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Presented by Schlafly Beer / The Saint Louis Brewery

Though Schlafly Beer’s motto is “hand-crafted in small batches,” this time of year the brewery also turns its attention to hand-crafted art. The crafts of both beer and art have gone hand in hand at Schlafly Beer for 14 years through the Art Outside festival, the brewery’s annual Memorial Day weekend art fair at Schlafly’s Bottleworks location in Maplewood, Missouri.

“We started Art Outside as a way to showcase all of the great local artists in the St. Louis area, in a relaxed atmosphere with some great Schlafly beers,” says Wil Rogers, Schlafly’s brand manager.

It goes without saying that Schlafly brought beer to the party–and not just any beer. Each year, the two-location and 27-year-old brewery brews a new beer exclusively for the festival. This year’s limited-edition beer, Gruit Beer, a beer brewed without hops and similar to a Berliner Weisse with a tart flavor and lower ABV, will be released in April and celebrated at the May Festival.

To connect the beer more to the artist community, the brewery started an Artists Series five years ago to feature the work of local artists on the 750-mL bottle label.

“The Schlafly Art Director reached out to us to design the bottle label in the Fall of 2017,” says Paige Brubeck, co-founder of Sleepy Kitty Arts, a St. Louis-based screenprinting and artist studio. “It was hard to design a label, however, without trying the beer first.”

“We did a lot of research on Gruit beers,” adds Evan Sult, Sleepy Kitty Arts’ other co-founder. “From the descriptions, we imagined this to be a good Spring beer that you could take to a park for a jazz festival and enjoy it out in the grass with others.”

With spring and early summer on their minds, Brubeck and Sult used their screenprinting basics–color, texture, and layers–to design a label that reflected the bright taste of the beer, creating a graphic that incorporated bright colors and florals.

Finally tasting the beer in mid-March, they found a beer that implied spices, herbs, botanicals, really a bouquet of plant life full of flavor layers. They felt confident their label design was an accurate depiction of what is inside the bottle.

“We often buy beer based on the label,” Sult confesses. “We love to have our work crossover with the things we love and we specialize in cool things.” According to their website, that includes everything from posters to “screenprinted goods for bands, theater companies, venues, wedding and commitment ceremonies, and other interesting events.” This beer label, however, will be the duo’s first 3D object.

Hosting a booth, Sleepy Kitty Arts will be one of the 65 selected artists from a 120-mile radius to showcase their wares at Art Outside.

“Drawing nearly 20,000 visitors each year, Art Outside is dedicated to showcasing local art in an approachable venue and manner,” Rogers explains. “Art Outside is not an ordinary fair, but one that features quality and affordable art, music, and plenty of tasty food and drink from Schlafly Beer. The festival’s mission is to increase public knowledge and appreciation for the local art scene by creating opportunities that connect artists, musicians, and the community.”

Check out Schlafly’s Gruit Beer and the family friendly, all ages welcome 14th Annual Art Outside at the brewery’s Bottleworks location from Friday, May 25 to Sunday, May 27. The live local music schedule can be found on the Art Outside website.

Sara Pletcher is the conference operations manager at Zephyr Conferences, the brainchild behind beer, wine, and food conferences for bloggers and industry professionals. Sara drank her first craft beer in 2009 and, therefore, naturally wrote her master’s thesis on the Delaware craft beer industry. She’s excited to finally put her passion to good work.

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DRAFT Magazine by Draft Staff - 2M ago

Presented by Schlafly Beer / The Saint Louis Brewery

Though Schlafly Beer’s motto is “hand-crafted in small batches,” this time of year the brewery also turns its attention to hand-crafted art. The crafts of both beer and art have gone hand in hand at Schlafly Beer for 14 years through the Art Outside festival, the brewery’s annual Memorial Day weekend art fair at Schlafly’s Bottleworks location in Maplewood, Missouri.

“We started Art Outside as a way to showcase all of the great local artists in the St. Louis area, in a relaxed atmosphere with some great Schlafly beers,” says Wil Rogers, Schlafly’s brand manager.

It goes without saying that Schlafly brought beer to the party–and not just any beer. Each year, the two-location and 27-year-old brewery brews a new beer exclusively for the festival. This year’s limited-edition beer, Gruit Beer, a beer brewed without hops and similar to a Berliner Weisse with a tart flavor and lower ABV, will be released in April and celebrated at the May Festival.

To connect the beer more to the artist community, the brewery started an Artists Series five years ago to feature the work of local artists on the 750-mL bottle label.

“The Schlafly Art Director reached out to us to design the bottle label in the Fall of 2017,” says Paige Brubeck, co-founder of Sleepy Kitty Arts, a St. Louis-based screenprinting and artist studio. “It was hard to design a label, however, without trying the beer first.”

