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ASAP Talent Services: Retention and Employee Engagement - Part 2 - YouTube
Welcome back to part two of our series! Today we’ll focus on the importance of employee engagement and how it can impact your company as a whole.


Last time in part one of this series, we discussed strategies for boosting employee retention. Today in part two, we’ll focus on another important aspect of being an employer: employee engagement.

Since 2010, numerous studies have come out that have really enlightened us as to what constitutes employee engagement, how it impacts productivity, and how it impacts employee retention. These studies have suggested that up to 80% of people don’t like their jobs and that dissatisfaction influences their disengagement.

But what do those employees look like? Well, those are the people that might distract themselves with social media throughout the day. Their lightbulbs aren’t on, they just seem unmotivated, and they don’t rally behind their company’s mission.

Why is it that people seem to be disengaged from their jobs? Well, the studies found that there are two key reasons:

1. They feel undervalued
2. They’re dissatisfied with the company’s leadership

This reminds me of a great quote by Simon Sinek: “Leadership isn’t about being in charge; it’s about taking care of those in our charge.” Studies have also shown that employees with lower engagement are four times more likely to leave than those who are highly engaged, so we know this is an important topic.



Leadership isn’t about being in charge; it’s about taking care of those in our charge.


C-suite executives view this issue as one of the top issues that constitute a threat to their business, and it actually ends up costing the U.S. One study said that the issue of employee disengagement cost the country at large over $400 billion a year.

So what can be done to alleviate this problem? Here are a couple of things to think about in your own business:

1. Build trust in leadership. This includes middle-management, not just c-suite management. We have to show our people that we truly care about them personally, not just professionally, and we have to act with integrity. People in our organizations can see how we act behind closed doors as well as how we act with our customers.


2. Demonstrate competence. If mid-management is disengaged, it can trickle down to the people who work in their groups. What’s important isn’t what we do as a job function—it’s about why we do it. The question, then, is how do we capture our mission to change our communities and leave a lasting impact on our one-on-one, daily, and weekly meetings?

Ultimately, the first step to solving these issues is to realize how important it is, and now that we know what we can do, tactically speaking, to help move the needle in the area of employee engagement. Shifting your own perspective, and therefore your employees’, can have a huge spillover effect when it comes to retaining your top talent and increasing your organization’s productivity.

If you have any questions or comments about this topic, feel free to reach out to us. We’d love to have a conversation with you.


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ASAP Talent Services: Retention and Employee Engagement - Part 1 - YouTube
Today’s focus is on employee retention and a few actions you can take to keep your “A-players” around to promote the good health of your company.


Today I’m bringing you part one in my two-part series that will aim to help you with retention and employee engagement. They go hand in hand and are equally important in your workplace environment, but they’re also distinct from each other, so I’ve decided to focus on retention for part one.

Retention is the ability to hold onto the “A-players” in your organization that you value greatly and, in the event that they were to leave, would leave big shoes to fill.

Granted, there are times where we don’t take issue with or may even want an employee’s resignation if that particular person is underperforming or if they pollute the culture you’ve worked to build. That can be viewed as an opportunity to top-grade that position and hire someone who adds to the culture and is a stronger fit.

With the labor market as tight as it is today, though, it’s especially important not to lose your most indispensable players or even those who are one rung down from that.



Retention is the ability to hold onto the “A-players” in your organization that you value greatly and, in the event that they were to leave, would leave big shoes to fill.


Here are a few things you can do, tactically speaking, to bring about greater retention in your organization:

First, conduct performance reviews and convey what your employees are doing well and the areas where they can improve. Rather than seeing it through the company lens, make the review about the employee, and gain a richer understanding of where they’d like to be in both the short term and long term. 

Seek to understand what skills and experience they’ve developed that make them feel their job is worthwhile as well as those that they’d like to fine-tune and develop further, so they can realize their greater potential.

As a final tip, although compensation isn’t one of the top two reasons employees leave to pursue new career options, your employees’ compensation should be commensurate with the market standard when accounting for the skill set and experience they bring to the table.  

Stay tuned for part two where we dive into employee engagement! If you have any questions or ideas for a future video topic, please let me know. I’d be happy to have a conversation with you! 
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ASAP Talent Services: What Is Your Employer Brand? - YouTube
Your employer brand doesn’t impact the ways that consumers view your company, but it can have a huge impact on the kind of people you recruit. Here’s how.

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Today I’m going to talk about your employer brand in the marketplace and what that means for your hiring. It doesn’t matter what kind of company you have—you have multiple “brands” out there.

One thing that we’re all familiar with is the consumer brand. Because of your product or services, you have a brand with them, which is great.

However, today I’m talking about your employer brand. This means that as an employer of people, what do those in the marketplace think about you as a place to work? It’s totally different than your product or service brand.

If you sell cars or drinks, your consumer loves your product, but that doesn’t necessarily translate to being a good employer brand.




Asking good questions in interviews will improve your employer brand.


A lot of things can impact your employer brand. One thing is just being aware of it.

How you treat your existing employees has a major impact on your employer brand. People talk, and a lot of them find out about companies through word of mouth. When people leave or quit, how professional are your exit interviews? Do you learn about why they are leaving and try to change for the better? Doing so will improve your employer brand immensely.

