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Mental health is often overlooked but is just as important as our physical well-being. Did you know that 1 in 5 people will be affected by a mental illness at some point their lifetime? Millions of people currently live with some form of mental illness. Despite these astonishing statistics, there is still a negative stigma that surrounds mental illness. This is in large part due to a lack of education and knowledge about mental illness and its devastating effects. May is Mental Health Awareness Month, so let’s take a closer look at mental health and how to help someone you love who may be suffering from a mental disorder.

What is Mental Health?

Mental health is closely tied to your physical health; so much so that poor mental health can actually cause physical health problems such as high blood pressure and obesity.

Mental health is three-fold and encompasses:

  • Emotional well-being
  • Psychological well-being
  • Social well-being

Your mental health plays a very large part in how you respond to and interact with the world around you. Mental illness is any disorder that negatively affects your mental health and interferes with your ability to function and enjoy everyday life.

Factors That Contribute to Mental Illness

Everyone is different, and the cause of mental illness will vary for each person. These are the three main factors from which mental illnesses are thought to stem:

  • Biological – Does your brain chemistry inherently put you at a higher risk for developing a mental illness?
  • Environmental Factors – This includes family life or sustained trauma that could lead to poor mental health.
  • Genetics – Is there a family history of mental illness that leaves you at greater risk?
What are the Warning Signs of Mental Illness?

The way in which mental illness manifests is different in each person. Here are warning signs that you or a loved one may be struggling with mental illness:

  • Chronic irritability
  • Prolonged sadness
  • Anxiety
  • Withdrawal from family and friends
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Severe mood swings
  • Feelings of hopelessness
  • Thoughts of suicide
  • Inability to complete day-to-day tasks

This is by no means a complete list of symptoms, as mental illness can range from mild to very severe.

4 Most Common Mental Illnesses

There are more than 200 known forms of mental illnesses in the world. Here are five of the most common disorders:

  • Depression – Experience feelings of sadness, loss of interest in activities, insomnia, etc.
  • Anxiety – Often goes hand-in-hand with depression. Symptoms include nervousness, panic attack, and possibly physical symptoms such as a racing heartbeat.
  • Schizophrenia – Common symptoms include distorted perceptions of reality, hallucinations, and delusions.
  • Dementia – Common symptoms include loss of memory, becoming disoriented and the inability to comprehend.

This is by no means an exhaustive list and disorders may present in different ways depending on the origination and severity of the illness.

What to Do if You or Someone You Know is Suffering From Mental Illness

It can be hard watching someone you love struggle with mental illness. It is important to continue providing positive support while urging them to seek out professional treatment. It is very common to resist help at first, so do not be surprised if your loved one does not jump at the opportunity for treatment. Keep encouraging in a way that does not feel overbearing or overwhelming.

If you think you are suffering from a mental disorder, turn to someone you trust and seek out professional treatment. Mental illnesses, when left untreated, can lead to devastating consequences, including increasing severity of the disorder and even self-harm or harm to others.

When it comes time to seek help, trust Fairwinds Treatment Center, the leaders in mental health recovery in Florida. Our team understands it is not easy to seek help and treats each patient with care and compassion. By partnering with several insurance companies, we also strive to alleviate the financial burden of seeking treatment. Contact us today for more information and to schedule an appointment. 

The post May is Mental Health Awareness Month: Mental Illness Treatment appeared first on Fairwinds Treatment Center.

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As a parent, you only want what's best for your child. Yet ensuring they're looked after and taken care of can become a challenge if your teen struggles with an eating disorder. Unlike other issues such as a cold or flu that can be easily remedied, there can be many potential barriers to finding effective treatment for an eating disorder.

But in the end, making sure your teen is healthy and happy is the ultimate goal. And to achieve that, you must dispel misconceptions about eating disorders and work to understand exactly what treatment your adolescent needs to get better. Here's how.

"The first step is identifying the disorder your child is dealing with."

