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BEACH program update

Kitsap Public Health District issued a no-contact health advisory for the east shore of the Port Washington Narrows, between the Warren Avenue Bridge and Manette Bridge. This is due to a 1,500 to 2,000 gallon sewage spill from Seaglass Village Apartments. Signs have been posted at public access points and the public is advised to avoid contact with the water in those areas. This advisory will remain in effect through Sunday, July 21. 

Contact with fecal contaminated waters can result in gastroenteritis, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections, and other illnesses. Children and the elderly may be more vulnerable to waterborne illnesses.

Stay updated on water quality at your beaches by following our Fecal Matters blog posts, connecting on Facebook, or joining our listserv.

Julianne Ruffner, our BEACH Program Manager, is available at 360-407-6154 or julianne.ruffner@ecy.wa.gov for questions.
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A lot of people have their eyes on the skies right now, keeping a sharp lookout for wildfire smoke. Although cooler weather has meant that the 2019 wildfire season has gotten off to a thankfully slow start, the widespread drought in Washington and climbing temperatures mean that a major blaze could come at any time.



Despite the best efforts of firefighters, we can’t always control the amount of smoke we get from summer blazes. With that in mind, it makes a ton of sense to limit all of the other sources of smoke that we are exposed to. In winter, that may mean burn bans, or encouraging people to use either low-emission, modern woodstoves or switch to other forms of heating. In the spring and summer, limiting smoke means reducing the amount of green waste and slash being burned, and providing other ways for communities to dispose of this material.

What’s wrong with burning green waste? Although burning green waste – tree limbs, bushes, yard trimmings and similar material – is illegal in urban areas throughout Washington, it is legal and fairly common in many rural areas. The advantage of burning is that it’s cheap and simple. The disadvantage? One, it’s dangerous – “controlled” fires that get out of control are the number one cause of wildfires in Washington. And, two, burning waste produces lots of smoke – often in the very communities that are already being hit the hardest by wildfire smoke.

“Burning is thought of as a cheap and easy way out, but it’s risky and it means putting more smoke into the air and into people’s lungs,” said Sean Hopkins, Ecology’s smoke management lead for Central Washington. “Our communities are already exposed to far too much smoke – we need to do everything we can to protect air quality.”

For years, the Department of Ecology’s Air Quality program has been working with local communities to make safer alternatives to burning more affordable and more accessible.

Over the past four years, Ecology has provided communities in North Central Washington – the part of our state that experiences the most wildfire smoke – with more than $200,000 to collect green waste and chip it, allowing the material to be composted or disposed of in other ways.

Lake Wenatchee Fire and Rescue chipping wood waste
near Lake Wenatchee and Plain.
A recent Ecology-funded project with the Lake Wenatchee Fire and Rescue District is a good example of how this works. Ecology provided Lake Wenatchee with a $50,000 grant to buy a commercial-sized wood chipper and then hold a series of free chipping events in the Lake Wenatchee and Plain communities.

Residents only needed to stack up their brush and limbs next to the road – up to 10 cubic yards per household. Fire district crews towed the chipper along the road and chipped as they went.
By the end of June, the fire district collected and chipped more than 14 dump truck loads of brush.

Burning that material would have put nearly a ton of particulate pollution into the air. Thankfully, with the chipper in hand, the fire district will be able to hold more chipping events in the future.

In the past year, Ecology has also been working closely with Okanogan County’s Solid Waste Department. Okanogan faces a special challenge in getting rid of tree limbs and other green waste: The apple maggot.

The apple maggot threatens Washington’s famous apple orchards, and officials have put in strict limits on transporting homegrown fruit or tree limbs to prevent the spread of the pest. Because Okanogan County includes areas in both the quarantine zone and the pest-free area, that makes collecting green waste a challenge. With $85,000 in grants from Ecology, however, Okanogan was able to not only buy a wood chipper, but also build its own steam treatment unit.
A new wood chipper Okanogan County purchased with an Ecology grant.

