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Welcome to Cool Comics in My Collection Episode 199, where we look at various comic books I own (and in some cases ones that I let get away), both new and old, often with a nostalgic leaning for those feelings of yesteryear. I hope you have as much fun reading about them as I had writing about these cool comics!

For each of the comic books I include here, I list the current secondary market pricing (with the exception of digital issues, which don’t have collectible value). This is according to the websites comicbookrealm.com (CBR) and Zap-Kapow Comics (ZKC), using the comic book grading scale of 9.4 (if both sites have the same price, you’ll find just one price for that issue). Not all my comics meet that grade. Some are probably better, and some are certainly worse. But to simplify it, that’s the scale I use here. And remember, a comic book is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it.

Did you know that you can be a guest host for Cool Comics? It’s your chance to show off some of your favorite comics in your personal collection! Just pick any of your comics for inclusion (this blog is for all ages, so please keep that in mind), with a maximum of seven issues. Repeat guest hosts are permitted and encouraged. To submit your completed blog (or if you have any questions), write to edgosney62@gmail.com.

The Cool Comics In My Collection Facebook Group is a place where you can discuss the comics you love, your favorite titles, and the characters that keep you coming back for more. Also, creators are welcome to share news about what you are working on, including Kickstarter campaigns. And don’t forget the prizes. Yes, Cool Comics gives away cool prizes. Be sure and join today!

If you have any comments, please scroll to the bottom of the page to where it says, “Leave a Reply.” And now, Episode 199…

Cool Comics News!

While I consider myself a comic book commentator and influencer, I’m a far cry from being able to claim the mantle of “Comic Book Historian.” Rather, I’m more of a student of comic book history. I gain my education via magazines such as Back Issue and Alter Ego, books on comic book history, and I’ve also added podcasts to my curriculum, such as Into the Weird. If you click on the name and listen to Episode 10, the podcast team reads an email I sent to them.

And speaking of Alter Ego, a few weeks back I found a big batch of back issues of it and Back Issue magazine at my local comic shop. I recently finished reading issue 154, which had a great feature on Golden Age artist Allen Bellman along with some fun early Seventies Marvel comics staring female heroes. If you want to know more about the creators and characters of your hobby of choice, these two magazines are excellent.

Cool Comics Battle of the Week!

Your Cool Comics Battle of the Week is Deathstroke versus Shang-Chi, the Master of Kung Fu! What do you think would happen if they faced each other in a titanic tussle, and how do you see the winner achieving victory? Let us know in the comments section below.

Cool Comics In My Collection Contemporary Cool Comics

#985 — The Amazing Spider-Man #25, Marvel, September 2019.

I’ve read lots of Spider-Man comic books (Amazing, Spectacular, Peter Parker, Marvel Team-Up, no adjective, and Ben Reilly/Scarlet Spider/Clone Spider-Man) during my life, going back to the early Seventies. And some periods I’ve enjoyed more than others. When you’ve taken a break from the hobby, sometimes it’s painful when you return because things aren’t the way you remember them as being, and you aren’t happy with the changes. I enjoyed the last few months of The Amazing Spider-Man before it got renumbered to the current run, but I’ve just been lukewarm with The Hunt storyline. Not that it was bad, but it didn’t do much for me. I think most comic book readers know what I’m talking about…not necessarily with this run of Spider-Man, but at some point in your reading, one of your favorite titles suddenly doesn’t feel the same any longer. So we come to this giant 25th issue, and I was hoping that it would give me back that Spider-Man feeling that I remember so well. And for the most part, it did. Thanks to Mary Jane Watson. Anyone who’s read this issue knows all about what she did at the theater, and her interactions made this big issue worth it. The cover price of The Amazing Spider-Man #25 is $7.99, while the current value is $8.

#986 — Superman #13, DC, September 2019.

Initially, Superman #13 wasn’t going to be a part of Cool Comics. I decide on the comics a couple weeks in advance and start reading what’s scheduled to go in the episode about a week-and-a-half before publication. Yet after reading this issue, the first “Year of the Villain” title I’ve gotten, I knew it belonged as part of Cool Comics. Superman and his father (Jor-El…if you haven’t been keeping up, he’s still alive) are in space, traveling to where Krypton used to be located to find out once and for all what really caused the destruction of the planet. But we also get an in-depth view of Jor-El before the devastation, including clandestine meetings with galactic leaders, his efforts to find out information concerning Rogol Zaar, and the drama he and his wife faced concerning young Kal and life and death. There are those who don’t like the current writer of the Superman comics, Brian Michael Bendis, but I’ve been having lots of fun reading them over the last year. The cover price of Superman #13 is $3.99, while the current value is $4.

#987 — Deathstroke #19, DC, July 2017.

Remember “The Judas Contract” way back in 1984? It was a story appearing in Tales of the Teen Titans #42 through 44, and Tales of the Teen Titans Annual #3. I wasn’t actively reading or collecting when these came out, but picked up both issue #44 and the annual in back-issue bins sometime during the Nineties, so when I started reading this Deathstroke issue that is part 3 of “The Lazarus Contract,” it immediately brought “The Judas Contract” to mind, and by golly, even though many changes have take place in DC comics since 1984, there were some parallels, making it fun for anyone who remembers that blast from the past. This storyline takes place in Titans #11, Teen Titans #8, then this issue of Deathstroke, and finishes up in Teen Titans Annual #1. For those who fondly remember “The Judas Contract” and want to read this new take, you can also purchase Titans: The Lazarus Contract in hardcover, trade paperback, and digitally. The cover price of Deathstroke #19 is $2.99, while the current values are $9 on CBR and $8 on ZKC.

Cool Comics Done Dirt Cheap

#988 — Deadly Hands of Kung Fu #2, Marvel, August 2014.

During my first phase of comic book collecting (1973 to 1978), I was not at all caught up in the Kung Fu craze, so when Master of Kung Fu started appearing on the shelves at Slick’s in Martins Ferry, Ohio, I barely gave it a sideways glance. Though I wish I could hop in my DeLorean and tell my younger self what comics to buy, it’s probably not going to happen. Yet we can dream, can’t we? Meanwhile, I do feel like a kid again when I find Seventies gems at discounted prices. But during a long absence from comic book collecting (mid-2003 to mid-2017), I missed out on lots of other cool stuff, including Shang-Chi, the Master of Kung Fu himself, in this miniseries. Fortunately for me, my legendary longbox (over a year ago, I bought a longbox that was stuffed with 419 comic books for just $20; hence, Cool Comics Done Dirt Cheap) helped me discover a number of cool comics that I’d missed out on. But this is issue 2 of 4, so I need to keep my eyes out for the other three issues. The hunt is never-ending, right? The cover price of Deadly Hands of Kung Fu #2 is $3.99, while the current value is $4.

FCBD the Cool Comics Way (Week 11)

#989 — Bob’s Burgers, Dynamite, May 2019.

Last August in episode 152, I had my first experience in any way, shape, or form with Bob’s Burgers. I didn’t like the first story in the issue, enjoyed the second, and didn’t really commit one way or the other on the third tale. This year I thought the first story, “The Ride,” was very entertaining and brought to mind elements of my short story Counterclockwise (which can be found as a solo Kindle story and additionally as a paperback and via Kindle in Ha!Ha!Ha! a Supervillain anthology). In my opinion, The Ride makes it worth searching out this Free Comic Book Day issue, if you like offbeat stories. Up next, Bob’s Burgers gives us a cautionary tale in a wacky way that I’m guessing will entertain most of you. Last, we get a bit of a bizarre space-faring adventure that takes enough odd twists and turns to keep you reading to the end. The cover price of Bob’s Burgers is free, while the current values are $0 on CBR and $1 on ZKC.

Cool Comics Kids

#990 — Porky Pig #73, Whitman/Gold Key, March 1977.

This issue of Porky Pig came out in the Gold Key era, but has the Whitman Pre-Pack logo on the cover, for those completists out there who are wondering about the image. When I was a kid, I didn’t care much for Porky Pig, but as I’ve matured, I now must admit that I sort of like him. With that in mind, I don’t know how today’s youth feel about Porky (and do kids today even know much at all about Looney Tunes?), but I still recommend this comic for your growing Cool Comics Kids collection that you can safely give to the youngsters in your life. Like most of the other titles in this category, the issue has several complete stories that are perfect for young attention spans. If you do some digging you can find comics like this in discount bins from time to time, and I grabbed this one for just a quarter. The cover price of Porky Pig #73 is 30¢, while the current values are $10 on CBR and $5 on ZKC.

Cool Comics Classics

#991 — John Carter, Warlord of Mars #1, Marvel, June 1977.

During my third phase of comic collecting (1993 to 2003), I was able to find all but three issues of this series in back issue bins. I hadn’t gotten around to reading any of them, and then when I ended up selling the majority of my collection because my house was overrun with white boxes, all my issues of John Carter ended up in the sale. So, this first issue is a replacement. It’s in far better condition than the previous number one I owned, and I paid $9 for it. But it’s a piece of Bronze Age beauty that I really wanted in my collection, and I’m happy to have it back. I’m not sure if I’ll ever get all the other issues I had from this short series, but this is the one I really wanted. If you’ve seen the underrated movie, you’ll recognize parts of this story. I’ve yet to read the original novel, A Princess of Mars, so I can’t tell you how this comic book matches up to it, but maybe some of you readers out there can let us know in the comments section below. Written by Marv Wolfman, with art by Gil Kane and Dave Cockrum, this comic isn’t for everyone, but for those who appreciate Edgar Rice Burroughs and licensed comics, this is a visual feast not only of the story itself, but the experience of going back to 1977 and enjoying the ads on the pages, too. So welcome back, Carter! The cover price of John Carter, Warlord of Mars #1 is 30¢, while the current value is $35.

Recently Read Digital Comics

I’m still making my way through the digital issues of All-Star Superman, but this week things were a little busier, so I was only able to read issues 7 and 8 of the series. Both had a lot of Bizarro World interaction, which can get a little annoying at times, if you know what I mean—”Me am fan of Bizarro talk”—not so much. Still, Bizarro has long been a part of Superman comics, so I’m not complaining. By the way, I’ve been reading All-Star Superman with the DC Universe app, and the mechanics of it have been working just as well as comiXology, which is usually the app I use for my digital reading. It gives you the option of reading frame by frame, but I have noticed that the art is a little fuzzy this way. I’m not sure if these issues look the same or better in comiXology, or if just this particular comic series has this happening or all comics via the app suffer from this. Regardless, I like the availability of so many titles to choose from. It seems like most people got the DC Universe app (at least from what I’ve seen on social media) in order to stream shows and movies, but don’t discount the vast collection of DC back issues available to you.

ComicBooks For Kids!

ComicBooks For Kids! (CB4K) is a charity that Cool Comics In My Collection is honored to be working with. CB4K provides comic books to kids in hospitals and cancer centers all across the Unites States. You can check their website and see if your local hospital is included and if not, you can work with them to get them included! If you like what you see, please help them out and follow/like their Facebook page. Their link is https://www.facebook.com/comicbooksforkids/

Never Miss an Episode of Cool Comics!

Now you can get Cool Comics in My Collection delivered directly to your email! Just click “Join My Newsletter” on my website (or click on the image of my No-Prize!), sign up, and that’s it. Pretty easy, right? Just be sure to follow the instructions on the confirmation email so that you start receiving my newsletter. If you don’t see it, you may want to check your Spam or Junk Mail folders.

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Welcome to Cool Comics in My Collection Episode 198, where we look at various comic books I own (and in some cases ones that I let get away), both new and old, often with a nostalgic leaning for those feelings of yesteryear. I hope you have as much fun reading about them as I had writing about these cool comics!

For each of the comic books I include here, I list the current secondary market pricing (with the exception of digital issues, which don’t have collectible value). This is according to the websites comicbookrealm.com (CBR) and Zap-Kapow Comics (ZKC), using the comic book grading scale of 9.4 (if both sites have the same price, you’ll find just one price for that issue). Not all my comics meet that grade. Some are probably better, and some are certainly worse. But to simplify it, that’s the scale I use here. And remember, a comic book is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it.

Did you know that you can be a guest host for Cool Comics? It’s your chance to show off some of your favorite comics in your personal collection! Just pick any of your comics for inclusion (this blog is for all ages, so please keep that in mind), with a maximum of seven issues. Repeat guest hosts are permitted and encouraged. To submit your completed blog (or if you have any questions), write to edgosney62@gmail.com.

