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Nick Symmonds is a highly decorated elite runner. He’s a two-time Olympian, World Championships silver medalist, and a 7-time NCAA champion.

But maybe even more impressive is his beer mile accomplishments.

Symmonds is a previous world record holder in the beer mile, which consists of chugging four beers while running four laps.

U.S. Olympic Runner Runs 5-Minute Mile ... While Chugging Beers -- Nick Symmonds Beer Mile | TMZ - YouTube

In 2012, he helped elevate the trend of filming and posting the beer mile challenge online. His run of 5 minutes 19 seconds went viral when it was posted on TMZ.com. The notoriety of Symmonds accomplishment helped make the beer mile more mainstream, and it attracted other elite runners to the sport.

Symmonds also ran in the inaugural beer mile world championships, but came up short to the winning time of 5 minutes flat.

In the following years, the beer mile attracted attention in features from ESPN and even the Wall Street Journal. Today, the beer mile world record is an astonishing 4 minutes and 34 seconds, accomplished by Corey Bellemore of Canada.

Now, there is even a movement to make the beer mile an official Olympics event. On one running message board, many speculate that he could be an Olympic beer mile champion, if the event existed on that stage.

In 2016, World of Beer launched a petition to elevate the beer mile into an Olympics event. “Yesterday’s fringe sport has evolved into a challenging, competitive and much-loved pastime,” the petition stated. “If tug-of-war can be in the games, why not beer mile? Let’s get it into the world’s games. Are you with us?”

So as you watch this year’s Olympics, know that in some ways elite Olympic athletes are just like the rest of us: They like to enjoy a beer (or four) with their training as well. They just do it slightly faster.

Week 7 #BeerFit CHALLENGE.

Train like a beer mile Olympian! If you don’t want to drink four beers while running a mile, do an interval workout on the track followed by enjoying a beer.

Post photos of yourself having a beer while watching the Olympics on Instagram and Twitter with the hashtag #BeerFit

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DRAFT Magazine by The Beer Runner - 2w ago

Photo by Amy Parkes on Unsplash

After a long run, there’s nothing more refreshing than a cold beer.

You can relax with a Negative Split Stout following a track workout, or drink a Pre-HOPtaine in honor of one of running’s greatest rebel legends from Ghost Runners Brewery.

If the wind was always at your back then Big Boss Run Club’s Tail Wind IPA might seem appropriate.

If you find yourself in that state of post-run bliss, then the Lagunitas Runner’s HIGH-P-A brewed in honor of the Chicago Area Runners Association might be for you.

The point is there is no shortage of running-themed beer offerings for those who are into both craft brewing culture and an active lifestyle.

As craft beer and running culture have grown together, we’ve seen plenty examples where the two intersect: running groups with their own beer, a running store with 20 taps on the premises and breweries that make a specialty brew for marathons.

Ghost Runners Brewery is an entire brewery inspired by running, founded in Vancouver by neighbors Jeff Seibel and Rob Ziebell to combine the friends’ favorite passions.

“Ghost running describes the mental high that is achieved through running,” the brewery’s website states. “It is the feeling that the weight of the world has been lifted, and the freedom to experience joy in the moment.”

Being a beer runner is about exploring, pushing your boundaries and trying new things. That means appreciating different styles of beer, which includes the burgeoning category of running-inspired beers.

Week 6 #BeerFit CHALLENGE.

Find yourself a running-themed beer to treat yourself after your workout such as the BlueMile Extra Pale Ale from Flat12 Bierwerks, the Pace Setter Belgian Style Wit from Mavericks, or brew your own and add it to Untapped.

Post your group on Instagram and Twitter with the hashtag #BeerFit

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Over the centuries, different brewing cultures have developed a variety of approaches to the beer-making stage known as “mashing”—combining malted grains with hot water in order to extract the sugars and other nutrients that yeast will later consume and turn into sweet, sweet alcohol. The Germans, for instance, are known for the decoction mash; Belgian brewers established the turbid mash. And the British? They created the technique known as parti-gyle brewing.

