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Is $122,858 USD a Month Enough to Live On?

Recently it was reported that Tracey Hejailan-Amon was granted $122,858 USD as temporary monthly support. This is in addition to a lump-sum payment of $1,262,121. However, Tracey Hejailan-Amon says it “isn’t enough”.

Her husband Maurice Alain is apparently worth $1.4 billion.

The support order was made by a Monaco Court, but the wife would like to have the case heard in New York. Her lawyer stated that the wife:

“maintains that she was never domiciled in Monaco … [Maurice] contends that Tracey’s shoe collection … was in the Monaco home and this constitutes proof that she was a Monaco domiciliary. This case is a ‘shoe-in’ for the record books in Monaco — it’s well beyond the ‘War of Roses,’ it’s the ‘War of Louboutins.’ ”

This case, and the high monetary awards, are similar to the Bitcoin cases we recently wrote about and also the case where the wife claimed support that included a wine budget of over $10,000 where the court considered:

 a large figured that had been included in the mother’s annual budget for wine.:

There is a claim of £10,555 per annum for “Wine”. The child is aged seven and does not consume the wine. This appears to be a mixture of wine supplied by the mother to the parents of children when they visit her home, and some general entertaining.

So what do you think?

Would a $122,858 USD a month be enough to meet your budget or would you request more?

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

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Who Should Get Access to a Dead Person’s Emails?

As reported in several recent articles in U.S. media outlets, the U.S. Supreme Court has been asked to rule on an intriguing new legal issue, one that is becoming increasingly prevalent in this era of rampant technology:  Who should have access to the emails belonging to a person who has died?

The question arose in connection with the Yahoo! account used by a now-dead Massachusetts man named John Ajemian.   Four years prior to his 2006 death in a motorcycle accident at the age of 42, he had set up the Yahoo! account with his brother. He had not bothered to make a Will, so when he died there was no governing provision for how the Yahoo! account was to be dealt with.

His two siblings were initially unsuccessful in their application to a Probate and Family Court to grant them access to his account, pursuant to their authority as his surviving relatives. That court had accepted Yahoo!’s lack-of-consent-related arguments, based on the federal Stored Communications Act.

However, after a successful appeal to the state Appeal Court, the lower-court ruling was overturned.  While falling short of imposing a positive mandate for Yahoo! to release the man’s emails, the Appeal ruling at least contemplated the possibility that Yahoo! could do so with the family’s permission.   (The Appeal court also sent one issue back to the Probate and Family Court for a re-hearing, namely the question of whether Yahoo’s stated Terms of Service agreement constituted a valid reason for refusing access.  That outcome will hinge on contract law principles, and will require the court to look at the matter from the standpoint of whether such agreements are valid and enforceable.)

The matter has now been scheduled to be considered yet again, this time by way of an application for judicial review brought before the U.S. Supreme Court.  No date has yet been set for that hearing.

It will be interesting to see how that top Court comes down on the matter, especially knowing that the outcome is so directly and arguably referable to other, similar tech-related scenarios and predicaments.

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

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Two necessary evils -- know your obligations re: income tax and spousal/ child support - YouTube

Wednesday’s Video Clip: Two Necessary Evils – Know Your Obligations on Income Tax and Spousal/Child Support

Income tax: Not a popular concept even at the best of times. But add in the obligations, which arise in the context of paying child or spousal support, and it’s enough to cause heart palpitations in most Canadians.

This is because the Canada Revenue Agency rules relating to how support payments are to be treated are quite complex. To make things more confusing, the federal Income Tax Act has separate rules for spousal support as opposed to child support.

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

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Custody Battle Gone Very Wrong:  Mom’s Cellphone Tracker Shows How Misguided Dad Really Is

I have reported previously about a case called M.M.B. (V.) v. C.M.V., the background facts of which are not terribly unique:  After their split in 2013 the parents had agreed to a “parallel parenting” and equal-time arrangement for their three children.  The mother now claimed that in the time since, the father had been engaging in a concerted effort to alienate her from them.  She asked for sole custody and an order that the father undergo therapy.

