay audience is your niche, don’t waste another minute waiting to pitch Popular Science. It’s one of the oldest magazines still in existence with roots dating back to the late 1800s.

It’s got a circulation of about 1.5 million readers, and a healthy budget to pay freelancers. How about $2/word or $1,000-plus per assignment?

Need story ideas? In the current issue, you’ll read about new threats posed by the Zika virus, rapidly-evolving drone technology, a cookie-test kitchen in outer space, and more.

Contact: Senior Editor Rachel Feltman

19. Sierra

When Sierra magazine editor Jason Mark stepped into his new role a few years ago, he had just walked through Nevada’s Carson-Iceberg Wilderness, surrounded by massive wildfires. That solo experience shaped his mission to lead this magazine dedicated to causes to protect the planet, natural spaces, and outdoor recreation.

“I keep thinking about that trip to the Sierra, which seems emblematic of the challenges facing the environmental movement today,” says Mark. “We want to celebrate and enjoy the big, open spaces we love. At the same time, we have to be always on guard to protect those places. ”

This is the magazine for Sierra Club members. Pitch story ideas about outdoor adventure, environmental issues, and people on a mission to “explore, enjoy, and protect the planet.” Pays $1/word and up per assignment.

Contact: Editor Jason Mark

20. Smithsonian

Did you know the Smithsonian Institute includes 19 museums and galleries, the National Zoological Park, and 2.7 million square feet of indoor space? There’s a lot to know and a lot to learn about the past, present and future of science, technology, the environment, and even the universe.

And you can write about it for the Smithsonian magazine and get paid well. The Smithsonian pays freelancers $1-$3/per word, which means a $500 assignment is more than realistic. So how do you break into this magazine?

“There has to be something surprising and narratively interesting there,” says Senior Editor Jenny Rothenberg Gritz. “If the story is about the natural world, either the person you’re writing about has to be super charismatic and interesting, or something done about the issue has to be amazing.”

Contact: Associate Editor Thomas Stackpole or another member of the editorial staff.

21. The Sun

Here’s an interesting way to differentiate yourself as a news and literary magazine…no advertising. That’s the Sun’s approach to focus on great writing.

This magazine has been around for 40-plus years, and is looking for essays, interviews, and story ideas about political and cultural issues. The Sun pays up to $2,000 per assignment.

“We’ve been described in many ways,” says Editor and Publisher Sy Safransky. “Celebratory, fierce, unflinching, thoughtful, truthful, dark, darkly funny, tender.”

And it shows in recent articles on food inequalities in the U.S., an outsider’s view from inside the commercial fishing industry, the uncanny sense for home that dog’s have, and more.

Contact: Senior Editor Andrew Snee or another member of the editorial staff.

Get paid to write for magazines

If you’re looking for magazines that pay $500 or more per assignment, this isn’t even the tip of the iceberg. Lots of magazines pay pro rates.

  • Check Writer’s Market (print or online) for more. Skip over the magazines that pay low rates, and focus those that pay $1/word or more.
  • Get in touch with the editors at custom pubs and trade magazines. These mags frequently work with freelance writers and pay pro rates, but aren’t as easy to find as consumer pubs in Writer’s Market.
  • Keep on pitching. Then work through the process to study the magazine, develop a story idea, and write a killer query letter. If you can do this for magazines that pay lower-rates, you can do it for bigger magazines that pay top dollar.

What well-paying magazines do you write for? Tell us in the comments below.

Evan Jensen is the blog editor for Make a Living Writing. When he’s not on a writing deadline or catching up on emails, he’s training to run another 100-mile ultra-marathon.

The post Write for Magazines: 21 Publications That Pay $500+ Per Assignment appeared first on Make A Living Writing.

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Get more freelance writing jobs with Instagram Live. Wait, what?

When I first heard about this marketing strategy for freelance writers, I thought it sounded a lot like one of those spammy get-rich marketing programs spawned from the be-a-social-media-star generation.

You know…videos of a well-dressed millennial taking selfies, riffing on making money online, a lovely beach scene in the background, and choppy look-at-the-birdie camera movements.

Is there any possible way Instagram Live could help you land freelance writing jobs?

That’s the question that was on my mind. Call it Shiny Object Syndrome if you want. I’ve got the curious mind of a journalist and had to find out.

For starters, think about this…Instagram has over 1 billion monthly users. And more than 500 million of them use it every day.

Sure many of those people are just sharing their selfie library. But it’s increasingly being used to drive traffic, make sales, and generate leads for products and services…services like freelance writing.

Translation: You can use Instagram Live to get more freelance writing jobs. Here’s how:

The birth of Instagram Live for freelance marketing

Let’s go way back…oh, let’s say 2015

  • Twitter’s live streaming platform, Periscope, was all the rage.
  • You could get on live with others, share to your heart’s content, and the video would stay up for 24 hours.

Some freelancers (like writer and life coach Angie Atkinson) started using this to show off their personality and give prospects a taste for what to expect.

