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A fellow asked me to paint four D&D miniatures for him. I managed to finish two before heading out on holidays.


First up is a human fighter with a flaming sword. Grey primer, block paint (with a bit of wet-on-wet) followed by a wash and seal.


The sword looks better in person than it does in the picture (camera struggles with red tones, it seems).


Second dude is a human fighter in fancy mail.


Same technique minus the wet-on-wet. Good details so the wash really popped it.


I also took the chance to base one of my own figures (RAFM Cthulhu) that I had painted awhile back but lost track of before completion.


The WizKids figures are really nice to work with. I have two elf warriors presently underway and I hope to finish them up in the coming week.


After than, I need to finish my 1812 rebasing (just need to get some static grass on).
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No gaming for me this week and the family is taking a short vacation. But I did manage to complete some terrain just before we left.


This is a library set from Mantic Games and contains 14 pieces. It is cast in brown plastic but I primed it white to do a wash.


This pack was pretty decent. It also more of less matches with the WizKids bookshelves that I previously purchased.


Overall, not a bad addition to my skirmish terrain.
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Bruce had me over for some Congo Gulch this week. The scenario was a supply train had to cross the board to get to the fort (Bruce's old west fort was out on loan so we made due with a stand-in). The number of wagon in the fort (of the three that arrived on board) at the end of eight turn determined victory level.


The locals set up with two units hidden on the board (eight locations to choose from) and an additional unit (owner's choice) arrived each turn at a random board edge.


The first of the ambushers unmasked immediately atop of rocky hill to snipe from a distance. They were charged by a unit of cavalry while the wagon train lit out in the opposite direction. Unfortunately for the cavalry, fire plus the arrival of mounted locals meant they were wiped out.


The wagon train tried to skirt the table edge to avoid the obvious trap in the canyon and put some distance between the  wagons and the revealed locals. Another pair of lucky rolls saw two more mounted troops materialize right in the wagon's path.


This gave time for the rest of the locals to catch up and combine sniping and a charge in the canyon. This basically rolled up the wagoneers' flank.


The wagoneers gamely pushed on but just got overwhelmed by melee troops and could not employ their superior firepower effectively. In the end, all three wagons were captured for a convincing win for the locals. Dinner menu at Fort Donner features long pork for the foreseeable future!


Overall, this scenario offers lots of replayability and several tactical options. I deployed the locals forward to attrited the visiting team. But a different strategy would be to deploy them back and marshal reinforcements for a charge. The wagoneers might also have rushed troops forward and dismounted to create fire bases and a safer path for the wagons.
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I made it out to the club this week. Bruce hosted four guys in another Congo Gulch game. This time it was a good old election, with each player trying to get to the post office to cast ballots for their candidates.


As we had a bit of overflow, Chen and I duked it out in Imperial Settlers. Damn, was Chen a hard opponent on his first time through the game!


We ended up tied for victory points at the end it was decided based upon remaining resources! need to refresh myself on the rules over a couple of points before playing again.


In the meantime, there was a fair bit of shooting and other silliness on main street I left before this was decided. Biggest lesson seemed to be that a secret ballot made for a more interesting game.


Some decals I ordered on eBay came in this week. The old time murals and posters were pretty good.


The graffiti was printed on clear film and it really needs some white paint in behind to pop. Lesson learned!


Evens some basic signage makes a big difference on these buildings, though.



And this sign made me laugh (when I found my reading glasses!).


Up next: Maybe some scenery as well as a tiny 28mm D&D commission I took on.
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No gaming for me this week (school events intervened) but I did finish up some painting. I'm almost finished the fourth season of Gotham, so I'm back in a superhero frame of mind.


A few month back, I picked up a few more HO-scale railway buildings for my Gotham layout. One of the better ones was JDs Furniture. The building needed some additional painting and washing.


The most interesting part is the lovely (and brittle) fire escape down the side. I also painted a random factory of some kind.


I finally ran out of decals so I broke down and ordered some online (along with some graffiti decals). I'll have to finish this building up when they come in.


I also knocked off this oil tank, which will make a useful scenario objective and LOS block.


I've also been making progress on finishing off the British rebasing in my War of 1812 project. I hope to have these done by the end of the month--there was quick a lot of paint touch-ups to do.
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Bruce pulled out the game Hammer of the Scots this past week. I've never played and, wow, what an amazing game!


Things started out poorly for me as I managed to lose William Wallace right out of the gate (bad strategy on my part) and Bruce then pushed north aggressively.


Once I got the hang of the game, I then started to rebuild.


As we near the end of the short Edward the 1st game, Bruce nicely timed an over-wintering and beat me silly, so I conceded with one year to go.


Overall, a super good game that I would totally play again now that I understand what is going.
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Old Jethro came to town with his poke full of gold and now everyone is headed to the hills to stake a claim! Basic mechanics were move to hill, grab a poker chip from one of six piles, and return to bank to stake claim. First chip from each colour to bank got that claim (which yielded victory points at end of game).


