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Acute brain injury can result in significant damage and loss of consciousness, and it may warrant life support and admission to an intensive care unit. It is when a complex journey towards recovery begins, sometimes it involves daily life and death battles. Once the condition of the patient stabilizes, the question is will they ever wake up?
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Finding acceptance after a brain injury isn't easy. "For a long while, I bucked against our reality. I found myself caught between what I had once known and an uncertain future. The in-between caused marked turmoil. As much as I didn’t want to accept Taylor’s brain injury as part of our lives, it is. As much as I wish it didn’t affect Taylor and our family … it does." 
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A study to learn if acute elevations in serum inflammatory markers predict symptom recovery after sport-related concussion (SRC).
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Caring for someone who's suffered a stroke can be challenging. “People don’t know what to do and they usually can’t guess,” caregiver Kelly Renzoni said. “Until you’re in this kind of situation, you have no clue what it’s like.” She offers her insights and advice on how to navigate the caregiver's role on the road to recovery.
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“I knew something wasn’t right but I really didn’t think too much of it,” says the 30-year-old Lauren Barnathan. She ignored the symptoms of her stroke and it cost her a full recovery. Now she's on a mission to educate others about the signs - and encourage them to act before it's too late.
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“I couldn’t read; I couldn’t write. I could see the hospital signs, the elevator signs, the therapists’ cards, but I couldn’t understand them,” wrote Ted Baxter. But he refused to give up.
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American soccer icon Brandi Chastain says she sometimes “can’t remember some details of a place we went . . . or somebody’s last name.” Both Chastain and fellow soccer player Michelle Akers have long wondered what effect the headers and other knocks to the head they took during games have had on their neurological health.
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Researchers have found a way to detect “covert consciousness” that could aid the recovery of people with severe brain injuries.
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“Using annual estimates of severe physical violence,” Valera notes in a study published last fall in the Journal of Neurotrauma, “1.6 million women can be estimated to sustain repetitive T.B.I.s in comparison to the total annual numbers of T.B.I.s reported for the military and N.F.L. at 18,000 and 281 respectively.”Part of the problem is that women hurt by intimate partners tend to hide that fact, making them hard to identify and study. But the bigger issue is that public outrage and advocacy play a major role in determining what research gets funded. In the case of head trauma, almost all the attention is going to football — and so, by extension, to only one gender.

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