“We did a lot of research on Gruit beers,” adds Evan Sult, Sleepy Kitty Arts’ other co-founder. “From the descriptions, we imagined this to be a good Spring beer that you could take to a park for a jazz festival and enjoy it out in the grass with others.”

With spring and early summer on their minds, Brubeck and Sult used their screenprinting basics–color, texture, and layers–to design a label that reflected the bright taste of the beer, creating a graphic that incorporated bright colors and florals.

Finally tasting the beer in mid-March, they found a beer that implied spices, herbs, botanicals, really a bouquet of plant life full of flavor layers. They felt confident their label design was an accurate depiction of what is inside the bottle.

“We often buy beer based on the label,” Sult confesses. “We love to have our work crossover with the things we love and we specialize in cool things.” According to their website, that includes everything from posters to “screenprinted goods for bands, theater companies, venues, wedding and commitment ceremonies, and other interesting events.” This beer label, however, will be the duo’s first 3D object.

Hosting a booth, Sleepy Kitty Arts will be one of the 65 selected artists from a 120-mile radius to showcase their wares at Art Outside.

“Drawing nearly 20,000 visitors each year, Art Outside is dedicated to showcasing local art in an approachable venue and manner,” Rogers explains. “Art Outside is not an ordinary fair, but one that features quality and affordable art, music, and plenty of tasty food and drink from Schlafly Beer. The festival’s mission is to increase public knowledge and appreciation for the local art scene by creating opportunities that connect artists, musicians, and the community.”

Check out Schlafly’s Gruit Beer and the family friendly, all ages welcome 14th Annual Art Outside at the brewery’s Bottleworks location from Friday, May 25 to Sunday, May 27. The live local music schedule can be found on the Art Outside website.

Sara Pletcher is the conference operations manager at Zephyr Conferences, the brainchild behind beer, wine, and food conferences for bloggers and industry professionals. Sara drank her first craft beer in 2009 and, therefore, naturally wrote her master’s thesis on the Delaware craft beer industry. She’s excited to finally put her passion to good work.

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DRAFT Magazine by The Beer Runner - 2M ago

With warmer weather approaching, it’s time to consider if you have the right gear for springtime beer and running.

There are telltale signs that beer drinkers and runners are serious about their craft, without having to say a word. The scientific term for this is “signaling theory.” Others may call it “showing off.”

Consider running gear. Having a pair of lightweight running shorts versus running in mesh knee-length basketball shorts separates the serious runner from the casual cross-trainer.
For beer drinkers, you know you’re really into beer if you have to have a specialty glass for every style.

Sometimes, you can get your beer and running gear from the same source. Consider the new Mikkeller Running Beer Box, a service of the global Mikkeller Running Club. The new beer box delivery is advertised as an “exclusive membership specially for all of you beer runners to stay on top of both your running and drinking game!”

The membership consists of a quarterly care package with 12 beers, running gear, runners lotions, apparel, vouchers, VIP stuff and a newsletter for members only. In other words, it sounds like a beer runner in a box.

But you can also go overboard. The person who is covered head to toe in Nike logos will probably be seen as a poseur. The beer drinker who refuses to drink Coors at a wedding on principle alone will probably be considered an insufferable beer snob.

These non-verbal cues can change over time. If you saw someone drinking out of a can a few years ago, chances are you’d think they were a college student. Today, you’d think they’re a serious craft beer connoisseur.

Similarly, if you saw someone running barefoot a few years ago, you’d think they are out of their mind. Today you’d view them as a hardcore runner.

So this week, find the right gear that fits you as a craft beer drinker and athlete. What does it say about you?

Week 14 #BeerFit CHALLENGE
Treat yourself to a new piece of gear, whether it’s a new specialty drinking glass or spring apparel. Post a photo on Twitter and Instagram with the hashtag #BeerFit.

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Photo courtesy Terrapin Beer Co.

Growing up in craft, Terrapin Beer Co. is utilizing its 16th Anniversary Carnival on Saturday, April 14, to celebrate its heritage as well as the curvy, and sometimes, bumpy road that led the brewery to its recent success, including a barrelage increase of 87 percent from 2008 to 2017.

Despite arriving during the non-craft beer age and battling Georgia sales and distribution laws, Terrapin Beer Co. quickly made a name for itself in the craft beer world after winning a gold medal at the Great American Beer Festival in 2002 for its Rye Pale Ale and a silver medal at the World Beer Cup in 2004 for its Extreme Cream Ale, in the midst of the extreme trend.