Steaming the wood chips at high heat is the required method to kill any apple maggot larvae that might be present. This then allows the treated wood chips to be moved into pest-free areas for disposal. Steam treatment was one of the methods suggested in a 2018 report on managing waste disposal and the apple maggot problem by Ecology and the Washington State Department of Agriculture.

Okanogan County has purchased the chipper and just finished building the steam treatment unit. The county plans to put the new equipment to use later this year.

No matter what we do, smoke will always be with us in Washington. These projects in North Central Washington show us that there’s still a lot we can do to reduce smoke when we can and help our communities breathe easier.
- Andrew Wineke, Air Quality Program 
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Tacoma's new Dune Peninsula at Point Defiance Park.
Image Courtesy of Metro Parks Tacoma
Since the 1980s, we have been working in partnership with the City of Tacoma and the EPA to clean up the blight and contamination left behind by the former Asarco smelter.

On Saturday, July 6, 2019, a beautiful new park was born from the smelter’s slag heap after decades of hard work, and millions of dollars in cleanup. The Dune Peninsula at Point Defiance Park is now open to the public with walking paths, a public amphitheater, and sweeping views of Puget Sound and Vashon Island.

History of the site
The former Asarco smelter plant and smokestack
After operating for nearly 100 years, the Asarco smelter was designated as a Superfund cleanup site in 1987. While the smelter provided local jobs and valuable metal resources for the nation, it also left a toxic legacy in the soil, groundwater, and sediments in Puget Sound.

The once-iconic Asarco smokestack – the tallest in the world at 571 feet – vented heavy metals and arsenic that drifted along the winds to contaminate an estimated 1,000 square miles of land from Seattle to Olympia. Even the 11-acre peninsula that the park is built on was created from slag waste that Asarco dumped into Puget Sound over a period of decades.

Since the smelter was closed and its smokestack imploded in spectacular fashion, the site has been undergoing a remarkable physical and economic transformation. This includes the development of Point Ruston, with theaters, restaurants, shopping, and condominiums with spectacular views – and now this beautiful park.

Funding from the ashesIn 2009, Washington state was awarded a $188.5 million settlement during Asarco’s bankruptcy. $95 million of these funds were set aside for the Tacoma smelter. In 2013, the state legislature granted Ecology $5 million of these funds for the Metro Parks Trails Project. This funding was used to permanently cap 400,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil on the peninsula — enough to fill 120 Olympic-sized swimming pools — and allowed the new park to be built over the top.

Many agencies provided funds for additional improvements around the new park including:
  • $36.6 million from Metro Parks' 2014 voter-approved park bond
  • $25.4 million from the EPA
  • $3.5 million from the Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office to create a 20-foot wide trail, and a pedestrian bridge over Pearl Street.
  • $2.5 million from the Washington State Department of Transportation to create a new roundabout entrance to Point Defiance Park
  • $1 million from Ecology to create a regional stormwater facility that can handle 8 million gallons of water daily from a 754 acre watershed

Naming the parkBack in the 1950s, the Asarco smelter and its pervasive pollution inspired local author Frank Herbert to draft an award-winning ecologically-inspired science fiction novel titled “Dune.” The Dune Peninsula Park is named after this novel, and Frank Herbert’s name is emblazoned on the new trail winding through it.

Cleanup continuesWhile the Dunes Peninsula is now open to the public, Ecology is still cleaning properties in nearby neighborhoods within the Tacoma Smelter Plume. To date, these cleanups have removed contaminated soil from homes, schools, daycares, parks, and camps in the surrounding area. Nearly 1,200 homes in the smelter plume qualify for cleanup.

Around 300 homes have already had their soil replaced, along with nearby city parks, schools and even Fort Nisqually at Point Defiance. Homeowners whose properties may be contaminated can contact us to learn more about the options available. For more information on all of our cleanup programs around the Asarco smelter, visit our Tacoma Smelter Plume Project page.
By Marcus Humberg, Communications Specialist, Toxics Cleanup Program.
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While recent rain is helping many parts of the state, more than a
few scattered showers are needed to fix Washington's drought.
For the past few months, Washington’s weather has been all over the map.