The Cool Comics In My Collection Facebook Group is a place where you can discuss the comics you love, your favorite titles, and the characters that keep you coming back for more. Also, creators are welcome to share news about what you are working on, including Kickstarter campaigns. And don’t forget the prizes. Yes, Cool Comics gives away cool prizes. Be sure and join today!

If you have any comments, please scroll to the bottom of the page to where it says, “Leave a Reply.” And now, Episode 198…

Cool Comics News!

I’m on my second week with Zap-Kapow Comics, and I really like it. If an entry doesn’t have pricing, or there’s a missing issue or title, you can click “Report Error” for the comic, or if the comic just isn’t there, you can select “Contact” at the bottom of the page to send them an email, and they’ll get on it faster than you’d imagine. Some updates are made in minutes, while others get updated a few hours later (which is to be expected). If a title is missing, they let you know that it will be included in the next edition of the price guide, which comes out at the beginning of the month. If you go with the least expensive plan (Bronze Age), you pay just $4.99, a one-time fee. But if you want updated pricing and new issues to show up, you must pay 99¢ per update. Silver Age is a one-time fee of $19.99, and Golden Age, which comes with all the bells and whistles, costs $24.99. With those two plans you get the updated pricing for free at the beginning of each month. The only drawback is that for the new comics you purchase in July, you’ll have to keep track to add them in August…although with the Golden Age membership, you can create pull lists, so this, I’m assuming, adds them for you automatically. Although if you ended up getting a cover variant or something a little different, you’ll probably need to go to the comic and make sure you update it the way you want it listed. Visit the FAQ at the site for the lowdown on this. By the way, it works very well on my phone just using the browser and looks great. I think I’m spending too much time on it…

Cool Comics Battle of the Week!

Your Cool Comics Battle of the Week is Aero versus The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles! What do you think would happen if they faced each other in a titanic tussle, and how do you see the winner achieving victory? Let us know in the comments section below.

Cool Comics In My Collection Contemporary Cool Comics

#979 — Lois Lane #1, DC, September 2019.

Lois Lane is one of the oldest characters in the history of comic books. She appears in the first issue of Action Comics (you know, the one that introduced Superman to the world back in 1938) and has been one of the most important supporting cast members ever since. And now, at long last (it’s been 45 years since the end of Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane), we get a 12-Issue Maxi-Series of the this iconic character. Written by Greg Rucka, with art by Mike Perkins, Lois Lane will appeal to readers who appreciate intrepid news reporters (I had to say it), secrets, espionage, and anyone who is part of Superman’s world. If you don’t mind politics in your comics (and politics that bleed from today’s real headlines into the fictional world of the Daily Planet), you may want to try this out. Although I realize that politics have long been a part of comic books, I don’t care much for it. Comic books are a way to escape reality for short periods of time, giving us moments in which we don’t have to worry what’s being said or done in not only your home country, but the world at large. And that’s about as political as I’ll get with all of you. The series is just heating up (don’t believe me? just look at the cover…and things also heat up a little too much when Clark visits Lois and…I’ll leave it at that), but I’m one and done with it. It’s not on my pull list, and the main reason I grabbed this first issue is because I think that it’s a historically important comic (not in the sense that it’s going to balloon in price, but because it’s Lois Lane). The cover price of Lois Lane #1 is $3.99, while the current value is $4.

#980 — Aero #1, Marvel, September 2019.

If I hadn’t read the War of the Realms: Agents of Atlas mini-series, Aero wouldn’t be on my radar at all. First appearing via online comics for a Chinese audience, Aero now has the attention of many more readers thanks to the big company crossover. And Wave, another superhero who made her debut in War of the Realms, also appears with Aero in a second story in this same issue. In the first story, “Protector of the City,” the art style reminds me of Japanese manga, while the second adventure, “Aero & Wave: Origins & Destinies,” seems to be more in the typical superhero style I’ve seen over the years. Much like the Lois Lane comic above, this title isn’t on my pull list, and I bought it to try something a little different. And while the stories were decent, I’ll possibly never read another issue of Aero. The cover price of Aero #1 is $3.99, while the current value is $4.

Cool Comics Done Dirt Cheap

#981 — Gen13: Bootleg #17, Image Comics, March 1998.

One of the original Image Comics I liked back in the Nineties was Gen13, written by Jim Lee and Brandon Choi, with art by  J. Scott Campbell. I guess it reminded me of the X-Men, and I became a huge X-Men reader during that period. But I only bought a handful of Gen13 issues (there were lots of titles out then that I was trying, and if something didn’t resonate with me, I moved on to another), and ended up selling them all at a huge garage sale one summer weekend. But when I came into possession of my legendary longbox (I bought a longbox that was stuffed with 419 comic books for just $20 a while ago; hence, Cool Comics Done Dirt Cheap), once more I stumbled upon this group of heroes. This series has different creators and even a slightly different title, but it was fun paying this team a visit once more. The cover price of Gen13: Bootleg #17 is $2.50, while the current value is $3.

FCBD the Cool Comics Way (Week 10)

#982 — My Hero Academia & The Promised Neverland, Viz Media, May 2019.

For some of us who’ve been involved with comic books for decades, it’s not the easiest thing to read manga in the correct panel order. It shouldn’t be that hard, but sometimes we’re just so used to how we’ve always read comics that we need to really pay attention to what we’re doing! Okay, maybe it’s just me. Free Comic Book Day once more brings us another story from My Hero Academia, and in this story, there is a fight that takes place throughout and continues, it tells us at the end, into Volume 14. Because I don’t read this comic, I had no idea of what was going on, but I know there are fans out there who probably were on the edge of their seats. The second story in this FCBD issue is called The Promised Neverland, and it really captured my attention. The series has been around for a while, getting its start in 2016 in the anthology Weekly Shōnen Jump. The short piece I read in here was intriguing, and obviously others thought so because it was turned into an anime series. If you’ve seen it or read the series, tell us what you think of it in the comments below. The cover price of My Hero Academia & The Promised Neverland is free, while the current value is $1.

Cool Comics Kids

#983 — Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Adventures #10, Archie, May 1990.

Most of the comic books I’ve put in this Cool Comics Kids category have been Disney or Warner Brothers-related, with a few Harvey titles thrown in for good measure. And if you remember, a few episodes back (Episode 190, for those who like to know these things), we had our first look at Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles for the younger crowd, via Archie. TMNT first came on the scene in 1984, and while Big Brother may have been watching (or reading, if you will), I wasn’t. These were college years for me, and although I flirted with some Marvel and DC titles in 1982, that was about it. And the next thing you know there’s a cartoon, action figures galore, and this comic series for the younger crowd that couldn’t get enough on Saturday mornings. I was too busy graduating and getting married to even notice, but soon enough the wife and I got into the TMNT action figure craze. This comic probably has a lot of sentimental value for some of you out there, so grab these issues when you can find them (I found this one for just a quarter!) and relive those simpler times. The cover price of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Adventures #10 is $1, while the current values are $5 at CBR and $3 at ZKC.

Cool Comics Classics

#984 — Tragg and the Sky Gods #9, Whitman, May 1982.

You never know what you’re going to find when you start flipping through quarter bins. Sometimes you find the same stuff you always seem to find and either don’t want it or need it, and sometimes you find something older and really different. Is it any surprise that I love to snag the “older and really different” comics? I’d never set eyes on Tragg and the Sky Gods before, but a little Internet searching helped me find out that Gold Key published issues 1-8, and then several years later, Whitman (Gold Key and Whitman both fell under Western Publishing) put out issue #9, although it seems to be a reprint of the first issue. The cover is almost an exact copy, and the tale we are given is an origin story. As some of you know, Western later stopped putting out comics under the Gold Key name and just used Whitman for their pre-packs (plastic bags of comics that typically were in three packs for a little less than the cover price), and they probably figured they’d capture a new audience with the Whitman Tragg. If any of you are Erich Von Däniken Chariots of the Gods? fans and/or conspiracy theorists, then you need to check out Tragg. Aliens come to our planet, take some females into their ship, and next thing you know, little Tragg and Lorn are born and are smarter and more powerful than the others in their tribe…who, of course, aren’t happy about this and basically try to kill our cute little alien DNA-privileged couple. This is a fun read, comic fans, and if I can find some of the Gold Key issues at decent prices, I’ll have to add them to my collection! The cover price of Tragg and the Sky Gods #9 is 60¢, while the current values are $9 at CBR and $6 at ZKC.

Recently Read Digital Comics

Continuing from our last edition of Cool Comics In My Collection, I’m still catching up on these digital editions of All-Star Superman, as recommended by my buddy J.C. who writes the awesome blog, The Review Basement!

In All-Star Superman #3, the Man of Steel plays favorites and gives Lois Lane superpowers. No, he doesn’t sacrifice his own to bestow upon her, but instead gives her this strange yellow tube filled with a glowing liquid. Superman tells her that it’s a formula that will give her superpowers for a day. She drinks it and gets to see how the other half lives.

In All-Star Superman #4, Jimmy Olsen thinks he’s pretty cool and causes some problems, but things have a way of working themselves out by the end. A sort of fun issue that includes a Turtle Boy poster in a panel.

In All-Star Superman #5, Clark Kent goes to prison to interview Lex Luthor before his execution. For some reason, Luthor isn’t overly worried about his upcoming date with death, Clark is more bumbling than ever, and the Parasite nearly ruins everything.

In All-Star Superman #6, we get our most poignant moments of the series thus far, as a young Clark meets members of The Superman Squad, from a far distant future. But there is more than meets the eye with one of the members, and by the end, you might find yourself wiping a tear from your eye.

ComicBooks For Kids!

ComicBooks For Kids! (CB4K) is a charity that Cool Comics In My Collection is honored to be working with. CB4K provides comic books to kids in hospitals and cancer centers all across the Unites States. You can check their website and see if your local hospital is included and if not, you can work with them to get them included! If you like what you see, please help them out and follow/like their Facebook page. Their link is https://www.facebook.com/comicbooksforkids/

Never Miss an Episode of Cool Comics!

Now you can get Cool Comics in My Collection delivered directly to your email! Just click “Join My Newsletter” on my website (or click on the image of my No-Prize!), sign up, and that’s it. Pretty easy, right? Just be sure to follow the instructions on the confirmation email so that you start receiving my newsletter. If you don’t see it, you may want to check your Spam or Junk Mail folders.

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Welcome to Cool Comics in My Collection Episode 197, where we look at various comic books I own (and in some cases ones that I let get away), both new and old, often with a nostalgic leaning for those feelings of yesteryear. I hope you have as much fun reading about them as I had writing about these cool comics!

For each of the comic books I include here, I list the current secondary market pricing (with the exception of digital issues, which don’t have collectible value). This is according to the websites comicbookrealm.com (CBR) and Zap-Kapow Comics (ZKC), using the comic book grading scale of 9.4 (if both sites have the same price, you’ll find just one price for that issue). Not all my comics meet that grade. Some are probably better, and some are certainly worse. But to simplify it, that’s the scale I use here. And remember, a comic book is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it.

Did you know that you can be a guest host for Cool Comics? It’s your chance to show off some of your favorite comics in your personal collection! Just pick any of your comics for inclusion (this blog is for all ages, so please keep that in mind), with a maximum of seven issues. Repeat guest hosts are permitted and encouraged. To submit your completed blog (or if you have any questions), write to edgosney62@gmail.com.

The Cool Comics In My Collection Facebook Group is a place where you can discuss the comics you love, your favorite titles, and the characters that keep you coming back for more. Also, creators are welcome to share news about what you are working on, including Kickstarter campaigns. And don’t forget the prizes. Yes, Cool Comics gives away cool prizes. Be sure and join today!

If you have any comments, please scroll to the bottom of the page to where it says, “Leave a Reply.” And now, Episode 197…

Cool Comics News!

You’ll notice that starting in this episode, I’ve added pricing from an additional source, Zap-Kapow Comics. When secondary value is the same, the entry will look as it always does, but when there is a difference, I’m using the initials CBR and ZKC. While many of you read and collect comics just for the fun of it, it’s still interesting to know what some people are paying for our treasures, right? And with this in mind, Cool Comics now gives you two price sources (to get pricing at ZKC, you have to subscribe to one of three levels of service…it’s a really cool website, and so far, I’m having fun with it). In a later edition of Cool Comics, I’ll give you more of my impressions of Zap-Kapow Comics.