“Two years, two beers and two medals,” recalls Brian “Spike” Buckowski, Terrapin’s founder and CEO. Even with these medals, however, Buckowski and his business partner, John Cochran, were contract brewing in Atlanta and then Frederick, Maryland (now the Flying Dog Brewery), still actively seeking investors, maxing out credit cards, and searching for a brick and mortar location. In 2006, Cochran and Buckowski formed a new Terrapin investment group with local investors, and purchased the old SweetWater brewery in Athens from Zuma Brewing Co. (Zuma purchased the brewery from SweetWater in 2005).

Photo courtesy Terrapin Beer Co.

With fresh beer coming out of its new 25-barrel brewhouse in December of 2006, and after quickly expanding into more states than anticipated, Cochran, Buckowski, and Dustin Watts–Terrapin’s first employee and current vice president of marketing and sales–thought they were well on their way to a smooth path to success. Artistic differences, however, led them to separate from their newly found investors in 2008.

“Looking for cash for the buyout, we partnered with Tenth and Blake, MillerCoors craft group,” explains Buckowski. “They loaned us the money for one year, but by 2010, we decided to sell 24.4 percent of Terrapin to Tenth and Blake and were able to remain independent.”

That independence lasted until 2017 when Tenth and Blake became a majority owner. There were no descendants to take over the brewery when Buckowski and Cochran retire, and Cochran ultimately moved to Asheville, North Carolina to open UpCountry Brewing Co.

“It was time to flip the equity,” Buckowski says. “I do still own part of the company and if the Georgia beer laws changed years ago, we probably would have led a different path for our company. Growing a beer footprint today, however, is a struggle due to the cost to do so–salespeople, benefits–so it was time to let someone else take those reigns and I can go back to why I got into this business–for the love of beer.”

Buckowski’s time is now spent on projects like the ATL Brew Lab at SunTrust Park, home of the Atlanta Braves. The Brew Lab is home to a pilot system five-barrel brewhouse and six ten-barrel fermenters, which produces a combination of new beers and old Terrapin favorites served at the Terrapin Taproom next door and open year-round.

“Our journey has been really unique,” comments Watt, “but we still ask ourselves what do we want to be when we grow up? A brand is like a human–as it grows, it develops–and we’re no different.”

Photo by Fiona Hicks

And as the Terrapin Tribe, as they affectionately call their team and family members, celebrates its 16th year growing up, they’re looking forward to sharing their successes with their fans. Barrel aged beers, year-round favorites, beers from the ATL Brew Lab, unique casks made by their brewers, and other special brews will be available for sampling during their 16th Anniversary Carnival on Saturday, April 14. Entertainment will include Rust, Strung Like a Horse, acts from sideshow couple Captain & Maybelle, as well as local vendors, food trucks, and carnival games with proceeds benefiting Nuci’s Space, a health and resource center for musicians. Tickets are $26 and can be purchased here.

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DRAFT Magazine by The Beer Runner - 3M ago

Winter often means being cooped up on the treadmill for your workouts. Spring means you can start signing up for races. The best part of warmer weather? Hanging out at the finish line beer tent. Do you have others to add to the list? Leave a link in the comments section.

The Sasquatch Scramble
When: April 22
Race notes: The 5K, 10K and half marathon participants of this trail run receive a Sasquatch Scramble tech tee, post-race beer from Standard Deviant Brewing.
Sign up here

The Little Kings Mile
May 4
Race notes: The one-mile kickoff is part of a beer race trilogy that also includes Bockfest 5K and the Hudy Brewery Run. The series celebrates Cincinnati’s brewing history and benefiting the Over-the-Rhine Brewery District. The course goes around the stadium along Cincinnati’s riverfront and ends with an after party at the Moerlein Lager House.
Sign up here

Salomon Trail Running Festival
May 26-27
Race notes: Shipyard Brewing sponsors the post-race BBQ and offers two free cans of beer for trail runners. Race distances go from 5K all the way to 50 miles, and beer is definitely part of the celebration.
Sign up here

Sly Fox Brewery Fox Trot 5K
May 19
Race notes: Race starts and ends at the Sly Fox Brewery (with each runner getting a glass of the brewery’s 2015 GABF silver medal winner Grisette), plus live music, food truck and beer pairings, and lawn games at the finish.
Sign up here

Bridge to Brews 8k/10k
April 15
Race notes The race starts and finishes at one of Portland’s original breweries, the Widmer Brothers Brewing Company, and takes runners over one of the area’s most picturesque bridges, the Fremont Bridge. Everyone gathers after the event for music, food and beer.
Sign up here

Week 12 #BeerFit CHALLENGE

Run a spring race and post on Instagram and Twitter at the beer tent with hashtag #BeerFit

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By now, it’s a given that most races offer craft beer to all finishers. But some races go above and beyond for their winners with the ultimate prize: Their weight in beer.

