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The following is a guest piece by Chris Dyer.

Which comes first: a distinctive business identity or its underlying culture? That’s a trick question. The culture that drives recognition has no beginning or end point, but is instead a continuum. Every company that’s serious about branding defines its unique selling points. And every business that emphasizes healthy workplace culture lives the uniqueness that defines its identity.

Both of those actions put companies in control—they command how they are perceived by employees, who then internalize and project this image. And this lets businesses control how they are perceived in the marketplace, which is a big driver of performance.

Given the choice, wouldn’t you want to be the one who calls these shots? Of course. Then you should strive to define your company’s unique culture, today and every day.

It’s important to understand the cyclical nature of culture and identity. No business is stagnant. It changes and grows, as do its people. Think of your workplace culture as evolutionary, just as your business is. Commit to an ongoing effort to celebrate the unique aspects of your employees, your teams, and your brand.

Why Differentiate?

Businesses adopt brands in order to draw clients and customers through trust. Goods and services may, indeed, be unique, but they have finite appeal. Trust seals relationships. Offering clients information about your company’s mission, vision, and values—expressed in a brand—gives them a better understanding of how and why you operate. And this builds confidence in you.

So, how to get that information out there? By allowing your company culture to project it. This means choosing employees who can reflect your mission and vision. It means forming teams that act on those values. And it means walking the fine line between being consistent and being fluid in a changing marketplace.

Unique at the Individual Level

Celebrating uniqueness at the employee level not only serves to strengthen your brand but to increase staff engagement with their work. Engagement helps you retain your best people as it furthers a distinct cultural awareness, perpetuating the cycle. Engagement also indicates a company’s respect and appreciation for the individual, increasing the motivation to perform well.

In my research into what fosters great culture, I found worker engagement to be fundamental. A 2017 Gallup survey of 31 million businesses pegged overall employee engagement at just 33 percent, compared with 71 percent of self-described engaged employees among the “world’s best organizations.” Those who fell into the last group felt that:

• their input was valued
• their personal integrity mattered
• their talents were put to good use

These results come from listening to the stories that individuals tell. Every employee brings life experience as well as skill to a task. Accommodating the different ways in which people think, work, and learn enriches the company’s larger skill set.

Does a direct report coach a youth sport? Encouragement and leadership will be strong suits. Is another employee a gifted illustrator? Tap that talent to add life to written reports or whiteboard sessions.

To leverage the unique abilities of your staff, set out to identify what sets individuals apart, and then seek to augment or complement those qualities in new hires.

Unique as a Group

Assembling a cast of talented individuals automatically confers uniqueness on your business. Invest in their passions. Offer to match fundraising efforts for their Little League team. Showcase their art or their volunteer organizations at informal events.

Joining your staff’s pursuits raises your visibility as a community-minded business, or simply as an employer who cares about its people, at or away from work. This brings you all closer as a team.

In fact, your shared experience offers a good opportunity to speak the same language, which can also define your culture and business identity. Take Walmart, for example. As part of my review of top cultures, I visited the corporation’s Walmart Museum in Bentonville, Arkansas, and learned that a proprietary language creates a sense of teamwork among the retailer’s 2.5 million employees in more than 10,000 stores.

This is a way to highlight cultural uniqueness that doesn’t cost a dime. It can be using acronyms as shorthand for common phrases, as Walmart does for “every day low prices” (EDLP). Or it could be classifying meeting priorities with memorable animal names, as my company does. Through consistent use, my whole staff instantly knows the level of urgency—from low to high—when a “cockroach,” “tiger team,” or “ostrich” meeting is called.

A common shorthand brings workers of all designations together and adds to group identity, which, in turn, helps define the brand it promotes.

Unique as a Brand

Culture, these days, has moved beyond workplace trappings, like Amazon’s famous pet-friendly offices or Google’s well-publicized bean bag chairs. The best companies take what is unique at the individual and team levels and pour it into their brand identities. Their cultures have moved from the literal to the figurative. That’s a plus.

After all, uniqueness is not cut-and-dried. Sometimes you can’t put your finger on it. It may even be stronger as an attitude, a feeling.

To arrive at this existential state, return to your company’s building blocks, its mission, vision, and value statements. You will know that yours are alive—not just posters on the wall—when all of your employees can identify the concepts they contain and demonstrate how these are expressed in their work. It is up to team leaders to keep them at top of mind, refer to them in meetings and conversations, and ask employees to find ways to incorporate them daily.

The trickle-down effect will become a tidal wave. People will bring up unique phrases and company philosophies in the break room and during off-hours. Vendors will be brought into the loop. Customers will notice subtle differences in their relations with your company, versus competitors.

This brings us back to the unique selling points of your products or services. Those are concrete—you can list them. Maybe they are convenience, good value for the price, or superior quality. In today’s crowded marketplace, lots of companies might claim those features. Add to them the unique story threads of your employees and organization, however, and you have got a brand that will always be a fresh and new as your culture.

Chris Dyer, author of “The Power of Company Culture: How Any Business Can Build A Culture That Improves Productivity, Performance And Profits” is the Founder and CEO of PeopleG2, a background check and intelligence firm based in California. To learn more about Chris, visit his website: www.ChrisDyer.com.

The post Uniqueness And Company Culture – A Renewable Cycle appeared first on Tanveer Naseer.