Late last week I finished reading Tony Isabella’s 1000 Comic Books You Must Read. This is a fun look at a wide variety of comics that starts with Action Comics #1 in 1938 and takes us through the years (up to the end of 2008) with snapshots of covers and snippets of information such as date, publisher, issue number, and a short comment from the author. Tony makes no claim that these are the greatest one thousand comics of all time, but they are comics he likes for one reason or another and recommends that fans should give them a try. This is a fun coffee table book that most comic fans would probably enjoy having in their collection.

Cool Comics Battle of the Week!

Your Cool Comics Battle of the Week is The Punisher versus Sgt. Rock! What do you think would happen if they faced each other in a titanic tussle, and how do you see the winner achieving victory? Let us know in the comments section below.

Cool Comics In My Collection  Contemporary Cool Comics

#973 — War of the Realms #6, Marvel, August 2019.

Can you believe we went four consecutive weeks at Cool Comics without a word about War of the Realms? “So why bring it up now?” Because it’s officially over…at least until the special July Omega issue comes out. I still haven’t decided if it’s going to make an appearance here or not. And since I live in the U.S.A. and today is Independence Day, the War of the Realms is a good fit as it’s an all-out battle for freedom. All in all, I enjoyed this huge crossover event. We met some new characters in War of the Realms: Agents of Atlas, saw some awesome battles, and witnessed comic book bravery (just making sure that you know that I know that none of this is real…but it’s fun, right?). If you’ve been keeping up with at least some of the story, you really need to get this issue. If you like Thor, this comic gives you more Thor than you can shake an enchanted uru mallet at. And the end is pretty interesting, to say the least. Don’t worry, no spoilers here! The cover price of War of the Realms #6 is $5.99, while the current value is $6.

#974 — G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero #175, IDW Publishing, February 2012.

How can we not include G.I. Joe in this Fourth of July edition of Cool Comics? Seriously, this fictional character is a Real American Hero (this sentence presents a bit of a conundrum, doesn’t it? Is he real or fictional? In the end, it doesn’t matter, because it’s G.I. Joe!). I know I’ve mentioned on here before that I sort of fell in between the two big G.I. Joe phases: the 12-inch figures from the Sixties and the 3.75-inch toys that appeared in 1982. I was too old and sophisticated for the toys and cartoons in the Eighties (or so I thought), which is rather unfortunate, because as an Army veteran, I now have an appreciation for this franchise. These days, when I’m digging away in quarter boxes at my favorite comic shop, I always grab G.I. Joe comics when I find them (which is how I got this issue). Chalk full of action, these comics don’t disappoint. The cover I got with this issue is a variant and brings The Terminator to mind! The cover price of G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero #175 is $3.99, while the current value is $4.

#975 — American Splendor: Unsung Hero #1, Dark Horse Comics, August 2001.

For those of you who are familiar with and appreciate Harvey Pekar, I’m going to apologize upfront for being unfamiliar with his work. Or at least I was, until I read American Splendor: Unsung Hero #1. Though Pekar was born, lived, and passed away just a little north of where I’ve spent most of my life, my comic book reading typically veers toward the superhero variety. Yet as life continues, I’ve found my reading habits branching out in different directions, with growing appreciation towards other genres of this fascinating hobby. This comic is the first of three issues that brings us the story of Marine Lance Corporal Robert L. McNeill and his journey from Camp Pendleton to his time served in Vietnam. The interiors are done in black and white, and the art style reminds me of Primitivism, which works well for this biographical story. Though the conflict in Vietnam is often laced with negative connotations, that doesn’t take away from the bravery and sacrifice that members of our armed forces displayed there. The cover price of American Splendor: Unsung Hero #1 is #3.99, while the current value is $4.

FCBD the Cool Comics Way (Week 9)

#976 — Stranger Things & Black Hammer, Dark Horse Comics, May 2019.

Thanks for taking a break from streaming Stranger Things Season 3 on Netflix to come read the newest episode of Cool Comics. We really appreciate it. And since you’ve made this great sacrifice, we made sure to include the Free Comic Book Day Stranger Things issue on launch day. And Black Hammer too, for all you Black Hammer fans out there who are trying to compete with those kids from Hawkins, Indiana. The Stranger Things story takes place just a few weeks after season one, giving us a picture of some of the fallout the characters went through. If you are a fan of the show and you don’t have this comic, you’ll probably want to find yourself a copy. Next week the Dark Horse/DC company crossover Black Hammer/Justice League: Hammer of Justice #1 of 5 comes out, so our timing at Cool Comics is, once more, hard to beat. I don’t know much about Black Hammer, and this half issue didn’t make me feel any better prepared to talk about it here, but fans of Jeff Lemire probably already have this FCBD issue in their collection. The cover price of Stranger Things & Black Hammer is free, while the current values are $0 at CBR and $1 at ZKC.

Cool Comics Kids

#977 — Looney Tunes #46, Whitman, March 1984.

When picking out a library of comic books that are both safe and entertaining for the little ones in your life (or even for those of us who are kids at heart), and considering that today is Independence Day, our Cool Comics Kids selection this week is that all-American favorite, Looney Tunes! Many of you readers grew up watching these great characters on TV every Saturday morning, and I’m betting that some of you out there bought some of these Looney Tunes comic books. No doubt, these stories will put a smile on your face. This particular issue was next to last in the run that started out as Gold Key and ended up under the Whitman banner at Western Publishing, and I was fortunate enough to find it while scrounging around in a quarter bin. Why was I fortunate? Because this comic came only in a pre-pack with other comics, and they are a little more difficult to find, hence the higher collectible price. Cool Comics loves those quarter boxes! The cover price of Looney Tunes #46 is 60¢, while the current value is $26.

Cool Comics Classics

#978 — Sgt. Rock #377, DC, June 1983.

As hard as this may be to believe, this is just the third issue of Sgt. Rock I’ve ever owned. He’s never much been on my radar, but I do have a lot of respect for the character, and I plan on adding more in the future. Military comics were never a priority for me, even when I was reading comics while serving in the U.S. Army. I guess I wanted to separate working life from my comic book reading. Regardless, today I have a deep appreciation for the genre, and when I saw this issue hiding out in a quarter bin, I immediately knew it was coming home with me. While we tend to want our soldiers to be brave, this is the story of “The Worry-Wart,” a kid who feels he’s never prepared enough for battle and spends his time going over checklists in his mind, not to mention the fact that he’s afraid he’ll let Sgt. Rock and Easy Company down. And he wants to be transferred to another unit. What happens when combat can’t be avoided? Read this one to find out, fellow fans! The cover price of Sgt. Rock #377 is 60¢, while the current values are $9 at CBR and $6 at ZKC.

Recently Read Digital Comics

J.C., one of the awesome members of the Cool Comics In My Collection Facebook Group, recently read All-Star Superman and posted a link to his review (another great reason to become part of the Facebook community is the quality reviews and stirring conversations that result from these gems!). Several group members who’ve also read it provided positive comments on the post, and I found myself reading the first couple issues of this Grant Morrison and Frank Quitely adventure in digital format that same night. While I understand that many people don’t like digital comics, I had access to these issues at no additional cost and didn’t have to make a special trip to a store or wait for a collection to arrive in the mail. Without giving too much away (although the story has been around for over a decade in print form), some of the things I liked about the first issue include the short origin story (we’ve seen Superman’s origin retold a lot…and it’s being retold yet again, isn’t it?) and the fact that now the Man of Steel actually has a physical problem to worry about…really worry about! Getting curious? In the second issue, I liked the bit about the key to the Fortress of Solitude, the fact that Lois is having a hard time believing something Superman told her, and the way she never stops snooping around. Will I enjoy the remaining ten issues just as much? Let’s hope so!

ComicBooks For Kids!

ComicBooks For Kids! (CB4K) is a charity that Cool Comics In My Collection is honored to be working with. CB4K provides comic books to kids in hospitals and cancer centers all across the Unites States. You can check their website and see if your local hospital is included and if not, you can work with them to get them included! If you like what you see, please help them out and follow/like their Facebook page. Their link is https://www.facebook.com/comicbooksforkids/

Never Miss an Episode of Cool Comics!

Now you can get Cool Comics in My Collection delivered directly to your email! Just click “Join My Newsletter” on my website (or click on the image of my No-Prize!), sign up, and that’s it. Pretty easy, right? Just be sure to follow the instructions on the confirmation email so that you start receiving my newsletter. If you don’t see it, you may want to check your Spam or Junk Mail folders.

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Welcome to Cool Comics in My Collection Episode 196, where we look at various comic books I own (and in some cases ones that I let get away), both new and old, often with a nostalgic leaning for those feelings of yesteryear. I hope you have as much fun reading about them as I had writing about these cool comics!

For each of the comic books I include in this blog (except for digital issues), I list the current secondary market value. This is according to the website comicbookrealm.com. They list out the near mint prices, which are on the comic book grading scale of 9.4. If you go to the website to look up any in your collection, you can click on the price and see the value at different grades. Not all my comics are 9.4. Some are probably better, and some are certainly worse. But to simplify it, that’s the grading scale I use here. And remember, a comic book is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it.

Did you know that you can be a guest host for Cool Comics? It’s your chance to show off some of your favorite comics in your personal collection! Just pick any of your comics for inclusion (this blog is for all ages, so please keep that in mind), with a maximum of seven issues. Repeat guest hosts are permitted and encouraged. To submit your completed blog (or if you have any questions), write to edgosney62@gmail.com.

The Cool Comics In My Collection Facebook Group is a place where you can discuss the comics you love, your favorite titles, and the characters that keep you coming back for more. Also, creators are welcome to share news about what you are working on, including Kickstarter campaigns. And don’t forget the prizes. Yes, Cool Comics gives away cool prizes. Be sure and join today!

If you have any comments, please scroll to the bottom of the page to where it says, “Leave a Reply.” And now, Episode 196…

Cool Comics News!

I was able to attend my first show of the season on Sunday, the Akron-Canton Comic Con. After making some great purchases (some of which you’ll see here in future episodes!), I had lunch at Hamburger Station in Akron, Ohio, with some other like-minded comic book aficionados. What shows have you gone to this year? Tell us about it in the comments section below!

Cool Comics Battle of the Week!

Your Cool Comics Battle of the Week is Nomad versus The Huntress! What do you think would happen if they faced each other in a titanic tussle, and how do you see the winner achieving victory? Let us know in the comments section below.

Cool Comics In My Collection  Contemporary Cool Comics

#967 — Uncanny X-Men #22, Marvel, August 2019.

In the Seventies I paid no attention at all to the X-Men. Then, in 1982 when I started my Second Phase of comic book reading and collecting, a friend recommended The Uncanny X-Men, and for the short time I got comic books that year, I started to understand why people loved them. After that, it took me a little over ten years to come back to comics, and when I did, I went X-Men crazy and started reading not only Uncanny, but also X-Factor, X-Force, Excalibur, Generation X, and just plain old X-Men. And let us not forget all the Age of Apocalypse twisted X-Men titles. I had boxes upon boxes of X-Men. When I thought I was finished with the hobby once and for all in 2010, I sold nearly every X title I had. The year 2017 saw me start buying new comics again, but this time I stayed away from X-titles…for a while. Nowadays it seems the thing for Marvel to do is to keep on killing mutants, along with putting a bunch of them in alternate realities or whatever it’s supposed to be (there were too many titles and I’m not reading them). Now the current run on Uncanny X-Men is coming to a close, and Jonathan Hickman, a writer I’m unfamiliar with due to my absence from comics from 2003 until 2017, is back and taking over everything X. Will that bring an end to all the deaths? Will those who were thought dead spring back to life (how shocking that a comic book would do such a thing!)? I’ll be interested to see what happens. Meanwhile, in current continuity, being a mutant is a very dangerous thing. The cover price of Uncanny X-Men #20 is $3.99, while the current value is $4.

Cool Comics Done Dirt Cheap

#968 — Nomad #4, Marvel, February 1991.

When you look up Nomad on Wikipedia, it’s a little disconcerting to see just how many Marvel characters have gone by that codename over the decades. The Nomad from this comic, Jack Monroe, is considered to be the most familiar of the five, but for me, when I hear the name Nomad, I always think of the time Steve Rogers tossed aside his role as Captain America and became the hero known as Nomad. By the way, the Captain America to Nomad story took place during my favorite comic era, the Seventies, and that’s reason enough that he’s the Nomad who pops into my mind. This particular issue, #4, came by way of my legendary longbox (I bought a longbox that was stuffed with 419 comic books for just $20 a while ago; hence, Cool Comics Done Dirt Cheap), and of course it’s the last of a short 4-issue run, so I was pretty lost as to what was going on. And yes, as the cover shows us, Captain America pops in for a quick cup of coffee with his pal who took over his old name. The cover price of Nomad #4 is $1.50, while the current value is $3.