Understand the separate disorders

The first step to finding the right treatment is identifying the disorder, or multiple disorders, your child is dealing with. A damaging and common myth about eating disorders is that they are all the same. Yet the grouping together is not always malicious, some parents may just not understand the full severity and depth of eating disorders.

Knowing that you're not likely a doctor, it can seem impossible to try to diagnose your teen. But there are symptoms and behaviors that can help indicate exactly what your family and teen is dealing with. For instance, rapid and excessive weight loss or compulsive behavior can indicate struggles with anorexia; bulimia can be characterized by hiding of food, social withdrawal or physical injuries caused by self-induced vomiting. Each disorder requires it's own treatment plan.

Talk to the experts about options

The next thing to do is contact a medical professional or treatment center about what can be done. Just as there are different disorders, there are different treatment options to best target the nature and severity of the situation.

While it may not always be possible, try to involve your child in any discussions. Again, while this may not be feasible in every instance, the more knowledge that can be gained together, the better. Learning about what separates inpatient from outpatient settings can help you pick the best course of treatment for your child.

Ensure the care is holistic

Treatment for an eating disorder should entail much more than just medical treatment for the disorder itself. In almost every case, a mental health issue co-occurs with an eating disorder. This makes it essential that your teen get care for their mental health, and not just their body. It's important to broach the subject of psychotherapy and counseling, and whether those will be included in the treatment regimen. Group counseling, for example, can help teenagers understand they're not alone and learn from others in the same position. Therapy can help them address problem behaviors and stressors, as well as learn mindful and self-empowering strategies. 

Another facet of treatment should be about what happens after leaving a program. Adolescents should receive nutrition education — like on what to eat or how to meal plan — and other assistance for maintaining a healthy life post-treatment.

If you want more information on what different treatments look like and which is best for your child, contact Fairwinds Treatment Center today.

The post Treating my teen: How to get your child the right treatment for an eating disorder appeared first on Fairwinds Treatment Center.

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Adolescence can be a tricky stage in life for parents and their teenagers alike. You only want what's best for your kids, but the pressures and changes of adolescence can make it hard to communicate or connect. Many parents worry, which is only natural; yet sometimes that concern is warranted. 

About 1 in 10 teenage girls will develop an eating disorder, according to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, while adolescent boys are also at risk. Scores of families with teens will have to face the reality of eating disorders, which is not easy. The stress and damaging behavior can compound existing issues. However, given the potentially life-threatening nature of these conditions, identification and action are needed.

Here are three things you should know about adolescent eating disorders:

1. Eating disorders are often linked to mental health issues

There is a common misconception that eating disorders are borne of themselves, that outside of usual teenage angst there are no conditions that may lead to or further complicate an eating disorder. It's crucial that parents understand the link between eating disorders and mental health. It is rare that any eating disorder exists on its own, as they are often linked with serious mental health concerns like depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress or obsessive compulsive disorder.

In fact, statistics from one study cited by the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) found 95% of individuals hospitalized for an eating disorder had a co-occurring mood disorder. Stress or low self-esteem as a result of negative school interactions or other life events can foster concurrent disorders. It's vital to recognize this inherent link when talking with a teenager or finding help.

2. Early identification is key

Eating disorders are tough to spot. Skipping meals or rigorous dieting can sometimes seem like teenage behavior; but it's important to look closer if these symptoms and signs begin to manifest. Why? Because eating disorders are life-threatening conditions. Separate statistics cited by NEDA show eating disorders have the second-highest mortality rate of all mental health disorders, behind opioid addiction. Further, 1 in 5 deaths due to anorexia is a suicide.

There's little time to waste in finding treatment, especially if symptoms start to appear more frequently or seem to worsen. While taking such action is never easy, it can be life saving.

3. There are multiple types of eating disorders

Another unfortunate misconception about eating disorders is tending to group them all together. This can come to the detriment of finding effective treatment. Anorexia nervosa, binge-eating, bulimia, pica and other disorders all have distinct symptoms, side effects and effective care options. Treating one eating disorder as any other can only exacerbate the problem. Acting as if an eating disorder is just a teenage phase, and not giving it the serious attention it requires, can also be a damaging mistake.

