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Feather Communications has been named one of the Top 10 Resume Services in Minneapolis.

Dr. Heather Rothbauer-Wanish, founder of Feather Communications, is a Certified Professional Resume Writer and provides resume-writing services to clients throughout the United States. Find My Profession, a website geared towards helping clients land job opportunities, cultivated the listing of Minneapolis-area resume writers. According to the site, a solid history of glowing reviews helped Feather Communications secure a spot on the list.

“I’m excited to be included as a top resume writer,” Rothbauer-Wanish said. “My passion for resume-writing has allowed me to assist thousands of clients in helping them to identify their strengths and achievements,” she continued. As part of her website, she features a regular blog offering implementable tips that range from formatting resumes to how to write a cover letter.

Tips from Feather Communications have been featured on CareerSidekick, MSN, Monster, Recruiter, MFG Jobs, and the Management Resource Association websites. “I absolutely love what I do and I am passionate about helping people market themselves to land their dream jobs,” she concluded.

For more information on resume writing services, please contact Feather Communications at 715-559-6378 or email heather@feather-communications.com.

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Feather Communications Blog by Heather Rothbauer-wanish, Freelance.. - 2M ago

It’s the holiday season of Thanksgiving, Christmas, and the New Year—there are a lot of holiday parties, company get-togethers, and other networking events. It’s a stressful, busy, and complicated time of the year. Because of that, many job seekers take this time of the year “off” from actively seeking new opportunities. You may believe that everyone is taking this time “off” to relax for the new year—that is note case. In fact, job seekers should NOT take this time off from seeking new job opportunities.

Tip #1 – Hiring is a Year-Round Activity. Many people think that hiring ceases during the holiday season, but that is not true. Organizations are still looking for qualified employees from Thanksgiving through the New Year—don’t take this time away from job-seeking. In fact, there is less competition during this time of the year, so it is the PERFECT time to search for a job.

Tip #2 – Networking Events are Less Casual. During the holidays, events tend to be less formal and it may be easier to mention that you are seeking a new job opportunity. If you can, attend Chamber of Commerce events, fundraising opportunities, and volunteer promotions. This is a great way to let people know that you are seeking new job opportunities while in a casual environment.

Tip #3 – Send Happy Thanksgiving or Happy New Year Cards. Instead of sending the traditional Christmas card, send a Thanksgiving Card or a Happy New Year Card. Do NOT ignore providing a thank you just because you think a thank you car or message will be ignored at this time of the year—that is not true.

Tip #4 – Relax and Enjoy Time with Family and Friends. Even though you may be actively searching for a new job opportunity through the holidays, it is also important to relax and enjoy time with family and friends. It’s vital that you take time away from the job search to rejuvenate and relax while also focusing on the new year.

Remember—don’t take the holidays off when thinking about future career opportunities. A lot of job seekers decide to take a step back from searching during the holidays—DON’T DO IT. There is less competition, people are more relaxed, and the job market is as busy-as-ever during this time.

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At some point during your career, you may be applying for a job and you will discover that you are considered overqualified. It may be a job that you would LOVE to secure, but you are concerned that if you include your backgrounds, skills, education, and work history, the potential employer will no give you a second-look because you may be too bored, want too much money, or don’t really want the position.

Tip #1 –  Don’t include advanced degrees on your resume if they aren’t relevant. In the past, I worked with a client who had a law degree, but his entire professional career had been spent in sales and that’s where he wanted to remain. So, we only mentioned his undergraduate degree and focused on his sales and marketing skills—leaving off the fact that he was a lawyer.

Tip #2 – Choose the job history that aligns with the future job opportunity. If you have worked for 15 or 20 years, you likely may have older positions that aren’t relatable to the future of your career. Instead, only include the positions that are in-line with your career direction and use a heading that says Selected Professional Experience or Relevant Work History.

Tip #3 – Be specific with your skills. Instead of touting high-level skills that have nothing to do with your goals, eliminate these and really concentrate on the key words and qualifications that are listed in the job posting. By changing your skills and career summary each time you send your resume, you are also much more likely to get through Applicant Tracking Systems.

Tip #4 – Use a career summary that highlights why you are the right person for the job and why this job may be for you. Mention your passion for the field or a past accomplishment that directly aligns with this job opening. Show them why you are the right person for the position and why they should call you for an interview.

Remember, if you are already applying for a job and sending a resume, the company should understand that you are interested in the opportunity. However, it also doesn’t hurt to ensure that your resume aligns with that perception, too.

If you still have questions, please contact me today and I can review your resume – I look forward to  hearing from you!

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Feather Communications Blog by Heather Rothbauer-wanish, Freelance.. - 2M ago

As you begin writing your resume, you may be inclined to include too much or too little information, go back to far in your job history, or not properly highlight your skills and qualifications. Most people do not enjoy writing about themselves and find writing a resume a daunting task. Instead of wondering WHAT information to include, I encourage you to think about WHY you include certain information. In fact, most of the time, we need to consider these HARD TRUTHS about your OLD resume. (Click HERE to contact me for a FREE resume review!)

#1 – Get rid of the objective. The truth is, your objective is painfully obvious. In fact, you wouldn’t be sending a resume if you didn’t want a new job. So, your ultimate objective is to secure an interview for a new job opportunity. So, instead of putting an objective on your resume—which takes up valuable space at the top of your document—use that area to make a short career summary that allows you to hit upon the key words used in the job posting.

