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A delicious recipe for Yakisoba, or Japanese Stir-Fried Noodles, using pork belly, cabbage and carrots. Make this tasty dish in 30 minutes, perfect for busy weeknights! Recipe with step-by-step photos.

Japanese Noodles

During my early years as a young professional, my girlfriends and I often met for dinner after work at a cheap and cheerful Japanese restaurant, and this was when I was introduced to Yakisoba. Up until that point, my knowledge of Japanese cuisine had been limited to sushi rolls, so I was excited to discover a whole new world of Japanese savoury dishes.

Yakisoba is a delicious Japanese noodle stir-fry dish with a distinct taste which makes it quite unique when compared to the more well-known Chinese or Thai noodle stir-fries.

Why This Recipe Works
  • Make this delicious stir-fry in 30 minutes!
  • Cabbage, carrots and shitake mushrooms are the traditional vegetables used in this dish, but you can use almost any vegetable you like.
  • The pork belly will render some fat to add a delicious savouriness to the dish, but you can substitute the pork belly for chicken or firm tofu, or even leave it out for a completely vegetarian dish.
Yakisoba Noodles

Although “soba noodles” are made from buckwheat, the noodles used in Yakisoba are actually wheat-based.

You can find pre-cooked yakisoba noodles sold in vacuum-sealed packets in most supermarkets or Asian grocers.

Yakisoba noodles have a long shelf-life, so they are perfect for keeping on hand in the pantry. Once you see how easy it is to make Yakisoba, you will know why I always keep multiple packets of yakisoba noodles on hand at home!

If you can’t find yakisoba noodles, udon noodles would also work really nicely in this recipe, or any Chinese-style egg noodles.

Yakisoba Recipe

The most common version of Yakisoba is stir-fried noodles with pork, shredded carrots and cabbage. But like for most stir-fries, you can use whatever protein you like, and whatever vegetables you like.

In fact, what I love about this Yakisoba recipe is that I can turn a fridge-raid into a delicious meal. I always have carrots, cabbage and capsicums (bell peppers) in the fridge, but sometimes I will use vegetables more common in Chinese cuisine, such as bok choy and shitake mushrooms.

Yakisoba Sauce

What is unique about Yakisoba is the sauce. The versions that I have made over the years have always included Worcestershire sauce and tomato ketchup – two ingredients which give the sauce a characteristic savouriness and sweetness.

How to Make Yakisoba Step 1

Place the yakisoba noodles into a large bowl and cover with boiling water. Use a pair of chopsticks or tongs to gently shake and separate the noodles. Drain the noodles and set them aside.

Even though the packet instructions often say that you can use the noodles straight from the packet, I recommend soaking them first to loosen the noodles. Otherwise, if you cook them straight from the packet, you will risk breaking the noodles as you stir them.

Step 2

Remove the rind from the pork belly and thinly slice the meat. Generously season the pork with salt and pepper.

Heat the oil in a large wok or non-stick frying pan. Cook the pork belly in batches until the meat is golden and caramelised.

Use a slotted spoon to remove the meat to a large plate and set aside.

What you will have left in the pan is some deliciously rendered pork belly fat which will add a lot of flavour to the dish. If you have more than about 3 tablespoons of fat in the pan after you have finished cooking the pork, remove the excess oil.

Step 3

Add the onion and garlic to the pan, and cook for a few minutes until they are aromatic.

Then add the chopped vegetables, and cook for a few minutes until the vegetables just start to soften.

Step 4

Return the pork to the pan, together with the noodles and the yakisoba sauce.

Stir everything together and cook until the noodles have warmed through and they have soaked up all of the sauce.

Garnish with spring onions (scallions) or chives just before serving.

How to Serve Yakisoba

Most Japanese restaurants serve Yakisoba with a garnish of pickled ginger, and I also like to have a generous sprinkle of chilli flakes or Togarashi on mine.

I must admit that the first time I tried Yakisoba, I had actually ordered Omusoba, which consists of a portion of Yakisoba wrapped in a light omelette, and drizzled with Japanese Kewpie mayonnaise and Tonkatsu sauce. It is like the Japanese equivalent of a burrito and so so delicious!

More Stir-Fry Recipes

If you are looking for more stir-fry recipes, you might also like:

Coconut Chicken Noodle Stir-Fry

Easy Sweet and Sour Chicken

Pad See Ew (Thai Stir-Fried Noodles)

Satay Chicken Stir-Fry

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Yakisoba (Japanese Stir-Fried Noodles)

A delicious recipe for Yakisoba, or Japanese Stir-Fried Noodles, using pork belly, cabbage and carrots. Make this tasty dish in 30 minutes, perfect for busy weeknights!

  • Author: Thanh | Eat, Little Bird
  • Prep Time: 15 mins
  • Cook Time: 15 mins
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: Serves 3-4
  • Category: Dinner
  • Method: Stove Top
  • Cuisine: Japanese
Ingredients

For the Yakisoba Sauce

For the Stir-Fried Noodles

  • 500 g yakisoba noodles (pre-cooked in vacuum-sealed packets)
  • 300 g pork belly
  • sea salt
  • freshly cracked pepper
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1 large onion, thickly sliced
  • 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1 large carrot, julienned
  • 1 small red capsicum (bell pepper), thinly sliced
  • 1 cup Chinese cabbage, thickly sliced
  • spring onions (scallions) or chives, chopped into small batons
Instructions
  1. Make the Yakisoba Sauce by mixing all of the sauce ingredients together in a small bowl.
  2. Place the yakisoba noodles into a large bowl and cover with boiling water. Use a pair of chopsticks or tongs to gently loosen and separate the noodles – this should take just 3-5 seconds. Drain the noodles and set aside.
  3. Remove the rind from the pork belly, and then thinly slice the pork.
  4. Season the pork generously with salt and pepper.
  5. Heat the oil in a large wok or non-stick frying pan over high heat.
  6. Cook the pork belly in batches until the meat is nicely golden and caramelised.
  7. Use a slotted spoon to remove the pork to a large plate and set aside.
  8. There should be about 3 tablespoons of oil now in the pan, most of it being rendered fat from the pork belly. If there is too much oil in the pan, remove the excess oil.
  9. Cook the onions and garlic for about 1 minute until they start to release their aroma.
  10. Add the carrots, capsciums (bell peppers) and cabbage.
  11. Stir everything together for a few minutes until the vegetables start to soften.
  12. Return the pork to the pan, together with the noodles and the Yakisoba Sauce.
  13. Stir everything together until the noodles have warmed through and they have absorbed all of the sauce.
  14. Garnish with spring onions (scallions) or chives just before serving.
Kitchen Notes

VARIATIONS FOR VEGETABLES You can use almost any vegetable in this recipe. Other suggestions include: * bok choy, roughly chopped * green capsicums (bell peppers), thinly sliced * shitake mushrooms, thickly sliced VARIATIONS FOR MEAT You can substitute the pork belly for thinly sliced chicken breast or chicken thigh. MAKE IT VEGETARIAN You can make this dish vegetarian by omitting the pork belly and replacing it with thick slices of firm tofu, or just use vegetables. CONVERSIONS To convert from cups to grams, and vice-versa, please see this handy Conversion Chart for Basic Ingredients.