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Of the many issues leaders have to address, failure has to be one of the most challenging. No doubt this is why we love sharing motivational quotes about failure, like this one from Thomas Edison: “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.”

It’s easy to see why these quotes are so compelling as they almost transform failure into a positive experience that propels us to keep pushing ahead.

Perhaps this is why the idea of “failing fast” has garnered so much attention – that while failure is inevitable, it doesn’t mean we can’t get over it quickly.

Of course, the problem with these quotes and this notion of “failing fast” is that they address a singular aspect of failure. Namely, the easier part of failure – one where we learn from our mistakes to become stronger.

The truth is the hardest part of failure is grappling with those feelings of not living up to what we thought we could do or be [Share on Twitter].

Indeed, what makes failure so painful is how it makes us second-guess ourselves – our knowledge, our insights, our perceptions, and with it, whether we really have what it takes to succeed.

But the answer to this is not simply to tell our employees to “fail fast”. Rather, it’s to shift the conversation we have with them about it, and consequently, how they themselves frame this emotional experience and what they’ll do about it.

To illustrate what I mean, I’d like to share a personal story of how I helped my daughter Malaika recently through her own moment of grappling with failure to find her way back.

For the last few years, Malaika has been pushing herself to not only achieve a high academic record, but to be very active in various extracurricular activities, including being elected this year as Student Council President.

Coming off last year with an over 90% average and a diverse range of extracurricular activities, she was eager to get that acceptance letter for the Health Sciences program when she graduates from high school next month.

A few weeks ago on a Friday afternoon, Malaika got the news that she was on a waiting list to get in the program, while a few of her classmates who had slightly higher grades but no extracurricular activities were given immediate acceptance.

She came home from school that day completely dejected, trying to hold back her tears of frustration as she blurted in exasperation what was the point of working so hard and being so active in school if all she got for it was being on a waiting list.

After giving her space to vent her frustration and her fears of not getting in, I looked at her and said for the next two days we’re only going to do one thing – “we’re going to own the suck.”

And that’s exactly what we did – over that weekend, whenever she needed to share her frustrations over not doing better, or her fears of what will she do if she doesn’t get accepted, I’d just remind her that’s it’s okay to feel crappy because “today, we’re owning the suck”.

But at the end of that second day, I went over to Malaika and told her “Okay, for the last two days, we owned the suck. Now … what are you going to do about it?”

While she didn’t have an answer at that moment, about an hour later she came to me and told me how she had some ideas of what she could do. She could apply to a similar program in another educational institution. Or she can go into her second option and re-apply during the winter semester and do the required courses over the following summer to catch up.

In the end, Malaika came up with three different tactics to give her options of what to do, which ultimately proved to be unnecessary as two weeks later, she got word that she had been accepted into the Health Sciences program after all.

In sharing this story, what I hope to demonstrate is that while it’s understandable that we’d want to soften the blow of failure, sometimes the best thing we can do is “own the suck” [Share on Twitter].

That we give our employees – and sometimes, ourselves – the permission to accept the negative emotions that swirl around us in those moments of failure.

After all, this is what emotional intelligence is all about – it’s not just deciphering our employees’ emotional state, but empathizing with what they’re going through. Of what their reality is and how that’s impacting them, not just in terms of their productivity, but in terms of how it’s affecting them personally.

Not only does this give our employees the emotional space they need to deal with the pain that comes with failure, but as I did with Malaika, it sets the stage for us to help them gain clarity about what they can do about it going forward.

I’ve written before that while we might admire the achievements of successful people, it’s only through learning about their failures that they become relatable because we all know what that feels like, and in particular, how it makes us question what we’re capable of and what value we can create.

That’s why when it comes to failure, we can’t simply gloss over the pain. Sometimes, we just need to own it to help us truly grow and become stronger going forward [Share on Twitter].

Perhaps Brené Brown said it best when she wrote “When you numb your pain, you also numb your joy.”

As much as we might be conditioned to block out those emotional dark skies that failure casts around us, as leaders, we need to give our employees that space to live in that moment, to empathize with them that yes, this hurts. And as I told my daughter, that in that moment, we’re going to own the suck.

And by giving employees space to own the outcome of failure, they will find within themselves the resolve to do something about it [Share on Twitter].

In so doing, we not only create conditions for them to ultimately learn from this failure, but we help them discover their own courage, their own story. A narrative that will not only fuel their drive to press ahead, but will serve them well the next time they encounter failure, especially after seeing how we truly have their backs in wanting them to succeed and thrive under our leadership.

The post Do You Allow Your Employees To “Own The Suck”? appeared first on Tanveer Naseer.

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“What do you do about the meeting after the meeting?”

That’s a question I was asked recently in one of my Q&A sessions held after a corporate training event I conducted recently. I’ve been rolling that question around in my mind ever since, not because there’s anything particular unique about it. On the contrary, it’s because of how familiar the underlying answer I gave to this question is to another workplace problem I was asked about.

This other question surfaced during a working session I had with another leader a few weeks prior who wanted my thoughts about something he referred to as the “dour face syndrome”.

In this case, this leader shared how the Great Recession had hit his organization hard, but over the past 3-4 years, they had not only turned things around, but the company was growing at a faster rate than before. As he put it, “we had not only returned to greener pastures, but the grass was now better than it had ever been.”