What’s more noteworthy is the rather epic court ruling in their case, which spanned over 1200 paragraphs, where the court recounted a dizzying array of tactics by each of the parents; overwhelmingly, however, the ruling focused on the misconduct of the father, who the court repeatedly noted had viewed himself as being “in a war” with his former spouse and determined to “win” at all costs.

Among the many accusations of rather mind-boggling misconduct on his part, one of the more interesting ones involved him using an app installed on the mother’s own cell phone to “track” her location.  As the court explained the gist of the mother’s testimony:

During the last two years of the relationship prior to separation, her evidence is that the [father] became more volatile and threw things at or near her. The [mother] testified that he was obsessed with the idea that she was having an affair. Her evidence is that she had never had an affair during the marriage.

 She further testified that the [father] had a constant need to be “in control” and that he utilized a feature on her cell phone to be able to track her whereabouts. Two examples that she cited were, on one occasion when she attended at a lawyer’s office in July 2011, he telephoned her four times during her appointment with the lawyer, knowing exactly where she was at the time. The second example she gave happened in August 2011. They were in New York for a few days and she left early to return to school. While the [mother] was still in New York, she claims that he was able to track her whereabouts and knew that she had taken a different route home. She says that she did so in order to look at possible housing for her and the children. He accused her that she was travelling to a residence for purposes of having an affair.

 As further proof that he was tracking her whereabouts through her cell phone, she indicated that she, as a result of these situations, learned that there was a “track my phone” feature on her phone which she then disabled. Shortly thereafter, however, she testified that he insisted on having her cell phone for some unrelated purpose. When he returned it to her she noticed that that the tracker had been reconnected. …

 When asked about the allegation of tracking the [mother] on her cell phone, his explanation for his knowledge of her going to a lawyer is that their cleaning lady told him this in July 2011 when the [mother] was going to the lawyer.

 When asked about the feature of “find my phone” so that he could allegedly track her whereabouts from his phone, he has a very “plausible” explanation. He claims that because he was using his phone for Association work they jointly downloaded this app so that she would be able to find his phone in the event that he lost it.

 Regarding the knowledge that he had that the [mother] was on a different route on the way home from New York City, the [father] once again has a “plausible” explanation. His brother who is a real estate agent, by happenstance, was showing a house across the road from where the [mother] was driving. His brother took it upon himself to call the [father] to report that he had seen his vehicle, thinking that it was the [father] but of course it was the [mother].

 This court views each of these explanations with a great deal of cynicism.

That cynicism was borne from many other conflicting and incredible explanations by the father, including one piece of “smoking gun” evidence noted by the court several hundred paragraphs later:

In response to the [mother’s] concern that the [father] was tracking her and the children’s whereabouts, the [father’s] response is somewhat contradictory. On the one hand, he “denied this” and stated that he “doesn’t care where she goes”. On the other hand, on several occasions, he admitted to “wanting to locate the children and not her”, which he believes to be a safety issue. He said he ”was able to locate the children by their cell phone devices”.

 This was an admission by the [father] that the court finds is consistent with the evidence given by the [mother] at trial; that she knew that the [father] was tracking her movements through her cell phone. The court finds that this is inconsistent with the [father’s] “explanations” of how he knew the [mother’s] whereabouts on two separate occasions at about the time of the separation. He specifically denied under oath at trial that he was tracking her whereabouts through her cell phone. Undoubtedly, he had forgotten what he said during the assessment, or did not expect this court would take the time to read all of the exhibits.

Particularly as it relates to the father’s highly misguided win-at-all-costs focus, the M.M.B. (V.) v. C.M.V. decision is a virtual judicial textbook on “How Not to Behave” in the post-separation phase.  It could be interesting reading for those who can get through the 1,200-paragraph judgment.

For the full-text of the decision, see

M.M.B. (V.) v. C.M.V.

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

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Parents Lose Custody for Failing to Respect Teenager’s Wish to Transgender

An Ohio Court was recently asked rule on who should make medical decisions for a teenage boy who sought hormone treatment to enable him to transgender.

The parents did not consent and sought the court’s authority to stop the treatment. The child was placed in care of Family Services pending the outcome of the hearing.