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The post Yakisoba (Japanese Stir-Fried Noodles) appeared first on Eat, Little Bird.

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A tasty and authentic recipe for Swedish Meatballs with Creamy Sauce, full of fresh ingredients for maximum flavour. Recipe with step-by-step photos.

Swedish Meatballs

We often visit my brother-in-law and his family in Stockholm, and something we always look forward to is a hearty serve of Swedish meatballs.

Like for many people, my first encounter with Swedish meatballs was at the local Ikea as a child. Back then, eating at the Ikea restaurant was the height of sophistication for me, an experience which I relished every time, never really stopping to think why we were, in fact, eating in a furniture store.

And even today, while I dread any trip to Ikea and having to navigate the crowded indoor maze for a pack of tea lights, our children are always so excited to sit down to a meal of Swedish meatballs and a slice of Princess Cake for dessert. For me, it is my reward for braving the trip to Ikea in the first place!

Swedish Meatballs Recipe

The following is my recipe for Swedish Meatballs with a Creamy Sauce. I love using fresh herbs in my cooking, so these meatballs are packed with both fresh and dried herbs.

In fact, I also serve these meatballs with a simple Marinara Sauce (or tomato pasta sauce) – it’s a very versatile meatball recipe.

Swedish Meatball Sauce

But what I think makes this meatball recipe “Swedish” in character is the creamy sauce.

My sister-in-law is Swedish, and everytime we visit her in Stockholm, we are always delighted when she makes us köttbullar for dinner. Once, whilst I was observing her cooking, I noticed her add an unlikely ingredient to the sauce … soy sauce!

It turns out that many Swedes have a bottle of soy sauce in their pantry and use it to add savouriness and colour to their dishes, especially for the Swedish meatball sauce.

How to Make Swedish Meatballs Step 1

Soak the breadcrumbs in the cream in a large mixing bowl. This should take just a few minutes.

You can use any breadcrumbs you like, but I often use Panko breadcrumbs as I always have them in the pantry.

Step 2

Add the remaining ingredients for the meatballs to the mixing bowl. Use your hands to mix everything together until all of the ingredients are well combined.

Step 3

Shape the meatballs as big or as small as you like – I use about 1 tablespoon of the mixture for each meatball.

Step 4

Heat some oil in a large frying pan or skillet which will fit all of the meatballs and sauce later.

Brown the meatballs in batches until they are golden and caramelised all over. The meatballs do not need to be completely cooked through at this stage.

Place all of the cooked meatballs onto a large plate.

Step 5

Pour the stock into the pan and let it simmer gently. Use a wooden spoon to scrape any caramelised bits from the pan – this will add extra flavour to the sauce.

Return the meatballs to the pan, turn the heat down to low, and simmer gently for about 20 minutes. This process will ensure that the meatballs are cooked through, and the meatballs will also infuse the broth with more flavour.

Step 6

Use a slotted spoon to remove all of the meatballs to a plate again. Turn the heat up to medium, and add the cream and soy sauce.

Slowly whisk in the cornflour (cornstarch) mixture to thicken the sauce to your liking.

Taste the sauce for seasoning. You may need to add some water if the sauce reduced too much in Step 5.

Once you are happy with the sauce, return the meatballs to the sauce to warm through again gently. Garnish with fresh herbs before serving.

What to Serve with Swedish Meatballs

It is typical to serve Swedish meatballs with mashed potatoes and pickled cucumbers, although I sometimes change things a bit by serving it with pasta, or even some golden-fried hash browns or Rösti (we live in Switzerland, after all).

But what is absolutely essential is some lingonberry jam to go alongside the meatballs. In summer, when lingonberries are available at the farmers’ markets, I like to make my own lingonberry jam (which is very quick and easy in small batches).

If you can’t find lingonberries or lingonberry jam, cranberry sauce also works perfectly here.

More Nordic Recipes

If you are looking for more Nordic recipes, you might also like:

Aebleskivers (Danish Pancakes)

Chocolate Coconut Cake

Swedish Chocolate Cookies (Chokladsnittar)

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Swedish Meatballs with Creamy Sauce and Homemade Lingonberry Jam

★★★★★

5 from 2 reviews

A tasty and authentic recipe for Swedish Meatballs with Creamy Sauce, full of fresh ingredients for maximum flavour. This easy to follow recipe is perfect served with mashed potatoes and homemade lingonberry jam.

  • Author: Thanh | Eat, Little Bird
  • Prep Time: 30 mins
  • Cook Time: 45 mins
  • Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
  • Yield: Serves 2-4
  • Category: Dinner
  • Method: Stove Top
  • Cuisine: Swedish
Ingredients

For the Swedish Meatballs

  • 1/2 cup fresh breadcrumbs or Panko breadcrumbs
  • 60 ml (1/4 cup) double cream (heavy whipping cream)
  • 500 g (1 lb) ground beef (minced beef)
  • sea salt
  • freshly ground pepper
  • pinch of allspice
  • 1 teaspoon Herbs de Provence or dried oregano
  • 1 tablespoon fresh parsley, finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely minced
  • 1 small red onion, finely diced
  • 1 egg

For the Creamy Sauce

  • 250–375 ml (1 to 1 1/2) cups beef stock
  • 125 ml (1/2 cup) double cream (heavy whipping cream)
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce, or to taste
  • 4 teaspoons cornflour (cornstarch), mixed in a little water to make a slurry
  • parsley, finely chopped
  • chives, finely chopped

For the Homemade Lingonberry Jam

  • 500 g (1 lb) fresh lingonberries
  • 100 ml (1/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon) water
  • 300 g (1 1/3 cup) caster sugar (superfine sugar)
Instructions

For the Swedish Meatballs with Creamy Sauce

  1. Soak the breadcrumbs in the cream in a large mixing bowl to which you will add everything else later.
  2. Once the breadcrumbs have softened (this will take just a few minutes), add the remaining ingredients for the meatballs into the bowl.
  3. Mix everything together with your hands until it is well combined.
  4. Shape the meatballs. I prefer to keep the meatballs small, but make them as small or as large as you like.
  5. Heat some oil in a large frying pan which you will also use later to make the sauce.
  6. Fry the meatballs until they are golden brown all over. You may need to do this in batches. Don’t worry if the meatballs are not cooked through completely, as you will continue to cook them later.
  7. Remove the meatballs to a plate.
  8. Pour the stock into the saucepan and use a wooden spoon to scrape any brown bits from the pan.
  9. Return the meatballs to the pan, and simmer gently on low heat for about 20 minutes.
  10. Remove the meatballs to a plate.
  11. Add the cream and soy sauce.
  12. Slowly whisk in the cornflour (cornstarch) mixture to thicken the sauce to your desired consistency (you may not need all of the cornflour mixture).
  13. Taste for seasoning. If the sauce tastes too concentrated, add a bit of water.
  14. Return the meatballs to the saucepan, and garnish with parsley and chives before serving.