Residents of Spokane and the south east experienced a relatively damp spring, while much of western and central Washington have seen warmer than normal temperatures and low precipitation since April.

And for most of the summer, the usually fire-resistant west side has had a higher risk of wildfires relative to historical norms than has most of Eastern Washington, according to the National Interagency Fire Center.

As of July 11, the U.S. Drought Monitor still shows abnormally dry to severe drought conditions in all but the southeast corner of our state. Five percent of the state’s rivers are at record low, and many locations in western and north central Washington are expecting between 50 and 75 percent of normal stream flow through September.

So what does this all mean when more than half the state is in a declared drought emergency?

Jeff Marti, Ecology’s Water Resources Program drought coordinator, says recent precipitation has been a welcome change, but it hasn’t made up the deficit caused by warmer than usual conditions and a lack of snow pack.

“Over the last few days, some parts of the state have gotten some good shots of rain, and some places, like the Olympic Peninsula, have really needed it," Marti said. "Some rivers have rebounded nicely, but about a quarter of our rivers are still experiencing flows much below normal. It will take continuing rainfall to make that more than a temporary rebound. Our lowest flow season is still ahead.”

Conditions by region
While cooler weather and some rain has bumped up flows that supply irrigation water and support important fish migration in Central Washington, water supply remains in flux. Low reservoir levels in the Yakima Basin – the 7th lowest storage volume in 44 years – mean farmers must remain vigilant and fish managers on alert.

From arid areas to sudden downpours, weather patterns east of the Columbia River have meanwhile been wide ranging. The northeast portions of Pend Oreille and Stevens counties are in severe drought, while the east side’s midsection has seen thunderstorms and flash flood warnings several times over the past few weeks.

Crop damage from heavy rains was reported in Okanogan and Ferry counties, although NOAA’s National Weather Service shows total regional precipitation hovering just under average for the past month.

Conditions in the southeast have mirrored the majority of the U.S., and are wetter than in past years. Walla Walla basin water users have seen some low flows, but that’s mainly due to normal demand across the border in Oregon.

Taken as a whole, Washington’s lingering dehydration – the 13th driest July-June period ever recorded in the state – stands in stark contrast to the rest of the country. According to NOAA, the continental U.S. had its wettest 12 months on record, even as the Pacific Northwest became more parched. And with much of the summer yet to come, resolving this drought will require more than scattered showers.
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Jefferson County Department of Heath issued a no-contact advisory to water recreation at Oak Bay County Park. This advisory is due to high levels of fecal bacteria in the water. 

Signs have been posted at the beach to warn the public. This beach is being re-sampled and the advisory will stay in effect until bacterial levels have dropped to safe levels.

Contact with fecal contaminated waters can result in gastroenteritis, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. Children and the elderly may be more vulnerable to waterborne illnesses.

Stay updated about water quality at your beaches by keeping up with us on our blog Fecal Matters, on Facebook, or join our listserv.

Julianne Ruffner, our BEACH Program Manager, is available at 360-407-6154 or julianne.ruffner@ecy.wa.gov for questions. 
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The cleanup of Port Gamble Bay is just one of the more than
7,000 sites we've cleaned up since MTCA became law 30 years ago

Ecology’s Toxics Cleanup Program is updating Washington’s Cleanup Rule and we’re recruiting an advisory group to help!

The Cleanup Rule hasn’t been fully updated since 2001. We're updating it in three stages called “rulemakings” over several years. The first rulemaking is already underway and the advisory group will play a key role.

The Stakeholder and Tribal Advisory Group (STAG)
This group will provide feedback on the proposed rule changes, such as process changes to make cleanups more efficient. We’ll also seek its input on the cleanup standards during the second rulemaking starting in 2021.

Know someone who would make a great candidate?
You’re welcome to nominate yourself, someone else, or more than one person. We’re looking for diverse voices and perspectives:
  • People who have practical experience with cleanups under the Model Toxics Control Act and experience working in advisory groups
  • People who are willing to represent the broader interests of their organization or community, and can attend up to 12 meetings in Bellevue over the next two years
Check out the details in our First Rulemaking Notice No. 1 then submit your nominations by midnight, Wednesday, July 17, 2019. 