FCBD the Cool Comics Way (Week 8)

#969 — Striker Force 7, Graphic India Pte, May 2019.

Cristiano Ronaldo is a superhero! While there may be thousands…nay, millions, around the world who get excited over this prospect, I guess I’m not one of them. Why? Because I don’t watch soccer. Yes, this is a soccer player who fights crime. In a comic book, not real life. The inside cover tells us that Cristiano was a co-creator of this concept for Striker Force 7, and aside from this Free Comic Book Day issue, I’ll probably never read another panel of a Striker Force 7 comic. I’m not saying this to be mean or that the comic was bad, but it’s not my thing. Which makes me wonder how many soccer fans actually like comic books. Because if every soccer fan on the face of the planet were to buy a regular issue of this title (I don’t think an ongoing series or graphic novel exists, yet), the company would be living large. If you are a fan of this soccer superstar, you’ll probably want to get a copy of this FCBD issue just to have it. The cover price of Striker Force 7 is free, while the current value is $0.

Cool Comics Kids

#970 — Walt Disney’s Comics and Stories #437, Gold Key/Whitman, February 1977.

This is another Gold Key (but my copy is under the “Whitman” banner) anthology classic featuring Disney. And when it comes to getting comic books for little ones, it’s hard to go wrong with Disney. The only complaint kids today might have is a lack of interest and/or knowledge of some of these characters. Sure, they know those ice girls, that cool kid Coco, and even the beast and his friend, beauty, but do they know Scamp? And just how familiar are they with Donald Duck and his Uncle Scrooge? Oh yeah, Thumper and Chip ‘N’ Dale also have a story in this comic book. And it finishes up with Goofy and Mickey, and surely kids today know those two…I hope. But whether they do or don’t know these older creations, this funnybook presents a great opportunity to show them off to a younger generation. I found my copy in a quarter bin, which made it cheaper than the cover price! Good luck finding one to add to your growing Cool Comics Kids collection. The cover price of Walt Disney’s Comics and Stories #437 is 30¢, while the current value is $14.

Cool Comics Classics

#971 — The Huntress #1, DC, April 1989.

The July edition of Back Issue magazine (No. 113), paid special tribute to the 30th Anniversary of Tim Burton’s Batman movie. When they do that, most articles link back to the theme, and as I read Flashback: Bat-Legacy: The Huntress, it brought to mind that I happened to have a copy of The Huntress #1 in my magical filing cabinet of unread comic books. Did I have any other choice than to put it on my priority read list? I think not, and I’m sure the majority of you agree that the timing was fitting. Though this series started between comic book collecting phases for me, I was fortunate enough to snag it out of a quarter box several months ago (I’ve found absolute gold in quarter boxes over the years, and look forward to showing you more here in the future). Written by Joey Cavalieri and with pencils by Joe Staton, I know I enjoyed this issue so much more after having read the article in Back Issue. I loved this introduction to the Helena Bertinelli version of the Huntress, and if you are a fan, this is a great issue to have in your collection. The cover price of The Huntress #1 is $1, while the current value is $12.

#972 — The Grim Ghost #1, Atlas/Seaboard, January 1975.

As constant Cool Comics readers are well aware, back in March I started becoming infatuated with the old Atlas/Seaboard comics from the mid-Seventies. I never bought any at the time but do remember seeing some on the shelves at the stores of my childhood comic haunts. And a couple weeks ago, two different Facebook groups posted this YouTube video (click it and watch…I promise we’ll still be here when you come back) of The Grim Ghost, and since I was able to snag a copy of this issue, I knew it was time to read it. There are some out there who don’t think much of Atlas Comics, and that’s okay. We like what we like, right? But now that I’ve read three of them, I have to say that I’ve enjoyed the experience so far. After an intro to the title character, we travel back to 1743 and witness a highwayman who takes what he wants, when he wants, including the lives of innocent citizens. Though he thinks himself quite clever, he ends up getting caught in a trap, and Mr. Dunsinane is executed and soon finds himself face-to-face with Satan! Though I rarely include panels here at Cool Comics, I just had to show you this big moment when reality hits home for the highwayman (click the image for a larger view). The cover price of The Grim Ghost is 25¢, while the current value is $20.

Recently Read Digital Comics

Aquaman: A Celebration of 75 Years contains 20 issues that swim through the decades with the king of the seas. Last December both Amazon and comiXology (Amazon is the parent company of the two) ran some downright “can’t beat” sales on these ultra-thick DC anniversary specials. The regular price of this 394-page Aquaman beauty is $29.99, and I paid just $4.99. You read that correctly, I paid just $4.99. I know that many of you out there prefer to hold the actual comic books in your hands, providing you with tactile and olfactory experiences that are hard to beat. Yet I was able to purchase a boatload of these anniversary titles in digital for the price of less than two of the hardcovers. Reading on my tablet allows for lots of flexibility, both when traveling and wherever and however I sit or rest in my bed when reading. The issues making up this collection are from Adventure Comics, Justice League of America, and of course, Aquaman titles. If you’re a fan, there’s a chance you already have many of the these in your collection, but you still may want to relive the memories with this giant tribute to Aquaman.

ComicBooks For Kids!

ComicBooks For Kids! (CB4K) is a charity that Cool Comics In My Collection is honored to be working with. CB4K provides comic books to kids in hospitals and cancer centers all across the Unites States. You can check their website and see if your local hospital is included and if not, you can work with them to get them included! If you like what you see, please help them out and follow/like their Facebook page. Their link is https://www.facebook.com/comicbooksforkids/

Never Miss an Episode of Cool Comics!

Now you can get Cool Comics in My Collection delivered directly to your email! Just click “Join My Newsletter” on my website (or click on the image of my No-Prize!), sign up, and that’s it. Pretty easy, right? Just be sure to follow the instructions on the confirmation email so that you start receiving my newsletter. If you don’t see it, you may want to check your Spam or Junk Mail folders.

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Welcome to Cool Comics in My Collection Episode 195, where we look at various comic books I own (and in some cases ones that I let get away), both new and old, often with a nostalgic leaning for those feelings of yesteryear. I hope you have as much fun reading about them as I had writing about these cool comics!

For each of the comic books I include in this blog (except for digital issues), I list the current secondary market value. This is according to the website comicbookrealm.com. They list out the near mint prices, which are on the comic book grading scale of 9.4. If you go to the website to look up any in your collection, you can click on the price and see the value at different grades. Not all my comics are 9.4. Some are probably better, and some are certainly worse. But to simplify it, that’s the grading scale I use here. And remember, a comic book is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it.

Did you know that you can be a guest host for Cool Comics? It’s your chance to show off some of your favorite comics in your personal collection! Just pick any of your comics for inclusion (this blog is for all ages, so please keep that in mind), with a maximum of seven issues. Repeat guest hosts are permitted and encouraged. To submit your completed blog (or if you have any questions), write to edgosney62@gmail.com.

The Cool Comics In My Collection Facebook Group is a place where you can discuss the comics you love, your favorite titles, and the characters that keep you coming back for more. Also, creators are welcome to share news about what you are working on, including Kickstarter campaigns. And don’t forget the prizes. Yes, Cool Comics gives away cool prizes. Be sure and join today!

If you have any comments, please scroll to the bottom of the page to where it says, “Leave a Reply.” And now, Episode 195…

Cool Comics News! A postcard I received about the campaign.

Comic books on Kickstarter (and other platforms) are sort of like Indie Publishing for books (which I’ve taken part in), and when we can support them at Cool Comics, we do so, and like to let the readers out there know about them, too. Illuminatus Comics currently has a campaign for their comic, “Take Your Kid to Work Day.” After just a few days, I’m happy to report that this Kickstarter is already near goal! But they have stretch goals, too, with all sorts of cool items that donors can receive if those goals are met. If you love comic books and appreciate all the hard work that goes into creating them, please click on the linked-title above, check out what this campaign is all about, and consider supporting Illuminatus Comics.

Cool Comics Battle of the Week!

Your Cool Comics Battle of the Week is The Incredible Hulk versus The Thing! What do you think would happen if they faced each other in a titanic tussle, and how do you see the winner achieving victory? Let us know in the comments section below.

Cool Comics In My Collection  Contemporary Cool Comics

#961 — Event Leviathan #1, DC, August 2019.

You know what? The stuff that happens in Event Leviathan is going to change the DC Universe forever, and if you aren’t reading it you’ll be totally lost and probably go into a panic and search all over creation for the back issues a year or so down the road, and you’ll wonder why you didn’t take advantage and buy it when you saw it in Cool Comics…or maybe not. I know, those of us who have been around the block a time or two have lived through all sorts of change in the comic book world, so you may be fine if you skip this. Maybe. And get this: gone from DC are A.R.G.U.S., D.E.O., Spyral, and Cadmus. Could the Justice League be next? Not if Batman, Green Arrow, and Lois Lane have anything to say about it. With their “never say die” attitudes, can they solve the mystery? Tune in to this “6-Issue Mystery Thriller” to find out! The cover price of Event Leviathan #1 is $3.99, while the current value is $4.

#962 — The Incredible Hulk: Last Call, Marvel, August 2019.

If you were a fan of the Peter David – Dale Keown run of The Incredible Hulk that started nearly three decades ago, then you probably put this one-shot on your pull list. To be honest, I wasn’t reading comics when the run started, and even though I bought some of the back issues, I didn’t think I’d be interested in this “Last Call.” And I surprised myself by picking it up and giving it a quick flip-through at my local comic book shop. Then I set it down on the shelf where I’d found it, looked at some other comics, but came back to it, deciding I needed this cool comic. It’s an emotional, action-packed story that does a nice job of summing up both Bruce Banner and the Hulk. There are probably very few people living in North America (and most of the world) who’ve never laid eyes on old jade jaws, thanks to the Avengers movies, and since you’re already familiar, even if you’ve never read any of his comics, this is a good one. The cover price of The Incredible Hulk: Last Call #1 is $4.99, while the current value is $5.

Cool Comics Done Dirt Cheap

#963 — Q2: The Return of Quantum and Woody #2, Valiant Entertainment, November 2014.

In the Nineties, when I started my third phase of comic book collecting, I found it interesting that there were a number of companies besides the B2 (Big 2…Marvel and DC) that seemed to be doing pretty well. Valiant was one of them, and though I didn’t buy any of their new comics on a monthly basis, I started buying up older issues in discount bins. I had a pretty decent collection, probably around 100 issues, when I realized that I had way too many comic books in my house, so I decided to sell the majority of them (this was maybe nine or so years ago, and at the time I thought I was through with comic books forever…as if). And since I didn’t have any emotional ties to the Valiant line, it was easy enough to put them in the sell pile. When 2017 rolled around and I decided to embrace my passion once more, I started feeling nostalgic about the Valiant comics I’d given up. So when I acquired my legendary longbox (I bought a longbox that was stuffed with 419 comic books for just $20 a while ago; hence, Cool Comics Done Dirt Cheap) and found a couple Valiant comics inside (even though they were newer and not the good old original early Nineties Valiant titles), it got me excited all over again for this company that put out comics I want to collect but so very rarely read. Since then, I’ve been able to find lots of those originals (including many of them that I’d sold) for a quarter each, so my collection is once again bursting at the seams. This new one is a little strange, but then again, that’s okay, because it was a “Valiant” effort (groan!). The cover price of Q2: The Return of Quantum and Woody #2 is $3.99, while the current value is $4.

FCBD the Cool Comics Way (Week 7)

#964 — A Sheets Story, Lion Forge, May 2019.

Did you happen to read Brenna Thummler’s graphic novel Sheets? If you did, then you’re probably excited to get your hands on this Free Comic Book Day story that takes place afterward. Full disclosure, I didn’t read Sheets. And when I picked up A Sheets Story, I was prepared for boredom. This FCBD edition falls under Lion Forge’s Caracal imprint, which caters to kids from ages 8 to 12, so you can understand why I thought I wouldn’t care. But I did care. Brenna pulled me into this universe she created and wouldn’t let me go. Almost as if she’d tied me up with a…sheet…so that all my focus was on this incredibly moving story. I read a lot of comics, so I can’t make any promises that I’ll ever read the original or the upcoming sequel in 2020 (Delicates), but I’m truly glad I got to experience this one. The cover price of A Sheets Story is free, while the current value is $0.

Cool Comics Kids

#965 — Bullwinkle and Rocky #3, Marvel, March 1988.