Getting more information is the first step to tackling the issue head-on. While eating disorders are sensitive topics to discuss, it's imperative that any concerned parent understand what their child is going through. If you're looking for treatment options or just more knowledge, talk to Fairwinds Treatment Centers today.

The post 3 things you should know about adolescent eating disorders appeared first on Fairwinds Treatment Center.

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An eating disorder isn't easy to see from a parent's perspective. While you might think the outward signs may be unmistakable, such is not always the case. Eating disorders — and the mental health issues they're often linked with — can be concealed, while life on the outside is made to seem like everything is fine. Any prying could also potentially worsen a situation.

According to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 1 in 10 female teens suffer from an eating disorder. Yet eating disorders can develop in adolescents of all ages, genders and backgrounds. 

It's important to find help quickly for loved ones suffering from an eating disorder, which can be life-threatening. This means awareness and identification are essential for any worried parents. Here are four warnings to be knowledge of:

1. Frequent dieting

Fad diets tend to sweep through high schools, but a preoccupation with calorie counts and other nutritional values can be a sign that points to deeper issues. Dieting taken to the point were rules or caloric counting become rigid, inflexible routines that provoke anger or anguish when not adhered to may be indicative of some form of eating disorder, or at least an unhealthy relationship with food.

"Be aware of eating in isolation."

2. Eating away from others

Taking dinner up to a bedroom may not seem like a big thing. But if your teen does it constantly, or makes excuses to eat in private, that's a potential symptom. The anxiety and shame associated with eating often drives those who suffer from a disorder to try to hide any eating. If such isolation occurs at home, in school or elsewhere, there may be something larger at play. Finding wrappers or trash in bathrooms or other areas could be cause to heighten your alarm, given an existing situation.

3. Change in behavior

Eating disorder are inextricably linked to metal health issues. The majority of people suffering from anorexia, bulimia or binge-eating disorders meet criteria for another core DSM-listed disorder, such as depression, paranoia or lack of impulse control. Together, these conditions may cause changes in your child that go beyond becoming a teen who is embarrassed by family. Irritability, discouraged feelings, obsession with body image and social withdrawal all call for further investigation if you're a parent.

4. Poor general health or other physical changes

While rapid weight loss is a clear sign of a problem, physical changes may not always be as apparent. Additionally, while ailments like a sore throat or a cold that just seems to stay may not raise alarms, the decreased immune response may be a greater issue. On harder-to-detect level, tooth decay, dry or flaky skin, heartburn, slow wound healing and swollen joints should also be looked at closely if concerns already exist.

If these symptoms present in your teen, it's best to watch for a bit, but inquire for help concurrently. If not indicative of an eating disorder, some of these warnings signs are alarming regardless. It can be a difficult process to find help for your child, but Fairwinds Treatment Center can walk you and your family through the options and potential steps. Reach out to us today.

The post Does my child have an eating disorder? 4 warning signs you need to know appeared first on Fairwinds Treatment Center.

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Struggles with excessive alcohol use are common: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 88,000 lives are potentially lost each year to it. This makes confronting the problem and helping those in need a crucial public duty. That’s why Alcohol Awareness Month began.

Nearly 30 years of raising awareness

April has been Alcohol Awareness Month since 1987, when the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence create the observance to connect individuals with resources, educate the public and reduce stigma associated with alcohol addiction. Now named Facing Addiction with NCADD, the organization says Alcohol Awareness Month is primarily an opportunity to “dismantle the barriers to treatment and recovery.”

How is this done? Supporters are encouraged to attend or host community events, raise awareness through social campaigns, and participate in a sober weekend. The first weekend of each April from Friday to Sunday is a 72-hour period where Americans are urged to go without a drink. Individuals who may be struggling with a substance abuse disorder can start treatment or understand the realities of their condition. Family members, friends, sponsors and allies can similarly go alcohol-free to express solidarity, as well as raise awareness. Meanwhile, April 11 is National Alcohol Screening Day.