Why does the Cleanup Rule matter? 
The rule outlines steps and standards that help protect your health, wildlife, environment, and economy. There are more than 13,000 contaminated sites in Washington and about 250 new sites are reported each year. But there’s good news: Ecology and our partners have already cleaned up more than 7,000 of these sites and we’re tackling more every day. 

Some of these sites may be in your own neighborhood, like a petroleum spill at your local gas station, or wood waste from an abandoned lumber mill contaminating the shoreline. Other sites stretch for thousands of acres, like the Tacoma Smelter Plume where air pollution deposited arsenic and lead for decades. The Cleanup Rule and Model Toxics Control Act help us clean up these sites so communities can thrive.

Submit your STAG nominations by midnight, Wednesday, July 17, 2019, then discover more ways to get involved:

1.    Track the rulemaking: Cleanup Rulemaking webpage, STAG EZView site, and Ecology's Site Register

2.     Subscribe to Cleanup Rule Update emails: MTCA-SMS Rule Listserv

3.     Visit What’s in my neighborhood to explore cleanups in your community


If you have any questions about the STAG or the rulemaking, contact Clint Stanovsky at MTCARule@ecy.wa.gov and 360-407-7193.


By Elaine Heim, Toxics Cleanup Program Policy Unit Planner

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BEACH Program Update

Good News! Clallam County Health and Human Services has lifted the no-contact advisory at Salt Creek Recreation Area beach. Analysis of water samples collected yesterday found bacteria levels were low and safe for water contact.

Contact with fecal contaminated waters can result in gastroenteritis, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections, and other illnesses. Children and the elderly may be more vulnerable to waterborne illnesses.

Stay updated about water quality at your beaches by keeping up with us on our blog Fecal Matters, on Facebook, or join our listserv.

Julianne Ruffner, our BEACH Program Manager, is available at 360-407-6154 or julianne.ruffner@ecy.wa.gov for questions.
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Ecology’s Water Quality Program is offering more than $183 million in financial assistance for 106 high-priority clean water projects across the state. The funding includes $169 million for 105 new projects and $14 million to fully fund a project from last year’s list. Offers went out to the successful applicants on June 28 and the projects can start as soon as the agreements are finalized.

“Nearly 90 percent of our state’s water quality funding goes to local communities,” said Heather Bartlett, Ecology’s Water Quality Program Manager. “Clean water projects can be in communities big or small and anything from enhancing wastewater treatment systems to designing stormwater gardens to planting trees along rivers.”

Our Water Quality Combined Funding Program supports local communities by helping them upgrade sewage treatment systems, manage polluted stormwater runoff, and complete a variety of other projects to prevent and cleanup pollution. More than $100 million of our combined funding is for new projects that will help support Puget Sound recovery. These projects are a high priority, as they help improve water quality and create a healthy habitat for the endangered Southern Resident Orca, salmon, and the food web they rely on.

Clean water funding comes from a mix of state and federal funds for water quality improvements and protection. State financial managers calculate that 11 direct and indirect jobs are created in Washington for every $1 million spent on building clean water infrastructure.

Our interactive map shows where the projects are located and provides additional details. Below you'll find a few of the project highlights.

Reducing stormwater pollution
The South Fork of the Palouse River will benefit from a new 
stormwater decant facility in Pullman.
Ecology is offering $33 million in grants to 38 communities to implement projects to treat and reduce stormwater pollution. More than $20.5 million of the stormwater grant funding is for Puget Sound recovery projects, as stormwater runoff is a leading pollution threat in urban areas. The highest-priority stormwater projects include:

  • The City of Pullman in Whitman County was offered a $525 thousand grant to design and build a new stormwater decant facility. The City’s current facility is undersized and not connected to the City’s sewer system. The new facility will help improve water quality in the South Fork Palouse River, as untreated stormwater has been identified as an important source of pollutants to the river.
  • The City of Bremerton in Kitsap County was offered a grant of more than $800 thousand to construct a system to treat runoff from 6.31 acres of urban roads and parking lots and 8.32 acres of other surfaces to improve the water quality of Ostrich Creek. The creek is considered to be the most polluted stream in Kitsap County, with restrictions on contact due to pollution. The project was the highest rated stormwater project among this year’s applications, and it is a high priority in the Puget Sound Action Agenda.
  • The City of Tacoma in Pierce County was tagged to receive a $5 million grant and more than $2.7 million in loan to retrofit stormwater treatment on nearly 27 blocks of failed residential roadway in the Larchmont Neighborhood. The project will treat stormwater and reduce stormwater flows from 43 developed acres through infiltration, using permeable pavement and sidewalks. The project will help restore more natural hydrologic conditions to Flett Creek and Chambers Creek.

This planning map shows the blocks in Tacoma's Larchmont 
Neighborhood that will receive stormwater retrofit.
Addressing nonpoint pollutionNonpoint pollution comes from activities that are usually widespread across an area without a single pollution source. Nonpoint pollution is a serious pollution problem across the state, and one of the most difficult to solve. We are helping to address nonpoint pollution by funding 33 projects with $21.4 million in grants, forgivable loans that do not have to be repaid, and low interest rate loans.

This septic project in Chinook is one of +1,200 projects
Craft3 has financed under the Regional Loan Program to
improve public health and water quality.
  • The projects offered funding include an expansion of the highly successful Regional Loan Program for repairing and replacing failing onsite septic systems at homes and small businesses. The program currently includes 15 counties, but with the new funding it can expand to seven more counties: Benton, Ferry, Franklin, Okanogan, Pend Oreille, Stevens, and Skagit. 
  • The Underwood Conservation District in Klickitat County was offered a $250 thousand grant to conduct riparian planting, install cattle exclusion fencing, implement livestock best management practices, monitor water quality, and provide education and technical assistance in the White Salmon River Watershed. The primary areas of focus for the project are streamside agricultural areas in the Trout Lake Valley.
  • The Cascadia Conservation District in Chelan County was offered a $245 thousand grant to implement a large-scale riparian restoration plan through a community-wide clean water outreach and education campaign and to provide technical assistance to landowners to take steps to reduce nonpoint source pollution and practice good stewardship. The project is consistent with actions recommended in locally-developed water quality improvement reports and management plans.

Supporting wastewater treatment projects
A leaking, exposed outfall pipe that goes into
Olequa Creek could be replaced with new funding.
Ecology is offering $124 million for 35 wastewater treatment projects. Of this, $110 million is for new projects and $14 million is to fully fund a project from last year’s list. Nine of the projects qualified for hardship financial assistance due to their potential impact on residential sewer bills. These hardship projects may receive a combination of grants, forgivable loans that do not have to be repaid, and low interest rate loans. High priority wastewater hardship projects include:

  • Yakima County was offered nearly $1.5 million in grant and $700 thousand in loan to design and construct critical repairs and improvements at the wastewater treatment facility in the community of Buena. The repairs and improvements are necessary to ensure proper treatment of the wastewater discharged from the facility. The project was the highest rated among all projects submitted for funding this year.
  • The City of Vader in Lewis County was awarded $4.8 million in grant and loan to protect Olequa Creek by constructing significant improvements to its wastewater treatment facility. The funding for the project is approximately half grant and half loan.

Adequate funding in state budgets for the Centennial Clean Water Program is vital for helping small, financially challenged communities such as these to complete important wastewater projects. The program also provides funding for many nonpoint pollution control projects across the state.

More informationWe’re looking forward to seeing these projects take off! In the coming months, we plan to share updates and clean water successes.  If your community is receiving funding for clean water projects and you’d like to share your project’s progress, please let us know by emailing Emma Kluzniok at emma.kluzniok@ecy.wa.gov.

Find out more about the Water Quality Combined Funding Program on our website.

