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Alejandro Rojas presents an excellent interview with a reflective, 83-year-old Stanton Friedman, the original civilian investigator of the Roswell incident, on the occasion of his last expected visit to the annual Roswell UFO Festival. There's also a tribute to Stan at his 2013 International UFO Congress Lifetime Achievement Award, containing a great deal of valuable biographical material. Iconic Australian researcher Bill Chalker is also in a contemplative mood, musing about The Old and the New. The "Old" is the sesquicentennial of a UFO sighting/dream in a Sydney, New South Wales, suburb. The "New" is a November 25, 2009, Port Jervis, New York, CEII-EM "vehicle stoppage" case that also may feature a particular phenomenon called "solid light." Bill has been working on this particular part of UFO phenomenology for some time; it features light beams that behave oddly, usually "stopping" or ending some distance short of how ordinary light should act. Friedman and Chalker might take issue with the following, but A Conservative and a Marxist Both Claim Ufology is a Leftist Pursuit. Thankfully, author Jason Colavito allows that "there is no one political orientation for an ancient astronaut theorist," even if he does promote "the fact that the ancient astronaut [AA] theory is structurally conservative, with a small 'c'." Some few AA assumptions are characteristic of a 19th-century European zeitgeist that was largely unconsciously (and that makes it perhaps even more objectionable) racial, but that does not equate to AA believers being racists; the AA branch is not the only one in ufology; and Colavito and sociologist Michael Barkun overstress an association of popular ufology with the extreme right. Still, this is an interesting article. (WM)

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We all like mysteries, but it also feels good to crack them once in a while. Here are three recent examples. First: An ancient Greco-Roman poem tells of brave fishermen who harpooned a "sea monster." But the latest evidence is that it wasn't really a sea monster, but a whale. Second: A Mysterious 2,000-Year-Old Papyrus Puzzle Has Been Solved. Infrared images revealed that the Basel Papyrus was not a single sheet of two-sided, mirror-writing papyrus but many pages glued together--no wonder it has proved impossible to decipher! And third: It seems Archaeologists and astronomers have solved the mystery of Chile's Stonehenge. Rows of cairn-like pillars--known in the indigenous Quechua language as the saywas, or markers--dot the Atacama desert in northern Chile, but their purpose has eluded investigator for 500 years--until now. A recent investigation reveals that, like Stonehenge, the saywas had a simultaneous calendrical, ritual, and political purpose. Not everything mysterious remains a mystery, but some appear to be truly insoluble: Will Science Ever Solve the Mysteries of Consciousness, Free Will and God? And in a follow-up article, Michael Shermer's mysterianism is confronted by skeptics in Mysterianism Redux. (PH)

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Some historians have been tempted to throw things at the screen--silver or small--when something appallingly inaccurate is shown as "fact" in a movie or tv program. So the picture of Dr. J. Allen Hynek and a gray alien in Mark O'Connell's piece didn't sit well, nor does the statement by the author of Mark's linked article about Project Blue Book, that "The historical aspect of the series sets the show apart." And even much less the quote Mark reproduces "'We were pretty good about sticking with history,' declares the show's creator." We loved Aidan Gillen's "Littlefinger" character in Game of Thrones; we're not so sure about his upcoming J. Allen Hynek. And neither is, we think, screenwriter and author of the Hynek biography The Close Encounters Man O'Connell. (WM)

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Nick Redfern discusses two very similar tales of human-alien conflicts at secret U.S. military bases: the story still told by "Area 51's" Bob Lazar, and an earlier claim by the late Paul Bennewitz. Nick's conclusion in this article is likely spot-on. But there are some subjects we should accord credence, as a Former NASA Engineer Argues We Should Take UFOs Seriously. Brett Tingley has an excellent summary of Albany physics prof (and a whole lot else) Kevin Knuth's The Conversation essay. Knuth is a (former NASA) scientist who Brett Tingley shows has a different opinion about the significance of UFOs. On another subject Brett has a more inflammatory title in Scientists Accuse NASA of Destroying Proof of Life on Mars. If valid, the latest analysis by no means convicts NASA scientists of knowing negligence or worse, but it does illustrate how mistakes can be made in such cutting-edge studies. (WM)