For the Homemade Lingonberry Jam

  1. Wash the lingonberries and remove any spoilt berries, leaves and stems.
  2. Place the lingonberries in a medium saucepan, together with the water.
  3. Bring to the boil.
  4. Add the sugar and stir to dissolve.
  5. Turn the heat down to medium-high, and continue simmering until the lingonberries have softened and broken down, and the mixture starts to thicken.
  6. If the mixture looks too thick, thin it with a dash of water.
  7. Make sure you stir frequently to prevent the jam from sticking to the bottom of the pan where it can burn easily.
  8. The lingonberry jam is ready when most of the berries have burst and you have a thick, jam-like consistency. If you like your lingonberry jam to have more texture, try not to squash the berries too much as you are stirring.
  9. The lingonberry jam will continue to thicken as it cools.
  10. Serve the lingonberry jam warm or cold with the Swedish Meatballs.
  11. Store any unused lingonberry jam in a sterilised jar and in the fridge.
Kitchen Notes

I tend to make a small batch of lingonberry jam for this dish because it is quicker to cook than making a larger batch, and I can often make the lingonberry jam at the same time as the Swedish meatballs.

If you wish to make a large batch of lingonberry jam for storing, make sure you prepare enough sterilised glass jars in advance.

CONVERSIONS
To convert from cups to grams, and vice-versa, please see this handy Conversion Chart for Basic Ingredients.

Nutrition
  • Serving Size: 4
  • Calories: 327
  • Sugar: 3.6g
  • Sodium: 375.5mg
  • Fat: 14.7g
  • Carbohydrates: 17.5g
  • Fiber: 1.2g
  • Protein: 30g
  • Cholesterol: 133.6mg
Did you make this recipe?

Please leave a comment below and share your photos by tagging @eatlittlebird on Instagram and using #eatlittlebird

Update

This recipe was first published on 3 February 2017. It has been updated with new photos and more comprehensive recipe notes.

The post Swedish Meatballs with Creamy Sauce and Homemade Lingonberry Jam appeared first on Eat, Little Bird.

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eat, little bird by Eat, Little Bird - 1M ago

Delicious Healthy Oatmeal Cookies which are sugar-free! This recipe uses maple syrup as a natural sweetener. These oatmeal cookies are perfect for school lunchboxes and as a healthy snack. Recipe with step-by-step photos.

Healthy Cookie Recipe

I am always on the lookout for healthy options for my childrens’ lunch boxes, and when I came across this recipe for oatmeal cookies which were sugar-free, I was sold.

These healthy oatmeal cookies are heady with coconut, and I love that you can quickly make them in the food processor.

Why This Recipe Works
  • These oatmeal cookies contain no sugar!
  • Hence, they are perfect for school lunch boxes, as well as a healthy snack for the adults!
  • This recipe uses maple syrup as a natural sweetener.
  • You can easily adapt the recipe to add nuts, raisins, or even chocolate chips.
Sugar-Free Cookies

I must admit that I often end up packing the same food in my childrens’ lunch boxes, over and over again. I seem to have a short list of “healthy kids food” which I have on constant rotation.

But these sugar-free cookies are something which I can change slightly each time by adding nuts or dried fruits (or chocolate!), and I know that our kids just love them. In fact, I often have to pack extra cookies for them to share with their classmates!

Sugar-Free Diet

We don’t binge on cakes and sugar-loaded desserts every day (contrary to what people think when they look at my blog!); these are food items which we reserve for special occasions or when we might be entertaining guests.

I would even go so far as to say that our children only get to eat sweets and chips when they attend birthday parties; dessert in our home is often a serve of natural yoghurt, some fruit, or maybe even a square of chocolate if we are feeling generous!

Sugar is found not only in “sugary foods” like cakes and sweets, but it is also naturally occurring in foods such as fruit, dairy and carbohydrates which the body converts into sugar.

I try to eliminate or reduce sugar wherever possible, and especially in food that we eat on a day-to-day basis. For birthdays and celebrations, I’m happy to tuck into a “real” chocolate cake with all of the trimmings, but the food that we eat everyday should be much more nutritionally balanced.

Maple Syrup as a Replacement for Sugar

Maple syrup is made from the sap of maple trees which has been boiled and reduced to produce a golden, sticky liquid.

Although maple syrup contains fructose, or fruit sugar, it has higher nutritional value than regular cane sugar.

Maple syrup also has a lower glycemic index than cane sugar (whether white or brown), which means that it will not cause your blood sugar to spike like regular sugar can.

Hence, maple syrup can be a healthy alternative to regular sugar in many baking recipes.

Dairy-Free Cookies

These healthy oatmeal cookies can also be adapted to be dairy-free by substituting the cow’s milk for almond milk or oat milk.

I have used all different types of milk in this recipe, and they all work well.

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies

More often than not, I make these oatmeal cookies plain. But on occasions when I want to make them more of a treat, I will add about 1/3 cup of mini dark chocolate chips. I can’t tell you how fast these cookies disappear!

How to Make Healthy Oatmeal Cookies Step 1

Place all of the ingredients into a food processor, and blitz until the ingredients are well-combined.

Step 2

Scoop about 1 tablespoon of the cookie mixture and roll it into a ball before placing onto a baking tray lined with baking paper.

I recommend using a small ice-cream scoop with 15 ml (1 tablespoon) capacity as the cookie mixture can be quite sticky, but also so each cookie is roughly the same size.

Step 3

Place about 1 tablespoon of flour onto a small plate, dip a fork into the flour, and use the fork to gently flatten each ball of dough.

Sprinkle each cookie with extra dessicated coconut, and then bake for about 20 minutes or until lightly golden.

Print
Healthy Oatmeal Cookies

Delicious Healthy Oatmeal Cookies which are sugar-free! This recipe uses maple syrup as a natural sweetener. These oatmeal cookies are perfect for school lunchboxes and as a healthy snack. Recipe with step-by-step photos.