But every day when he went to work, all he saw were “dour faces”. So one Friday afternoon, he decided to throw a company BBQ party, where employees were given company T-shirts and baseball hats:

“Everyone was having a great time, laughing and playing these various games we had set up around the company parking lot. It really seemed to turn things around. But then, come Monday when I walked in the door, those sullen faces had returned and I found myself once again leading a team suffering from dour face syndrome. So what am I supposed to do to get rid of these gloomy faces and the negative mood it creates?”

I’m sure some of you can probably relate to this anecdote with your own version of a “dour face syndrome.” What’s interesting for me, though, is how both these scenarios reflect a misplaced focus on the part of both leaders. And that is how they’re trying to cure the symptoms without addressing the underlying cause.

In both cases, these leaders were focusing on behaviours that garnered their attention as being problems that required immediate correction. And while they may succeed in putting a stop to these problematic behaviours, they haven’t dealt with what’s the underlying cause that lead these behaviours to show up in the first place.

And sadly, this narrow-focused approach is a lot more common than we might think, even amongst the most well-intended of leaders.

After all, in our pursuit to “get things done” – or in some cases, to just get through the day – it’s easy to limit our focus to those symptoms churning on the surface of our organization. That we look for that magic pill to silence issues that distract us from the work we’d rather spend our time doing.

Unfortunately, all this serves to do is shift our efforts to healing symptoms that affects us negatively, as opposed to the real pain points that affect our employees in terms of how they view their role within our organization, and with it, what they’re willing to contribute.

In other words, if we are to be true in our leadership, we can’t make our focus be about what bothers us, but rather the adverse conditions impacting those we lead [Share on Twitter].

Granted, it’s almost a commentary of our times that examinations to understand the deeper causes behind the issues we see bubbling on the surface are often met with resentment, under the guise that doing so only serves to divide than heal and unify.

Perhaps one of the ironies I’ve found in these conversations with these leaders is while they understand their job is to map out the long-term view for their organization, they fail to recognize how this is informed by the realities their employees face today.

Indeed, a leader’s ability to chart their organization’s path forward is connected to their ability to understand the current reality of their employees [Share on Twitter].

That it’s only through understanding what challenges and obstacles your employees are grappling with that we can better understand and deliver what they need from us to move forward.

That’s why we shouldn’t simply gloss over negative outlooks with pithy, motivational quotes or inspirational chants. Rather, as I shared with a group of leaders a few weeks ago, sometimes we need to let our employees know that it’s okay “to own the suck.” To be open and honest that things are not great; that we’re frustrated and maybe even doubting that we’re on the right path.

Of course, when we accept the truth about what’s going wrong today, we have to be honest about our part in doing something about it [Share on Twitter].

That as much as we might treat the symptoms that garner our attention, we also not hide behind the stories we tell ourselves about who we are or what our organization is about. Especially if we don’t want to end up gathering dust as yet another name on that list of organizational has-beens.

It’s a problem that as leaders we can’t afford to disregard, especially as we continue to operate in an environment where things are not only moving faster than before, but where there’s a growing tendency to view the world in terms of how we choose to see it, as opposed to how it really is.

That narrowing of our collective viewpoints is particularly dangerous for leaders of today’s organizations as, with this impeding war for talent that’s now creeping upon us, it’s critical that we demonstrate that our leadership is not limited to what’s important to us, but to what matters to those we have the responsibility to lead.

The truth is our leadership should be about resolving the issues that prevent our employees from delivering their best, and not simply the things that get under our skin [Share on Twitter].

Only then can we move from a state of perpetual reaction, of racing to put out one fire after another, to truly embracing the vision that binds our collective efforts together and what we need to do next to make that vision our new reality.

The post Are You Curing Only The Symptoms Of What Ails Your Team? appeared first on Tanveer Naseer.

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While there’s little question that organizations need to be more responsive change, the real question today’s leaders need to address is are they at ease with taking risks, and more importantly, are the risks they’re taking the right ones? This question lies at the heart of my conversation with my guest Doug Sundheim in this latest episode of my leadership podcast, “Leadership Biz Cafe”.

Doug is the president of the The Sundheim Group, a consulting agency that focuses on strategy execution and team development and whose clients include Time Warner, SAP, International Baccalaureate Organization, and Morgan Stanley.

In addition to being a regular contributor to the Harvard Business Review, Doug is the author the book, “Taking Smart Risks, How Sharp Leaders Win When Stakes Are High”.

Over the course of this episode, Doug and I discuss his approach to smart risk-taking, including:

  • What organizations often get wrong with the “innovate or die” approach in terms of what they should be focusing on as the risk they should be taking.
  • How finding something worth finding for, seeing the future now, and acting and learning fast form the foundation for smart risk-taking.
  • The 3 D’s that lead us to find what we’re willing to fight for and be willing to take a risk on.
  • Why scheduling time in our day for creative thinking can help us be smarter about the risks we choose to take.
  • What are smart failures and why are they important in terms of taking smart risks that drive future growth.

I’d appreciate it if you could help your support help support future episodes of this leadership podcast by taking a moment to rate my show on Google Play, Stitcher Radio, or iTunes.

It’s worth noting that my leadership podcast was recognized by Inc. As one of “12 podcasts that will make you a better leader”. So please help me get the word out about my show.