Leverage ‘live’ action for freelance marketing

Facebook takes note of Twitter and within a year introduces Instagram Stories and Instagram Live.  You can use these features to share details like:

  • Your latest projects and assignments
  • New freelance writing clients
  • Testimonials and success stories
  • Marketing efforts to land more freelance writing jobs
  • Content marketing strategies
  • Search engine optimization tips
  • Headline writing tips
  • Income reports
  • Freelance writing goals
  • Challenges you’re struggling with
  • Niche experience…and more
But why would you use Instagram Live as a freelance writer?

It’s a solid social media marketing tool you can use to interact with prospects, clients, and other writers. And if you do it right, it’s a viable way to grow your network and land freelance writing jobs.

Yes, you’ll need to spend some time developing your list of Instagram followers to include potential prospects and current clients. But you don’t need millions or even thousands. Think about it this way:

  • How many solid clients do you need to earn a healthy income as a freelance writer? Maybe a dozen or so. Follow your clients and prospects you want to work with. Like and comment on their Instagram posts. It’s not hard. You really only need a few of the 1 billion monthly Instagram users to hire you to make a living writing.

Here are 5 ways you can use Instagram Live to grow your prospecting list or find new freelance writing jobs:

1. Announce a contest, discount, or give-away

Show up and announce a writing discount, contest or giveaway in advance via the Instagram Live platform.

For example:

  • Writing discount: “15% off all projects booked by the end of the month. Follow and comment, then PM me with your project details and schedule a phone call.”
  • Giveaway: “Receive a free copy of (business or marketing book, or book relevant to your niche). Follow and comment. Then PM me with your mailing address. First five people to do this win.”
  • Contest: “Enter to win a free content review of your (website, landing page, blog, etc.) Follow and comment, and make a case for why you could use some help. Five winners will be selected.”

This Instagram Live marketing technique is kind of like the classic TV lotto drawings and game shows. Tweak it for your business to connect with your clients and prospects. When you’re done with the contest, go live again to announce the winners or share a success story about one of the projects you worked on.

2. Host a Q&A session

You can use a Q&A (question & answer) session to show off your skills and knowledge as a niche writer, address writing and marketing topics important to your clients and prospects, or give prospects a taste for how you work.

What questions frequently come up when you talk to prospects and clients? Make a list and use it for an Instagram Live session.

For example:

  • What’s your process for writing a blog post, case study, white paper, landing page, etc.?
  • How much do you charge? What’s your fee? How much is this going to cost?
  • What’s your editing process look like?
  • Can you help me with SEO (search engine optimization)?
  • How long does it take you to complete an assignment?

Pay attention to questions that pop up frequently in your emails and phone calls. Then do a special Instagram Live to talk about how your clients can troubleshoot the problem. This provides tremendous value to build your reputation as the freelance writer in your niche.

3. Provide a behind-the-scenes look

Getting a never-before-seen moment caught on Instagram Live is the quintessential social media moment. Use it to show your clients and prospects what a typical day looks like for you. It’s one more way to connect with clients and prospects, show off your personality, and peek inside your freelance life.

You might be thinking, “But there’s nothing interesting enough about my freelance life to talk about on Instagram Live. Think again.” What may be ordinary and uninteresting to you may be insightful, interesting, and helpful to someone else.

Give a behind-the-scenes look at things like:

  • Writing and rewriting a blog post headline
  • Identifying a key phrase for SEO
  • Hosting a client/prospect call where you discuss the details of a project
  • Showing vignettes of your day writing, editing, answering phone calls, responding to emails, going for a walk, juggling freelance work with taking care of kids, etc.
  • Discussing a project with an editor, another writer, or graphic designer you’re working with

Note: There are some limitations to how you can use Instagram Live compared to more traditional webinar software, but it still works well.

4. Host a live event

Whether it’s a sold-out convention or breaking news, Instagram Live is a fabulous way of showing the world what you’re working on and how you’re staying up to date.

If you want to host a live event using Instagram Live, here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Plan ahead. Develop the topic you’ll discuss, and anticipate questions your followers may ask.
  • Invite followers to ask questions ahead of time, prior to your Instagram Live session
  • Post reminders to promote your Instagram Live event or email your followers the details
  • Show up on time and stick to the schedule for your Instagram Live event.
  • Answer questions as part of your Instagram Live event, usually near the end of your live event

Note: Sometimes the sound quality can be compromised when there are crowds, so keep that in mind before you go live.

5. Encourage follower interaction

You can also use Instagram Live to encourage your followers to interact with each other. It’s a great way to generate testimonials from clients you’ve worked with, expand your network, and meet prospects that can lead to more freelance writing jobs. Wondering how to do this?