Everyone hauls for the hills on the first turn except the lawman, who elect to wait in the graveyard to waylay returning prospectors and jump their claim. Richard rather unfortunately got caught in a nasty two-way cross fire between the townies and the lawmen and was reduced to a single unit early on.


In the hills, Team Sombero discovers trigger happy prospectors!


While gold is collected, some locals encounter a mountain lion.


Eventually, Richard and Chen start to come back to town with gold claims.


That left Scott and I to try to shoot them up before they could get into the bank.


Richard managed to survive numerous combats and got in the bank. So Scott and I turned on Chen and a claim squirted loose.


I grabbed it and ran for the bank while we tried to keep Chen pinned down with a second claim outside of the bank.


At the end fo the game, the dastardly lawmen won the day (high die roll for gold points). Overall, a fun game with lots of potential strategies to play out. Thanks to Bruce for hosting! Also, welcome to new comer Dan, who watched the game and wrangled casualties.
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Bruce had me over for another test drive of his old west adaptation of Congo. This time the scenario was Little Round Top. The visiting team arrived from the left and top of the board. The only home team units were in the village at the bottom right. Other home team units could appear on a die roll.


For example, rights behind my set up area on turn two. Leading to...


...this rather difficult tactical issue.


The overall thrust of the game was that the visitor units moved down the right side and across the bottom of the table while home-team units ambushed or chased them. Having to constantly adjust to the home-team units appearing was a good and stressful mechanic ("Oh God, they appear WHERE this turn? Oh no. OH NO!").


The unit of burros below was completely wiped out in an ambush (removing 1/5th of my overall force in a single turn). Fortunately, the dice were swingy.


One unit of visitors made a stand on a hill and managed to push back (and eventually eliminate) the home-team unit through concentrated rifle fire.


The local's base was eventually captured and the visitors set up (as best they could) on the bottom right of the table to use their firing skills.  At this point, it was almost impossible or me to push any of the home team off the board in the direction required to gain the most victory points so it just became about surviving.


Bruce's new models are pretty sweet (Foundry) and really gave the game a lot of flair.


In the end, through the pleasure of the dice gods, the visiting team managed to squeak out a victory point (11-9 or thereabouts). But it all came down to two devastating volleys in the last turn.


Overall, the adaptation makes for a good game. Lots of colour, easy mechanics and a nearly historical result. Looking forward to seeing this game at the club this week. These rules could work for the Riel Rebellion, I would think. Bruce had some great scenario ideas at the end of the game.
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It has been a busy few weeks so I have gotten a bit behind in blogging. Two weeks ago, Bruce hosted me in another game of musketeers using the Tribal rules.


There was a hidden character that the cardinal had to find and rescue while the musketeers tried to prevent the rescue.


On the right side of the board, I finally got the hang of using shooters to immobilize while swordsmen close in to do some damage.


The left side was a bit of a bad match up for the cardinal's forces and, at this point, I figured the game was in the bag.


Then the cardinal appeared and greased three units in short order. Jerk.



At that point, the cardinal had found the figure to be rescued and I didn't have enough troops left to do anything about it. A great skirmish game because we actually had to fight each battle with cards (instead of just pushing the figures together and rolling dice). Gonna try to graft this system onto some superheroes.

This week, I was at the club and hosted a game of Imperial settlers for Andy, Scott, and Terry.


Despite Terry's baleful gaze, I think we had a good time. There are a lot of decisions to make each turn and minimal interaction between players. I was leery of four people meaning a lot of sitting but we managed to learn and play the game in 2 hours.


The Egyptians won. Scott played well and it is a good faction. Terry played the Japanese (which were interesting and different).


Andy and I soldiered on with the Roman and Barbarians. I was way behind but was trying for a long-game win. Alas, Scott just had too much of a lead by the end of the game.


Up next: I am half way through rebasing the 1812 British that I have after a trip to the washer store.
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No gaming for me this week but I did manage to finish a tonne of rebasing. These are older 1/72-scale War of 1812 guys guy I had on multi-figure bases.


I wanted to move them to individual bases so I could play some new Osprey rules that are out for North America. First up at 80 or so US foot soldiers.


I have a bunch of mounted left to do. I also have some cannons that are half done (ran out of washers!).


I also rebased a bunch of militia. These are a grab-bag of mostly older figures, including a bunch of Airfix confederates. These seem have taken more damage to their paint jobs over time.


There are several units of this guy (doing the "juke box hero" pose).


There are some of there figures mixed in. I think these guys with the top has were from a US-Mexico War set (Alamo?).


Then there are some Italeri, including this guy from an AWI set. He's wisely hiding behind a fur tree.


I pulled the British and Canadian troops off the shelf to start debasing them in anticipation of a run to the washer store this week.

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