‘Help for Today, Hope for Tomorrow’

The theme of April 2019 is “Help for Today, Hope for Tomorrow,” which is intended to inspire confidence that becoming free of alcohol use is possible. According to Facing Addiction with NCADD, 20 million people are living in recovery. Reaching those 17.6 million who currently suffer from a dependency with a positive message may help lead them to seek solutions.

Alcohol Awareness Month is an ideal time for that outreach, as events are held on a local, state and national level. These programs focus on education on prevention and treatment options, and take place in places like high schools, university campuses, places of worship and community centers.

How you can help

It’s easy to participate in Alcohol Awareness Month and do a part in helping address the issue. The Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion lays out a few ways in which you can take up the cause:

  • Hold an alcohol-free block party that engages youths or other community groups, and which is sponsored by local businesses.
  • Tweet about Alcohol Awareness Month using approved or trending hashtags; link to helpful content in other social media posts.
  • Volunteer with a local organization to help connect those in need with resources or referrals to services.

On a more personal level, make it a point to either get help for yourself or a loved one. While there is no wrong time to do this, Alcohol Awareness Month is a particularly advantageous time to seek recovery. Those barriers to sobriety are perhaps never lower, and there are numerous stakeholders and advocates ready to pitch in and get you or a family member the treatment you need.

If interested in learning more about those options for substance abuse, or facts about alcohol use in general, contact Fairwinds Treatment Centers today.

The post April is Alcohol Awareness Month appeared first on Fairwinds Treatment Center.

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Recovery from a substance abuse disorder is a long journey. This can sometimes intimidate those who need help. And while each person's progression through recovery will be unique to them, general misconceptions exist — like that seeking help means sacrificing control over your life.

Wendy Williams, a noted daytime talk show host and former radio personality, recently demonstrated how entering recovery does not mean giving up obligations or hobbies. As she continues to battle substance abuse and film her show daily, Williams is an example for how individuals needing help can get assistance and still maintain a regular, fulfilling life.

Filming while commuting from sober house

For viewers of The Wendy Williams Show, there was almost no way to know their favorite host had been taping each day and living at a sober house the whole time. While Wendy Williams had missed time recently because of a thyroid issue, she had returned in early March and the show seemingly never skipped a beat. Later in the month, she informed her audience about steps she had taken to address a substance abuse disorder, something she said she's battled in the past.

While Williams was taping her show, she also was living in a sober house and commuting to group addiction counseling sessions. The revelation was a surprise, as Williams continued to reveal she had a 24-hour sobriety coach, facts only herself and immediate family knew.

Outpatient treatment allows you to pursue life and sobriety together

Living in a sober house has not stopped Williams from hosting her show, nor from launching a substance abuse disorder hotline — which was the initial basis for the announcement. Williams is taking care of her professional duties and doing good for her community as she recovers. This is the opportunity outpatient treatment offers to those who need help, but may be hesitant.

Outpatient treatment similar to the kind Williams is going through involves receiving care in-residence, whether at home or a sober-living house. Participation in group meetings or other activities and events is personalized to an individual's schedule to ensure they can still go to work, take care of kids or attend a birthday party. This part-time flexibility is an advantage compared to other options like inpatient or partial hospitalization, which usually require admitting to a facility.

However, there is a higher level of personal responsibility when it comes to managing recovery in an outpatient program. This is a good learning experience and time to build self-discipline, but will require accountability. Care providers usually don't place anyone in outpatient who couldn't reasonably deal with the risks or temptations.

If you're interested in more about outpatient or the different treatment options, contact Fairwinds Treatment Centers today.

The post Wendy Williams shows how to live your life and still be active in sobriety appeared first on Fairwinds Treatment Center.

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Spring Break is in full effect for college students across the nation.

Some students will simply take the time off to relax. Some might even use the time to study or catch up on readings. But for many, traveling and partying during spring break is something of a cultural cornerstone.

This makes spring break a particularly touchy time for students who show signs of addiction issues, as well as those who already have a diagnosis.