Ask your followers via Instagram Live to:

  • Recommend a graphic designer, web designer or SEO expert they’ve worked with
  • Suggest software and tools to help run their businesses
  • Discuss issues or challenges unique to your niche and industry
  • Offer tips and advice to resolve problems related to business, customer service, marketing, etc.
  • Provide encouragement and support to each other
Measure your marketing results with Instagram Live

Instagram Live is just like any other marketing strategy you can use to land freelance writing jobs. Tracking your efforts provides a way to measure your efforts and make adjustments to improve. If you’re going to commit to using Instagram Live for freelance marketing, here are some things to remember:

Track trends

Sometimes it feels like there’s a new Instagram Live feature coming out every other day. Stay on top of changes happening to the platform and its parent app…Facebook. One of the best ways to do this is to follow someone who already has a lot of followers in a topic you’re interested in or that’s within your niche.

Stick to your purpose

Just like any other social media tool, Instagram Live should be incorporated into a larger marketing plan…your purpose to get more freelance writing jobs and be the freelance writer for your niche. Balancing the social aspect with your overall goals for your freelance writing business, particularly with a new tool, can be a delicate process.

Have fun

Planning out Instagram Live streams and adding them to your content calendar is key for freelance writers to incorporate it into your content marketing activities. Also, keep this in perspective…you’re going to mess up. It’s “live” so you’re not going to get a chance to edit yourself or control everything in your environment.

Your viewers expect to see imperfections and even technical difficulties. If you’re concerned about losing followers because of a tech problem, tell your fans to stay tuned and wait for another “live” pop up. Looking too planned will make the stream appear stiff or overly structured.

Instagram Live was created to strip away the formality of social engagement. Its immediacy at the top of everyone’s Instagram feed is gold. Play around with it to grow your client base.

‘Go live’ to get more freelance writing jobs

Want to get more freelance writing jobs? Give Instagram Live marketing a try. It’s one more way to connect with clients and prospects, and define yourself as the writer in your niche.

Do you use Instagram Live for freelance marketing? Let’s discuss in the comments below.

Willi Morris is a writer and administrative assistant who loves the internet and has a fondness for both Star Wars and Star Trek. Follow her on My Freelance Life.

The post How to Use Instagram Live to Get More Freelance Writing Jobs appeared first on Make A Living Writing.

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Do you find yourself sometimes feeling jealous of that successful freelance writer who seems to have everything dialed in?

You know, the freelance writer who has plenty of clients, earns a healthy income, networks like a boss, and seems to have all the answers to marketing, pitching, copywriting, and business.

You spend some of your precious free time thinking your life as a freelance writer would be pretty sweet if you could just trade places.

Sound familiar?

In today’s social-media driven world, it’s easy to get sucked into thinking everything you see is the whole truth, and nothing but the truth. But we all know, it’s just the highlight reel…the best part of that freelance writer’s business, minus reality that isn’t so rosy.

If you’ve ever felt jealous or envious of another freelance writer’s success, it’s time to put things in perspective.

I have a story for you…and some things I need to share with you about my own life.

First, the story:

The freelance writer’s tale of the bag of troubles

Once upon a time in a tiny Eastern European shtetl, a woman was feeling overwhelmed with her life. Let’s imagine she’s a freelance writer.

She took her woes to her rabbi.

“I feel like I can’t go on!” she tells him. “Life is just too hard. My mother-in-law lives with us, my children are ill-behaved, I have so many responsibilities, I’m often underslept and don’t feel so well…what can I do? I can never get any writing done!”

“That’s no problem,” the rabbi replies. “Bring all your troubles in a sack to the village square tonight, when the moon is full. I’ll tell all the other villagers they must come and bring their bags.

“You can take a look in all the other ones, and then pick someone else’s bag. You can take it and go live that other person’s life instead.”

Switching places seems like a good idea…

As you can imagine, our freelance writer was excited. At last, she might find some peace and writing success!

She found a sack and gathered things that represented all her woes to put inside. She waited excitedly while the moon slowly rose, thinking of all the people in the village who were better off than she was, whose easier lives she might claim.

When she arrived at the square, she found all the villagers assembled with their bags, just as the rabbi had promised. She strode eagerly and directly to the bag of one of the wealthiest women in town. She seemed to lead a charmed life with lots of idle time. Their children were so well-mannered! Surely if she could have this woman’s life, she could write the Great American Novel in no time flat.

A peek inside changes perspective

But when she peeked in the bag she got a shock. Inside these bags, thanks to the rabbi’s Kabbalistic powers, was the naked and complete truth of each family’s life — the troubles and travails each kept secret.

Her wealthy family’s bag was made of rich red velvet on the outside…but the inside was black as coal. It even smelled bad. Gazing into the bag, she could see that the family’s father was a violent alcoholic who was beating his seemingly perfect wife behind closed doors. The children were quiet because they were terrified. The writer quickly lost interest in swapping her current life for the contents of this bag.

Shocked, she tried another well-off woman’s sack, only to discover her husband was planning to leave her, and she had recently been diagnosed with a terminal illness. She was deeply depressed and had suffered several miscarriages she still mourned. The husband also had been hiding financial losses, and in fact they were broke and would soon need to sell their impressive home.