Sometimes it’s for special occasions. The 50th running of the Scotiabank Calgary Marathon offered the top male and female finishers their weight in Wild Rose Brewery beer for the 50K. Everybody who finished took home a beer stein. The overall winner came away with 120 bottles of beer.

Sometimes whole teams win their weight in beer. That was the case for Deschutes Brewery’s relay race. The Oregon brewery hosted the Brewers Cup Relay, a 4-kilometer race for teams of two or four runners. Participants ran and drank a Pacific Wonderland Lager before tagging a teammate to repeat the process.

Prizes include winning the team’s weight in Deschutes Brewery Pacific Wonderland Lager; Deschutes Brewery Public House gift certificates and Deschutes Brewery swag.

Avery Brewing Company also offered the prize for its 4K Four on the Fourth. Avery has long been a supporter of earning your beer with sweat, and they also hosted bike rides that start and end at their Tap Room.

There was a lot of competition for Avery’s top prize among the elite athletes in Boulder, and the female winner was Kayoko Fukushi, an Olympic marathoner for Japan. Her prize translated to five cases of craft brew from Avery Brewing Co. But since the Olympian was training for Rio in August, she didn’t drink her winnings. Instead, she shared it with her agent and the Japanese team coaches.

Fukushi’s training partner, meanwhile, finished second in his age group and took home a case of beer. He gave his winnings to the owners of Twin Lakes Inn, where the team stays every year, according to Runner’s World.

So if you’re not fast enough to win your weight in beer, at least make friends someone who can. They’ll probably have more than they can drink anyway.

Week 11 #BeerFit CHALLENGE

Sign up for a race that has craft beer winnings at the end. And if you’re not likely to win, at least sign up for a race where everyone gets craft beer at the end.

Post photos on Instagram and Twitter of your post-race prizes with the hashtag #BeerFit

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DRAFT Magazine by Draft Staff - 4M ago

When you visit the website for the German beer Erdinger, you find something you might not expect:

A 20-day personal training plan to get fit.

Bavarian beer Erdinger calls itself “the sports and fitness drink” — thank you Google for the translation — and explains its advantages.

Whether at work, before driving or after sports, there are certain occasions where it is wiser to avoid alcohol. For those who don’t want to miss out on the delicious taste of wheat beer, though, the solution is Erdinger Weissbier ‘non-alcoholic’.

The Huffington Post reports that Erdinger began targeting athletes in 2001 with advertising featuring triathletes, and its popularity has grown after being distributed for free at the finish area of European sporting events.

The brand has found a niche in the country famous for its thirst for beer. The nonalcoholic beer satisfies those who have a commitment to both the taste of suds and an active, healthy lifestyle.

Now nonalcoholic beer is getting more attention due to the German contingent at the Olympic winter games.

A new article in the New York Times highlights the German team’s signature recovery elixir.

“It’s a really good drink directly after training or after competition,” said German biathlete Simon Schempp, who won a silver medal at this year’s games.

The Times’ reports that Germans often drink non-alcoholic beer in place of sports drinks after exercise, and that Johannes Scherr, the doctor for the German Olympic ski team, said nearly all of his athletes drink non-alcoholic beer during training.

The brewery Krombacher supplied about 1,000 gallons of nonalcoholic beer to the athletes’ village for German athletes.

Is it working? Well, you can’t argue with success. Right now, Germany is tied for the most gold medals.

Week 9 #BeerFit CHALLENGE.

This week, replace your Gatorade with a non-alcoholic beer. Post photos on Instagram and Twitter with the hashtag #BeerFit

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DRAFT Magazine by Draft Staff - 4M ago

Ultra runners are crazy. They also know how to get the most out of life.

When he ran coast to coast, Patrick Sweeney subsisted on a diet that included potato chips and beer. “I know potato chips aren’t the healthiest, but the beer worked great,” he said. “I wasn’t drinking it to get drunk. It was just a nice thing to look forward to at lunch time.”

Jim Kerse likes to down a beer five miles before he hits the finish line in 100-mile races. “My body gets sick of the sweet stuff and the beer gives me a lift and takes the pain away,” he said.

Jesse Weber filmed himself running through the Antelope Canyon for the 50-mile race, including his mid-race beer break. “I’m making an instructional video about how to not run a marathon,” he said in a video of the race on YouTube, which racked up more than 115,000 views.

Those are just a few examples. Ultra runners consume calories like a furnace, and beer happens to be a subsistence of choice.