The parents argued that given the child’s mental state he was not “even close to being able to make such a life-altering decision”.  Medical experts disagreed and submitted that the father’s conduct was harming the child.

The grandparents requested custody and offered to care for the child and were willing to make medical decisions with the child. This proposal was supported by the child’s court appointed guardian.

Judge Sylvia Sieve Hendon ruled and CNN reported that:

The grandparents, rather than parents, will be the ones to help make medical decisions for the child going forward. But before any hormone treatment is allowed, the court ordered, the teen should be evaluated by a psychologist who is not affiliated with the current facility where he is receiving treatment, on “the issue of consistency in the child’s gender presentation, and feelings of non-conformity.”

In Ontario, we already have legislation to address this very issue. As we previously reviewed in “Gender Expression” Now Protected for Kids by Law Ontario’s amendments were aimed at:

courts, social workers, and adoption services. It mandates that when providing services or considering the best interests and welfare of a child, these entities must consider “race, ancestry, place of origin, color, ethnic origin, citizenship, family diversity, disability, creed, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression.”

It also prevents parents from challenging a child’s same-sex orientation, or with identification not with the gender that he or she was born, but rather the opposite one.

This directive gives rise to a corollary assessment as well: Whether a child should be removed from a home where the parents oppose a child’s declaration of his or her homosexuality or choice of “gender”. The principle behind this part of the legislation is that a parent who refuses to recognize a child’s preference in this regard is actually perpetrating abuse; the child’s removal from the home environment and into child protection facilities would prevent further abuse from occurring.

It would appear that Ontario is ahead of the curve by crafting legislation designed to protect the rights of the individual and the best interest of children.

What are your thoughts?

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

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Happy family day from the lawyers and staff at Russell Alexander Collaborative Family Lawyers.

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Bitcoin and Divorce: Perils and Pitfalls

We are seeing increasing divorce cases that involve Bitcoin and other crypto currencies.

This Is Money reports that there have already been several divorce cases that involve Bitcoin. They rightly point out that discovery and tracing of this asset can be problematic for lawyers:

“Tracing cryptocurrencies could be enormously time-consuming and expensive. This is, of course, much easier if cryptocurrencies are traded via an online investment platform and bought with funds from a bank account, as the original value of the transaction can then be established. When cryptocurrency is purchased directly and moved offline, it becomes almost impossible to trace.”

For divorcing couples in Ontario, full financial disclosure is the norm. So, if you own Bitcoin or other crypto currencies you will need to disclosure these assets (and their value) to your spouse. If fail to disclose your Bitcoin then there is a chance that any Court Order or divorce agreement you enter into may be set aside if the asset is discovered later as result of this non-disclosure.

The relevant date to value the asset would be your date of separation (DOS). The Bitcoin may also be exempt from sharing if you brought this asset into the marriage and owned it on your date of marriage (DOM). The value of the Bitcoin on your DOM may be a deduction to any final sharing you do with your spouse. However, the value increase of you Bitcoin from your DOM to your DOS may have to be shared with your spouse.

You should engage the services of an experienced family lawyer if you are divorcing and you (or your spouse) own Bitcoin or other crypto currencies.

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

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Take a look at the behind the scenes of our new video shoot. We worked hard to bring you up to date information on important issues. New topics covered included child custody, spousal support, financial disclosure, and more.

Behind The Scenes: Lawyers Turned Actors - YouTube

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

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Are Surreptitious Recordings Admissible in Family Court?

A recent Alberta case called St. Croix. v. St. Croix gave the court an opportunity to review the Canadian law on whether surreptitious telephone recordings could be admitted in Family court.

The background facts that sparked this review featured a mother who had asked the court to admit her evidence of recorded telephone conversations between her and the father of a child they had together.  They were embroiled in a dispute over custody and parenting issues, and she had recorded some of their conversations using her smartphone.  She alleged that in those recordings he had uttered threats to kill her (including a vow to “rip her head off” if she ever tried to take their child from him).