  • Author: Thanh | Eat, Little Bird
  • Prep Time: 10 mins
  • Cook Time: 20 mins
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: Makes 16 cookies
  • Category: Cookies
  • Method: Oven
  • Cuisine: International
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F) (without fan).
  2. Line a baking tray with baking paper.
  3. Place all of the ingredients into a food processor.
  4. Blitz until everything is well-combined.
  5. Pinch off a tablespoon of the mixture and roll it into a ball. Alternatively, use a small ice-cream scoop with 15 ml (1 tablespoons) capacity (which I recommend as the mixture is very sticky).
  6. Place the balls of dough onto the lined baking tray.
  7. Place the extra flour onto a small plate and dip a fork into the flour.
  8. Gently flatten the balls of dough with the floured fork.
  9. Sprinkle with extra dessicated coconut.
  10. Bake the cookies for about 20 minutes, or until they are lovely and golden.
  11. Cool the cookies on a wire rack.
Kitchen Notes

VARIATION
Stir about 1/3 cup mini dark chocolate chips (bittersweet chocolate) through the cookie mixture.

STORAGE TIPS
These cookies taste best on the day they are baked. However, they  keep well in a covered container for a few days, but will soften slightly.

RECIPE CREDIT
This recipe is adapted from Love, Laugh, Bake! by Silvia Colloca

OVEN TEMPERATURES All recipes on this website state temperatures for a regular oven (i.e. a conventional oven without fan). If you have a convection oven with a fan, please consult the manufacturer’s handbook on how to adjust the temperature and baking time accordingly.

CONVERSIONS
To convert from cups to grams, and vice-versa, please see this handy Conversion Chart for Basic Ingredients.

Did you make this recipe?

Please leave a comment below and share your photos by tagging @eatlittlebird on Instagram and using #eatlittlebird

The post Healthy Oatmeal Cookies appeared first on Eat, Little Bird.

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An easy and delicious falafel recipe using canned chickpeas – perfect for easy weeknight meals! Serve with a delicious Tahini Yoghurt Sauce for a tasty meal which your friends and family will love. Vegan and gluten-free.

Easy Falafel Recipe

I always try to serve a few vegetarian meals during the week, and homemade falafels is one of my favourite go-to dishes. My husband loves the fresh salads and chopped veges that I serve alongside, the kids get to eat with their hands – everyone is happy!

Why This Recipe Works
  • This falafel recipe uses canned chickpeas to save on prep time.
  • These falafels also contain frozen peas for extra protein and vibrant green colour.
  • The cooked falafels keep well for several days in the fridge, so they are perfect for meal prep.
  • This falafel recipe is suitable for vegans and can also be adapted to be gluten-free.
Growing up in Sydney

As a young child, I remember living in the western suburbs of Sydney for a few years where there was a strong Lebanese, Turkish, Greek and Italian community.

I remember my friends back then as fondly as the food that their families would serve me on our playdates – chicken souvlaki eaten straight from the barbecue, pita breads stuffed with tabbouleh and falafels, all-you-can-eat moussaka, crispy börek parcels filled with spinach, lots and lots of baklava and sticky Turkish delight.

When I think back to all of these delicious meals, I realise how much the cuisine of my childhood has shaped my palate today, and how lucky I am to have been introduced to so many wonderful dishes at such a young age. It makes me even more aware of the food that I cook and serve to my own children today.

Falafel Recipe

As a busy mum with two small children, I’m always looking for ways to get dinner on the table quickly. When making falafels, you need to be a bit organised as there is some chilling time required, but the steps are not complicated at all.

My falafel recipe is heady with fresh herbs and spices, and it also contains frozen peas as a secret hidden vegetable – just don’t tell the kids!

Vegan Falafel Recipe

This falafel recipe is vegan-friendly.

Gluten-Free Falafel Recipe

I normally make these falafels with plain flour (all-purpose flour), but when I am entertaining friends who are on a gluten-free diet, I simply substitute the plain flour (all-purpose flour) with buckwheat flour, chickpea flour, or a gluten-free flour blend.

Dried Chickpeas vs Canned Chickpeas

Most traditional recipes for falafels use dried chickpeas as the main ingredient, and which need to be soaked for at least overnight. I’ve made falafels using both dried chickpeas and canned chickpeas, and, to be quite honest, I could never taste the difference!

Once I realised that my homemade falafels tasted just as good when using canned chickpeas, falafels quickly fell into my “easy dinner recipe” file.

I regularly keep canned chickpeas in the pantry to make my delicious hummus, and now they will also come in handy for making last-minute falafels.

How to Make Falafels Step 1

Place all of the ingredients for the falafels, except for the flour and baking soda, into the food processor. Blitz until everything just comes together.

Now add the flour and baking soda, and blitz again until you have a thoroughly combined mixture. It’s fine if there are some chunks of peas or herbs in the mixture.

Step 2

Transfer the falafel mixture to a large bowl and chill in the fridge for at least 30 minutes.

At this stage, you can keep the falafel mixture in the fridge for 1-2 days.

Step 3

Pour about 2 cm (1 inch) depth of vegetable oil into a saucepan, and place this on the stove over medium heat.

Meanwhile, form the falafels. You can do this with your hands and you can make the falafels as big or as small as you like.

I like to use a small ice-cream scoop with a 15 ml (1 tablespoon) capacity so that each falafel is the same size. Sometimes I cook the not-perfectly-formed falafels straight from the ice-cream scoop; other times, I will roll them in to a nice little ball first.

If your kitchen is quite warm, you might need to chill the uncooked falafel balls before frying them; if they are too warm or soft, they might fall apart during cooking. Otherwise, if your kitchen is fairly cool, you can skip the second chilling stage.

Step 4

Cook the falafels in batches until they are golden and crispy, and they have warmed through completely. Turn them constantly in the oil so that they can brown evenly.

I like to keep the cooked falafels in an oven-proof dish in the oven at 150°C (300°F) to keep warm until serving.

What to Serve with Falafels

My family love to eat falafels stuffed into warmed and toasted pita breads, which happens to be a healthy way of bundling up different herbs, salads, and vegetables.

At other times, I will rustle up some homemade flatbreads, which sound like a bit of effort, but they are ridiculously easy to make. In fact, the flatbreads shown in the photos are homemade 🙂 (Also because pita breads and flatbreads are hard to find in Zurich …) I hope to post my flatbread recipe soon!

But one of my favourite ways of eating falafels is served on a bed of couscous with a green leafy salad alongside. The options are endless!

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Falafels with Tahini Yoghurt Sauce

An easy and delicious falafel recipe using canned chickpeas – perfect for easy weeknight meals! Serve with a delicious Tahini Yoghurt Sauce for a tasty meal which your friends and family will love.