The sum of life experience includes everything

Suddenly, the writer had an idea. She turned this bag upside down and shook it, hoping to empty out its terrible contents and just keep the good part, the good things everyone knew about this woman, the beautiful home and fine clothes. But nothing would come out — the contents seemed woven into the fabric of the outside of the bag.

This wasn’t turning out at all as the unhappy writer had hoped. Who could have imagined what terrible things were hiding inside these beautiful bags! With growing anxiety, one by one, she peeked into the bags of all her neighbors.

Why we envy…

I tell you this story because jealousy happens to all of us, and this is why it happens: Because we can’t see what’s inside other people’s sacks. We don’t know the whole story.

We see the public face of other peoples’ lives, and we think we know what it would be like to be them. But there is always more that’s hidden from sight.

Pull back the curtain

For instance, I remember as a young writer thinking the novelist Louise Erdrich was so amazing. She won prestigious writing awards, had these beautiful daughters and was married to another successful novelist, Michael Dorris. What a charmed life! Or so it seemed to me, looking at the glittering outer wrapping of her bag.

Until it all came crashing down in 1997, when allegations arose that Dorris had molested his children, and he committed suicide. It came to light the couple had already been separated for a year.

Another example: I’m sure quite a few people were envious when top blogger Jon Morrow recently revealed he earned $500,000 from his blog in its very first year. I’m thinking the same people probably wouldn’t be as enthusiastic to take his place if they knew he can hardly move a muscle in his body.

What we really want is just the good part of someone else’s life. But along with that good comes the whole messy rest of it.

To get that life, you have to take the whole bag — all the experiences, good and bad, that shaped that person into the writer they’ve become.

What’s in my freelance life bag?

It’s come to my attention recently that there may be writers who feel jealous of me. My blogging bag is looking nice and shiny on the outside these days, isn’t it?

So I thought I’d give you a peek at the inside of my bag. Because now that I’ve had some success, it has truly brought home to me how money cannot buy you happiness.

I don’t want to intrude on the privacy of my family, so I’m not going to say which of these relates to which of my family members. But here’s a list of some of the issues I am grappling with right now:

  • Verbal abuse
  • Depression/anxiety
  • ADHD
  • Cancer
  • Addiction
  • Memory loss
  • Sleep apnea
  • Failing grades
  • A major gastrointestinal disease
  • Oppositional/defiance
  • Insomnia
  • Threats
  • Fighting

So many days lately, after I switch off my computer and turn to trying to be a mom and a wife, it’s like a trip through the looking glass.

In one world, I can impact thousands of writers and help them earn more. People beg me to talk to them, and tell me I’m competent and helpful and wonderful.

But at home?

It’s not exactly all happiness and rainbows

People shout at me and call me names. No one seems to appreciate what I have to say. In fact, they tell me I’m an idiot or call me a liar on a regular basis. “Mom, you don’t know what you’re talking about,” is a common refrain.

Ironic, huh?

And after nearly a decade of trying mightily to create peace and joy and family harmony, I don’t seem able to make much of an impact. All I can do is pray and keep searching for answers. I’m learning to let go of what I can’t control, and just try to be the best me that I can.

My life is not perfect. But it’s the only life for me, and the only life that could make me the writer and writing coach I am today.

It would never be the same outside of the bag without what’s inside. We’re each a package deal, and the product of all our experiences, good and bad.

We can’t skip the unpleasant parts and only have the good ones, because they are all mixed up together. All we can do is use what we’re given, and write our truth.

The end of the story

Have you guessed what happened to our shtetl freelance writer?

After carefully examining each bag, she gazed across the square to the spot where — in her eagerness to cast off her own difficulties and swap them for someone else’s trouble-free life — she had hastily tossed aside her own plain burlap sack.

She ran fast as she could to her bag.

After seeing the truth of her neighbors’ lives, she had a new perspective. Her life was blessed and wonderful. Her husband was a loving man who truly cared for her. They were poor, but they had enough.

And in her bag was a special gift — she could write.

Then she did the only thing there is to do, for each of us. When we see the whole truth of others’ lives, we always pick up our own bags and take them home.

YOLO advice for the jealous freelance writer

How about a little YOLO advice for the jealous freelance writer? You only live once. No one’s life is as charmed as we might think. If you want to be a successful freelance writer, now is always the best time to go for it, even if your life isn’t perfect.

What’s in your bag? Leave a comment and share what you’re struggling with right now.

The post Freelance Writer Envy? Read This for a Sobering Peek Inside Real Life appeared first on Make A Living Writing.

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You’ve got an online writing assignment, but you’re feeling stuck.

So you procrastinate. You make excuses. You roll around on the floor. And you keep listening to that voice inside your head that fills you with doubt and fear.

Sound familiar?

That’s exactly what Kristina Adams’ online writing career looked like for years when she first started out. Full-on writer’s block, lots of mistakes, lots of wasted time.

And then one of those life-changing epiphanies happened that changed everything. It made her rethink her approach and take a hard look at her productivity habits. The result: she went from writing next to nothing, to publishing her first book.