On a motion as to the recording’s admissibility, the court noted that it had not been provided with a copy of the recording, and was merely advised by the mother that it contained a threat of physical violence, and that it was relevant to the broader issues before the court.  The parents disagreed on how relevant it might be.

This scenario prompted the court to review the general law on whether, and in what circumstances, surreptitious recordings are admissible in Family law matters. Here are the key points:

  • Courts generally view surreptitiously-recorded telephone conversations with repugnance.[1]
  • However, short of certain specific privacy expectations, there are few if any restrictions on the admissibility of surreptitious recording of conversations or events. They are generally not prohibited or illegal.[2]
  • Rather than accept or reject them outright, courts will consider what the recordings themselves disclose, and weigh how probative they are, and then assess that against any prejudicial effect. [3]
  • Under the common law (which includes Family Law), it does not generally matter how the evidence is obtained and as long as the other person in the recording knows, prior to the hearing date, that the recordings exist and are being relied on, they can amount to real evidence of conversations or events.[4]
  • However, those restrictions do exist on various facts, and the cases go both ways.

In short:  There’s no clear yes-or-no answer, since it depends on the facts.[5]  

Returning to St. Croix v. St. Croix, the mother sought to have the recordings admitted as evidence on the basis that they were relevant to determining the child’s best interests. But the court pointed out that this might actually heighten the acrimony between her and the father, and reward her for being the better “documentarian” in their interactions.  More to the point, this was likely to prolong their litigation and increase expenses, since it would catapult both of them toward providing the court with longer and more numerous affidavits and court exhibits.

In the end, the court in St. Croix decided not to allow the telephone recording, and added that it would be a rare case where this kind of evidence should be admitted, and only after the court holds a voir dire to determine whether it is admissible in all the circumstances.[6]

For the full text of the cited decisions, see:

St. Croix v St. Croix

Mazur v. Corr

Scarlett v. Farrell

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

[1] Scarlett v. Farell. 2014 ONCJ 517.

[2] Mazur v. Corr, 2004 ABQB 752.

[3] Scarlett v. Farell. 2014 ONCJ 517.

[4] Mazur v. Corr, 2004 ABQB 752.

[5] And for those reading, it’s important to seek the advice of an experienced Family lawyer, before trying to use recorded phone conversations in your litigation.

[6]It should be noted, however, that additional procedural steps were still pending, whereby the trial judge would determine whether that decision was final.

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2017 Russell Alexander Charitable Giving Fund Grant Recipient: 541 Café and Eatery

FEBRUARY 5, 2018

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Russell I. Alexander Awards 2018 Charitable Giving Fund Grant
541 Café and Eatery is excited to receive $2,500.00.

BROOKLIN, ON February 5, 2018 –

The Russell I. Alexander Charitable Giving Fund provides grants and financial support to community organizations that are doing meaningful work, but may not be as visible as some of their larger counterparts. As part of this giving fund, 541 Café and Eatery has been provided with a donation in the amount of $2,500.00. 541 Café and Eatery opened its doors in 2013 and has served marginalized members in their community ever since.

541 has been highlighted in the press for their unique button exchange program. Patrons of 541 are encouraged to purchase button’s for $1.00 each, which then can be redeemed by community members in need to purchase affordable and nutritious meals.

541 is a non-profit and volunteer driven organization, and the proceeds from food sales are used to facilitate programs.

Sue Carr, 541’s Executive Director, will be using the donation funds towards “buttons which are a valuable resource at 541 as they are used to feed the hungry”.

About Russell I. Alexander

Russell I. Alexander is a law firm dedicated solely to family law. With experienced lawyers and staff of 17 people, the firm provides guidance on matters relating to family law. For additional information about the Russell I. Alexander Giving Fund, please visit www.russellalexander.com.

Previous Giving Fund recipients include: Covenant House Homeless Youth Shelter, Lindsay Muskies Hockey Association, Whitby Girls Hockey Association, the Lindsay Lynx Girls Hockey Association and Luke’s Place.

To learn more about the Russell I. Alexander, Family Lawyers, you can also visit them on Facebook.

Interviews with Mr. Alexander and or his staff can be arranged by contacting 905.655.6335.

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