  • Author: Thanh | Eat, Little Bird
  • Prep Time: 20 mins
  • Cook Time: 20 mins
  • Total Time: 40 minutes
  • Yield: Serves 4
  • Category: Dinner
  • Method: Stove Top
  • Cuisine: Middle Eastern
Ingredients

For the Falafels

  • 150 g (1 cup) frozen peas, slightly thawed
  • 2 x 400 g (14 oz) canned chickpeas (garbanzo beans), drained and rinsed
  • 1 medium onion, roughly chopped
  • 2 cloves of garlic, peeled
  • 2–3 sprigs of flat-leaf parsley
  • 2–3 sprigs of coriander (cilantro)
  • zest of 1 lemon
  • 2 tablespoons tahini
  • 1 tablespoon ground cumin
  • 1 tablespoon ground coriander
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • freshly ground pepper
  • 100 g (2/3 cup) chickpea flour, gluten-free flour blend, or plain flour (all-purpose flour)
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • vegetable oil for frying

For the Tahini Yoghurt Sauce

  • 500 g (1lb) natural yoghurt or Greek yoghurt
  • 5 tablespoons tahini, or to taste
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • 1 clove of garlic, finely grated
  • sea salt, to taste

For Serving

  • flatbreads or pita breads, warmed
  • salad leaves
  • radishes, thinly sliced
  • fresh herbs – mint, coriander (cilantro), parsley
  • hot sauce (optional)

Equipment

  • food processor
  • small ice-cream scoop
Instructions

For the Falafels

  1. Place the peas, chickpeas, onion, garlic, parsley, coriander (cilantro), lemon zest, tahini, ground cumin, ground coriander, salt and pepper into a food processor.
  2. Blitz until everything is just combined.
  3. Add the flour and baking soda.
  4. Blitz again until you have a smooth mixture.
  5. Transfer the falafel mixture to a large bowl.
  6. Chill the falafel mixture in the fridge for at least 30 minutes.
  7. Line a tray with baking paper.
  8. Roll 1 tablespoon of the falafel mixture into a small ball and place the falafel onto the lined tray. I find it easiest to use a small ice-cream scoop (with 1 tablespoon capacity), so that each falafel is the same size. Repeat until all of the falafel mixture is used.
  9. Place the tray of falafels into the fridge for at least 15 minutes to firm up.
  10. To cook the falafels, pour the oil into a saucepan until you have a depth of about 2 cm (1 inch).
  11. Heat the oil over medium heat.
  12. Cook the falafels in batches until they are golden brown all over and warmed through. Turn them frequently in the oil so that they can brown evenly.
  13. Drain the cooked falafels on paper towels.
  14. Serve immediately.

For the Tahini Yoghurt Sauce

  1. Whisk together all of the ingredients in a medium bowl.
  2. Taste for seasoning.
Kitchen Notes

MAKE-AHEAD TIPS
* Both the falafel mixture and Tahini Yoghurt Sauce can be made 1-2 days in advance and kept in the fridge.
* The cooked falafels can be kept in the fridge for several days. 

STORAGE TIPS
* Leftover cooked falafels can be kept in a covered container in the fridge. Reheat them in an oven at 180°C (356°F) for about 10 minutes until they have warmed through.
* The Tahini Yoghurt Sauce can also be kept in the fridge for several days.

CONVERSIONS
To convert from cups to grams, and vice-versa, please see this handy Conversion Chart for Basic Ingredients.

Did you make this recipe?

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The post Falafels with Tahini Yoghurt Sauce appeared first on Eat, Little Bird.

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A simple and delicious chestnut cake using sweetened chestnut purée, with the addition of chocolate chips for extra indulgence.

Mimi Thorisson

It has been a few months since I had the wonderful opportunity to meet and cook with Mimi Thorisson in her home in south-western France. 

I find myself frequently reminiscing about the recipes we cooked, what we chatted about while we were sitting at her vast dining table, and the recipe notes which I exchanged with the other ladies in the workshop. I think often of her impossibly beautiful children with their impeccable politeness, not to mention their envious appetite for everything their mother would put before them.

As I look back on my time at the Manger Workshop, it becomes apparent that it has had more of an impact on me than I had first thought, but in a way which I hadn’t expected.

Mimi had a calmness to her which was very appealing, particularly in light of the fact that her children would frequently flit about her with their small demands (like most children do), yet Mimi still found a way to put her children at ease whilst, at the same time, conduct a workshop for a bunch of strangers loitering in her family kitchen.

These days, when my children attempt to rupture my zen whilst I am trying to get myself sorted in the kitchen, I find myself briefly pausing and asking myself, “What would Mimi do?”

First, maybe Mimi’s children wouldn’t be flat out on the kitchen floor, taking up valuable real estate in our tiny kitchen, and hysterical because they want pasta and I am cooking rice.

But it is nevertheless reassuring to have a role model to look up to; the day my children beg me for foie gras on toast (which I witnessed Mimi’s children doing), I will know that I have achieved something!

Chestnut Cake Recipe

I think something Mimi and I have in common is our love for chestnut purée.

During her workshop, she showed us how to make a very rich, but very simple, chocolate chestnut cake which contained a tin of this favourite ingredient of ours. The cake was dark and moist, almost like a pudding, and several in our group recreated this cake for Christmas dinner recently.

I was all set to make this cake one evening when I came across Mimi’s latest blog post which had a recipe for a Vanilla Chestnut Cake.

I was instantly reminded of a cake which my aunt used to make often whenever I visited her in Basel, a city in the north-west of Switzerland which borders with both France and Germany. I have some memories of eating a chestnut loaf cake with bars of (Lindt) chocolate served alongside. It wasn’t a fancy cake, by any means, but it evoked happy memories.

And Mimi’s Vanilla Chestnut Cake is utterly delicious and addictive. I took the liberty to add dark chocolate chips to the cake, and my family and I finished the cake in almost one sitting. I think they will, too, have happy memories of this cake.

There is just one slice left, and I am claiming that for my breakfast tomorrow.

More Chestnut Recipes

If you have a can (or two) of sweetened chestnut purée which needs using up, may I suggest the following recipes using chestnut purée?

Mont Blanc Chocolate Pavlova

Chocolate Pavlova with Chestnut Purée

Print
Chestnut Cake with Chocolate Chips

★★★★★

5 from 2 reviews

A simple and delicious chestnut cake using sweetened chestnut purée, with the addition of chocolate chips for extra indulgence.