If you’re wondering how to get more online writing done, move up and earn more, you’ve got a choice to make.

Spend your days wasting time, doing nothing. Or do everything in your power to achieve your online writing and freelance goals. What’s it going to be?

If you want to speed things up and be a more productive writer, here are some things you can do:

Meet freelance writer Kristina Adams

Kristina Adams

Kristina Adams is the author of Productivity for Writers. She runs the site The Writer’s Cookbook, created to help freelance writers boost productivity, be more creative, and make money writing.

When she’s not working on her next fiction title, she’s writing and editing for clients, or helping freelancers develop better online writing and productivity habits.

Adams was a recent guest on the Freelance Writers Den podcast.

Q: What did your writing career look like when you first got started?

Adams: I wasn’t writing at all. I was suffering really bad with writer’s block. I finally realized I had to do something about it. When I finally did, I went from writing nothing to 14,000 words a day. I had a lot of writing friends ask me about how I did it. And that’s kind of how Productivity for Writers came about.

Q: What’s the best thing you can do as a writer to boost productivity?

Adams: Pay attention to the way you work. Figure out what needs to be done. And then come up with a system that works for you. It’s not enough to just set a deadline for an assignment if you have 50 million other things to do. Get specific. If you think a first draft will take you a few weeks, give yourself the time. Then break it down into research, writing, editing, proofreading, etc. Just giving yourself a general deadline isn’t enough.

Q: What’s wrong with leaving a writing assignment until the last minute?

Adams: Some people work well that way. You know, procrastinate, then wake up at three o’clock in the morning and scramble to get the assignment done. Working under pressure can make you work better, but not when it’s the kind of pressure that suffocates you. A little bit of stress is a good thing. But a lot of stress always ends badly. So you have to find that line for yourself, and plan ahead.

Q: What’s the main productivity challenge you see between part-time and full-time freelancers?

Adams: When you freelance on the side, it’s a lot easier to be productive. You only have a limited amount of time to write. So you get home, you write and do XYZ. And then you go to bed and repeat. When you’re a full-time writer and work at home, it’s easy to think you’ve got all this time in the world. When actually, if you’re self employed you have to be a lot more self disciplined as a writer.

Q: What do you suggest to structure a writing day to improve productivity?

Adams: Start with a to do list. I know it sounds a little old fashioned. Write it down on a piece of paper, use Trello or something similar. Break it down your writing assignments as much as you possible can. Don’t just say, “I’ve got this piece to write.” Go through every stage of the process, research, writing, editing, etc. It sounds really tedious and really silly.

But when you check off just one small task, it makes your brain get a little release of the happy hormone. And you start to associate happiness with getting all these things done. Over time you associate that with writing, especially if you reward yourself every time you tick something off. Eat your favorite chocolate bar. Watch 30 minutes of your favorite TV show. Over time you’re going to associate writing with that good feeling, and you’re going to get more and more done.

Q: How do you plan out a writing assignment?

Adams: I’m not a fan of planning everything out to the letter when I’m writing. It can kill creativity and interfere with your flow. But I think having a rough outline, so you know where you’re going is a good idea. It’s like you know the path you’re going to take, but you don’t necessarily know the scenery you’re going to see along the way. The way I do this, is bullet point things to death to develop an outline, come up with  heading and subheads, and make notes for research I need.

Q: What do you think about multi-tasking?

Adams: I am vehemently against multi-tasking. I used to do it a lot. These days I don’t do it…I can’t do it. People talk about multi-tasking like it’s a badge of honor. But studies show that when you do something like watching TV and writing at the same time, your brain is split between these two different things. So it’s constantly flitting between the two. It can’t focus properly on either task. So you can’t give your all to either. And it actually takes you longer to do what you’re trying to do.

Q: Why do so many writers struggle with procrastination?

Adams: Generally, procrastination tends to come from a place a fear. So you need to work out what you’re afraid of. Sometimes the things we want the most are the things we’re most afraid of. A lot of people are just as afraid of achieving their dreams as not achieving them. So they just kind of get stuck. And that’s when people don’t write at all. Or they write something not as good as they could, because they’re so scared of giving their all and really pushing themselves.

If you’re a serial procrastinator, you really need to look inward and think about what it is you are afraid of. Therapy is a good way to do that. Talking to other writers is a good way to do that. And taking some time for some serious self-reflection is a good way to do that.

Q: Edit as you go, or write a complete draft first?

Adams: A lot of writers edit as they write. It’s a really bad idea. It’s a productivity killer, because you’re judging your writing before you can view it objectively. You see your writing like your baby, and you can’t take that emotion out of the equation.

What I suggest is writing your draft completely. Literally word vomit on to the page. Then take a break and come back to it with a fresh pair of eyes once. Do something else like step outside, have something to eat, go for a walk, or work on a different project. Then you can engage a different part of your brain to edit.

People often think writing and editing are the same, but they not. They’re very different skills. You you have to learn when to go into writing mode and when to go into editing mode. Your inner critic is the editor, and is often very, very harsh. So once you learn to separate the two, you become a better writer and better editor.