At its most basic, parti-gyle brewing involves stuffing a mash tun full of malt and combining it with hot water to create a very sugary wort (or gyle) that’ll be used to make a high-ABV beer. After this first gyle is drawn off, the brewer adds another batch of water to the remaining grain, using the “second runnings” and small amount of sugar it contains to make a second, weaker beer. In essence, the process enables brewers to create two (or, as we’ll see below, more) beers from a single mash while wringing out every bit of sugar the grain has to offer.

“Think of a traditional coffee maker, where you run water through ground coffee,” says Richard Dube, brewmaster and cofounder at Braxton Brewing Co. in Covington, Kentucky. “If you’re in a hurry and instead of waiting for the entire quantity of water to go through the grind you take the first cup, that cup’s going to be very strong, because you’re pushing a smaller quantity of water through a greater quantity of coffee. Likewise, if you only drink what’s dripping after most of the pot has been made, it’s going to be very, very weak.”

To celebrate Braxton’s the second anniversary at the end of March, Dube and his fellow cofounder Evan Rouse released two beers brought to life through the parti-gyle technique. Mentor, made with the first runnings and named for Dube, is a dense, 10.5% ABV Belgian tripel. Mentee, Rouse’s beer, was brewed with the second runnings; it has a mere 3.4% ABV but gets a fruity snap through additions of guava and pomegranate.

Due to equipment restraints—Rouse says it requires, among other items, a four-vessel brewhouse—parti-gyle brewing is a rarity among modern brewers. But some do still employ the technique. In Belfast, Maine, Marshall Wharf Brewing Co. produces the 4.1% ABV Little Mayhem from the second runnings of Chaos Chaos, a brutish imperial stout. Chicago’s Revolution Brewing Co. turns the leftover mash sugars from its HuGene imperial porter into Wee Gene, a 4.7% ABV London porter. And Minnesota-based Surly Brewing has used the remnants of Darkness to spawn Damien, a black IPA, since 2011.

But there is perhaps no brewery in the world that makes parti-gyle brewing such an integral aspect of its process as Fuller’s Brewery in London. The brewery’s three flagship beers—ESB, London Pride and Chiswick Bitter—all come from the same mash. Fuller’s, however, treats parti-gyle a bit differently: Each wort that emerges from the mash goes through a boil with the same hop regimen. The finished beers are made distinct from one another through careful blending of the stronger and lesser-strength wort.

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DRAFT Magazine by The Beer Runner - 3w ago

At the end of every social run, the Fishtown Beer Runners raise their glasses for their ritual toast.

“To the professor!”

With that, the Philadelphia running group honors a Spanish researcher whose study found that beer is a better post-run refreshment than water.

It’s nice to have science on your side for what you love.

The Fishtown Beer Runners have 3,400+ Facebook members and even has its own documentary. And they are just one of many clubs around the country for fans of beer and running.

It started with the Hash House Harriers, a “drinking group with a running problem.” Today you can find the Hashers worldwide, and beer and running groups are exploding everywhere.

Other popular beer and running groups include Mikkeller Running Club, Big Boss Run Club, Running for Brews, Sloppy Moose Running Club, RunTOBeer, the East Bay Beer Runners and too many more to list here.

I’ve run and grabbed a beer or three with beer runner clubs from Denver to Boston, and heard of countless more. You can go into just about any major city in the country and find a social group (or several) sponsored by a running store, a pub or both.

And running, just like drinking, is more fun when you’re with a group.

Week 5 #BeerFit CHALLENGE.

Join the club! Check with your local running stores, craft breweries or bars to finding a drinking group with a running problem, as the Hash House Harriers call it.

Post your group on Instagram and Twitter with the hashtag #BeerFit

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Whether you’re hosting a football bash or backyard barbecue, these easy, beer-infused appetizers are the quickest, simplest way to elevate your party.

Check out the recipes below and use them to plan your next shindig.

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DRAFT Magazine by Draft Staff - 1M ago

It’s fourth and goal with 4 seconds on the clock and you need to score here to take home the big trophy. You have spent the entire season perfecting your ability to throw your neighborhood’s best watch party, but this is no regular season game. No. This is the Super Bowl and the pressure is on. Will you serve your world-famous, dry-rub wings with a standard case on ice or pair them with yet another perfectly crafted, draft beer?