  • Author: eatlittlebird.com
  • Prep Time: 20 mins
  • Cook Time: 50 mins
  • Total Time: 1 hour 10 minutes
  • Yield: Serves 4-6
  • Category: Cakes
  • Method: Oven
  • Cuisine: French
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F) (without fan).
  2. Whisk the eggwhites until stiff peaks form.
  3. In a separate bowl, beat together the egg yolks, sweetened chestnut purée, and butter.
  4. Gently mix through the flour, baking powder and salt.
  5. Gently fold through the eggwhites, a few large spoonfuls at a time, through the cake batter. Take care not to lose too much air.
  6. Once all of the eggwhites have been added to the cake batter, gently fold through the chocolate chips.
  7. Grease a small bundt pan with butter or a non-stick baking spray, and dust with flour. Tip the bundt pan over the sink and shake out any excess flour. (Note: I used a bundt pan with 750 ml / 3 cup capacity).
  8. Pour the batter into the cake pan and bake for 40-50 minutes, or until a skewer inserted in the middle comes out clean.
  9. Leave the the cake to cool on a wire rack for about 15 minutes before gently removing the cake from the pan.
  10. Leave the cake to cool completely on a wire rack.
  11. Dust with icing sugar (powdered sugar) before serving.
Kitchen Notes

USING A BUNDT PAN
For most plain cakes, I like to use a fancy cake pan to make them more special. Here, I used a small bundt pan with 750 ml (3 cup) capacity. If you don’t have a bundt pan, you could, of course, bake the cake in a 21 cm (9 inch) round cake pan. The cake might take less time to cook in a normal round cake pan as it is not as deep as a bundt pan, so start checking with a skewer after 35 minutes or so.

SWEETENED CHESTNUT PURÉE
If you can’t find sweetened chestnut purée near you, you could try to make some yourself, provided that you can find pre-cooked chestnuts (whether frozen, canned or in vacuum-sealed packs). My recipe for Mont Blanc Pavlova contains instructions on how to make your own sweetened chestnut purée.

RECIPE CREDIT
This recipe has been adapted from Mimi Thorisson.

OVEN TEMPERATURES
All recipes on this website state temperatures for a regular oven (i.e. a conventional oven without fan). If you have a convection oven with a fan, please consult the manufacturer’s handbook on how to adjust the temperature and baking time accordingly.

CONVERSIONS
To convert from cups to grams, and vice-versa, please see this handy Conversion Chart for Basic Ingredients.

Nutrition
  • Serving Size: Serves 4 to 6
  • Calories: 466
  • Sugar: 16.4g
  • Sodium: 113.7mg
  • Fat: 20.6g
  • Carbohydrates: 62.5g
  • Fiber: 5.3g
  • Protein: 8.8g
  • Cholesterol: 153.3mg
Did you make this recipe?

Please leave a comment below and share your photos by tagging @eatlittlebird on Instagram and using #eatlittlebird

Update

This recipe was first published on 29 January 2017. It has been updated with new photos and more comprehensive recipe notes.

The post Chestnut Cake with Chocolate Chips appeared first on Eat, Little Bird.

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eat, little bird by Eat, Little Bird - 2M ago

Delicious Sticky Pork Bao Buns with Quick Pickled Carrots and Quick Pickled Cucumbers. Perfect as a snack or a tasty meal. Recipe with step-by-step photos.

Steamed Buns

If you have been following me on my Instagram Stories, you may have noticed that I like to make homemade steamed buns for dinner … quite often!

When my children start to complain that they are eating too much rice or too many noodles, I know that it is time to start changing things up a bit, and bao buns can be a good alternative for many Asian dishes.

Sticky Pork Bao Buns

I love to make Chinese Barbecue Pork (Char Siu Pork) when we have visitors, but also sometimes for a comforting mid-week meal.

And for my take on David Chang’s pork belly buns (of Momufuku fame), I like to simply stuff the bao buns with slices of char siu pork, accompanied with some quick pickled cucumbers and carrots, and garnished with spring onions (scallions) and coriander (cilantro).

It’s sort of a short cut on a traditional Steamed Pork Bun (char siu bao), but with fresher ingredients and fresher flavours.

If you are making all of the components from scratch on the same day, you will need to be quite organised, but your friends and family will definitely be in for a treat!

But if you have a Chinatown nearby with ready access to shop-bought steamed buns and char siu pork, these Sticky Pork Bao Buns can be prepared within minutes.

How to Make Steamed Bao Buns

Most Asian grocers stock plain steamed bao buns in the freezer section, which means that you can be minutes away from a delicious meal at any time.

But if ready-made steamed buns are not available where you live, or you happen to love a spot of bread-making, I have an easy recipe for bao buns which you can make from scratch. The results are perfectly soft and fluffy bao buns – you might never buy them from the shops again!

Click here for my recipe for bao buns with step-by-step photos.

How to Make Chinese Barbecue Pork (Char Siu Pork)

Like for the steamed buns, if you have close access to a Chinatown, you will probably also be able to buy char siu pork from a good Chinese takeaway.

But making your own char siu pork is actually quite easy, and whenever I make Chinese Barbecue Pork, I often make a double batch as the leftovers can be used in so many different ways. Any leftover char siu pork can be wrapped in foil and reheated in the oven.

Click here for my recipe for char siu pork with step-by-step photos.

How to Make Quick Pickled Carrots

Asian cuisine is often about balancing flavours, namely sweet, salty and sour elements.

Pickled carrots are commonly used in Vietnamese cuisine to add a sour element and to balance any salty flavours. They also add a nice crunchy texture.

You will often find pickled carrots served in a Vietnamese Banh Mi, or even as a substantial garnish to Vietnamese Grilled Pork Chops.

A traditional pickling liquid requires at least overnight to work its magic, but when time is short, I like to make Quick Pickled Carrots. For this, I find a 2:1 ratio of vinegar to sugar just right for my tastes, but you can adjust the ratio to your own liking.

The carrots should be cut into thin matchsticks (or “julienned”), and this is easiest done using either a mandoline slicer or with a julienne peeler.

How to Make Quick Picked Cucumbers

Similar to the Quick Pickled Carrots, I also like to use a 2:1 ratio of vinegar to sugar, but you can adjust the quantities to your liking.

Quick Pickled Cucumbers add a nice crunch and sourness to the soft bao buns.

If you are really pushed for time, you could skip the pickling altogether – my children love fresh cucumbers and I serve a generous quantity for them to munch on alongside the bao buns.

More Asian Recipes

If you are looking for more Asian recipes, you might also like:

Asian Braised Beef Short Ribs

Chinese Barbecue Pork (Char Siu Pork)

Pickled Chillies

Steamed Bao Buns

Print
Sticky Pork Bao Buns

Delicious Sticky Pork Bao Buns with Quick Pickled Carrots and Quick Pickled Cucumbers. Perfect as a snack or a tasty meal.

