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Karen Briggs
Tuesday is newaza nite. For this session, we will learn the Briggs Sankaku, which is actually more of a turnover into osaekomi. This is the favored newaza technique of four-times World Champion Karen Briggs of Great Britain.

We will also revise the Keylock Roll that Connie Ramsay showed us last Tuesday. It's important to revise techniques we've learned in order to seal it into memory. Besides, the Keylock Roll has a similar entry to the Briggs Sankaku so it is related in a way.

Lastly, we will work on the British Rolling Strangle, something that Connie showed us as well last Tuesday. Practice makes perfect so revise this technique, we shall.

After the groundwork session is done, we will do a bit of gripping work. I'll go through some gripping basics, theory, practical applications and so on.

Then, we'll end with randori, first with newaza and then finally with tachi-waza. Should be a good session.
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Montreal, July 14, 2019 – The day was cut short for Canadian judokas Mohab El Nahas and Zachary Burt on Sunday at the Budapest Grand Prix. Both were fighting in -90 kg, and neither of them got a ranking.

Mohab El Nahas, 53rd on the world ranking, started off strong after winning by ippon against Chinese Xuewen Wang. “In this fight, Mohab El Nahas proved he was better than his opponent, both tactically and technically,” said national team coach Michel Almeida.

El Nahas couldn’t keep up and was eliminated by ippon in the next round against Dominican Robert Florentino, ranked 26th in the world.

The Canadian and the Dominican had recently fought each other in a bronze-medal match at the Pan American Championships held in Lima last April. Florentino had also won that bout. “From previous results, it was fair to assume the Dominican would be the stronger one today. Mohab would need to be flawless to win the fight, and today was not yet the day for him to perform like that,” explained Michel Almeida.

“I had already fought him at the Pan Ams, so I was ready and knew what to do, but he surprised me with a move I never saw him do before and he scored. I’m looking forward to the rematch already, and I’ll be working a lot harder to be able to beat strong opponents like him,” commented El Nahas.

Zachary Burt, ranked 28th in the world, also fought the same opponent he had faced during the bronze-medal match at the Pan American Championships, Peruvian Yuta Galaterra Villar. Unlike his teammate, Burt had won his bout and the bronze medal in Lima.

This time, Villar, 50th on the world ranking, defeated him. “We were expecting a better performance from him,” said Almeida.

The Ontarian was defeated by waza-ari, prematurely ending his tournament. “The Peruvian was in a better shape today. He caught me in the beginning and I was unable to come back to tie and force overtime, or to score a full point,” explained Burt.

The Canadian team leaves the Budapest Grand Prix with a medal for Kelita Zupancic. The Ontarian judoka stood on the third step of the podium in the -70 kg category on Saturday.

-30-

Written by Sportcom for Judo Canada

Information:
Patrick Esparbès
Chief Operating Officer
Judo Canada
(514) 668-6279
p.esparbes@judocanada.org

The post Canadian Judokas Learning in Budapest appeared first on Judo Canada.

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PlanetJudo by Stilman Davis - 2d ago
On Thursday, July 11, 2019, Gerald Wee, devoted husband, father, grandfather, son and brother passed away surrounded by his family. Jerry was born in Detroit, Michigan on January 3, 1951. He graduated from Cass Tech High School and went on the Wayne State University. Jerry started judo at the age of 14 in 1964. He …

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Zupancic (middle right)

Montreal, July 13, 2019 – Canadian judoka Kelita Zupancic won a bronze medal in -70 kg on Saturday at the Budapest Grand Prix, in Hungary.

Ranked 13th on the world ranking, Zupancic defeated Brazilian Maria Portela, 6th in the world, to earn her spot on the podium.

After winning her first two fights, the athlete from Whitby, in Ontario, was defeated in overtime by Spanish Maria Bernabeu, ranked 15th and eventual silver medallist at the tournament.

Canadian then won in repechage against Tunisian Nihel Landolsi, earning her a ticket for the bronze-medal bout.

“The star of the day was obviously Kelita Zupancic. Through a systematic mix of grip fighting, strategic attacks and her trademark ground work, she was able to succeed in all but her quarterfinal match,” said coach Michel Almeida.

Also fighting in -70 kg, Emily Burt was eliminated after her first and only bout. After getting a bye through the first round, the Ontarian was defeated by Portuguese Barbaro Timo.

Good Performance for the Men’s Team

On the men’s side, in -73 kg, Antoine Bouchard was eliminated in the third round after Uzbek Giyosjon Boboev won the match. Bouchard had previously defeated Somon Makhmadbekov, from Tajikistan, and Timo Allemann, from Switzerland.

Also in -73 kg, Constantin Gabun was eliminated in the second round by the eventual gold medallist, Kosovar Akil Gjakova. Michel Almeida had some good comments on Gabun’s performance.