For the parents of college students, spring break behavior is often so outside the norm for most of the participants that it can be difficult to parse whether someone exhibits signs of worrying behavior, or if they’re simply engaging in a rare one-off along with their peers.

To help with this process, here are several key ways to identify the symptoms of substance abuse after spring break:

Take Note of Binge Drinking

This is one of the toughest areas to pin down during spring break celebrations because of the nature of many of the celebrations held by and for college students during this time.

The average spring break reveler imbibes massive amounts of alcohol:

  • Male college students average 18 drinks per day
  • Female college students average 10 drinks per day
  • 50% of men report passing out or vomiting
  • 40% of women report passing out or vomiting
  • Outside of spring break, 50% of college students of both genders report drinking to excess at some point throughout the year

This provides a particularly convenient cover for problem drinkers. In a context where everybody is drinking to excess, their own behavior and symptoms of substance abuse can very well go undetected.

Expect better of your child. Ask them honestly about their drinking experiences during spring break, but don’t simply write off excessive drinking as normal. While they spent their holiday around higher than normal numbers of drunk people, remember to place this “one-off” event in the larger context of their drinking habits.

Look For Signs of Alcohol Poisoning

Even when many of their peers are drinking to excess, there remains a worrying level of drinking that the majority will not get close to.

Problem drinkers often develop high tolerances for alcohol, which can be confusing for their loved ones and peers who might not notice just how drunk they are slowly becoming.

This is why looking for the physiological signs of alcohol poisoning is so important. Expecting loud or brash behavior isn’t necessarily the best way to track problematic drinking.

Signs of alcohol poisoning include:

  • Irregular breathing
  • Confusion
  • Vomiting
  • Lowered body temperature
  • Unconsciousness

These basic symptoms add up as proof that someone not only drank more than average, but enough to cause themselves harm.

Some students do indeed find themselves on the wrong side of alcohol poisoning due to inexperience, rather than chronic alcohol abuse. These students, with support from their family and friends, should take some time to consider their relationship to alcohol and whether it could develop into a problem.

However, if your child is already consistently drinking, a night leading to alcohol poisoning takes on an entirely different tone. It speaks of symptoms of substance abuse and a broader lack of self-control, rather than an isolated mistake.

Ask Honest, Pointed Questions About Your Child’s Spring Break

College students are notorious for alcohol abuse and promiscuity during spring break. Some parents place this in the larger context of the media-hyped concept of “hookup culture,” and worry that these opportunities for compulsive behavior could send their child down a dangerous path.

One important fact to keep in mind is that these behaviors are nothing new — and they haven’t increased in any meaningful way for the current generation.

If your child implies or says that they were in compromised or risky situations due to their drinking over spring break, it’s the perfect opportunity to open the conversation to how their nights of drinking go outside of spring break.

Fairwinds Is Here to Help

Worrying about spring break behavior is a common experience for the parents of college students. But that doesn’t erase just how dangerous these circumstances can be for a student with symptoms of substance abuse or impulsive behavior issues.

Fairwinds Treatment Center exists to help families and addicts deal with their symptoms of substance abuse directly. With an individualized approach for each patient, we welcome all parents seeking advice or treatment for their children as they cope with substance abuse issues in an environment as challenging as college. Contact us for more information on how we can help you and your student.

The post How to Identify the Symptoms of Substance Abuse After Spring Break appeared first on Fairwinds Treatment Center.

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When you’re suffering from a substance abuse disorder and struggling to find the right treatment for you, it can be difficult to find lasting success in recovery.  A possible reason for this is that substance abuse often occurs alongside an undiagnosed mental illness, which, when left untreated, can weigh down an already-heavy load and potentially lead to a greater likelihood of relapse.

We believe substance abuse is often an expression of underlying psychological or emotional pain and that’s why we use the unique and effective approach of combining clinical treatment with therapeutic counseling.  We utilize personalized treatment plans which meet your individual needs and ensure a greater chance at success and a brighter future for our patients.