  • Author: Thanh | Eat, Little Bird
  • Prep Time: 30 mins
  • Cook Time: 15 mins
  • Total Time: 45 minutes
  • Yield: Serves 3 to 4
  • Category: Dinner
  • Method: Stove Top
  • Cuisine: Chinese
Ingredients

For the Quick Pickled Cucumber

For the Quick Pickled Carrots

For the Spicy Hoisin Sauce

To Serve

  • 12 plain bao buns (ready-made or frozen, or see my recipe for Steamed Bao Buns)
  • 500 g (1 lb) Chinese barbecue pork or char siu pork (shop-bought, or see my recipe for Chinese Barbecue Pork)
  • spring onions (scallions), cut into short lengths
  • coriander (cilantro), cut into short lengths or finely chopped
  • Pickled Chillies
Instructions

For the Quick Pickled Cucumber

  1. Dissolve the sugar in the vinegar in a bowl.
  2. Finely slice the cucumber, either using a sharp knife or a mandoline slicer.
  3. Mix the cucumber through the pickling liquid.
  4. Set aside for at least 10 minutes.
  5. Just before serving, drain the pickling liquid and gently squeeze the cucumbers to release any excess liquid.

For the Quick Pickled Carrots

  1. Dissolve the sugar in the vinegar in a bowl.
  2. Julienne the carrots, either using a sharp knife, mandoline slicer or julienne peeler.
  3. Mix the carrots through the pickling liquid.
  4. Set aside for at least 10 minutes.
  5. Just before serving, drain the pickling liquid and gently squeeze the carrots to release any excess liquid.

For the Spicy Hoisin Sauce

  1. In a small saucepan, mix the hoisin sauce and Sriracha sauce together.
  2. Heat gently over medium heat until it has warmed through.
  3. Serve the sauce warm.

For the Steamed Bao Buns

  1. To make your own homemade Steamed Bao Buns, please see my recipe for bao buns with step-by-step photos.
  2. The bao buns need 10-12 minutes to steam, so I recommend steaming the bao buns (homemade or frozen) just before serving.
  3. Allow about 3 buns per person as a main meal.

For the Chinese Barbecue Pork

  1. The pork should be served warm, so reheat the pork as necessary. I generally wrap the work in foil and reheat in a hot oven.
  2. Thinly slice the pork, allowing about 3-5 slices per bun.

To Assemble the Spicy Pork Bao Buns

  1. Split open the freshly steamed bao buns.
  2. Spread both sides of the bun with the Spicy Hoisin Sauce.
  3. Layer some slices of Chinese Barbecue Pork inside the bun.
  4. Top with some slices of Quick Pickled Cucumbers and some Quick Pickled Carrots.
  5. Garnish with spring onions (scallions), coriander (cilantro) and Pickled Chillies (optional).
  6. Serve immediately.
Kitchen Notes

CONVERSIONS To convert from cups to grams, and vice-versa, please see this handy Conversion Chart for Basic Ingredients.

Did you make this recipe?

Please leave a comment below and share your photos by tagging @eatlittlebird on Instagram and using #eatlittlebird

The post Sticky Pork Bao Buns appeared first on Eat, Little Bird.

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eat, little bird by Eat, Little Bird - 2M ago

How to make the perfect, soft and fluffy steamed bao buns with step-by-step photos. Follow these tips and tricks to make the perfect homemade bao buns, perfect for filling with your favourite ingredients.

Bao Buns

When David Chang first offered his version of Pork Belly Buns on his restaurant menu at Momofuku Noodle Bar in New York, back around 2004, nobody could have predicted that the humble bao buns would be catapaulted to international foodie fame.

Even I sought out a table at Momofuku each time I visited New York, no matter how long the queue. I simply loved his idea of turning a plain bao bun into a sandwich or burger of sorts, filled with tender pork belly and a simple garnish of pickled cucumbers.

Homemade Bao Buns

Sadly, back in Zurich, bao buns were nowhere to found in the shops, nor restaurants (and this remains the case in 2019!), so I set about making steamed bao buns using David Chang’s recipe from his cookbook, Momofuku.

Over the years, I have fiddled with the recipe somewhat (David Chang’s recipe makes about 50 buns!), and the bao bun recipe below is one which I turn to throughout the year.

Why This Recipe Works
  • This bao bun recipe makes light, fluffy and pillowy steamed buns which are perfect for stuffing with your favourite fillings.
  • You can use this recipe to shape the bao buns however you like.
  • The cooked bao buns can be frozen and simply reheated in the steamer.
Steamed Buns

Traditional Chinese steamed buns are round in shape with an enclosed filling, either with char siu pork or a traditional ground pork mixture with slices of Chinese lap cheong sausage and boiled egg.

Steamed buns can also be made plain, i.e. without any filling. In my family, we often make plain steamed buns, which are round in shape with a twisted knot at the top, to serve alongside roast duck.

But somewhere along the way, someone came up with the genius idea of making folded over steamed buns which could be opened up and filled with a variety of ingredients, much like a burger or sandwich.

Bao Buns Recipe

If you are lucky, your local Asian grocer might stock ready-made bao buns in the freezer section.

If not, this easy bao bun recipe might require a bit of planning and preparation, but you will be rewarded with deliciously fluffy homemade buns which will delight everyone who tries them.

How to Make Bao Buns Step 1

To make the perfect bao buns, you need both yeast and baking powder to help the buns to rise. Start by measuring all of the dry ingredients into a large mixing bowl.

Then measure the warm water and oil into a measuring jug. The water needs to be a bit more than lukewarm to help activate the yeast, but it shouldn’t be boiling hot.

Step 2

I prefer to make my bao bun dough using my electric stand-mixer, but you can, of course, do everything by hand.

Using a dough hook on medium speed, mixing the liquid into the dry ingredients. Depending on the type of flour which you have used, you might need more or less liquid that than stated in the recipe. You want just enough liquid to bring everything together into a sticky dough.

Then, continuing on medium speed, knead the dough until it becomes soft and smooth to touch. This should take about 10 minutes using the stand-mixer on medium speed, or about 5 minutes by hand.

Step 3

Once the dough is soft and smooth, I recommend kneading it by hand for a few more minutes on the kitchen benchtop.

Place the ball of dough back into the (clean) mixing bowl, and place the bowl somewhere warm for about 60 to 90 minutes for the dough to rise and double in size.

Step 4

Once the dough has doubled in size, punch it back and knead it by hand for about 5 minutes to release any air bubbles in the dough.

Then roll out the dough until it is about 1 cm in height.

Use your hands to rub some oil onto the surface of the dough. This will prevent the dough from sticking together later when you shape the buns.

Step 5

Use an 8 cm (3 inch) cookie cutter to cut out rounds from the dough.

Step 6

Place these rounds onto a small sheet of baking paper – I like to use plain white cupcake wrappers which I flatten with a rolling pin.

Fold over each round in half and then use a rolling pin to gently flatten the dough to form the bun shape.

Step 7

Place all of the shaped buns onto a large tray, cover with a tea towel, and place in a warm place for about 30 minutes for the buns to rise again.

After this time, the bao buns should have risen and puffed up slightly.

Step 8

Meanwhile, prepare the steamer on the stove (see notes below). Steam the buns in batches for 10 to 12 minutes, or until they are puffy and soft, and cooked all the way through.