Click on the player below to listen to the podcast:

[Running time: 44 minutes]

Noteworthy links:

  • Buy Doug Sundheim’s book “Taking Smart Risks” on Amazon (link automatically redirects to Amazon.ca for Canadian readers and other international Amazon sites depending on your location).
  • Learn more about Doug’s work at The Sundheim Group.
  • Watch my TEDx talk on YouTube.

The post How Leaders Can Get More Comfortable With Taking Risks appeared first on Tanveer Naseer.

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The following is a guest piece by CEO David Mattson.

Over the years, we’ve worked with a lot of CEOs and others in senior leadership positions, and I’m often asked what the very best corporate leaders have in common when building their teams. The answer is simple: Great leaders are always recruiting for tomorrow, rather than just for today.

Let me explain what I mean by that. Mediocre or poor leaders recruit only when there’s an unexpected, immediate opening that they must quickly fill. They’re basically in damage control mode, focused only on the short term. But when the emergency of that sudden vacancy passes, they once again put recruiting aside.

Superior leaders, by contrast, are always in recruiting mode, and always thinking in the long term about the talent they need to attract and retain. They constantly ask themselves whether a new business contact could make a contribution at their organization. They never stop looking for people who can help them achieve their vision for where the company will be in three, four or five years in the future.

Great leaders also know the difference between “willing” and “able.” They look objectively at their current staff, and identify what the specific talent requirements are going to be – not just for today, but for the company’s next level of growth. They ascertain all the organization’s talent gaps, and then they look closely at the existing team.

What they usually discover is that some people on the payroll are able to help them close those gaps, but unwilling to do so. These team members present extremely limited growth potential within the company and may even present a cultural mismatch.

People who are willing but unable to fill the talent gaps present a much different challenge. Great leaders know they have a responsibility to provide these people with the tools they need to build their skills and experience so they can make a contribution toward the company’s success.

Some employees, when supported over time via a personalized learning and development plan, will grow dramatically and be able to help close the talent gap; others won’t. The key is to identify which is which, and to find the best way to utilize and grow the internal talent.

When we take into account our current staff’s potential for growth, though, we typically find that there are still major gaps we need to fill to move our organization where it needs to be within three to five years. And that’s where the “always be recruiting” mindset really applies.

To be a truly successful leader, you need great people. And to get great people, you need to constantly focus on building your talent bench. Whenever you meet a talented, highly motivated person who looks like a good match with your organization’s culture and its major goals, you need to be prepared to start the networking, recruiting, and interviewing processes … and to involve others in your organization in that process.

Great leaders know that an organization’s talent pool is everything. They also know that the interview process is a key element in the sales cycle for leaders. They manage a continuous pipeline of high-quality recruitment discussions. As a result, they build deep, broad networks of potential employees and allies who are both willing and able to help them move forward the organization’s long-term goals.

These leaders not only create a competitive edge for their organization over time – they also reduce their own stress levels, because they have plenty of “back-up talent” in place. That means that the departure of a key contributor isn’t necessarily a crisis that threatens the whole organization, but an opportunity to hire a new star with the potential to shine.

David Mattson is the CEO and President of Sandler Training, an international training and consulting organization headquartered in the North America. His most recent book is “The Road to Excellence: 6 Leadership Strategies to Build a Bulletproof Business”.

The post Building The Bench Is Everyone’s Job – Including Leaders appeared first on Tanveer Naseer.

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The following is a guest piece by Alex Vorobieff.

A healthy relationship with feedback exists when you can unemotionally assess the results of your business and then rationally determine what inputs or actions you need to change.

Denial is a very frequent manifestation of an unhealthy relationship. It’s important to honestly evaluate and improve your relationship with feedback before you implement them. Otherwise, you can spend time and money and still not eliminate the cause of your frustration or transform your company.

1. Time to Take Stock
The key to unlocking the starting gate is getting a triangulated assessment of your relationship. Is it healthy or unhealthy, and to what degree? If you have an unhealthy feedback relationship, you will need to do some work before you can benefit from implementing any business alignment tools.

With a verified healthy relationship, however, you have an important key to exit the circle of frustration. You can use a number of tools to assess your relationship with feedback. These include monitoring your internal dialogue, searching for emotional no-fly zones, looking for missed feedback, and asking others for their perspectives.

2. Monitor Your Internal Dialogue
Start listening to your internal dialogue. How do you respond when you learn things didn’t go according to plan? Do you react emotionally, with declarative statements, or do you look for the root cause of the problem, using objective, truth-seeking questions?

Write down your internal dialogue, exactly the way it plays in your head. After a week or two, revisit it objectively, as though you were reading a published diary from a historical figure. Do you find emotional statements or truth-seeking questions—especially when you receive unexpected feedback? Does it honestly match the internal dialogue you remember before you started monitoring it?

While you listen for your internal responses, you can search for emotional no-fly zones.

3. Search for Emotional No-Fly Zones
Listen to your internal dialogue during meetings. If it were recorded, what would the transcript look like? Do you fend people off from opening certain issues for discussion? Are people afraid to engage, ask questions, and probe assumptions?

Don’t worry if you start to do this and you’re a little shocked. It’s a good sign if it is easy to determine that you have a poor relationship with feedback, because that is the condition keeping you stuck in the circle of frustration in the first place.