A Dual-Diagnosis Approach

It’s rare that addiction exists all on its own.  And the human mind is highly complex – so many of our choices are driven by emotional, biological, and chemical processes of which we are completely oblivious.  In this way, we may be using substances to self-medicate the symptoms left by past traumas or other emotional ordeals without fully realizing or understanding what’s happening.  While many other treatment centers approach healing as though substance abuse occurs in isolation, our unique dual-diagnosis approach seeks to uncover contributing factors and provide both the appropriate clinical and therapeutic support needed for lasting recovery.

Dual diagnosis is the process by which identification of concurrent conditions is made. Co-occurring conditions may include anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, or other conditions, often accompanied by distorted perceptions.  Substance abuse functions as a form of self-medication which is meant to alleviate the symptoms of a mental illness.

While this can feel to sufferers as though it does relieve symptoms in the short term, studies have shown that substance abuse worsens the symptoms of mental illness overall.  This acts like something called a positive feedback loop, wherein the symptoms of mental illness worsen, self-medication increases, and thus symptoms worsen further and things get worse and worse.  Treating substance abuse without treating any mental illness which is prompting and/or exacerbating that substance abuse is not going to be nearly as effective as diagnosing and treating both conditions at the same time.

Why Fairwinds?

Fairwinds Treatment Center is a pioneer in both dual diagnosis and pharmacology, having been founded in 1989 by Dr. M.K. El-Yousef. We have a track record of over 30 years of helping individuals and families suffering from substance abuse, eating disorders, and mental health issues to live a happy and healthy life.  We use an integrated, dual-diagnosis approach to treatment of both substance abuse and co-occurring mental illness, which means there’s no need to continue suffering.  Along with our individualized treatment plans, this can help ensure a lasting recovery.  Treatment involves daily visits from the treatment psychiatrist and 24/7 medical attention, so we’re always here to help you overcome the challenges involved in beating addiction and co-occurring mental illness.

Our highly-trained clinical team works closely with each individual, and we are specialized in treating adults with substance abuse and co-occurring mental health issues.  We have one of the highest staff-to-patient ratios in the industry, and our model for recovery combines individualized care with individual/group therapies. Our patients benefit from a multi-layered approach to treatment and a multi-faceted support network to firm up gains which are made throughout the course of treatment.  We have a high rate of success because of the expertise of our clinical team which treats each patient with compassion, individualized care, and respect.

Treatment at various levels includes medical stabilization, detoxification, residential/in-patient care, intensive out-patient programming, and after-care treatment. Care is facilitated by our experienced clinical team of psychiatrists, addiction and eating disorder specialists, registered nurses, nutritionists, master level therapists, and certified addiction counselors.

We’re Here to Help

If you or a loved one is seeking treatment for drug addiction, contact Fairwinds Treatment Center to discuss your situation with one of our admissions counselors.  We’re here to help with the expertise, experience, and unique, individualized approach you deserve on your road to lasting recovery and a healthy lifestyle.

Find out more about dual diagnosis.

The post The Importance of a Dual-Diagnosis Approach to Treating a Substance Abuse Disorder appeared first on Fairwinds Treatment Center.

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Understanding the levels of care for substance abuse or eating disorders is important. Whether you're seeking treatment or helping a friend or family member do so, becoming familiar with the different tiers of care will help identify the best route to recovery. 

The number of distinct options may seem overwhelming at first — with six primary levels of care available — but knowing what each entails is key to finding the right type or mix of care for yourself or a loved one. Not every provider will offer each level, which makes knowing about the levels all the more vital.

Here's an introduction to the six levels of care and some central facts:

1. Detox

This is a period of mindful and bodily cleansing that is necessary in any long-term rehabilitation. Detoxification may be offered as a stand-alone program, or as a part of an overall personal recovery plan. The details of detox are largely known, and providers work to address withdrawal as best they can, using patient history, current health and severity of symptoms.

2. Inpatient care

Inpatient treatment can often require entering the program full time, which allows for 24/7 access to care services and monitoring. The experience is meant to be as comfortable as possible for the patient, who receives an individualized recovery plan. This strategy is informed by an assessment prior to entrance and is implemented daily. Such medical and support resources are critical, as is dedicated staff supervision, as many enter inpatient from detox.