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Being pelted with piscine is nothing new in monsoon season, and a recent load fell from the skies onto the tomb of Sheikh Salim Chishti, which, unsurprisingly, "became a matter of discussion amongst people." Also up for discussion is the question What's Causing The Mysterious Hums Heard Around The World? The answer may, or may not, be found in the first episode of "Sound Mysteries," which is a new series intended to address "weird or unexplained sonic phenomena." (LP)

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Sharon Hill writes persuasively about how the label of "Skeptic" has nowadays become associated with "a dismissive, know-it-all attitude" and expresses her disappointment with organizations that claim to represent the Skeptic point of view. She laments the lack of "respect, cooperation and reasonable discourse" and reminds us that "we have to seek common understanding to get anywhere." Illustrating the problem is this piece from Loch Ness Mystery: Back in 1962, a Loch Ness water bailiff's response to one skeptic was simply No, Dr Burton! A. W. Campbell had his own sightings of the Caledonian critter and, in the article linked by Glasgow Boy, takes exception to Burton's argument that the locals couldn't tell a "vegetable mat" from a monster. (LP)

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Rich Reynolds calls for a cease-fire in attention to the Roswell UFO crash story, as retarding progress in a field he regards as seriously goofy anyway. Nick Redfern takes seriously what might at first glance surprise many--the notion that the late Charles Moore might have known more about "bodies" perhaps associated with the 1947 Roswell "crash" than he admitted. Of course, this comports well with Nick's alternative Roswell explanation as possibly an American/Japanese project gone horribly wrong, but he's highlighted an interesting nugget of information--or "rabbit-hole"?--that he thinks could be followed. And speaking of Roswell tangents, Kevin Randle tells us about Finding the Ruth Barnett Diary. Kevin thinks he's made an argument that squelches Barney Barnett's claim of a crashed saucer on the Plains of San Agustin in July of 1947. Kevin believes he's peeled away another piece of detritus around whatever is the core Roswell story, and to one reader's complaint that we are not getting anywhere, he produces the historical-methods answer about source difficulties. Which to practical non-historians may still seem only "nonsense." (WM)

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Canadians may be best known for saying "sorry" too often--and for that diabolically artery clogging potato version of crack called Poutine--but they're also not afraid of getting their weird on. Case in point: to celebrate the 1967 Centennial, a town in the province of Alberta built a UFO landing pad attached to their local chamber of commerce in case ET wanted to know the best neighborhoods to abduct--er, we mean, to meet--human citizens. Fifty years later it appears they have gotten the invitation: Canadians spotted 3 UFOs per day in 2017: survey. Granted, only a small number of those sightings have been declared worthy of notice, while many were the result of media showers and the remaining few were more suited to tabloids than news. Still, it keeps this Canadian hopeful that one day she is going to look up at the sky, see something, and run away screaming. (CM)

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This typically interesting and visually captivating article starts with double ironies about the 2017 "UFO Researcher of the Year" and one of the sources for his inspiration about a UFO-Atlantis connection. While skeptics may ponder whether there can in fact be a connection between two things that do not exist, most serious ufologists shudder when the two topics are thus intertwined. Be that as it may, Collins' is a worthwhile summary of the relationship. But is the story of something else that sank beneath the waves, only in the waters off of 1967 Nova Scotia, similarly an entertaining myth? Well, Brett Tingley says that Jacques Cousteau's Grandchildren and the Infamous Shag Harbor UFO Incident have become associated. Well, more properly, next month Celine and Fabian Cousteau will visit the area and, with a diver who was involved in the original investigation, search for evidence to support "Canada's Roswell." We wish them all the best. Just two years prior to the Shag Harbour episode, a team at the Argentinian Antarctic base Belgrano saw "strange objects" but decided not to talk, as sketched in 1965: "He Saw The Saucers". Though not the only historical Antarctic UFO case, this one would be worth further pursuit while possible witnesses may yet be interviewed. (WM)

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The impending third edition of one of the ten most significant serious works of ufology is the occasion for this almost-lyrical musing by David Halperin. Halperin recalls a more than 50-year long distance friendship with Jerome Clark, editor-author of The UFO Encyclopedia, and Halperin's article is more than just a promo; it's a bit of UFO history as well. As Halperin himself has a magnum opus he's always wanted to "pen" on the subject, Halperin has a melancholy yet comforting feeling "that the enterprise that the two of us began together, and pursued the next half-century along our different paths, is drawing to its close." Much as we anticipate the publication of these two works, we fervently hope and believe that they will not be the last ufological salvos in either man's career. (WM)

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