By identifying it, you are already improving your relationship with feedback. Seeing the situation accurately is more than half the problem.

4. Look for Missed Feedback—the Silent Killer
If you aren’t finding any feedback to use to judge your reactions, you should be concerned. Feedback always exists, but sometimes it is unspoken.

Missed feedback is the silent killer. Pay attention the next time you propose an idea. Does your team withhold feedback? It’s not uncommon for subordinates to avoid giving feedback to someone who has a poor relationship with feedback. It’s a survival mechanism.

When customers are boiling angry, many will provide feedback. But have you ever been a disappointed customer and just thought it was easier to find another provider, rather than tell the company what you thought? Or when you were an employee, was it easier to just leave a company rather than say what the boss didn’t want to hear?

Once your team becomes more comfortable giving you feedback, you can then take the most difficult step: asking them to describe your relationship with feedback.

5. Ask Others for Their Perspectives
This is the true test. You have listened internally to assess your relationship with feedback, and you’ve observed your team’s reactions. In a way that encourages candor, you can now ask the people around you how they view your feedback relationship.

First, think about what you expect to hear. When you ask others to describe your relationship with feedback, how do you think they are going to describe it? Could you handle an unexpected description?

Answer the following questions honestly. No excuses or rationalizing it. If people felt they could respond openly, without “hurting your feelings” or burning a bridge with you, how would they answer these questions about you?

  • How do you respond when things don’t go according to plan: with emotional statements or with questions seeking to find the cause?
  • How do you respond when someone tells you something that conflicts with your perspective on an issue?
  • Do you have sacred cows or emotional no-fly zones?
  • Do people feel comfortable bringing up any legitimate business issue with you?

Now think about whom you will ask. Who can answer and is in the position to state his or her opinion without fear of upsetting you? This may include members of your leadership team, trusted advisors, your former employees, or even your spouse.

It can also be helpful to have an independent third party perform this assessment. This allows participants to respond more honestly, because feedback can be delivered in aggregate. Again, these answers may be hard to hear.

But the bigger the variance between your perception and how others perceive your relationship with feedback, the bigger the anchor keeping you stuck before you even cross the starting line. And the good news is that once you’ve done it, now you know. You have started to confront reality by giving yourself an unobstructed view of it.

6. Assess Your Team
An organization is generally a reflection of its leader’s habits and decisions. That said, once you improve your ability to confront reality, you need to make sure the people around you can as well. Look at your team and identify which people have unhealthy relationships with feedback. Who defends the status quo? Who addresses problems by asking rational questions about the root cause of a problem, rather than reacting with emotion? Which team members seem the most open to learning and growing their skills and capabilities?

It’s important to identify both the people who confront reality and the people who avoid it. Those who confront it will support you on the journey ahead, when change gets difficult. Those who avoid it will likely want to stop the process and turn back. You will need to talk to this latter group before you begin to transform your company. Let them know that you are committed to making this change.

You will very likely lose some people during this process. However, keep in mind that you are going to lose either the A players who want to work on an aligned team or the people who are okay with the current environment. Whom you keep is up to you.

7. Pull It Together
Because you are the leader, your personal starting position will inevitably be very close to your organization’s overall starting position. Once you have verified your starting position and that of your team, you can now start to prepare for the alignment journey ahead.

Based on the assessment process already described, you may have discovered that you have a poor relationship with feedback. Let that sink in. Can you handle that? Or do you want to deny it and put the book down? Things will not get better until you change this relationship.

8. Cross the Line
Take a good, hard look at yourself and your relationship with feedback. Be honest, and spend some time and consideration figuring out exactly where you are stuck, the position of your team, and, ideally, the current state of the company. Once you’ve identified your position on the starting line, congratulations: you’ve found the personalized starting line to transform your company.

Alex Vorobieff is the author of “Transform Your Company” and the founder and CEO of The Alex Vorobieff Company, a premier business-transformation company specializing in helping large companies get their team members on the same page to achieve desired outcomes.

The post Strong Leaders Need A Healthy Relationship With Feedback appeared first on Tanveer Naseer.

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Let’s face it, all of us want to be inspired at work. So why do studies show that over 70% of us feel uninspired about the work we do? And more importantly, what can we do about it? Those questions serve as the focus of this engaging, insightful, and at times humorous conversation with former Proctor&Gamble executive, Scott Mautz.

Scott is the CEO of Profound Performance – a keynote, workshop, coaching, and online training company that helps you “Work, Lead, & Live Fulfilled”. Scott is also a former Procter & Gamble executive who ran several of the company’s largest multi-billion dollar businesses.

In addition to writing a weekly column for Inc. Magazine on employee engagement and workplace culture, Scott is the author of two books, his latest being “Find the Fire: Ignite Your Inspiration and Make Work Exciting Again”, which serves as the focus of our conversation.

Over the course of the episode, Scott and I discuss a number of ideas and insights from various studies that demonstrate how we can be inspired at work and thrive, including:

  • The one question we should be asking ourselves to truly be inspired at work.
  • How to reframe your fear of failure so that it no longer prevents you from embracing change.
  • How we can overcome our fear of change by finding our anchor.
  • Why only 15% of the criticism we receive is useful in terms of inspiring us to push ourselves to do and be better (and why it’s our brains fault that criticism in general is so painful to hear).
  • 3 key insights into how we can to fuel enduring learning and growth in our work and personal lives.
  • A simple trick proven by research that can help anyone discover opportunities for learning and growth that will fuel your inspiration.
  • How we can be inspired by an uninspiring boss.