Did you grew up watching Rocky and Bullwinkle cartoons? If so, then you’ll probably appreciate these zany antics of “Moose and Squirrel.” And of course, right in the middle of the story, we have to wait while they present us with a tale of Dudley Do-Right and Snidely Whiplash. Writer Dave Manak and penciler Ernie Colon do a great job of making us feel like we’re kids again, as the characters and images take us back to those long-ago days when we didn’t worry about mortgages, electric bills, and taxes, but instead could just sit back and enjoy some fun cartoons. Don’t hesitate to add some of these Bullwinkle and Rocky comic books to your collection, whether for the little ones in your life or just to travel back to those days we can never truly capture but can somewhat replicate with our memories. The cover price of Bullwinkle and Rocky #3 is $1, while the current value is $5.

Cool Comics Classics

#966 — Fantastic Four #93, Marvel, December 1969.

If you appreciate the days of Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, then you won’t be disappointed with this gem of a classic from the end of the Sixties. But how do you get your hands on a comic like this without obliterating your checkbook? Reprints and digital are a couple of ways you can go, but if you want the original, like I have in my collection, then it may take a little hunting and some compromise. You can use the Internet (such as eBay or other auction sites and Facebook groups that are involved in comic book transactions), comic book conventions, or your local comic shop (which is where I picked up my copy). That’s the hunting part of it. For the compromise, you have to decide between price and condition. While my copy isn’t going to get me much money if I try to sell it, I bought it for just a couple dollars, and it’s good enough for me! As you can see on the action-packed cover, the Thing is about to get walloped but good. These two combatants are being forced to fight to the death, and the loser’s planet will also be destroyed, so there’s a lot at stake. Want to know how it ends? Then it’s time to start hunting for a copy! The cover price of Fantastic Four #93 is 15¢, while the current value is $95.

ComicBooks For Kids!

ComicBooks For Kids! (CB4K) is a charity that Cool Comics In My Collection is honored to be working with. CB4K provides comic books to kids in hospitals and cancer centers all across the Unites States. You can check their website and see if your local hospital is included and if not, you can work with them to get them included! If you like what you see, please help them out and follow/like their Facebook page. Their link is https://www.facebook.com/comicbooksforkids/

Never Miss an Episode of Cool Comics!

Now you can get Cool Comics in My Collection delivered directly to your email! Just click “Join My Newsletter” on my website (or click on the image of my No-Prize!), sign up, and that’s it. Pretty easy, right? Just be sure to follow the instructions on the confirmation email so that you start receiving my newsletter. If you don’t see it, you may want to check your Spam or Junk Mail folders.

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Welcome to Cool Comics in My Collection Episode 194, where we look at various comic books I own (and in some cases ones that I let get away), both new and old, often with a nostalgic leaning for those feelings of yesteryear. I hope you have as much reading about them as I had writing about them!

For each of the comic books I include in this blog (except for digital issues), I list the current secondary market value. This is according to the website comicbookrealm.com. They list out the near mint prices, which are on the comic book grading scale of 9.4. If you go to the website to look up any in your collection, you can click on the price and see the value at different grades. Not all my comics are 9.4. Some are probably better, and some are certainly worse. But to simplify it, that’s the grading scale I use here. And remember, a comic book is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it.

Did you know that you can be a guest host for Cool Comics? It’s your chance to show off some of your favorite comics in your personal collection! Just pick any of your comics for inclusion (this blog is for all ages, so please keep that in mind), with a maximum of seven issues. Repeat guest hosts are permitted and encouraged. To submit your completed blog (or if you have any questions), write to edgosney62@gmail.com.

The Cool Comics In My Collection Facebook Group is a place where you can discuss the comics you love, your favorite titles, and the characters that keep you coming back for more. Also, creators are welcome to share news about what you are working on, including Kickstarter campaigns. And don’t forget the prizes. Yes, Cool Comics gives away cool prizes. Be sure and join today!

If you have any comments, please scroll to the bottom of the page to where it says, “Leave a Reply.” And now, Episode 194…

Cool Comics News!

Cool Comics readers probably remember that I’ve been collecting Oblivion Song from Image Comics since it launched (issue #16 just came out), and now it’s in the news, because it’s been optioned for a movie. The writer of the comic, Robert Kirkman, is the guy who brought you The Walking Dead. Oblivion Song has been intriguing, and I’m interested to see if Hollywood does it justice.

Cool Comics Battle of the Week!

Your Cool Comics Battle of the Week is Black Cat versus Wildcat! What do you think would happen if they faced each other in a titanic tussle, and how do you see the winner achieving victory? Let us know in the comments section below.

Cool Comics In My Collection Contemporary Cool Comics

#955 — Black Cat #1, Marvel, August 2019.

While there are arguments both for and against Black Cat being a Catwoman knockoff, she’s celebrating 40 years of existence, so there is no denying her staying power. Known primarily for being part of Spider-Man’s world, she’s now flying solo in an ongoing series for the first time. I don’t have Black Cat on my pull list at my local comic shop (LCS), but figured that if there were any left when I walked into the store last week, I’d grab the first issue and tell you good comic book reading folks a little about it. And when you decide to do something like that, sometimes you miss out, because either the store owner doesn’t order many, or others had the same idea, and they get there in front of you and take the last ones. And that’s why I try to get there early when I can. I actually had my pick of covers, too. There were maybe ten issues of the regular cover left, a variant with a horizontal cover, and one copy of this Artgerm cover, which I decided to get. I’m usually the kind of collector who takes the regular cover, but since I’m not going to make this comic a part of my regular reading, I decided to get something a little special. Having said that, I won’t be surprised if I find myself grabbing issue 2 off the shelf next month when it comes out, because this was a pretty good start to the series. Also, this first issue contains a shorter backup story that has Dracula in it, which makes this a quality cool comic! The cover price of Black Cat #1 is $4.99, while the current value is $5.

#956 — Sons of Chaos Ashcan, IDW Publishing, June 2019.

A few weeks back I was at my LCS (Kenmore Komics & Games) digging through box after box of quarter comics (how can anyone resist such potential treasures?), when the shop owner let me know that he was sticking something extra in with my purchases. I didn’t really notice what it was until after I’d arrived home and was exploring all my new “old” editions. At a quick glance, I saw that it was horizontal. Typically, I don’t care for comics done “widescreen.” But it cost me nothing and I figured that since I noticed it was an ashcan, I should plug it here at Cool Comics so that you can get an early glimpse in case it’s something you want to purchase down the road. From the cover, it reminded me of 300, but once you flip to the inside you learn that this is a story about the Greek War for Independence against the Ottoman Empire. The part that really intrigued me was when I saw that the story is set in 1821. My ignorance of this war may be showing, but we only know what we know, right? And I guess I shouldn’t feel too bad about not knowing, as the comic tells as that it’s a “widely unknown portion of world history.” The full graphic novel from IDW Publishing is due in July and weighs in at 192 pages, and if the Ashcan is any indication, this is going to be great! The art and storytelling had me glued to my seat, and it turned out the horizontal format wasn’t a hindrance at all. Once you lose yourself in this tale, you don’t even think about anything except what’s going to happen next. The cover price of Sons of Chaos Ashcan is free, while the current value is $15.

Cool Comics Done Dirt Cheap

#957 — The Ride: 2 For the Road #1, Image, October 2004.

Did anyone out there read this one-shot? I recently pulled it from my legendary longbox knowing nothing about it (I bought a longbox that was stuffed with 419 comic books for just $20 a while ago; hence, Cool Comics Done Dirt Cheap) and ended up enjoying this black and white concept comic that contains two tales. The first story in The Ride: Two for the Road is “Shotgun,” written by Chuck Dixon with art by D. Alexander Gregory, while Cully Hamner provides both art and story for “Big Plans.” This is an Image comic, and not surprisingly this issue isn’t what most people typically think of when they think of comic books. In 1990-something I met Cully Hamner at a small comic convention in Atlanta, when I was serving there in the Army. He and I arranged for me to visit his art studio and interview him there, but—unfortunately—the story never ran. Nevertheless, it was a great experience to meet him and see where he made comics come to life. The cover price of The Ride: 2 For the Road #1 is $2.95, while the current value is $3.

FCBD the Cool Comics Way (Week 6)

#958 — Disney Descendants: Dizzy’s New Fortune, Tokyopop, February 2019.

This may come as a shock, but Disney Descendants isn’t in my wheelhouse. Sure, I’ve seen bits and pieces of different “Descendants” movies that my daughter Brynn watched on TV, but all I got out of it is that there is a female pirate with blue hair who can’t seem to remember her own name. If this Dizzy girl was in any of the movies, I don’t remember (but at least I don’t need to ask others “What’s my name?”), but I’m guessing that fans of the movies would probably enjoy this Free Comic Book Day edition put out by Tokyopop. Honestly, I have no idea how well comics with Disney stories and characters sell (although this one was free), but Mickey, Donald, and Uncle Scrooge seem like they’ve been in comic books forever. Any Disney comic completists out there? If so, here’s one to make sure you get your hands on. The cover price of Disney Descendants: Dizzy’s New Fortune is free, while the current value is $1.

Cool Comics Kids

#959 — Chip ‘N’ Dale #29, Gold Key, September 1974.

I’m still working my way through a bunch of Seventies-era kid comics I scooped out of a quarter bin many months ago (although since then I’ve found some newer kids comics, so I’m mixing them up a bit for the sake of variety) for our Cool Comics Kids section, and one thought that keeps going through my mind is that Gold Key really did a great job of producing stories to entertain younger kids and those who loved comics but didn’t care for the superhero genre. Again, here we are with a couple Disney classic characters in Chip ‘N’ Dale, and it’s hard to go wrong when using these familiar furry friends. So yes, if you’re thinking about building out a young reader’s comic library, make sure to go back a few decades, because they really did a nice job back then. And these don’t have to drain your bank account. I usually find mine in deeply discounted bins. Granted, the condition isn’t always great, but the price is right. By the way, I certainly like these chipmunks a lot more than the ones who keep tunneling through my mulch! The cover price of Chip ‘N’ Dale #29 is 25¢, while the current value is $12.

Cool Comics Classics

#960 — The Brave and the Bold #127, DC, June 1976.

Usually when The Brave and the Bold comes to mind, I think about those 100-pages for 60¢ editions from the mid-Seventies. Aside from those, I never owned any other issues of this title until the past few years when I started buying them on occasion out of quarter bins. It’s not that I have anything against the title, but when I first started buying comics as a kid, it was mostly Marvel. As a matter of fact, nearly every DC comic I bought in the Seventies was a 100-page issue or of the oversized Limited Collector’s Edition variety. My father was a pharmacist and could get a discount at the store where he worked, so I’d sometimes visit and find some of these comics, and he’d pick up a pen and draw a line through the price, then write down the new price with his discount. Smack dab on the cover. That probably makes some of you cringe, but my dad passed away in 2001 and I relish those ink marks today. As you can see from the cover of this issue, Batman teams up with Wildcat for an adventure, so if you’re a fan, you may want to search this one out. My dad went through a lot of medical problems, and you’d never hear him complain. There’s no doubt in my mind that my father was both brave and bold. It’s funny sometimes, isn’t it, where these old comic books take us? The cover price of The Brave and the Bold #127 is 30¢, while the current value is $12.

ComicBooks For Kids!

ComicBooks For Kids! (CB4K) is a charity that Cool Comics In My Collection is honored to be working with. CB4K provides comic books to kids in hospitals and cancer centers all across the Unites States. You can check their website and see if your local hospital is included and if not, you can work with them to get them included! If you like what you see, please help them out and follow/like their Facebook page. Their link is https://www.facebook.com/comicbooksforkids/

Never Miss an Episode of Cool Comics!

Now you can get Cool Comics in My Collection delivered directly to your email! Just click “Join My Newsletter” on my website (or click on the image of my No-Prize!), sign up, and that’s it. Pretty easy, right? Just be sure to follow the instructions on the confirmation email so that you start receiving my newsletter. If you don’t see it, you may want to check your Spam or Junk Mail folders.

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Welcome to Cool Comics in My Collection Episode 193, where we look at various comic books I own (and in some cases ones that I let get away), both new and old, often with a nostalgic leaning for those feelings of yesteryear. I hope you have as much reading about them as I had writing about them!

For each of the comic books I include in this blog (except for digital issues), I list the current secondary market value. This is according to the website comicbookrealm.com. They list out the near mint prices, which are on the comic book grading scale of 9.4. If you go to the website to look up any in your collection, you can click on the price and see the value at different grades. Not all my comics are 9.4. Some are probably better, and some are certainly worse. But to simplify it, that’s the grading scale I use here. And remember, a comic book is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it.