Q: Can software help writers be more productive?

Adams: I think it really depends. I’m a big advocate for Scrivener. I would have never finished anything without it, and and that’s no hyperbole. I don’t write chronologically. Writing for me is more of a jigsaw than a linear process. Using software that allows me to move blocks of content around easily makes a big difference. But you can do with EverNote, Google Docs, or something else. Develop a system that works for you. Software can help you, but it can also be a really big time waster. It really depends on how you work.

Q: How do you set daily writing goals?

Adams: You can either set a daily writing goals by the amount of time you write or the word count. I personally write by word count. But it’s really about finding out what fits with how you work.

If you want to set a writing goal based on time, try this. Set a 15-minute timer, and write. You don’t do anything else. No research, no planning, nothing. That 15 minutes is purely writing time. When the timer stops, even if you’re mid-sentence, stop. This kind of free-writing technique really trains your brain to think, “This is writing time, OK let’s go.” And it teaches you that discipline.

If you do it by word count, set a daily goal for yourself that’s a bit outside your comfort zone, but not completely ridiculous. Some days you’ll be able to make your goal really easily. Some days it’s going to be hard. And you need to be able to force yourself to hit your goal.

Q: What will help writers improve productivity the most?

Adams: Really work on finding out what’s holding you back. It might not be what you think. Very often, it’s the people around us. For example, toxic people can be unsupportive about your freelance writing goals. They make little comments that ebb away at your confidence for weeks, months or even years. And eventually you doubt your ability to do anything. But if you know that, you can deal with it, or whatever it is that’s holding you back. Keep an open mind. Keep pushing yourself. And you’ll be happier and more productive than ever.

Develop productivity habits for online writing success

If you want to be a more productive writer, take a closer look at what you’re doing right. And pay attention to things you’re doing that aren’t getting you closer to your goal. It’s not a waste of time. It’s how you get unstuck. Then develop an action plan and establish habits to move up, earn more, and make a living writing. You can do this!

What are your productivity tips for writers? Leave a comment below.

Evan Jensen is the blog editor for Make a Living Writing. When he’s not on a writing deadline, or catching up on emails, he’s training to run another 100-mile ultramarathon.

The post Online Writing: Productivity Habits to Speed Up the Process appeared first on Make A Living Writing.

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Anybody with a blog can make money writing. It’s so easy, you can do it in your sleep. Right?

Well, maybe. There’s just one thing you need to do. Make sure you write something that actually sells.

This might seem a little harsh because there are so many bloggers out there who want to make money writing. They publish lots of content, but don’t get a lot of traffic or generate sales.

Sound familiar?

Honestly, I hope the world never runs out of passionate writers. I absolutely love reading insights into specific topics.

But let’s face it—Can you make money writing with passionate, opinionated pieces on your personal blog? Unfortunately, the answer tends to be: “No.”

So, if you’re looking to make money writing with your blog, you need to wake up..change up your game just a bit. I’m not saying sell out and become a spammy marketer…Just look at things from a different angle.

Want to make money writing as a blogger? Here are 4 different types of articles you can (and should) write for your blog—no matter the niche.

Make money writing with affiliate marketing

If you want to make money writing about stuff on your blog, one of the easiest ways to do it is through affiliate marketing. Unless you’ve created your own products or services that you can charge for, you’ll have to rely on affiliate offers to get income.

Side note: That being said, you should choose wisely who you partner with. Staying with products within your niche that you actually use and love is typically a smart bet. And should be easy to write about.

Want to make money writing on your blog? Here are 4 types of articles that can earn you money while you sleep.

1. The list of resources article

When it comes to money-making articles, a list of resources is a great place to start. When readers are looking for a new product to help them in a certain area, they often turn to their favorite bloggers for recommendations. That’s why many pro bloggers have a resources page linked in their main navigation menu.

These articles don’t necessarily have to be strict lists. They can be formatted as authority articles. For instance, you can write an “Everything you need to know about (fill in the blank)” article. This not only establishes your authority on a subject, it also allows for a huge amount of clickable links.

And if those links are affiliate links… It’s a huge opportunity to start building blog income.

Here are a few great examples for how to design a resource page:

2. ‘Top 10’ or ‘Best of’ articles

Another strategy for drawing in potential readers and “customers” is writing “Best of” lists.

How many times have you been scrolling through Facebook and seen those “Top 10” list posts? Plenty, I’m sure. And how many have you actually clicked on?

Be honest with yourself. We’ve all done it, (especially those click-baity Buzzfeed articles…).

All joking aside, these articles actually work because they’re so good at grabbing attention. Some websites have dedicated their entire premise to “Best of” articles.

Take Top SciFi Books for instance. If you’re in the market for science fiction books, all you have to do is check out their “Best Sci Fi Book Series” or “Best Books Like Ready, Player One.”

These are well-written “Best of” articles that properly utilize their brand and affiliate marketing.