#2 – Don’t include every single job. The hard truth is that NO ONE wants to hear about you flipping burgers in high school or working as a bank teller 25+ years ago. The ONLY time that information is relevant is if you are now applying for a similar position. Otherwise, this information doesn’t pertain to today’s job environment and just dilutes your resume with old information.

#3 – Be careful with dates. Don’t include dates on your education—unless you graduated a couple of weeks ago and have zero work history. Otherwise, the date you graduated from high school or college is not relevant. In addition, include the last 10-15 years of job history and—if you feel the need to include older information—then include it in a section of earlier work history with no dates.

Finally, each time you consider adding a section, responsibility, or achievement, think, “Who cares?”  and “Does this matter to THIS job opportunity?” If the answer is that it won’t matter in the long run, then don’t include it. Instead, think of your resume as a clean, concise, and focused document that allows you to highlight your strengths and forgets the rest.

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Feather Communications Blog by Heather Rothbauer-wanish, Freelance.. - 2M ago

At a recent networking event, someone asked me about the common mistakes that I see on resumes. Then, he asked me if it differs depending upon the industry. In all honesty, it doesn’t. My typical client is someone that is age 35 and older, hasn’t looked for a job in over 10 years and now has an opportunity to make a career move or is being forced to do so. No matter the circumstance, read below for the five most common resume mistakes that I see on a regular basis.

#1 – Including an objective. Just. Don’t. Do. It. No one cares about your objective. While that may sound harsh, it is the truth. The company cares about what you can do for THEM. How are you going to make their job EASIER? Stating that you are looking to “…grow your leadership abilities while enhancing their organization…” isn’t helping your cause.

#2 – No career summary. So, you have (maybe) skipped the objective, but still didn’t include a career summary. This is a necessity. Provide the company with a high-overview of you as a job candidate. It only needs to be a three to five-line summary that gives several skill-sets and aligns with key words in the job search. Please know that this is the FIRST part of the resume.

#3 – A missing skills section. If you don’t have a qualifications/skills/core competencies/areas of expertise section, you are missing out. And, more importantly, companies are missing out on YOU. This is THE place to utilize those key words used in the job posting. If you don’t tell a prospective employer about your skills, how will they have any idea what they are? Use short, succinct, bullet points to match as many key words as possible—as long as you can back it up during a job interview.

#4 – Including dates with education. Unless you graduated from college last Saturday, the year you graduated no longer matters. In fact, at some point, that information could start to hurt you and could potentially bring about age discrimination. And, if you are yet to graduate from college, put your estimated date of month and year of graduation on your resume.

#5 – Including OLD jobs. While I LOVED my job as bank teller in high school, that was more than 20+ years ago and is no longer relevant. You don’t need to include very single job that you have ever had on your resume. Think relevance over quantity of past job experiences.

If you are still unsure of what to include or exclude from your updated resume, contact me HERE and I will provide you with a free resume review!

P.S. If you are ready to make your changes NOW, go HERE and download my 7 Steps to Mastering Your Job Hunt!

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Feather Communications Blog by Heather Rothbauer-wanish, Freelance.. - 2M ago

Picture this: you have been sending resumes to online job postings, meeting with networking connections to tell them you on the job hunt and you have finally landed an interview! In fact, it’s at a company that you would LOVE to work for and the job is perfectly suited for you. Then, panic sets in because you haven’t been on an interview for a LONG time and you get nervous—really nervous. Read through these tips below for some advice on how to appear confident during your upcoming interview.

Tip #1 – Do your homework. Research the company, its products, services, staff members, and mission statement. Do NOT show up to the interview and not know anything about the organization. In fact, a commonly asked interview question concerns you telling THEM what you know about their company. Don’t disappoint. And, with how easy it is to research a company on the Internet, you really have no excuse for not doing this easy step.

Tip #2 – Practice interview questions. Google a list of commonly-asked interview questions and think about how you would answer them. Conduct a mock interview with a trusted colleague or friend. (Contact me today for mock interview services) And, if you do this on your own, say your responses out-loud. Better yet, turn the camera on yourself and SEE how you respond to these questions. Often, how we think we sound is actually different than how it comes across to someone else.

Tip #3 – Don’t be squirmy. This may sound completely strange; however, when people get nervous, they fidget, play with their hair, dart their eyes in all directions, and generally squirm in their chairs. I tend to talk with my hands A LOT and probably do that even more when I’m nervous. To calm my nerves, I always bring a pen and a portfolio or paper with me. This grounds me and allows my hands to rest on something that doesn’t cause a distraction (just don’t play click-click-click with your pen).

Tip #4 – Breathe. Breathing comes naturally to all of us, right? Not true. When people are nervous, they tend to take short breaths and find themselves breathing shallowly. Take a few deep breaths upon arrival to your interview, take another deep breath before the first question, and be conscious of your breathing during the interview.

Tip #5 – Don’t be hard on yourself. Think positively and use every single interview as a learning experience. If—during the interview—you feel like you gave a less-than-stellar answer, don’t worry about it. You are probably dwelling on it more than the interviewers even noticed. And, even if this job opportunity doesn’t work out for you, you have gained even more experience as an interviewee and can learn from each one of them. Be certain that you are the CORRECT person for the job and explain how the company can be positioned better with YOU as a member of the team.

Interviews can be nerve-wracking. And, as I always tell my clients, if you aren’t nervous for an interview, I would almost think you weren’t really that interested. A little bit of nervousness can harness power within you and actually be a good thing – use that to your advantage.

Click HERE to access my Master Your Job Hunt email course – you’ll discover HOW to make an impact with your resume and land a new job faster!

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