Did you know that you can be a guest host for Cool Comics? It’s your chance to show off some of your favorite comics in your personal collection! Just pick any of your comics for inclusion (this blog is for all ages, so please keep that in mind), with a maximum of seven issues.

Join the Cool Comics Facebook group for a chance to win this issue!

Repeat guest hosts are permitted and encouraged. To submit your completed blog (or if you have any questions), write to edgosney62@gmail.com.

The Cool Comics In My Collection Facebook Group is a place where you can discuss the comics you love, your favorite titles, and the characters that keep you coming back for more. Also, creators are welcome to share news about what you are working on, including Kickstarter campaigns. And don’t forget the prizes. Yes, Cool Comics gives away cool prizes. Be sure and join today!

If you have any comments, please scroll to the bottom of the page to where it says, “Leave a Reply.” And now, Episode 193…

Cool Comics News!

Over the weekend, on my social media sites, I listed myself (in the little bio areas) as a Comic Book Commentator. But does such a title even exist? I couldn’t find any evidence during an Internet search, but my guess is that others have made this claim before. Regardless, I think it’s an apt description of what I do. Cool Comics is not a review site, and even though I wouldn’t mind being known as a Comic Book Historian (I have a long way to go!), it doesn’t fit. Cool Comics is not a comic book news site either, although I do have this Cool Comics News! section in which I give you interesting tidbits. So, what exactly is Cool Comics In My Collection? Each week I post some covers of comics in my personal collection and talk a little about them. Sometimes I tell you about the creators, or perhaps a smidgen of the plot, and occasionally I’ll bring up the time or place or moment in my life when I bought or read the comic and what it means to me now. Hence, “Comic Book Commentator.” I think I like the sound of it.

Cool Comics Battle of the Week!

Your Cool Comics Battle of the Week is Kermit versus Miss Piggy! What do you think would happen if they faced each other in a titanic tussle, and how do you see the winner achieving victory? Let us know in the comments section below.

Cool Comics In My Collection Contemporary Cool Comics

#949 — Exciting Comics #2, Antarctic Press, May 2019.

A few months ago, Exciting Comics #1 was listed in Recently Read Digital Comics, a section of Cool Comics that hasn’t seen much action lately. And I liked Exciting Comics. I liked it enough that since my local comic shop couldn’t get me a physical issue (the print numbers were rather small, from my understanding) I ended up ordering it from Midtown Comics in NYC. Yes, it’s on my pull list now, and the second issue was just as much fun, continuing all three of the stories contained in the debut. The original Exciting Comics came out in the Forties, and though I wouldn’t mind getting my hands on some of those, I’ll settle for the fun stories coming out now from Antarctic Press. The creators (Blackjaq: writers Bradley Golden and John Crowther, with artist Carlos Tron; Crimson Scorpion: writer David Furr with artist Joseph Olesco; and Madam Mask: writer David Doub with artist  Spike Jarrell) have got me hooked on all three stories in this awesome anthology, and I’m excited to see what comes next! The cover price of Exciting Comics #2 is $3.99, while the current value is $4

#950 — Superman: Leviathan Rising Special #1, DC, July 2019.

If you’re planning to read the Event Leviathan limited series from DC, then you don’t want to miss this special issue. Seriously. Just look at the bottom of the cover where it states, “The Epic Struggle to Control the DC Universe Begins Here!” Now tell me you can resist buying this one. Okay, it’s not cheap (and not many comics are cheap these days), but you get a lot of bang for your buck(s)! Look up from those mesmerizing words at the bottom of the cover and check out that action. Superman has some kind of green glowing contraption strapped to his chest and appears to be…gulp…dying (okay, we went through that back in 1992, and we aren’t going to be fooled again…or are we?), while some of your favorite heroes are coming to his rescue. Or is it too late? You’ll have to read it for yourself to find out! The cover price of Superman: Leviathan Rising Special #1 is $9.99, while the current value is $10.

Cool Comics Done Dirt Cheap

#951 — Nth Man #11, Marvel, April 1990.

Are you a fan of obscure comic book heroes and titles (I have a soft spot for Omega the Unknown, although it seems that he’s not so unknown anymore)? If you get a kick out of collecting small runs of titles that don’t get much mention, then perhaps Nth Man is one you’ll want to check out if you’ve been as oblivious to it as I have. To be fair, the short-lived series was published just before I started my third phase of comic collecting, and I don’t remember ever having read a thing about it. If not for my legendary longbox (I bought a longbox that was stuffed with 419 comic books for just $20 a while ago; hence, Cool Comics Done Dirt Cheap), he’d still be a complete stranger to me. And yet…a couple weeks ago I was scrounging around in some quarter bins and came across five or six issues. And the only reason I took any notice was because I’d already planned to read this comic for this episode. Did I buy any? Well, issue 1 was there, and for a quarter, I figured I’d grab it and perhaps add it to a future Cool Comics episode. The cover price of Nth Man #11 is $1, while the current value is $3.

FCBD the Cool Comics Way (Week 5)

#952 — Hope, Source Point Press, May 2019.

When you think superhero comics, Dirk Manning is not a name you’d associate with the genre. Yet the writer of the sensational horror tales contained in Nightmare World and other cool comics has me convinced that he can pen any kind of stories he wants to and make them as compelling as anything else you’ll find at your local comic shop. Hope #1 came out as a Free Comic Book Day offering, and if you didn’t get this one, you probably want to see if you can find a copy somewhere. Yes, I liked it that much. It’s a different kind of superhero comic, and in the first issue he puts the hero in a situation that will surprise you and have you screaming that you need issue 2, and you need it now! Also, K. Lynn Smith’s art perfectly captures the mood. The facial expressions are spot on, allowing the reader to really feel the emotions of the characters. I “Hope” you can find yourself a copy if you missed out on FCBD. The cover price of Hope #1 is free, while the current value is $1.

Cool Comics Kids

#953 — Muppet Babies #3, Star Comics (an imprint of Marvel), September 1985.

From the time I was a boy and first saw the Gene Kelly movie Jack and the Beanstalk, I’ve had a bit of a fascination with the legend. Have you ever seen that particular movie? Part cartoon, part live-action, it’s also a musical, and when I was young, it was magical. I still have the soundtrack and often get one of the songs stuck in my head. Thoughts of that old film came to mind while reading this issue of Muppet Babies, because as you can see from the cover, we get the Muppet version of what might happen if a giant beanstalk led to a land of giants above the clouds. If you’re looking to get some comic books for young readers, you may want to find some discount boxes and do a little digging, because I found this old gem for just a quarter. It seems like everyone loves the Muppets, and when you combine it with a favorite old tale, you’re bound to make some young readers happy. The cover of Muppet Babies #3 is 65¢, while the current value is $5.

Cool Comics Classics

#954 — G.I. Combat #247, DC, November 1982.

Yes, it’s D-Day, so in honor of those who braved the beaches of Normandy (and let us not forget the paratroopers and pilots, along with all the ships and their crews involved…Operation Overlord was a massive undertaking, and if you don’t know much about it, you should take some time to learn the actual cost of freedom), we salute you with this issue of G.I. Combat. The classic comic starts off with The Haunted Tank in “Hitchhikers to Hell,” written by Robert Kanigher and illustrated by Sam Glanzman. Next up is The Mercenaries (Soldiers of Fortune) in “Blood Money,” again written by Robert Kanigher, with art by Vic Catan, Jr. This is followed by Act of War, which tosses a little Shakespeare our way. It’s written by George Kashdan with pencils by Luis Dominguez. Of course we also get a war spy story, as OSS Super-Spy tells of “The First Kamikaze,” again written by Robert Kanigher and art by Eufronio Reyes Cruz. In closing, we are presented with another Haunted Tank story, this one titled “Dog Tag for a Ghost,” once more written by Robert Kanigher and penciled by Dick Ayers. I’m a fan of anthology style comic books, so if you like to get the complete story in one sitting, and you appreciate military comic books, you can’t go wrong with this title. The cover price of G.I. Combat #247 is $1, while the current value is $16.

ComicBooks For Kids!

ComicBooks For Kids! (CB4K) is a charity that Cool Comics In My Collection is honored to be working with. CB4K provides comic books to kids in hospitals and cancer centers all across the Unites States. You can check their website and see if your local hospital is included and if not, you can work with them to get them included! If you like what you see, please help them out and follow/like their Facebook page. Their link is https://www.facebook.com/comicbooksforkids/

Never Miss an Episode of Cool Comics!

Now you can get Cool Comics in My Collection delivered directly to your email! Just click “Join My Newsletter” on my website (or click on the image of my No-Prize!), sign up, and that’s it. Pretty easy, right? Just be sure to follow the instructions on the confirmation email so that you start receiving my newsletter. If you don’t see it, you may want to check your Spam or Junk Mail folders

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Welcome to Cool Comics in My Collection Episode 192, where we look at various comic books I own (and in some cases ones that I let get away), both new and old, often with a nostalgic leaning for those feelings of yesteryear. I hope you have as much reading about them as I had writing about them!

For each of the comic books I include in this blog (except for digital issues), I list the current secondary market value. This is according to the website www.comicbookrealm.com. They list out the near mint prices, which are on the comic book grading scale of 9.4. If you go to the website to look up any in your collection, you can click on the price and see the value at different grades. Not all my comics are 9.4. Some are probably better, and some are certainly worse. But to simplify it, that’s the grading scale I use here. And remember, a comic book is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it.

Did you know that you can be a guest host for Cool Comics? It’s your chance to show off some of your favorite comics in your personal collection! Just pick any of your comics for inclusion (this blog is for all ages, so please keep that in mind), with a maximum of seven issues. Repeat guest hosts are permitted and encouraged. To submit your completed blog (or if you have any questions), write to edgosney62@gmail.com.

 The Cool Comics In My Collection Facebook Group is a place where you can discuss the comics you love, your favorite titles, and the characters that keep you coming back for more. Also, creators are welcome to share news about what you are working on, including Kickstarter campaigns. And don’t forget the prizes. Yes, Cool Comics gives away cool prizes. Be sure and join today!

If you have any comments, please scroll to the bottom of the page to where it says, “Leave a Reply.” And now, Episode 192…

Cool Comics News!

For those who like your comic books a little less on the “comic” side and a little more on the dark side, Horror Comics #1, which just came out yesterday, may be exactly what you’re looking for. Published by Ben Dunn’s Antarctic Press, we covered this story in our Recently Read Digital Comics section back in episode 158 under the title Timmy Lala’s Ice Cream #1 (which was part of a Kickstarter campaign). Now under the new title of Horror Comics, up-and-coming writer Bradley Golden and artists Andrey Lunatik and Mickey Clausen bring this disturbing tale to us as an ongoing series, with issue 2 scheduled to come out in July. Having read the first issue, my advice is to keep it out of the hands of young readers in your home, or nightmares will ensue, and no one will get any sleep!

Cool Comics Battle of the Week!

Your Cool Comics Battle of the Week is Iron Fist versus Batman! What do you think would happen if they faced each other in a titanic tussle, and how do you see the winner achieving victory? Let us know in the comments section below.

Cool Comics In My Collection Contemporary Cool Comics 

#944 — War of the Realms Strikeforce: The Land of Giants #1, Marvel, July 2019.

Midgard is in big trouble! Malekith’s forces are taking over Earth, and the good guys need a heavy hitter like Thor to lend them a hand. Only he’s busy smashing Frost Giants at Jotunheim. So what to do? Lady Freyja recruits Captain America to take a team and bring back her stepson. Cap, Wolverine, Spider-Man, Luke Cage, and Iron Fist, with an assist from Daredevil, now the God Without Fear, end up in the Land of Giants. This War of the Realms one-shot is rated T+, so be prepared for some bloody battles along the way. Three different WOTR one-shots all have “Strikeforce” in their titles, and while none of them are required to enjoy what’s been happening during this big Marvel event, they certainly add to the fun and flare of watching the heroes we depend on try their best to defend life on planet Earth. Written by Tom Taylor with pencils by Jorge Molina, this one is a bit darker than some of the others in this ongoing epic, but also loaded with lots of comic book fun and humor. The cover price of War of the Realms Strikeforce: The Land of Giants #1 is $4.99, while the current value is $5.

Cool Comics Done Dirt Cheap

#945 — Doctor Zero #2, Epic Comics (an imprint of Marvel), June 1988.