3. The ‘review of your favorite product or service’ article

A review is another great place to start making money on your blog.

Believe it or not… reviews are often some of the most searched terms on Google (like this: What’s It Like Writing for Contently? Writers Spill Their Secrets). People looking for reviews are normally interested in buying, and they’re just looking for someone to affirm their decision.

For example: Let’s say you’re looking to buy something that can help you gain an advantage in your Amazon book marketing skills, and you run across my software Publisher Rocket.

Now, you could take my word at face value. OR…You could find a third-party review. Something that really gets into the down and dirty. You need to know all about the good, the bad, and the ugly of the program. So, maybe you land on a review such as this Publisher Rocket Review by Sam Howard.

She really gets in-depth when it comes to talking about Publisher Rocket. Her likes and dislikes. And these can help you decide if it’s right for you.

And if Samantha is an affiliate for Publisher Rocket… She can get a cut of the sales made off of her site. As you can see, writing a killer review about a product is a big step toward raising your monthly profits.

Note: Did you know the Freelance Writers Den has it’s own affiliate marketing program? If you’re a member, why not write about the Den on your blog, use an affiliate link, and earn money to pay for your membership or make a little extra.

4. The ‘comparison of two products’ article

What’s better than one review? Two reviews.

That’s right. By taking the comparison angle, you’re able to squeeze two different reviews into a single article. Neat stuff, huh?

Often times, this is where most of your affiliate sales will come from. People searching between two very particular services are on the verge of purchasing. Writing a comparison can help to sway readers to your product or affiliate offer, which means more money made at the end of the day.

But is a comparison of two products really worth writing? Is it better than just a solo review?

In my opinion it is. Why? Because comparison keywords tend to be MUCH less competitive to rank for in Google.

Here’s an example looking at some email marketing services.

*All numbers on this table have been directly acquired through Ahrefs.com–a wonderful service for SEO’ers.

A brief lesson on SEO strategy

Notice that while the search volume is really high for the solo keywords, so is the competition. Most bloggers would have a very hard time ranking for those searches.

But look what happens when you compare Mailchimp and Constant Contact. The competition score drops down to an 8. That’s exponentially easier to rank for. And you still have a shot at 3,700 people (every month) potentially looking to buy.

As far as how to write a comparison post, here’s an example from my site comparing Thinkific vs Teachable

But remember, this style of article works in any niche.

Here are two examples from popular food blogs: This first one compares the organic meal delivery services  Green Chef and Sun Basket, and this second article compares the grocery delivery service Shipt vs Instacart.

Blog to make money writing

If you want to make money writing on your blog, it’s is entirely possible. And if you do it right, it can become a source of passive income. Thousands of people do it every single day. And it all starts with simply including a few blog posts that give you the best chance to get paid.

It’s important to realize that these money-making articles aren’t slimy sales pitches. Readers appreciate them. You’re helping readers save time, buy with confidence, and learn from your personal experience and research. That’s valuable.

And the cool thing, you can make money writing in any niche with these four types of blog posts. Do a little keyword research to find the best opportunities, and start writing.

How do you make money blogging? Leave a comment below.

Dave Chesson is the creator of the e-book keyword research tool KDP Rocket (yes, Carol uses, recommends, and proudly affiliate sells it). He also shares in-depth book marketing guides on Kindlepreneur.com

The post Make Money Writing: 4 Types of Posts That Pay While You Sleep appeared first on Make A Living Writing.

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Need writing tips and advice, but you’re in a hurry?

There’s nothing wrong with poring over your library of books on freelancing for the best writing tips, techniques, and business practices.

But what if you’re perpetually short on time? There’s a good chance you don’t crack those writing books for another day, another week…

And that’s a problem if you want to ramp up your freelance writing business fast, need a shot of motivation, or a writing tip related to a current client project.

When I was fresh out of school, only a novice at my day job, I decided to be a writer. No marketing experience. No niche knowledge. Heck, I hadn’t even written a single word of business writing.

I needed a lot of writing tips and advice…fast. So I asked writers in my network a simple question:

If you had 30 seconds to give a new writer just one piece of advice, what would it be?

And they delivered a pay-dirt pile of advice about freelancing.

Looking for writing tips to put you on the fast track to move up and earn more? Here you go:

Master your mindset as a freelance writer

So you want to be a freelancer writer? You’ll need to get your mind right.

Unless you happened to hitch a ride with Marty McFly in the move Back to the Future and got stuck in 1885, you’ve probably heard plenty of conversation about the importance of mindset.

But more than just Think and Grow Rich, cultivating a mindset of confidence, success and capitalizing failures is critical for freelance writers (newbies and pros) to go the distance.