How to Steam Bao Buns
  1. Bamboo steamers are great for steaming bao buns and Asian grocery stores tend to stock a large variety of sizes at inexpensive prices. Aside from price, another advantage of bamboo steamers is that they also look good for serving at the table.
  2. I recommend buying the largest steamer which can fit your saucepan and stove.
  3. The bamboo steamer should be the same size as the saucepan you are using underneath. So if you are using a bamboo steamer which is 12 inches in diameter, your saucepan should also be 12 inches in diameter.
  4. If you plan to make bao buns (or even dumplings) often, I recommend buying at least two steamer baskets which can sit on top of each other to save on cooking (and waiting) time.
  5. If you are particularly serious about making bao buns, I recommend investing in a multi-tiered metal or stainless steel steamer which you can find at most Asian grocery stores. These also come in a range of sizes and have the advantage of being dishwasher-safe.
  6. Fill the saucepan about one-third full with boiling water, and place the steamer baskets on top.
  7. Place the saucepan with the steamer baskets on the stove over low-medium heat. If you steam the bao buns at too high a temperature, there is a risk that the buns might overcook or they might even become soggy.
  8. Place the bao buns in each steamer basket, giving them some room to rise and expand upon cooking.
  9. Place the lid on the top steamer basket and steam for about 10 to 12 minutes, or until the buns have risen and are light and fluffy once opened.
Tips For Making Bao Buns
  • Plain flour (all-purpose flour) works fine in this recipe as the cornflour (cornstarch) will help to give the buns a light and fluffy texture. The buns will be not be brilliant white like those found in Chinese restaurants, but the taste and texture should still be the same.
  • For snowy white buns like those found in Chinese restaurants, I recommend using bleached flour which you can find in Asian grocery stores.
  • It is important to knead the dough for the recommended amount of time. Failing to knead the dough properly may result in buns which appear blotchy (but should still taste fine), and this is due to not working the ingredients together sufficiently and/or failing to remove all of the air bubbles in the dough.
  • Steam the buns on a low-medium heat so that the buns do not overcook and become soggy.
How to Store Homemade Bao Buns

Bao buns are best eaten fresh and as soon as they are steamed.

Any leftover cooked bao buns can be stored in zip-lock bags in the freezer. To reheat, simply steam the frozen bao buns for about 5 minutes to warm through completely.

What to Serve with Bao Buns

Chinese Barbecue Pork (Char Siu Pork)

Pickled Chillies

Print
Steamed Bao Buns

How to make the perfect, soft and fluffy steamed bao buns with step-by-step photos. Follow these tips and tricks to make the perfect homemade bao buns, perfect for filling with your favourite ingredients.

  • Author: Thanh | Eat, Little Bird
  • Prep Time: 2 hours
  • Cook Time: 10 mins
  • Total Time: 2 hours 10 minutes
  • Yield: Makes 12 buns
  • Category: Bread
  • Method: Stove Top
  • Cuisine: Chinese
Ingredients
Instructions

To prepare the buns

  1. Measure all of the dry ingredients into a large mixing bowl or the bowl of an electric stand-mixer (if using).
  2. Measure the warm water and oil into a measuring jug. The water needs to be a bit more than lukewarm to help activate the yeast, but it shouldn’t be boiling hot.
  3. Using the dough hook on medium speed, mixing the liquid ingredients into the dry ingredients. Depending on the type of flour which you have used, you might need more or less liquid that than stated in the recipe.
  4. Once you have a sticky dough, continue kneading the dough on medium speed until it becomes soft and smooth to touch. This should take about 10 minutes using the stand-mixer on medium speed, or about 5 minutes by..
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eat, little bird by Eat, Little Bird - 2M ago

An easy lemon curd recipe with just 4 ingredients which you can make in a few minutes. Perfect for using at breakfast or in cakes and desserts.

Lemon Curd

A very versatile condiment to have in your fridge is a homemade lemon curd. I love it simply spread on toast for breakfast, dolloped onto Plain Scones with some clotted cream, and used in a Lemon Pavlova for maximum tang.

Lemon Curd Recipe

This is a very easy lemon curd recipe and uses only 4 ingredients.

It also takes a mere 10 minutes or so to make and keeps well in the fridge for up to 1 week or more.

How to Make Lemon Curd

Start by melting the butter in a small saucepan.

Meanwhile, whisk together the eggs, sugar, lemon zest and lemon juice.

Once the butter has melted, pour in the egg and lemon mixture. Continue whisking the mixture over medium heat for about 5 to 10 minutes, until the mixture has thickened nicely.

The lemon curd is ready once it coats the back of a spoon nicely, and if you draw a line through it with your finger, the line remains.

How to Use Lemon Curd

Here are some recipes using lemon curd:

Lemon Curd Tarts

Lemon Pavlova

Madeleines with Lemon Curd

Print
Lemon Curd

An easy lemon curd recipe with just 4 ingredients which you can make in a few minutes. Perfect for using at breakfast or in cakes and desserts.

  • Author: Thanh | Eat, Little Bird
  • Prep Time: 5 mins
  • Cook Time: 10 mins
  • Total Time: 15 minutes
  • Yield: 375 ml (1.5 cups)
  • Category: Dessert
  • Method: Stove Top
  • Cuisine: British
Ingredients
  • 100 g (1 stick) unsalted butter
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 150 g (1/2 cup plus 3 tablespoons) caster sugar (superfine sugar)
  • 2 lemons, zest and juice
Instructions
  1. Melt the butter in a small saucepan.
  2. In a medium-sized bowl, whisk together the remaining ingredients.
  3. Once the butter has melted, whisk in the lemon mixture.
  4. Continue whisking the mixture over medium heat until the mixture has thickened.
  5. Once the mixture starts to thicken, take it off the heat briefly while you check the consistency.
  6. The lemon curd is ready when it coats the back of a spoon, and when you draw a line through it with your finger, the line remains.
  7. Taste to see if you need to add more sugar or lemon juice as lemons can vary in size, sourness and sweetness.
  8. The lemon curd will continue to thicken as it cools.
  9. Store the lemon curd in a sterilised glass jar in the fridge.
Kitchen Notes

CONVERSIONS
To convert from cups to grams, and vice-versa, please see this handy Conversion Chart for Basic Ingredients.

Nutrition
  • Serving Size: 1
  • Calories: 131
  • Sugar: 12.8g
  • Sodium: 14.3mg
  • Fat: 8.3g
  • Carbohydrates: 13.4g
  • Fiber: 0g
  • Protein: 1.6g
  • Cholesterol: 79.7mg
Did you make this recipe?

Please leave a comment below and share your photos by tagging @eatlittlebird on Instagram and using #eatlittlebird

The post Lemon Curd appeared first on Eat, Little Bird.

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