Another factor to consider is how you treat people through the interview process. Asking good questions, giving them fair offers, and all the other little things you do to leave a taste in someone’s mouth will improve your employer brand.

All of these things work together in totality to create your employer brand. Having a good employer brand impacts many things, including retention, hiring, and more.

If you have any questions for me about how to create a better employer brand or about anything else related to your hiring needs, don’t hesitate to give me a call or send me an email. I look forward to hearing from you soon.


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ASAP Talent Services: Why Job Offers Are Getting Turned Down - YouTube

A lot of job offers are getting turned down in our current market, but there are a few things you need to remember to make sure the same thing doesn’t happen to your company.


We’re in a candidate-driven market right now, and as a result, more and more job offers are getting turned down. What are some of the trends of this market?


  • Stiff competition between employers trying to hire the same people 
  • Companies are incentivizing their current employees with strong offers to keep them where they’re at
  • Some companies have long, drawn-out recruiting cycles that send mixed messages to candidates and discourage them  
  • Companies aren’t properly defining their employment opportunity, or candidates are getting mixed signals from those involved in the interview process
  • Some employees are just tire kickers—they’re not serious about making a move, and they might only be using a job offer as leverage to get a raise at their current company


How can you adjust to this market and make sure your job offers don’t get turned down? There are four points you need to remember:

1. Recruit from the perspective of the employee, not the employer. Find out what they’re looking for and figure out how your opportunity can help them advance their career.



Find out what they’re looking for and figure out how your opportunity can help them advance their career.


2. Understand what motivates them besides money. Ask open-ended questions that inquire as to what they’re really looking for in their next opportunity. Are they looking to learn new skills? Are they career-motivated or quality-of-life motivated? How does your opportunity apply to their motivations?

3. Don’t make offers without knowing they want to join your organization. 

4. Stop lowballing people. Make a great offer on the first try, and only after they’re verbally pre-closed to accept. The only surprises in an offer should be if it’s more than the candidate expects.

If you’d like to talk more about this topic, have any questions, or need more information, feel free to reach out to us. We look forward to hearing from you soon.


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ASAP Talent Services: The 11 Most In-Demand Jobs of 2019 - YouTube

 For today’s message, we’re going to share the top 11 most in-demand jobs of 2019. 


Today, we’d like to shed some light on the top 11 most in-demand jobs of our marketplace in 2019. This list comes straight from an article recently published by Fox Business News.

You can find a more in-depth analysis of this list by checking out the original article here, but, for now, let’s dive right in to the top 11 jobs:

1. Data scientist. It’s predicted that more than 4,000 new jobs will be added for this position in the United States.


2. Site reliability engineer.
This IT position will be highly in demand this year.


3. Enterprise account executive.
This position, which is more geared toward software sales, is also set to be in high demand.

4. Product designer. Those in this IT role are tasked with engineering technology products.

5. Product owner. Those in this role are responsible for handling business analytics and business processing.


6. Customer success manager. This role brings approximately $90,000 a year and is in very high demand.


7. Engagement manager. This includes those involved in IT program management, business analysis, and business process improvement.


8. Solution architect. Though it does not generally involve managing people, this role pays similarly to managerial positions.


9. Information technology leader.
More than 1,500 of these jobs are expected to be added in 2019.


10. Scrum master.
This position involves managing agile development teams.


11. Cloud architect.
Again, more than 1,500 of these jobs are expected to be added in 2019.


If you have any other questions or would like more information, feel free to give me a call or send me an email. I look forward to hearing from you soon.
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ASAP Talent Services: What Are Your Job Applicants Really Thinking During the Interview Process? - YouTube
 You could be unintentionally disappointing your applicants, thanks to a bad interview process. Here’s how you can fix it.



Through working with our 70+ clients, we’ve seen the good, the bad, and everything in between when it comes to job application processes. More importantly, we’ve seen how they affect applicants. 

A lot of companies have an interview process that takes too long and fails to give adequate feedback to applicants. When an applicant finally gets their first phone interview after a week of waiting, another week will go by without them hearing anything. Then they get the interview, and another week passes. This often adds up to more than a month, and it’s way too long. 

Having so many steps in the process can also eat up time. When candidates have four or five interviews spread across 10 different decision makers, what do you think goes through their head?


A lot of companies have an interview process that takes too long and fails to give adequate feedback to applicants.


They think the company is disorganized, indecisive, unfocused, and not interested.

The common thread between these thoughts is that they’re all negative. When looking to find high-level additions for your company, using an interview process fraught with bad impressions is not a good way to do so.

If you’re not interested in an applicant, tell them quickly and professionally. Leave them with a good feeling about the role, and make them think, “I just wasn’t quite right for the role.” If not, they could go and share their dissatisfaction in your company with others in the job market. And if you really are interested in a candidate but they’re carrying all the bad thoughts we mentioned earlier, that’s even worse—they could potentially walk away altogether!

To avoid losing top talent, there should only be a few key decision makers who are all on the same page and who all provide timely feedback. You’ll get to the offer stage quickly and efficiently, and you’ll win a great addition to your team.