I’d appreciate it if you could help your support help support future episodes of this leadership podcast by taking a moment to rate my show on Google Play, Stitcher Radio, or iTunes.

It’s worth noting that my leadership podcast was recognized by Inc. As one of “12 podcasts that will make you a better leader”. So please help me get the word out about my show.

Click on the player below to listen to the podcast:

[Running time: 51 minutes]

Noteworthy links:

  • Buy Scott Mautz’s book “Find the Fire” on Amazon (link automatically redirects to Amazon.ca for Canadian readers and other international Amazon sites depending on your location).
  • Learn more about Scott’s work (and get a copy of his free workbook gift) at ScottMautz.com.
  • Read my article we discuss during the show “The One Thing Exceptional Leaders Never Forget”.

The post How To Reignite Our Inspiration At Work appeared first on Tanveer Naseer.

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Recently, Tesla and Space X founder and CEO Elon Musk shared a powerful message on Twitter about his company’s recent launch of the Falcon Heavy rocket with the Tesla-driving Starman inside:

Why Falcon Heavy & Starman?

Life cannot just be about solving one sad problem after another. There need to be things that inspire you, that make you glad to wake up in the morning and be part of humanity. That is why we did it. We did for you. https://t.co/5STO7q4wro

— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) March 11, 2018

Now I’ve read many articles about Elon Musk and the various lessons on leadership we can learn from him. But reading his tweet above really struck a chord with me, in large part due to something I’ve observed in recent conversations I’ve had with new and experienced leaders.

What I’ve noticed is leaders having this myopic focus on just trying to ‘get things done’; that they’re able to put out as many fires as they can in the hopes of having a moment to simply catch their breath from the daily tsunami of demands for their time, attention, and resources.

Understandably, this is the by-product of years of operating in this faster workplace environment, where we’ve all been told to not only embrace disruption and innovation, but to throw in a good dose of agility into our organizational mix as well to avoid the risk of our organization getting caught standing still … or worse, being left behind.

And yet, while we can comment extensively on the future-proofing these aspects bring to an organization’s longevity, in the context of Elon Musk’s quote above, it brought to mind something else as well.

I’m sure most of you have come across this idea of imagining being on our deathbed and asking ourselves if we’d regret the choices we made over the course of our lives. In most cases, this exercise is used to motivate us to make better decisions and choices today so as to avoid that outcome when we arrive at death’s door.

But to be honest here, I think this exercise is why so many of us opt not to do something more meaningful today. After all, our lifespans are actually getting longer, with more and more people living to 100 and beyond (in fact, there’s a senior citizen residence here in Montreal that was featured in the news for having 20 residents that are 100 years old and older).

And with all that time left on our clock (hopefully) stretching out before us, what does it matter if today, we’re only focused on just getting things done? So what if we’re not doing more than that? We have so many more years ahead of us to do more with our time and with our lives.

That’s why I think we need to change our focus from the end of our lives to today. More specifically, that we have a greater intentionality on what we’re choosing to do today.

In other words, the way we challenge ourselves to believe in a brighter future is not by fear of regret, but in the hopeful aspirations of who we can become [Share on Twitter].

That’s why I think the question we should be asking ourselves is not are we doing what we can to avoid being on our deathbed looking back with regret over the paths not taken.

Rather, the question we should ask ourselves is this – would you be willing to waste a year doing less than what you’re truly capable of achieving just to get things done? Would that be something you’d willingly settle for?

Now I know at the beginning of the year, we’d all answer with a resounding “No!”, as the arrival of a new year instills us full of hope and aspirations for what we can achieve.

But as leaders, it’s also our job to ensure that this sense of optimism, hope, and belief in ourselves and our potential is not simply a flickering flame that shines brightly at the start of the year. Instead, we need to use our leadership to feed it and transform it into this unstoppable force that takes on a life of its own, thanks to the will and power of those under your care.

It’s what Elon Musk is telling all of us as leaders – our leadership can’t be simply about getting things done or solving problems. It has to be about inspiring the best in those we lead [Share on Twitter].

Yes, that sounds like a tall order – and without question, it most definitely is – which is why so many are quick to dismiss this notion, arguing that we’re not Elon Musk.

And yet, the reason why we can’t dismiss this idea is because through his own exceptional leadership, Elon Musk has proven that it can be done. That we can do it.

Just as Nelson Mandela, Viola Desmond, Martin Luther King, Jr., Winston Churchill, Mohandas Ghandhi, and Wangari Maathai have demonstrated through their leadership as being the key ingredient that drove their success – we’re not defined by the limits we face, but by how we choose to rise above them to improve the way things are [Share on Twitter].

Of course, the point here is not for us to measure ourselves and our efforts against such remarkable and noteworthy leaders. Rather, the point is to recognize that what made them exceptional leaders was their willingness to use their leadership to do more than “solving one sad problem after another”. That they honoured their responsibility to lead others by painting a vision that people were drawn to commit their best efforts towards making a reality.