Your last growler of that seasonal winter IPA went flat after the first quarter, so you ended up having to send in the second string canned lager anyway. So why bother?

Well, it’s time you learned about football’s No. 1 draft of craft, GrowlerWerks’ uKeg. These self-regulated, self-pressurized mini-kegs fit perfectly on the edge of a tailgate or set amongst the food spread of your nearest “homegate.”

You Tailgate? uKeg. #uTailgate - YouTube

Developed by three beer lovers with an engineering problem, the uKeg is designed and crafted for beer. With vacuum-insulated, stainless-steel walls, an easy-to-use regulator cap, and low-cost, food-grade CO2 cartridges your beer is guaranteed to stay cold, fresh and carbonated. All. Game. Long.

You’ll be pouring fresh through the halftime show, past the gut-wrenching fourth quarter, and make sure to enjoy a pint on draft after you have cleaned up and stuffed your fridge with leftovers.

Whether you finish every last drop or still have some leftover, don’t worry. The uKeg guarantees to keep your beer carbonated for at least two weeks, they fit on every refrigerator shelf, and they are easy to clean.

Lastly, set the uKeg out to dry, sit back, and enjoy. You took home the
trophy. You took home a uKeg.

Shop The uKeg. Football’s No. 1 Draft Of Craft: www.GrowlerWerks.com & Show us how #uTailgate!

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DRAFT Magazine by The Beer Runner - 1M ago

By now, the new-ness of 2018 has started to wear off and you’re probably falling back into familiar patterns.

That’s why now’s the time to mix things up in your beer and fitness routines.

One way to add variety is through the combination of craft beer and yoga.

Today, craft beer has become a popular refreshment the end of yoga sessions, and yoga mats have started to invade brewery spaces.

“In my opinion, yoga and beer is the combination of things that make us feel good,” says Mikki Trowbridge, one-half of the duo known as The Beer Yogis. “In moderation, both yoga and beer can be refreshing, relaxing, and releasing—all things that most of us need more of in our lives.”

Trowbridge and Melissa Klimo-Major and united by their love of beer and yoga. You can find them on road trips to different breweries to stretch, breath and bend surrounded by kegs, hops and malt.

Many breweries are also offering yoga in-house, including the West Sixth Brewing in Lexington, Kentucky and Morgan Street Brewery in St. Louis.

Lululemon Athletica is also stretching out to beer with its own official lager of a beer, music and yoga festival.

“Beer, it’s the new yoga pant,” the brand tweeted. “Meet Curiosity Lager by @StanleyParkBrew, the official brew of @SeaWheeze.”

Week 4 CHALLENGE.

Fit: Limber up, grab your yoga mat and a six pack and try beer yoga in 2018. Get your downward facing drink on.

Post what you did on Instagram and Twitter with the hashtag #BeerFit

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DRAFT Magazine by Draft Staff - 1M ago

Photo by Andrew Tanglao on Unsplash

For three years, I ran and drank beer every single day.

I started the streak on my 29th birthday and my goal was to run at least one mile and drink at least one beer per day for a year. I wanted to do something big for the final year of my 20s.

It turns out I enjoyed it so much I did it for two years beyond my goal. During that time, I ran roughly 5,300 miles and drank more than 2,000 beers. Most beers came after the run, but some were during.

The whole idea was to work hard and reward myself. I wasn’t expecting to become a better runner as a result, but that’s exactly what happened.

I ran 30 miles for my 30th birthday, set PRs in the 5K and half marathon, and raced a sub 5-minute mile. I was running faster at age 30 than I did as a high school cross country athlete.

Most days I ran at lunchtime to fit it in during a busy day of work, school and family life. I found this made me more productive. It cleared my head in the middle of the day and re-focused me for what I had to accomplish in the afternoon and evening.

It established a consistent routine that structured my day. I was also motivated to get my work done so I could have my beer reward at the end of the day.

During this time I was featured in Runner’s World and Wired. There are lots of people who maintained running streaks longer than me, but it appears I was the only one with a beer and running streak.