If you’d like to speak about your own hiring situation, have any questions, or need more information, feel free to reach out to us. We look forward to hearing from you soon.
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ASAP Talent Services: A Recap of SAP's Acquisitions and How They Affect the Company - YouTube

Here are the recent purchases made by SAP in order to enhance the customer experience.



Today we’ll be going over a recap of SAP’s recent acquisitions and how these new capabilities affect their offerings as a company. Oftentimes, they acquire competitors and products that will help them do something different from their core offerings.

  • Qualtrics allows organizations to focus on four key areas to improve the user’s experience: customer, product, employee, and brand data.
  • Contextor introduces AI and robotic process automation capabilities. Think of when you interact with a bot on a website.
  • Coresystems is involved with mobile and cloud-based field service management. This helps employees in the field to create real-time customer experiences.

Oftentimes, they acquire competitors and products that will help them do something different from their core offerings.

  • CallidusCloud helps manage sales and marketing automation. This product handles bidding, pricing, quoting, and invoicing processes.
  • Gigya is an identity management company that businesses can use to join the identity management marketplace. In other words, think of how some sites let you log in with social media sites like Facebook; Gigya handles this process.
  • Hybris ties into SAP’s increased focus on the customer experience.
  • Ariba is a major purchasing and supplier relationship managing company.

If you have any questions or need more information, feel free to reach out to us. We look forward to hearing from you.
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ASAP Talent Services: Sending You Our Best Wishes for a Great 2018 Holiday Season - YouTube

The holiday season is finally here. We wanted to make sure and reach out to wish you the best this year.


Today I want to send out our best wishes to everyone for the 2018 holiday season. We hope you have a very safe, healthy, and prosperous holiday season and a happy new year. Since we are a search firm first, I would be remiss if I didn’t say that the time to think about your 2019 hiring needs is now, even if you don’t plan on making moves until February or March. If there’s anything we can do to help in the meantime, feel free to reach out. 
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ASAP Talent Services: The Step in the Interview Process That You Shouldn't Overlook - YouTube
Job candidates aren’t the only ones who should do their research before an interview. Today, let’s talk about the pre-interview preparations hiring authorities should be engaging in, as well.


Today I’d like to highlight a crucial but often overlooked step in the interview process. In a candidate-driven market like the one we’re in right now, omitting this step will come back to haunt you when it comes time to make an offer.  

What is this critical step? Interview preparation.

Any good candidate knows that preparing for an interview is essential, so why aren’t more interviewers following their example? Of course, pre-interview due diligence is different for interviewers than it is for interviewees.

While candidates will spend their time preparing for the interview by learning about the position and the company, interviewers should do similar research on the candidate, themselves.

Before entering an interview, hiring managers should ask themselves whether they understand who the candidate is, what their hot buttons are, and what is motivating them to make a change.


Following this step as a hiring authority could be mean the difference between hiring an average worker and hiring an “A” player.


If the candidate is an “A” player and you hope to bring them on board, there are three main points you’ll need to understand about them:

1. What is it that they feel they’re lacking in their current position?
2. What primary factor (money, quality of life, location, etc.) is motivating their decision to change positions?
3. Does the candidate have any other opportunities lined up?

Knowing the answers to these questions before the candidate comes in for an interview is a must. Everyone on the interview panel should have a sufficient understanding of the candidate’s background before the interview process.

Following this step as a hiring authority could be mean the difference between hiring an average worker and hiring an “A” player.

If you have any other questions or would like more information, feel free to give us a call or send us an email. We look forward to hearing from you soon.
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ASAP Talent Services: How to Properly Discuss Your Compensation Expectations - YouTube
How do you properly discuss salary requirements and expectations? Today we will take a look.
Today I want to talk about compensation and how to properly discuss your expectations or requirements when you're the job seeker in an interview. Let's jump right in.

It is important to start by saying that there are some states in the United States where it is against the law for a potential employer to ask what you currently make. Instead, the conversation starts by asking “What would you like to make?” As the interviewee, you really need to know how to answer this. If you need to, have it scripted and practice it with someone you trust. This will help you interview better when the question does come up.

If you feel comfortable, you can let the company know what you currently make, including your base salary and bonus payout. I like to coach my people to go into interviews and say that they would like the compensation for the role to be reflective of the amount of impact they will have on the organization.

The problem with giving an exact, quantitative number is that you could tell them a number that is higher than what they had in mind.

 
Although this doesn't give the employer a direct answer, it does give you the chance to let them know that you're more about the opportunity. It also shows that you expect the compensation package to reflect your impact on the organization. If it is an important, high-impact role, it will say a lot to the company. You could also say that you want it to be in line with what you pay other people at similar levels.

The problem with giving an exact, quantitative number is that you could tell them a number that is higher than what they had in mind. This could shoot yourself in the foot and the conversation could go in the wrong direction quickly for a position you really wanted. You want to put yourself in a position to get a great offer for both you and the company.

If you have any additional questions about this, or if you're interested in speaking about buying or selling, please feel free to reach out to me. I look forward to speaking with you soon.
 

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