That as Elon Musk so eloquently points out true leaders are not driven by what benefits them, but by what benefits those around them [Share on Twitter].

Indeed, the true measure of leadership is not how well we manage processes, but how well we inspire others to aspire to be more [Share on Twitter]. That we demonstrate that our work lives don’t simply revolve around clearing off our To-Do lists, but involve asking ourselves what have I done today to move one step closer to achieving something that matters.

So while we may not lead social or political change that reshapes our community and country for the better, we can use our influence and our voice to create both an organizational vision and workplace environment where people are driven to bring their best selves to the work they do.

In so doing, we’ll become our own version of that exceptional leader that inspires the rest of us to believe in our potential to do the extraordinary, and achieve our own form of greatness.

The post The One Thing Exceptional Leaders Never Forget appeared first on Tanveer Naseer.

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The following is a guest piece by Stanford professor Dr. Leah Weiss.

Modern leadership training is being taken over by a clever but misguided trend. One that’s filled with yoga rooms and entertainment-infused buffet lunches. It’s a train that many corporations are jumping onto, but the intent is often confused and therefore the execution is weak.

The idea that organizations will successfully attract the best talent by peddling a laid-back compassionate culture is bound to fail. It will fail because it leaves the heavy lifting required in actually impactful leadership cultivation relegated to the role of little more than an afterthought.

Granted, some cultures actually get it right (Zappos is a great example) but most are still getting it very, very, wrong. Injecting a dose of compassion into a toxic or muddled corporate culture isn’t going to through entertainment and perks is bound to fail. That’s because strong leadership and a healthy culture requires an integrated approach to compassion – it can’t be a half-assed afterthought.

Real compassion in the context of leadership and corporate culture comes down to seeking, hiring, and developing leaders that earnestly give a damn about colleagues, communities, the larger world. It is doable – and here’s how to make it happen.

1. Hire With Intent
Hiring based on technical (or “hard”) skills is important, but equally as important is recognizing a candidate’s soft skills. Things like creativity, the ability to problem solve, demonstrated intellectual humility, and compassion must be at the top of the list next to any software or degreed accolades. Soft skills are trickier to recognize but can be seen by asking candidates to problem-solve on the spot (much in the way that Google does with its hiring methods).

2. Make Role and Purpose Clear
A recent study found that 64% of people have no idea what their job is. Instead of hiring leadership based on recommendations and resumes, hire based on a clear understanding of what a person’s role is. Ask leaders to detail what their tasks will be, what they should commit to, and point out how they fit into a company’s culture.

Further, make sure that leaders understand the larger puzzle. Each person within an organization has a specific purpose and fulfills a specific piece of the larger puzzle. Leaders must understand how everyone within a team fits and be able to explain that precise piece to employees at every turn. The blind leading the blind is a recipe for disaster.

3. Cultivate Compassion
It’s hard to break away from the mindset that compassion has no place in the work space. But studies have shown that genuinely caring about a co-worker or employee has a positive impact on a company’s bottom-line. A culture that has a base of compassion also fosters employees that are more engaged, happier, and less stressed.

Employees that enjoy being at work – and included in a culture built on compassion – are more productive and efficient. Constructing a culture with compassion at its core begins with leadership training and this can’t be stressed enough.

Leaders must first learn self-compassion and then learn how to effectively spread those same considerations to employees. The other interesting thing about compassion training is that it’s contagious – it begins with leadership and spreads rapidly through a culture resulting in a happier and more productive company.

4. Build A Safe Place
The workplace should be a safe place. It should be an environment where employees feel okay to share things like feelings and speak up when something is bothersome, invasive, or misunderstood. Safe corporate culture doesn’t have to come with cuddle rooms, but it does have to come with team meetings that are open and honest.

Leadership training should be based on the development of a safe space. Employees, as well as leaders, should be able to speak up at any turn and not feel unsafe, judged, or fearful.

5. Fix a Broken Culture
A culture that has run rampant for too long might seem unfixable, but even disastrous culture stories make great lessons. It is possible to turn a toxic culture around by reframing leadership education and goals and by hiring new leaders that embody soft skills. This begins with training and development that is rooted in the tenants of purpose, mindfulness, and compassion.

In an ideal world, toxic cultures can be turned around with existing leadership intact through compassion training. But we can’t be blind idealists. Firing leadership across the board isn’t the answer though some leaders may not adjust to new cultural concepts. A mix of old and new is often the hiring formula required to move away from culture of fear and uncertainty towards a culture of care.

Leah Weiss, Ph.D. is a Stanford Business School Professor, corporate consultant, and speaker. Leah is an expert in corporate mindfulness, compassion, and purpose. She is also author of the book “How We Work: Live Your Purpose, Reclaim Your Sanity, and Embrace the Daily Grind”. To learn more about Leah’s work, visit her website at www.leahweissphd.com.

The post 5 Steps To Cultivate Compassion In Leadership appeared first on Tanveer Naseer.

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The following is a guest piece by Derek Lidow.

Most people assume that successful entrepreneurs are created solely based on how innovative and groundbreaking their new idea is. We fantasize about coming up with that invention or idea that solves a gargantuan problem for a lot of people and therefore is the main driver that propels businesses to be wildly successful.

It might amaze many people to know that successful entrepreneurs are rarely building on new ideas or disrupting existing industries. In fact, this is almost never the case.