This gave me an appreciation for the power of habit. Consistency is the best training plan.

Even on days I wasn’t feeling it, I knew I had to get out for at least one mile. Knowing I could have a beer for the effort when I got home made it even easier. Usually those single miles would turn into much longer runs as running became second nature.

Today, when I want to get back in a rhythm, I go streaking. You don’t have to do three full years to get in a good habit, though. A week works too. So let’s start there.

Week 3 CHALLENGE.

Fit: Plan to go for a run or exercise every day for the next 7 days. Do something every day, no exceptions! For your reward, drink the same beer every day for 7 days. Each day, try to detect another subtle taste of the beer. See you you can learn from consistency.

Post what you did on Instagram and Twitter with the hashtags #BeerFit and #Streak.

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DRAFT Magazine by Draft Staff - 1M ago

Photo by lucas Favre on Unsplash

It was 3 am when Jake McCluskey started running.

At 380 pounds, he was too embarrassed to attempt a run during the day. He was afraid of people laughing at him.

It took him awhile to work up the courage to start. To pump himself up he watched a YouTube video on repeat of Marshawn Lynch saying, “I’m just about that action, boss.”

He watched it again and again and again. More than 30 times.

And then he took action himself, in the middle of the night. Even though he could barely make it a city block himself without getting winded.

At age 42, Jake (formerly known as “Big Jake”) has lost 180 pounds, completed a 50-mile run and is in training for a 100-mile race.

McCluskey changed his lifestyle and diet, but as a brewer, he hasn’t given up beer.
“I still drink beer every day,” he told the San Jose Mercury News. “The craft beer community is pretty supportive.”

In fact, his 50-mile run started and ended at breweries. He started his overnight run at San Francisco’s Cellarmaker Brewing Company, and finished 50 miles later at San Jose’s Good Karma Artisan Ales & Café, where he was greeted by a crowd.

The perfect time to start changing our lives is when we have the correct gear, the right plan, the ideal weather and all other areas of our life figured out.

But as Jake demonstrates, the perfect time to start is when you start.

A body at rest tends to stay at rest. A body in motion tends to stay in motion.

The only difference between the two is starting.

Week 2 TAKE ACTION:

Fit: Right now, run around a city block, do 10 push-ups or complete 30 sit-ups. Do it now!
Beer: Plan a new destination for a craft beer reward for this weekend for your exercise.

Post what you did on Instagram and Twitter with the hashtag #BeerFit.

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This time of year, you’ll hear people talking about their New Year’s Resolutions.

Most will fail.

But there’s a way to improve your odds: Balance fitness and fun.

There’s two main issues with resolutions that cause them to last as your hangover.

The first is they tend to be overly ambitious. If you fell into a bad habit, it developed over time. It’s not likely to change overnight simply because a date changed on the calendar.

The better approach is to know that you’re going to have setbacks and account for them before they happen. Then get back on track. Life is a marathon, not a 5K.

The second major flaw is the goals don’t come with a plan, or come with a plan that’s too rigid. You rarely get to a finish line unscathed without a quality training plan. You’ll end up lost if you don’t have a roadmap.

But you also have to allow yourself downtime if you have an injury, illness or beer pong tournament. It’s how you react that makes the difference between achieving your goal or not.

There’s a reason why serious drinkers call New Year’s Eve amateur hour and gym rats get annoyed by the temporary spike in cardio equipment usage after January 1st. Don’t get fixated on a night of partying or a goal without a plan. It’s about a complete and balanced lifestyle.

So if you’re tired of the disappointment, take the #BeerFit challenge.

In this blog, each week you’ll get a challenge and a reward.

Week 1:

First, sign up for a race, a fitness class or a gym membership. It could be a 5K or pilates, a marathon or cardio kickboxing. Make it something manageable and fun. Pick something that you enjoy doing.

Second, visit a craft beer store and buy a style of beer that you’ve never had before or that you don’t normally try. Ask in store for recommendations if you’re not sure where to start.

Finally, post your exercise and beer on Instagram and Twitter with the hashtag #BeerFit.

Happy new beer!

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