“Despite not achieving any classification, Constantin Gabun left a good impression of his fighting abilities. This was his second Grand Prix, after his debut in Montreal last week,” he added.

On Friday, Quebecois Jacob Valois was also eliminated after his second bout in -66 kg. After defeating Dominican Wander Mateo, the Montreal Grand Prix bronze medallist lost against Cuban Osniel Solis.

On Sunday, Canadians Zachary Burt and Mohab El Nahas will both be competing in the -90 kg category.

-30-

Written by Sportcom for Judo Canada

Information:
Patrick Esparbès
Chief Operating Officer
Judo Canada
(514) 668-6279
p.esparbes@judocanada.org

The post Kelita Zupancic Wins Bronze at the Budapest Grand Prix appeared first on Judo Canada.

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Muscle memory is crucial in most sports and certainly in judo.

I recall watching a documentary on sports and in a segment on swimming, the coach talked about getting his swimmers to do the same drills over and over again so that muscle memory sets in. I thought to myself, "Wow, even in swimming muscle memory is important". I guess when milliseconds count -- and make the difference between first place and second place -- you want to reduce reaction time as much as possible.

Muscle memory is most certainly important for judo. You can teach a judo player a specific move and they can learn it really well, to the point they can demonstrate it perfectly. But that doesn't mean they can use it well in randori or in competition. Unless there's muscle memory, where the move has already become second nature to the player, it just won't happen. If you have to think about it, it won't work.

There are two things that need to happen for muscle memory to be ingrained for any specific move. Firstly, the players have to drill the heck out of the move. They have to do it over and over again. Initially, when they are first learning the move, they should do it with without resistance. Once learned it, they need to do it with resistance. Secondly, they need to try it in randori. Only if they do these two things will it be executable in competition.

One of the main reasons many judo players find it so difficult to pick up new moves is that they don't actually do these two things. Let's face it, drills are boring. Nobody likes to do drills. If you get a general judo class to do the same drills over and over again, week after week, pretty soon you will have very bored judo players wondering when they are going to learn something new. So repeated drills is not very viable for a recreational class.

You can do it with competitors though because they are on a mission (to win) and they understand to achieve that, they have to do what it takes. If it means doing boring drills over and over again for weeks on end, they will do it. That's why it's crucial to have competition-training classes which are separate from general (recreational classes).

The second part of the equation (getting them to try it in randori) is also really hard to achieve, and it doesn't matter if they are a competitor or a recreational player. People are creatures of habit and they tend to fall back on what they already know. You can have a player drill a move for one hour non-stop but once they go into randori, it's like they never even know the move. They don't even try it once. I've seen that so many times. It's just human nature.

There are a few rare people who make it a point to try new stuff in randori, even without prompting. Those are very few and far in between but usually they are the ones who progress the fastest. They instinctively know that they have to try the moves if they want to master it. For the rest, you have to remind them over and over again to try it in randori and maybe, just maybe, they might give it a try.

If they don't, it's not because they are being defiant. Just that when randori starts, they are in fight mode and tend to instinctively stick to what's tried and true. After the randori, you ask them why they didn't try the new move and they say, "Oh, I forgot". And they aren't lying. During the heat of the fight, they genuinely forgot.

So, what can you do? You just gotta persevere and keep drilling them and reminding them to try it in randori until they start doing it. It's part of of the job of being a coach.
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The Rainbow Judo Club at Coulby Newham will be closed for one week only that is Wednesday 31st July.  The class at Highcliffe school on Saturday mornings will be closed for two sessions which will be Saturday the 21st and 28th of July.  The classes will be open all through the school holidays apart from these dates.

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Congratulations to Alyssa Gouder for being awarded Player of the week this Wednesday. Keep up the good work Alyssa!

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Jacob Valois Photo credit: Rafal Burza

Montreal, July 10, 2019 – Canada will be represented by 7 athletes at the Pan American Games held in Lima, in Peru, from July 26 to August 11. It’ll be a golden opportunity for athletes to live the experience of a major-Game tournament.

The Canadian team will include Marie Besson (-52 kg), Emily Burt (-70 kg), Mina Coulombe (-78 kg), Jacob Valois (-66 kg), Bradley Langlois (-73 kg), Mohab El Nahas (-90 kg), and Marc Deschênes (+100 kg).

“The Pan American Games aren’t part of the Olympic selection process. It’s a great opportunity to put forward our Next Gen athletes. It’s a very good tournament with high-calibre judo. They’ll have to be ready to win a medal, and it won’t be easy,” commented coach Jean-Pierre Cantin.

Among the headliners of the Canadian delegation, athletes can count on Quebecois Jacob Valois and Ontarian Mohab El Nahas as potential medallists. Both recently stood out at the Senior Pan American Championships in Lima and the Montreal Grand Prix, where they respectively ranked in third and fifth place.