While this might be a letdown for the budding inventor, this is great news for aspiring entrepreneurs to know that there are ways, right now, to help their businesses succeed without being hit on the head by an apple and coming up with a new scientific theory.

Let’s look into the history of some household entrepreneurs and their industries. Ford did not think up the combustion engine or automobiles, Edison did not think up incandescent light bulbs, Larry Page did not think up search engines. Disney didn’t think up animated films, or even amusement parks.

These great entrepreneurs did not wake up out of a deep sleep and begin drawing the next big thing. No, they succeeded by working tirelessly to tune existing ideas and inventions in ways that excited vast numbers of new consumers.

Ideas are not the keys to entrepreneurial success. Even a once in a lifetime, an unprecedented, world-changing, patent-protected new idea won’t guarantee success. Business history is littered with brilliant new ideas and inventions that were not able to sustain themselves on their novelty or necessity alone and were therefore dismal failures.

Poor leadership and poor execution can sink even the greatest ideas.

Do you find that hard to believe? Well, think about this. No new idea comes formed ready for delivery to the market. The more unique the idea, the less any human is able to predict or assess all the complexities of how supply and demand will evolve. Nobody has ever shown they have infallible, let alone reliable, instincts for anticipating how customers and markets receive new ideas. Sure, you can do a ton of research to forecast how customers and suppliers will react to an incremental change to an existing product or service.

The reason new ideas are not a slam dunk success story is because you still have to package, market and sell them. This is where some people make a huge mistake. They rest in the novelty of the idea alone. People who are building on old ideas already know they have to go into it ready to convince their potential customers why they are the best.

Whether new or old ideas, all successful entrepreneurs ultimately operate under the same guiding principle: They make their customers so happy that they gladly give them money in return.

Can it really be that simple? Well, that’s what history has shown.

Look at your own buying preferences.

Have you ever paid a few dollars more for something to get better quality or to have a better experience?

Ever gone to the “other guy”, who charges a little extra but provides excellent customer service?

Do you spend extra money on a movie ticket because the chairs are more comfortable or the theater cleaner or the popcorn better than at the $1 theater?

As customers ourselves, we will pay to control our outcome. One horrific experience with a product or transaction can make many people take their money elsewhere. On the other hand, we will throw our money at things that have delivered for us in the past.

Though our businesses and products have gotten more complicated over the last hundred or so years, the customer’s basic desire to have a good experience and be satisfied have not.

Business transactions boil down to three essential truths. If you are in business yourself, these are the three most important focal points for your business experience.

First, is the earliest and most basic form of all entrepreneurship—trade. “I will give you the fur from the antelope I killed (my product) in return for you giving me a basket full of grain (your currency).” The antelope fur will make one person happy, while the other person will be happier with the basket of grain. Trade is at the core of the entrepreneurial transaction, whether you’re trading real estate, products, or services.

Second, this unifying principle of entrepreneurship conveys an essential insight: emotions drive all actions, including the actions required to complete a transaction. Clearly, then, the positive emotions associated with delivering a product or service must be big enough to swamp the negative emotions associated with handing over money.

Entrepreneurs who overlook or forget this principle become frustrated and distracted when somebody doesn’t buy their product or service, even though they said they liked it. A person who likes something that you do or make may not like it enough to actually want to part with their money to buy it. Building a product or service to be more positively emotive will increase the chances people will want to pay real money for it.

Third, understanding the emotional state of your potential customer pre- and post-sale is critical. The jargon of value propositions causes many businesses and entrepreneurs to neglect monitoring or measuring the emotive responses of customers once they have received the product or service.

Our prehistoric entrepreneur could see that antelope fur kept his customer warm in the winter and therefore knew he could barter away the furs of all the antelope he could kill. A modern developer of Android apps has a much harder time knowing whether his or her app actually made the person who downloaded it happy enough to recommend it to others so that her business can grow and prosper. Most don’t even care to find out—and most app developers fail.

Further, to sell a product or service to a business, you usually have to make many people simultaneously happy. And because business people may feel pressured in different ways at work and at home, making businesses happy enough to buy can be enormously challenging.

Entrepreneurs who cease to control or care about how they deliver happiness will ultimately fail. And when you cease to control or care about being rewarded for delivering ever more happiness to ever more customers, it’s time to sell or retire.

Entrepreneurship has not changed. Often, today’s more complex entrepreneurship terminology—phrases like “value proposition” and “product market fit”—can obscure what it has always been about. Students and other aspiring entrepreneurs I counsel get distracted by such terms, particularly when these terms are introduced before the aspiring entrepreneur knows what they want to do. But aspiring entrepreneurs know intuitively how to answer when I ask, “What can you do to make some group of people so happy that they’ll give you lots of money?”

Derek Lidow is the former CEO of International Rectifier and the founder of iSuppli, a leading market research firm, which he sold in 2010 for $100 million to global information leader IHS.

He also has written two books on entrepreneurship: “Building on Bedrock: What Sam Walton, Walt Disney, and Other Great Self-Made Entrepreneurs Can Teach Us About Building Valuable Companies” and “Startup Leadership“. He is currently a professor at Princeton University, where he teaches entrepreneurship, innovation and creativity. To learn more about Derek’s work, visit his website: Dereklidow.com.

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