3. Outpatient care

The specifics of outpatient care are very similar to inpatient care — e.g. specialized recovery plan and access to treatment and therapy — but location is the main difference. Whereas inpatient may require an individual to reside a center for the duration of the program, outpatient care allows these people to receive care and visits from doctors in the home. The potential danger is, of course, that everyday temptations or stressors can return and lead to relapse. Crucially, providers rarely extend outpatient care to those who would be at such risk, while also ensuring those who do take advantage of it have all the support they need.

4. Intensive outpatient

While general outpatient care schedules are left to the individual, intensive outpatient care is a more condense and involved program. While the substance of care will still reflect the needs of the individual, this program generally is a two-month long commitment that allows those entering it to access group counseling sessions, cognitive therapy and other psychoeducation to help them confront a disorder.

5. Residential care

This level exists somewhere between inpatient and outpatient care. Often, those who've experienced a recent trauma or are a harm to themselves (and not others) might need more intimate and flexible care management, which is what this program can offer. In other cases, a disability or other condition may prevent proper recovery in a usual inpatient setting, making residential care an option.

6. Partial hospitalization

As the name would imply, this is the most intensive program and considered only when particular personal and disorder criteria are met. In such instances, patients would continue to reside at home but commute to treatment, and is not recommended for those seeking acute treatment.

All six levels of care are available at Fairwinds Treatment Centers, but not covered by all providers. Contact us today for more information on treatment for you or a loved one. 

The post What are the levels of care? appeared first on Fairwinds Treatment Center.

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Deciding to seek treatment for a substance abuse disorder is a major event in life. Regardless of whether you or a loved one is entering rehab, there can be anxiety, fear, confusion, hesitation and all sorts of emotions that may dissuade those in need.

Getting over that hump is critical to recovery, even if it's not the first time treatment is being sought. However, that's much easier said than done. Not only can stigma complicate the situation, but it can also create misconceptions related to what treatment actually entails.

To help you or a loved one prep for the next step, here are three things to know about rehab for substance abuse:

1. Each provider is different

Much like other institutions in health care, each recovery center will be different in the scope of its services, staff and available treatments. Individuals struggling with substance abuse, and any supporting family or friends, should become familiar with the most common programs for drug addiction treatment. These are: inpatient, partial hospitalization, outpatient, residential, intensive outpatient and detox.

Each person will have unique needs in recovery, and it's likely one or a combination of those programs is going to be the best fit. Knowing this ahead of time can help identify the ideal provider in terms of care, facility and operations. Cost is another factor in this equation. Many health insurers will cover behavioral and other treatments that are fundamental to treating substance disorder. Consulting your policy for the specifics is another way to narrow down the best provider (i.e. one that's in your covered network).

2. Addiction is not solely a physical disease

The physical symptoms of substance abuse are the ones most commonly associated with such disorders. Addiction affects both physical and mental well-being. That means when you or a loved one enter treatment, be prepared to address both. Looking at addiction through the lens of dual-diagnosis necessitates an approach that recognizes and targets the connection between concurrent disorders. Addiction and psychological issues like depression, bi-polar disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder share close links, and it's impossible to treat the individual as a whole without addressing each.

3. Time away has to be planned for

Being admitted to a treatment center means stepping away from personal and professional life for a bit. However, bills, work and other obligations don't tend to wait around, so it's best to take care of these responsibilities as best as possible. Sometimes the timeframe doesn't allow for such advanced strategy, so consider recruiting others to aid with duties like child care or even feeding a pet. Some programs may split time between an on-site facility and home, with some supervision included. Such situations can ease concerns about falling behind.

There's a lot more involved in entering addiction treatment, but this is a start for affected individuals and family. Want to learn more about the details of care and how different programs work? Contact Fairwinds Treatment Services today for information.

The post 3 things to know before entering rehab for substance abuse appeared first on Fairwinds Treatment Center.

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