More information on this funding cycle, including a link to the funding offer list and an interactive map of our offered funding for projects can be found on our funding cycles webpage.

A map of recent clean water projects across the state can be found on our Ecology Grants and Loans map.
By Daniel Thompson and Colleen Keltz, Water Quality Program

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Irrigators can learn about emergency drought permits at July 11 workshop
Naches River is running low as it flows to its confluence with the Yakima River (Photo by Eiko Urmos-Beery 2019)

In light of current water conditions in the Yakima River Basin, Ecology is launching a drought well relief program to assist  junior irrigators in the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation's Yakima Project who are receiving less than 70 percent of their normal water supply.

A workshop is set for 2-5 p.m. on July 11, 2019, at our Central Regional Office, 1250 W. Alder St., Union Gap, for irrigators who have or are considering applying for emergency drought permits this irrigation season.

Irrigators will learn under what conditions emergency groundwater permits may be authorized, and about this drought year’s cost-sharing program. Impacts of groundwater pumping to the aquifer must be offset through the purchase of mitigation water, to protect senior water users.

Under the state's drought relief program, the groundwater applicant and the state share in the cost to obtain mitigation water. Applicants will be required to pay $500 per acre feet of water authorized.

“We will also have time for questions, and will provide information on well construction, water measuring and reporting requirements, as well as other options that might be available to those needing emergency water,” explained Trevor Hutton, Ecology’s water resources manager in Union Gap.

Program designed for irrigators whose water is rationed
Now that the Bureau of Reclamation forecasts that pro-ratable water users will receive only 67 percent of their normal water supply, we can begin considering emergency drought groundwater applications.

In the Yakima River Basin, project irrigators with junior water rights, including the Kittitas and Roza districts, have agreed to live with 70 percent of their normal water supply without tapping into drought wells under goals of the Yakima Basin Integrated Plan. This is to protect groundwater and senior water rights, including rights held by the Yakama Nation.

Drought was declared in the Upper Yakima Basin on April 4, 2019, and drought was declared for the rest of the three-county watershed on May 20, 2019. State drought declarations may be made when the projected water supply dips to 75 percent of normal and watersheds are deemed to be at risk of suffering hardships.

Water users may also apply for expedited water-right transfers negotiated between willing private parties the drought declaration, and other non-project emergency well permits must bring proposed mitigation for consideration in the Yakima River Basin. 

Other Central Washington drought tidbits
  • Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District is fallowing 1,800 acres of land this irrigation season and making water available to other farmers who may be facing a shortfall or are shutoff this summer. The district has 5,600 acre-feet of water that is available to lease. About 100 water users on the Okanogan and Similkameen rivers in Okanogan County have been shut off due to low streamflows and the lack of snowmelt runoff from Canada. Learn more at the OTID water bank website
  • Kittitas County will be holding a public auction to lease county water rights to eligible bidders at 10 a.m. on July 9 in the Board of County Commissioner’s auditorium at 205 W 5th Avenue in Ellensburg. Staff will auction 25 (twenty five) acre-foot blocks of water at a minimum bid price of $240 per acre-foot. Irrigators interested in bidding must complete an eligibility review as described in the public notice
  • People who have questions about drought response in Chelan, Kittitas, Okanogan, Yakima and Benton counties may contact our customer service line at 509-575-2490.

    By Joye Redfield-Wilder, Central Region communications
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    Clallam County Health and Human Services issued a no-contact advisory to water recreation at Salt Creek Recreation Area. This advisory is due to high levels of fecal bacteria in the water. 

    Signs have been posted at the beach to warn the public. This beach will be re-sampled next week to see if bacterial levels have dropped to safe levels.

    Contact with fecal contaminated waters can result in gastroenteritis, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. Children and the elderly may be more vulnerable to waterborne illnesses.

    Stay updated about water quality at your beaches by keeping up with us on our blog Fecal Matters, on Facebook, or join our listserv.

    Julianne Ruffner, our BEACH Program Manager, is available at 360-407-6154 or julianne.ruffner@ecy.wa.gov for questions. 

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