The coach believes his protégé could continue with his momentum in Peru. “If he’s well prepared and if he delivers the performance he’s capable of, Jacob could win the gold medal. Things are going very well for him. With his result in Montreal, he got into the top 30 in the world. He’s ranked ahead of other Canadians and, technically, he’d be the last one selected for the Olympic Games with the continental quota. It can change at every tournament, but right now, he’s in a very good position.”

Wisdom is an Asset

For the Next Gen athletes, the major Games experience will allow them to be more familiar with the atmosphere and environment that can be a source of distraction during these events.

“You get easily get out of your zone in that environment. Judokas like Jacob, Mohab, Emily, Mina and Marie are ones we can imagine competing at the next Olympics and they can benefit from this experience, it’ll help with their confidence level,” said Jean-Pierre Cantin.

These Pan American Games will be a first experience for some, and a swan song for others, like veteran Marc Deschênes, who plans on taking advantage of his visit to Peru as much as possible.

“Pan American Games are very important for me. It might be my last major Games, so I want to make the most of it and perform!” he said.

Having competing in Toronto in 2015, the Laval native will easily find his marks. “My previous experience will help, because I’ll know what to expect. Toronto was a big and impressive tournament! I know I won’t be a favourite, and there’ll be tough opponents on my path, but I think I could come as a surprise,” he said with confidence.

The judo tournament will be held on August 8-11.

-30-

Written by Sportcom for Judo Canada

Information:
Patrick Esparbès
Chief Operating Officer
(514) 668-6279
p.esparbes@judocanada.org

The post Canada Bets on Young Recruits for Pan American Games appeared first on Judo Canada.

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Mike Tamura and Dr. Lisa Allan

Montreal, July 9, 2019 – Judo is becoming less of a men’s game. Sunday, during the Montreal Grand Prix men’s +100 kg finale, a woman was refereeing the duel of French Teddy Riner and Japanese Hisayochi Harasawa. British Dr. Lisa Allan is an important female figure in judo as the Competition Manager of the International Judo Federation (IJF).

She was introduced to the sport by her father, who was coaching the British team. While she coached and volunteered during her studies in organic chemistry, sport was a bit left behind after she completed her PhD. However, her love of judo was still alive, and the nomination of London to host the Olympic and Paralympic Games while she was at a professional crossroad changed her fate.

She submitted her résumé to the organizing committee, not believing she would get the job, but she was chosen as the Competition Manager. Her days in the lab were over, she was back on the tatamis!

“After the Games, I was looking for a job, and the President of the International Judo Federation, Marius Vizer, offered me a job within his organization. I worked at the secretary of the Sport Commission for about nine months before being appointed as the Competition Manager, and in 2017 I joined the Executive Committee.”

The Scotland native, first women to sit on the Executive Committee, is in a good position to judge the expertise of the organizing committee, who hosted a tournament that met the expectations of the international federation.

“It’s been really amazing! The leaders of the local organizing committee, President of Judo Canada Mike Tamura and CEO and High Performance Director Nicolas Gill know judo and know it at the high-performance level,” she said. “They’ve been athletes, coaches and managers, and they’ve been to maybe 90% of these events around the world in these roles. They were starting from a very good position when they launched the project.”

In the high spheres and on the mats, women will keep playing an important part. She says the process is already underway.

“Judo is quite unique, because men and women can referee male and female competitions. It’s not new, but now there are more high-level female referees. Female judo only became an Olympic sport in 1992. It’s nobody’s fault, and we’re not blaming anybody. That’s how it was. Going forward now, we need to make sure that all judo opportunities are available for everybody, regardless of their gender.”

Dr. Allan enjoyed her stay in Montreal for the competition at the Arena Maurice-Richard, the city and her daily jogging on Mount Royal.

“It’s my third time in Montreal, and I love the city! I haven’t been here during winter, but I’d be curious to see it. The organization was excellent, you have good technical officials, and the volunteers have been amazing. The crowd is cheering for everyone, and it’s pretty special, because you don’t get that everywhere in the world. All the small details make the difference between a good event and a great event,” said Dr. Allan, who gave part of her speech in French during the opening ceremony.

Montreal is a candidate city to host the Cadet World Championship in 2021, so the metropolis might welcome the world of judo once again.

-30-

Written by Sportcom for Judo Canada
Information:
Patrick Esparbès
Chief Operating Officer
(514) 668-6279
p.esparbes@judocanada.org

The post From the Lab to the High Spheres of Judo appeared first on Judo Canada.

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The summer issue of Koka Kids is out! Get your copy, and subscribe now by Read more

The post Subscribe to Koka Kids appeared first on Kokakids - Junior Judo Magazine.

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