Check out these mindset tips:

Don’t be afraid to be bold and touch on the subjects that matter even if they are sensitive topics.
Sara “Humble Queen” Scott, freelance screen writer and editor

Go for it.
Carol Tice, founder of Make a Living Writing and The Freelance Writers Den

Recognize early on that most editors and clients don’t know what they want until they see what they don’t want. (Get used to convolutes or non-existent direction before the first draft, then convoluted but passionate direction before the first round of edits.)
Justin P Lambert, communications consultant

#justkeepswimming (swimming, swimming)
Tricia Johnson Mool, freelance content writer and copywriter

Be patient. Everything will take longer to happen than you wish it would.
Alison Leuders, freelance writer

Keep writing, and never ever give up on your own style and voice of writing.
Surya Narayanan, writer at CIO Review India

Don’t give up.
Scot Martin, freelance B2B Copywriter

Don’t take rejections personally.
Janeen Johnson, contributing writer for Our Jamaica Magazine

Keep going…
Oliver Orme-Lynch, content writer

Take action, keep learning

What would happen if you filled your mind with writing tips and advice without taking action? Nothing.

Carol Tice frequently uses the mantra, “Be a writer, not a waiter.” Investing in yourself to develop your skills is critical to your success.

But the real wins happen when you learn and take action. That’s the ticket to freelance success.

Here’s how to level up your game:

Niche.
Steve Slaunwhite, copywriting trainer & coach

Focus on enhancing your skills and don’t rest on your laurels. Success follows those who embrace continuous adaptation.
Mahmood Anwar, freelancing coach and content writer

Read.
Sutapa Singha, content editor

Avoid content mills. Instead, learn how to cold pitch. Keep improving your pitches.
Zena Ryder, freelance copywriter and content writer

Know your audience!
Bindu Chunduru, freelance writer and subject matter expert

Hand in your pieces on time, and proofread your proofread version… You’ll get hired again and paid more if you show you’re reliable.
Heather Grace Stewart, Top 100 best-selling Kindle author

Read a lot. Write a lot. Accept your work will be rejected.
Rebecca A Eckland, writer, author, marketing specialist

Use outlines, and don’t be afraid to hire professional proofreaders.
Thomas Clifford, B2B copywriter for executives

Every day: Write. Write. And then write some more.
Lisa J. Jackson, business writer

Think like a writer, editor & marketer

No one starts out with perfect writing or marketing skills. It’s a process.

Every step of the way, you should be developing your skills as a writer, your marketing chops to get clients, tech skills, business skills to set your rates, negotiation contracts, and talk to clients.

In other words, learn to think like a writer, editor, and marketing manager.

Here’s how:

Assume the reader knows nothing, but don’t assume the reader is stupid.
Zack Robinson, SEO content expert

Just fix your takeaway and target audience for the piece you are writing. Everything else is just flow of writing which will improve with experience.
Nimeeshkumar Singh, independent journalist, brand consultant and content strategist

Market yourself regularly so you’re never short of work. Generally, I’ve observed that we freelancers start looking for work when we are short of it. Whether it is through cold pitching, social media or cold calling, market yourself regularly. Consistency is important in maintaining regular flow of work in freelancing.
Gagandeep Kaur, independent journalist, writer and content marketing strategist

Conduct efficient research. Formulate creative ideas. Create and stick to outlines. Make text scannable. Provide value, on-page SEO, embedded media, links.
Obaid Khan, B2B content strategist, founder of Pantheon Digital

Check your facts, don’t oversell or exaggerate
Elisavet (Lisa) Pavlidou, content developer

Never marry an idea. If a story line or dialogue is going nowhere, don’t keep it and force it to work. It never will.
Keith M. Hersch, 25-plus year ESL teacher, writer

Get out of your head and into the reader’s head.
Jim Koscs, automotive storyteller

Write short sentences.
Seth Carr, digital marketing strategist, writer

Tap into your freelance network for help

Want to be a freelance writer? It’s all-too-easy to find yourself writing in isolation mixed with a few client calls. And the best writer’s don’t work that way.

You need a network of other writers, creatives, and business professionals to share ideas with, seek out for support, collaborate on projects, and get ideas to improve your writing skills and grow your freelance business.

Stay connected with these writing tips

Join [a networking group]. You’ll connect with a group of generous, high-earning writers.
Karen Haywood Queen, technology writer

Join a Freelance Writers Den Bootcamp.
Jude Lockhart, freelance sci-tech and IT writer

Practice good posture & ergonomics when writing!
Angela Holmes-Abrams, freelance writer

Don’t try to go it all alone. Seek help in all areas – craft and business.
Mary Morris, Freelance Writer

Quick writing tips for freelancers

I asked one simple question on LinkedIn and received a load of responses (see all of them here) from freelancers who make a living writing. The result: Easy-to follow writing tips and advice you can digest in 30 seconds or less.

If you’re just starting out, stuck in a rut, or you’ve been freelancing for years, there’s always something new to learn. Keep going. You got this.

What’s your one piece of advice for freelance writers? Share your wisdom in the comments below.

Dan Phillips is a freelance industrial tech writer who enjoys. He takes clients on marketing gemba walks and wears steel toes all the time.

The post Writing Tips: 30 Freelancers Share Their Secrets in 30 Seconds or Less appeared first on Make A Living Writing.

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