Before the legendary longbox came into my possession (I bought a longbox that was stuffed with 419 comic books for just $20 a while ago; hence, Cool Comics Done Dirt Cheap), I’d never heard of Doctor Zero (or the Shadowline Saga, as the cover reveals). But lo and behold, 3 issues (numbers 2, 3, and 4) of this comic book title were tucked inside the longbox, and it’s my duty to show you at least one of the issues, so here it is. Did you read the series? Was it a favorite? Even if, like me, you are unfamiliar with this comic book (it came out between a couple of my collecting periods), you may recognize some members of the creative team. The writers of this issue are D.G. Chichester and Margaret Clark, pencils are done by Denys Cowan, and inks are accomplished by Bill Sienkiewicz. The series lasted just eight issues, but that could have been intentional, as far as I know. The story would have been easier to follow if I’d also had issue 1 to read, but regardless, it was fairly entertaining. The cover price of Doctor Zero #2 is $1.25, while the current value is $3.

FCBD the Cool Comics Way (Week 4)

#946 — Kino’s Journey: The Beautiful World, Vertical Comics, May 2019.

The only comic books I’ve read from back to front (although if they’re purposefully made to read that way, then they’re really being read front to back, only it’s a different “front” than I’m used to…you get the picture, right?) are a few done in manga style from Free Comic Book Day issues in past years. Occasionally they come with reading guides, which I think is a terrific idea, since for some of us, we’ve been reading for so many decades that old habits are hard to break. Regardless, I enjoyed this FCBD edition, Kino’s Journey: The Beautiful World (even if I read it a little slower, due to making sure I was staying the course and reading the panels in the correct sequence). The black and white story itself has a magical feeling to it, and when you get to the end, you find out that the journey continues in a collected edition. The cover price of Kino’s Journey: The Beautiful World is free, while the current value is $0.

Cool Comics Kids

#947 — Heathcliff #4, Star Comics (an imprint of Marvel), October 1985.

I would hazard to guess that when most people think of an orange cartoon cat, Garfield is the first to pop into their minds. Yet Heathcliff came first. So why isn’t he the more popular feline? Perhaps it’s because Heathcliff doesn’t have any thought bubbles, whereas Garfield talks in his own mind (although other animals do talk in Heathcliff’s comic universe). This allows us to associate with Garfield, almost as if he’s one of us. But Heathcliff has a charm of his own. Admittedly, this is the first Heathcliff comic book I’ve ever read, and I don’t remember anything from the comic strip, as it’s been years since I’ve seen any. And speaking of thought bubbles, Heathcliff does have an adventure in this comic in which his conscious is speaking to him, twofold: an angelic figure on one shoulder, and a devilish figure on the other…both obviously looking very much like him. As most of these comics aimed towards younger readers tend to do, there are four complete stories contained within, perfect for shorter attention spans. I was able to find this in a quarter bin, so keep in mind that you can still find some cool comics for kids without breaking the bank. The cover price of Heathcliff #4 is 65¢, while the current value is $5.

Cool Comics Classics

#948 — Justice League of America #141, DC, April 1977.

Cool Comics In My Collection episode 175 brought you the exciting story of Green Lantern Hal Jordan admitting to having committed the worst crime in the universe! And now we get the epic conclusion (well, it’s not really a conclusion, as there are still “problems” at the end of this “Giant” issue, but that’s no surprise, right?) in this story that could only be called, “No World Escapes the Manhunters!” Dramatic enough? I’m telling you, nothing beats the excitement of the Seventies when it comes to four-color fun! Written by Steve Englehart, with art by Dick Dillin, this issue is packed with DC’s big hitters, from Superman to Batman to Green Lantern to Wonder Woman, and it also includes Green Arrow, the Black Canary, Flash, and more. I was fortunate to find this on sale for just a dollar, and it’s worth all one hundred pennies! The cover price of Justice League of America #141 is 50¢, while the current value is $18.

ComicBooks For Kids!

ComicBooks For Kids! (CB4K) is a charity that Cool Comics In My Collection is honored to be working with. CB4K provides comic books to kids in hospitals and cancer centers all across the Unites States. You can check their website and see if your local hospital is included and if not, you can work with them to get them included! If you like what you see, please help them out and follow/like their Facebook page. Their link is https://www.facebook.com/comicbooksforkids/

Never Miss an Episode of Cool Comics!

Now you can get Cool Comics in My Collection delivered directly to your email! Just click “Join My Newsletter” on my website (or click on the image of my No-Prize!), sign up, and that’s it. Pretty easy, right? Just be sure to follow the instructions on the confirmation email so that you start receiving my newsletter. If you don’t see it, you may want to check your Spam or Junk Mail folders.

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Welcome to Cool Comics in My Collection Episode 191, where we look at various comic books I own (and in some cases ones that I let get away), both new and old, often with a nostalgic leaning for those feelings of yesteryear. I hope you have as much reading about them as I had writing about them!

For each of the comic books I include in this blog (except for digital issues), I list the current secondary market value. This is according to the website www.comicbookrealm.com. They list out the near mint prices, which are on the comic book grading scale of 9.4. If you go to the website to look up any in your collection, you can click on the price and see the value at different grades. Not all my comics are 9.4. Some are probably better, and some are certainly worse. But to simplify it, that’s the grading scale I use here. And remember, a comic book is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it.

Did you know that you can be a guest host for Cool Comics? It’s your chance to show off some of your favorite comics in your personal collection! Just pick any of your comics for inclusion (this blog is for all ages, so please keep that in mind), with a maximum of seven issues. Repeat guest hosts are permitted and encouraged. To submit your completed blog (or if you have any questions), write to edgosney62@gmail.com.

The Cool Comics In My Collection Facebook Group is a place where you can discuss the comics you love, your favorite titles, and the characters that keep you coming back for more. Also, creators are welcome to share news about what you are working on, including Kickstarter campaigns. And don’t forget the prizes. Yes, Cool Comics gives away cool prizes. Be sure and join today!

If you have any comments, please scroll to the bottom of the page to where it says, “Leave a Reply.” And now, Episode 191…

Cool Comics News!

This week we have no “new” issues for our Contemporary Cool Comics section. Sure, one is just a few months old, but the other is more than a decade over the hill. You might be asking yourself, “Didn’t any War of the Realms comics come out last week?” Indeed, they did, but I’ve inundated you with so many lately that it’s a little…embarrassing. But just in case you’re wondering what WOTR comics were available on Wednesday, May 15 (it’s rare that I cover comics that arrive the day before each episode is published, due to timing), here’s a nice little sampling: War of the Realms #4; Giant-Man #1; Spider-Man & The League of Realms #1; and War of the Realms Strikeforce: The War Avengers #1. I figured you needed a break from WOTR, and this week, Cool Comics gave it to you…sort of.

Cool Comics Battle of the Week!

Your Cool Comics Battle of the Week is Captain Marvel versus Astro Boy! What do you think would happen if they faced each other in a titanic tussle, and how do you see the winner achieving victory? Let us know in the comments section below.

Cool Comics In My Collection Contemporary Cool Comics

#938 — Captain Marvel #1, Marvel, March 2019.

I have the entire short run of Ms. Marvel (Carol Danvers) from the Seventies, but as far as the current Captain Marvel series is concerned (and those that came before it featuring Carol Danvers), I really don’t know much. I saw the movie, and I saw her in Avengers: Endgame, but aside from her appearances in Avengers, etc., I’m sort of a newbie as far as her more recent runs are concerned. And I do realize that she’s had the “Captain” in front of her name for a while now. I don’t understand the antagonistic attitude she seems to imbue, but, again, I don’t really know what’s going on in her head, so I’m a bit lost. So why do I have this issue? I saw some talk about this variant Artgerm cover, which is available only as a prepack at Walmart, and I guess it’s getting harder and harder to find, so I decided that if I saw it, I’d get it. I know people are buying it and trying to turn it on eBay for a profit, but I removed the cellophane and actually read the comic. To some, that’s a stupid move, but what’s the fun in just seeing the cover and not knowing the mystery of what’s in the actual story and what the two comics underneath might be? In my opinion, the best part of the comic is a short conversation between Thor and Iron Man. It really brought a smile to my face. I’m not looking to add more issues of this title to my collection, but I don’t regret getting this variant cover. The cover price of Captain Marvel #1 is $4.99 (and the three-pack cost just under $8), while the current value is $8.

#939 — Hunter’s Moon #1, BOOM!, April 2007.

Though Hunter’s Moon has been in existence for a dozen years, I’ve never read it, so for me, and maybe for you, it’s new. That’s part of what’s so much fun about comics: no matter when they were originally issued, if you’ve never read it, it’s brand new to you. This one caught my eye in a quarter box last fall, and once I noticed, across the top, that  it’s “From the writer of the Academy Award-Winning film ‘Ray,’” (which I’ve never seen) decided I might as well take a chance. There are similarities in screen-writing and comic book writing, so I felt this was worth the 25¢ I paid for it, and I was right. The problem, though, is that this is the first of a 5-part story, and it’s the only one I’ve found so far. This isn’t a superhero comic, by the way. It’s filled with lots of tension and drama, and you’ll find yourself turning pages faster as you get caught up in the story, and just when you NEED to know what’s happening…the end. Hopefully someday I’ll find the last four issues before I forget all about the story. The cover price of Hunter’s Moon #1 is $3.99, while the current value is $4.

Cool Comics Done Dirt Cheap

#940 — Demon Knights #19, DC, June 2013.

I wasn’t buying comic books during the run of The New 52, but when I can find some issues on the cheap, or really inexpensive trade or digital editions of characters I like, I’ll buy them to learn more of the history of that period of DC comics. This issue of Demon Knights comes from my legendary longbox (I bought a longbox that was stuffed with 419 comic books for just $20 a while ago; hence, Cool Comics Done Dirt Cheap), so as an individual comic, I paid just pennies for it (which is really cool!). And even though I sorted through them a bit, checking out what I got when I first acquired the legendary longbox, I somehow didn’t notice that Demon Knights actually stars THE Demon of DC fame (good old Etrigan, aka Jason Blood). Laugh all you want, but there are lots and lots of comics in existence, while my brain has limited storage capacity and, often, faulty recall. The story takes place in 1043 A.D., so any hopes of finding Batman and his pals in this issue evaporate the moment we see the date. If you’re a fan of The Demon and you neglected this series, you may just want to check it out. The cover price of Demon Knights #19 is $2.99, while the current value is $3.

FCBD the Cool Comics Way (Week 3)

#941 — Blastosaurus Annual #1, Golden Apple Books, May 2019.

While at first glance Blastosaurus looks to be more apt to appeal to a younger audience, it’s actually quite entertaining, even for the older set. This Free Comic Book Day issue is billed as Annual #1, so the question is, were there any issues before it? Yes indeed, Blastosaurus fans, there are. A little research tells us that this was the top-selling indie comic in New Zealand, and is now published through Golden Apple Books, which is a comic book shop in Los Angeles, California. It’s pretty cool that a comic shop decided to start publishing comics, and while I have no idea how many people are aware of this, putting out a FCBD issue is a great marketing tactic. Many will tell you that Free Comic Book Day hasn’t really helped the hobby much, but for some of us, it’s an opportunity to see what else is out there. The only complaint Cool Comics has on this one is the lettering needs to be a little larger if they want seasoned readers to jump onboard. The cover price of Blastosaurus Annual #1 is free, while the current value is $0.

Cool Comics Kids

#942 — The Original Astro Boy #2, Now Comics, October 1987.

The creator of Astro Boy, Osamu Tezuka, brought much joy to my childhood, not via Astro Boy, but instead through a couple of other stories you may be familiar with: Kimba the White Lion and Alakazam the Great. My sisters and I loved the Kimba cartoon so much that we often played childhood games centered around his adventures, and the theme song easily got stuck in my head. Alakazam the Great, while not a series, was an animated film about the adventures of a monkey, voiced by Peter Fernandez (yup…Speed Racer’s voice). When Alakazam sings, it’s Frankie Avalon. But Astro Boy, though I know who he is, was a cartoon I didn’t see when I was a kid, but my wife watched it and sometimes brings him up, so when I saw this comic for just a quarter, you know it had to come home with me. The publisher, Now Comics, may not have been around long (just 20 issues of this title came out), but they produced some really cool comics based on licensed properties including Speed Racer, The Real Ghostbusters, and The Green Hornet, and also attracted some major talents like Harlan Ellison, Neal Adams, and Alex Ross. The cover price of The Original Astro Boy #2 is $1.50, while the current value is $4.

Cool Comics Classics

#943 — The Brute #1, Atlas Comics, February 1975.

