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There are definitely things we do in medicine just because that’s how we’ve always done them. Among these evidence-free actions, we can include yearly screening for latent TB infection (LTBI) in all healthcare workers If we carefully examine the rationale behind this practice — as this thorough review nicely does — one would be hard-pressed to find any […]
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My siblings and I are pretty lucky, because our mother may be the smartest person in the world. Let me reassure you that this is not just our biased opinion. Everyone who knows her well thinks the same thing — including my wife, who told me today, on Mother’s Day, that my Mom’s remarkable brainpower should […]
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Even if you’re not an ID or HIV specialist, there’s an excellent chance you’ve heard of the PARTNER2 study, just published in The Lancet. If not, the title could not be more descriptive: Risk of HIV transmission through condomless sex in serodifferent gay couples with the HIV-positive partner taking suppressive antiretroviral therapy And, in case you’ve just […]
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Loyal readers of this site might note that we periodically stray from incisive, topical coverage of our exciting field of Infectious Diseases, and venture off into subjects that may or may not be ID-related. And good news for fans of this approach, because today it’s time to release our third episode of Fun with Old Medical Images.  […]
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Every clinically active ID specialist, hospitalist, and cardiologist realizes that treatment of bacteremia due to methicillin-resistant Staph aureus (MRSA) is no easy task. In fact, it’s a problem so difficult that persistent bacteremia due to MRSA deserved highlighting here as an “Unanswerable Problem in Infectious Diseases.” I wrote that over 5 years ago, and you know what? […]
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Like any card-carrying ID doctor, I enjoy teaching about antibiotics. Give me a whiteboard (small group), or a PowerPoint set-up (lecture hall), and I’m off and running. Not surprisingly, an important theme of these talks revolves around avoiding antibiotic overuse. Over the years, I’ve collected a few egregious examples of how marketing distorts public perception of […]
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Right there, on the homepage of today’s New York Times, our national paper of record — Sunday edition, no less! — appears this headline: A Mysterious Infection, Spanning the Globe in a Climate of Secrecy Most of this piece is about Candida auris, the highly resistant fungus that targets our most vulnerable patients — those with weakened […]
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When submitting an abstract to a scientific meeting, you can usually expect one of three outcomes. I’ve listed them below in order of preference, plus the messages the meeting organizers and abstract reviewers are not-so-subtly sending you: Oral Presentation:  Congratulations! Your abstract has been accepted for an Oral Presentation — in other words, the work sounds so […]
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In honor of spring (March 20), and the very important National Puppy Day (March 23), here are a bunch of ID and HIV-related recent items for consideration, contemplation, and perusal: A life-threatening case of tetanus in an unvaccinated boy highlights the personal and financial cost of the anti-vaccine movement. How deeply embedded are these false beliefs? The […]
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There’s a look our patients frequently give us when we tell them that preventive therapy for tuberculosis involves 9 months of treatment. If I were to put that look into words, they would be: Yikes, Doc, 9 months is waaay too long — you must be out of your mind. It’s the “Nine months?!?!” face. We’ve […]
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