You don’t have to complete 100 mile races to taste the lifestyle of an ultra runner. Running longer than you think is possible for your body right now gives you that ability to enjoy some extra beer without any guilt.

You can model yourself after Karl Meltzer, who in 2016 broke the record for fastest completion of the Appalachian Trail. How did he celebrate? The same way he finished every night on the trail.

“He walked down the mountain, sat in a chair and sated himself with pepperoni pizza and a beer,” The New York Times reported.

The 48-year-old former bartender finished the 2,190-mile trail in just under 46 days, which shaved about 10 hours off the previous record set by Scott Jurek.

Meltzer averaged 50 miles and 15 hours of running each day, which entitled him to the one or two beers he finished at the end of each leg.

Week 8 #BeerFit CHALLENGE.

Maybe you don’t have a 50-miler in you. But try going 5 miles longer than your normal run. You’ll earn yourself an extra beer or two.

Post photos on Instagram and Twitter and caption your distance with the hashtag #BeerFit

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Nick Symmonds is a highly decorated elite runner. He’s a two-time Olympian, World Championships silver medalist, and a 7-time NCAA champion.

But maybe even more impressive is his beer mile accomplishments.

Symmonds is a previous world record holder in the beer mile, which consists of chugging four beers while running four laps.

U.S. Olympic Runner Runs 5-Minute Mile ... While Chugging Beers -- Nick Symmonds Beer Mile | TMZ - YouTube

In 2012, he helped elevate the trend of filming and posting the beer mile challenge online. His run of 5 minutes 19 seconds went viral when it was posted on TMZ.com. The notoriety of Symmonds accomplishment helped make the beer mile more mainstream, and it attracted other elite runners to the sport.

Symmonds also ran in the inaugural beer mile world championships, but came up short to the winning time of 5 minutes flat.

In the following years, the beer mile attracted attention in features from ESPN and even the Wall Street Journal. Today, the beer mile world record is an astonishing 4 minutes and 34 seconds, accomplished by Corey Bellemore of Canada.

Now, there is even a movement to make the beer mile an official Olympics event. On one running message board, many speculate that he could be an Olympic beer mile champion, if the event existed on that stage.

In 2016, World of Beer launched a petition to elevate the beer mile into an Olympics event. “Yesterday’s fringe sport has evolved into a challenging, competitive and much-loved pastime,” the petition stated. “If tug-of-war can be in the games, why not beer mile? Let’s get it into the world’s games. Are you with us?”

So as you watch this year’s Olympics, know that in some ways elite Olympic athletes are just like the rest of us: They like to enjoy a beer (or four) with their training as well. They just do it slightly faster.

Week 7 #BeerFit CHALLENGE.

Train like a beer mile Olympian! If you don’t want to drink four beers while running a mile, do an interval workout on the track followed by enjoying a beer.

Post photos of yourself having a beer while watching the Olympics on Instagram and Twitter with the hashtag #BeerFit

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DRAFT Magazine by The Beer Runner - 4M ago

Photo by Amy Parkes on Unsplash

After a long run, there’s nothing more refreshing than a cold beer.

You can relax with a Negative Split Stout following a track workout, or drink a Pre-HOPtaine in honor of one of running’s greatest rebel legends from Ghost Runners Brewery.

If the wind was always at your back then Big Boss Run Club’s Tail Wind IPA might seem appropriate.

If you find yourself in that state of post-run bliss, then the Lagunitas Runner’s HIGH-P-A brewed in honor of the Chicago Area Runners Association might be for you.

The point is there is no shortage of running-themed beer offerings for those who are into both craft brewing culture and an active lifestyle.

As craft beer and running culture have grown together, we’ve seen plenty examples where the two intersect: running groups with their own beer, a running store with 20 taps on the premises and breweries that make a specialty brew for marathons.

Ghost Runners Brewery is an entire brewery inspired by running, founded in Vancouver by neighbors Jeff Seibel and Rob Ziebell to combine the friends’ favorite passions.

“Ghost running describes the mental high that is achieved through running,” the brewery’s website states. “It is the feeling that the weight of the world has been lifted, and the freedom to experience joy in the moment.”

Being a beer runner is about exploring, pushing your boundaries and trying new things. That means appreciating different styles of beer, which includes the burgeoning category of running-inspired beers.

Week 6 #BeerFit CHALLENGE.

Find yourself a running-themed beer to treat yourself after your workout such as the BlueMile Extra Pale Ale from Flat12 Bierwerks, the Pace Setter Belgian Style Wit from Mavericks, or brew your own and add it to Untapped.

Post your group on Instagram and Twitter with the hashtag #BeerFit

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