A couple months back, in March, I was excited to add Morlock 2001 #1 as an official Cool Comic (it’s Cool Comic #888, for those keeping track). As I started learning a bit about the company, Atlas/Seaboard, I started feeling more and more nostalgic, considering that they originally hit the newsstands during the heyday of my first phase of comic book collecting (1973-1978). I remember seeing them, but instead of giving them a try, I always reached for some Seventies Marvel titles, monster magazines, and The Planet of the Apes magazine. In the Nineties I picked a few Atlas comics up from sale bins, but never read them, and eventually sold them when making some breathing room in my house. After reading Morlock 2001 #1, my collector mentality (along with the nostalgic Seventies feeling it brought to mind) told me that I really should try to get more of these comics. So, I did. Only a few dozen Atlas Comics were published before they folded, and I’m over halfway there in getting the entire collection. So why did I decide to read The Brute #1 now? Because out of nowhere, rights were purchased, and these somewhat obscure comics are starting to get some attention as Paramount Pictures is going to be involved in bringing some of these comics to a theater near you. I don’t have great expectations (does anyone?) that The Brute and company will be big screen sensations, but I think it’s really cool that someone is making the effort. As for the comic, I enjoyed the story and hope to find issue 2 someday. Lucky for me that I found #3 the same day I purchased #1. And believe it or not, that’s as far as it goes. The Brute lasted just three issues. The comic brings to mind some of the old horror movies from days gone by, and that’s a good thing in my mind. The cover price of The Brute #1 is 25¢, while the current value is $28.

ComicBooks For Kids!

ComicBooks For Kids! (CB4K) is a charity that Cool Comics In My Collection is honored to be working with. CB4K provides comic books to kids in hospitals and cancer centers all across the Unites States. You can check their website and see if your local hospital is included and if not, you can work with them to get them included! If you like what you see, please help them out and follow/like their Facebook page. Their link is https://www.facebook.com/comicbooksforkids/

Never Miss an Episode of Cool Comics!

Now you can get Cool Comics in My Collection delivered directly to your email! Just click “Join My Newsletter” on my website (or click on the image of my No-Prize!), sign up, and that’s it. Pretty easy, right? Just be sure to follow the instructions on the confirmation email so that you start receiving my newsletter. If you don’t see it, you may want to check your Spam or Junk Mail folders.

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Welcome to Cool Comics in My Collection Episode 190, where we look at various comic books I own (and in some cases ones that I let get away), both new and old, often with a nostalgic leaning for those feelings of yesteryear.

For each of the comic books I include in this blog (except for digital issues), I list the current secondary market value. This is according to the website www.comicbookrealm.com. They list out the near mint prices, which are on the comic book grading scale of 9.4. If you go to the website to look up any in your collection, you can click on the price and see the value at different grades. Not all my comics are 9.4. Some are probably better, and some are certainly worse. But to simplify it, that’s the grading scale I use here. And remember, a comic book is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it.

Have you considered being a guest host for Cool Comics? You can do a theme or just pick any of your comics for inclusion (this blog is for all ages, so please keep that in mind), with a maximum of seven issues. Repeat guest hosts are permitted and encouraged. For any questions or to submit your completed blog, write to edgosney62@gmail.com.

The Cool Comics In My Collection Facebook Group is a place where you can discuss the comics you love, your favorite titles, and the characters that keep you coming back for more. Also, creators are welcome to share news about what you are working on, including Kickstarter campaigns. And don’t forget the prizes. Yes, Cool Comics gives away cool prizes. Be sure and join today!

If you have any comments, please scroll to the bottom of the page to where it says, “Leave a Reply.” And now, Episode 190…

Cool Comics News!

What are your comic convention plans for the next few months? Do you prefer cons that have big name celebrities who star in your favorite movies and TV shows, or are smaller cons with just a few comic book creators and lots of comics for sale more your style? If you’re the sharing type, tell us in the comments section below.

Cool Comics Battle of the Week!

Your Cool Comics Battle of the Week is The Outsiders versus The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles! What do you think would happen if they faced each other in a titanic tussle, and how do you see the winner achieving victory? Let us know in the comments section below.

Cool Comics In My Collection Contemporary Cool Comics

#931 — War of the Realms: New Agents of Atlas #1, Marvel, July 2019.

After a two-week hiatus from War of the Realms, comic fans who are enjoying the big Marvel event will be happy to see that Cool Comics is still having fun with it. This particular issue, New Agents of Atlas, introduces us to some new characters…at least for most of us. Sword Master and Aero exist online for the Chinese market at NetEase Comics (don’t worry about remembering this, as there’s a section at the end of the story that gives you the scoop). But not only do we meet them, we also get the first ever appearance of Wave, who is a Filipino superhero. Does that mean this issue will only increase in value? Probably, but the amount is determined by just how popular the characters end up becoming. I really enjoyed this Asian team and having Shang-Chi in the mix is a plus in my mind. The other heroes are Silk (Cindy Moon), Kamala Khan (Ms. Marvel), and Amadeus Cho (Brawn). They are led by former S.H.I.E.L.D. agent Jimmy Woo. War of the Realms isn’t just about battling in New York City, but it’s a worldwide catastrophe, and we get to see what’s going on across the globe. If you can still find a copy, grab it…word is it’s heading to a second printing and prices are starting to rise. The cover price of War of the Realms: New Agents of Atlas #1 is $3.99, while the current value is $4.

#932 — SHAZAM! #5, DC, July 2019.

With the Captain Marvel movie still pulling in money and Avengers: Endgame shattering box office records (not to mention my inclusion of a Captain Marvel comic last week that was yet a different Marvel hero), I thought I’d give some love and attention to SHAZAM! The movie, while making a nice profit, is nowhere in the neighborhood of the two aforementioned properties, and I’m here to tell you that it’s lots of fun. Okay, I understand that for many of you, that’s not your version of SHAZAM (if you’ve read The New 52 stories that served as backup in Justice League comics, or read the collection, you will recognize the movie version), but if you go in with an open mind, you may just find yourself smiling throughout the film. The current comic series picked right up where The New 52 stories left off, and while it’s been fun, I’m ready for the characters to move on to the next storyline (but due to circumstances and considering what the writer, Geoff Johns, seems to be building, I think it’s going to be a while…but I’m sticking with it). The use of bright colors makes the covers and comics attractive, and the only real complaint I have is that the issues are a bit behind schedule. The cover price of SHAZAM! #5 is $3.99, while the current value is $4.

Cool Comics Done Dirt Cheap

#933 — Adventures of the Outsiders #42, DC, February 1987.

I own just three issues of Adventures of the Outsiders, but I treasure each one. The comic was published at a time when I wasn’t active in the hobby, but lucky for me I’ve gotten to experience it via  my legendary longbox (I bought a longbox that was stuffed with 419 comic books for just $20 a while ago; hence, Cool Comics Done Dirt Cheap), which contained three issues. The heroes who make up the Outsiders aren’t exactly household names (and part of the fun is learning just who they are and what powers they have), and include Black Lightning (who is much better known now due to The CW TV show), Geo Force, Halo, Katana (who is in the Suicide Squad movie and has been in The Arrow TV show), Looker, and Metamorpho. So why do I care? Because Mike W. Barr, the esteemed writer, attends a monthly comic book gathering that I also started attending, and he’s a really cool guy. You tend to view the hobby a little differently when you start to meet the creators. It adds a new level of appreciation and enjoyment. Just ask the millions of people who’ve attended comic conventions over the years and around the world if you won’t take my word for it. The cover price of Adventures of the Outsiders #42 is 75¢, while the current value is $3.

FCBD the Cool Comics Way (Week 2)

#934 — Animosity Tales #1, AfterShock, May 2019.

No doubt about it, AfterShock puts out some interesting comics, and their Free Comic Book Day issue this year, Animosity Tales, proves my point. What would happen should animals suddenly gain sentience and be able to communicate with us? Some would be loyal for sure, but others…well, watch out, world, because other animals may not be so happy with their lot in life. Humans—or at least some humans—might just go on the offensive, while others are sympathetic and try to help out their animal friends. Regardless of where you fall on the spectrum, Animosity stories have been a part of AfterShock for the last few years, so if you enjoyed this FCBD issue, by all means, try to pick up some of the other tales (or tails) out there. The last few pages give us a preview of a new series, Mary Shelley: Monster Hunter. If you appreciate the novel Frankenstein and the story behind it, and don’t mind a little fiction on the side to make it interesting in a different way, this may be a series you want to look for. The cover price of Animosity Tales #1 is free, while the current value is $1.

Cool Comics Kids

#935 — Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Adventures #2, Archie, October 1988.

For a while, way back in ancient times, my wife and I started buying Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles toys. I’d see bits and pieces of the cartoon version here and there (and I may have seen one or two of the early movies), and young relatives really liked it…and even today many still love the turtles, but I’ve never really felt a connection the way some of you have. Yet I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to get this Archie published version of the turtles for just a quarter, which is an adaptation of the original five-episode cartoon. Though this is a little more violent than many of the earlier kid’s comics that have been featured in this section, it can’t be ignored that children really love those darn turtles (and of course no one dies…except robots). Did you grow up in the era of turtle magic, in which you couldn’t wait for Saturday mornings each week? If so, this comic is for you. The cover price of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Adventures #2 is $1, while the current value is $8.

Cool Comics Classics

#936 — The Thanos Quest #1, Marvel, September 1990.

You know who Thanos is, right? He’s that big, muscular purple guy who wants to control the fate of the Marvel Universe. And how can you avoid him, these days? He’s all over TV commercials for some movie that’s breaking box office records. Chances are, if you’re reading Cool Comics, then you’ve read a comic or two in your time that featured The Mad Titan. So while Avengers: Endgame rages across the silver screen, and others are finally getting around to watching Avengers: Infinity War so they can get current, some of us are diving a little deeper by discovering just what The Thanos Quest is all about. Ever wonder about those Infinity Gems (or stones…or whatever you and Thanos want to call them) and where they came from? I’m talking from a comic book perspective, of course, because what takes place in the Marvel Cinematic Universe is best explored and explained by others, since Cool Comics is about…you guessed it, comics! I was fortunate to grab this issue (and the second issue…see below) for the low price of 50¢ many moons ago when I was in the Army, stationed in Atlanta, GA. Yet I’ve never read it until this past week. The Thanos Quest is just two parts, and in this first issue, Thanos attempts to attain three soul gems from the following: the In-Betweener, the Champion, and The Gardner, all mighty and powerful beings in the Marvel Universe. Can he pull it off? The cover price of The Thanos Quest #1 is $4.95, while the current value is $30.

#937 — The Thanos Quest #2, Marvel, October 1990.

Notice the date of this mini-series? It came out in 1990, just before The Infinity Gauntlet (then The Infinity War, The Infinity Crusade, and so on), but I rarely see any mention of it online. Sure, I lived without it and read the three Infinity series previously mentioned, but now that I’ve gone questing with Thanos, I see how it fits into the entire plotline and really should have read it first. But mistakes are sometimes made, and we at Cool Comics did our best to rectify this shortcoming in our Infinity experience. As our story continues, Thanos has three more friends to go visit and convince that he alone should have possession of those pretty rocks. After a quick parley with the Collector, Thanos runs off to face…The Runner! After sipping some sweet tea with his buddy, he returns to the Collector, fills him in on how his meeting with the Runner went, and is off flying across space once more until he comes upon The Grand Master. And then it’s game on! Who wins this battle of wits and strength? It would be cheating if I told you, and if you cheat, do you really win? I enjoyed The Thanos Quest and recommend finding cheap copies to read if you don’t want to shell much money. And you can always go digital if you just want to experience the story. The cover price of The Thanos Quest #2 is $4.95, while the current value is $30.

ComicBooks For Kids!

ComicBooks For Kids! (CB4K) is a charity that Cool Comics In My Collection is honored to be working with. CB4K provides comic books to kids in hospitals and cancer centers all across the Unites States. You can check their website and see if your local hospital is included and if not, you can work with them to get them included! If you like what you see, please help them out and follow/like their Facebook page. Their link is https://www.facebook.com/comicbooksforkids/

Never Miss an Episode of Cool Comics!

Now you can get Cool Comics in My Collection delivered directly to your email! Just click “Join My Newsletter” on my website (or click on the image of my No-Prize!), sign up, and that’s it. Pretty easy, right? Just be sure to follow the instructions on the confirmation email so that you start receiving my newsletter. If you don’t see it, you may want to check your Spam or Junk Mail folders.

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