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If you’ve been referred for dialysis, you have a lot to consider about your treatment. The dialysis facility you choose becomes your home away from home. A great location, environment, and staff have the power to make or break your dialysis experience. No wonder choosing the right dialysis center can be an overwhelming decision. But with a little planning, it doesn’t need to be!

So, how do you choose a great dialysis center?

Consider the Location

A great location is one of many factors that can set one facility apart from another. After all, you have more time for the things you enjoy if you choose one convenient to you. Treatments can be time-consuming, so you don’t want to waste any more time stuck in traffic than you need to.

Consider Your Comfort

You want a dialysis center that is clean, pleasant, well-equipped, and cheerful looking. Consider choosing a center with plenty of privacy, comfortable dialysis stations, and entertainment to help the time spent during treatments to go by more quickly.

Consider the Staff

The staff responsible for your care needs to be exceptional, professional, and compassionate. You deserve nurses, doctors, and nurse practitioners that approach your care holistically, and see you as a person – not just another nephrology patient!

Coastal Nephrology is the Smart Choice for Dialysis in Jupiter

We are conveniently located on the corner of University Boulevard and Corporate Way. Our facility provides both hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis in a private setting with TV entertainment available during treatment.

Our nurses are among the friendliest in Florida; they are committed to keeping you comfortable, safe, and satisfied! Former and current patients have described Dr. Abbas Rabiei as “exceptional”, “conscientious”, and ” a real asset” to the Jupiter medical community.

Call internal medicine specialist, Dr. Rabiei at Coastal Nephrology at 561-253-8121 for the best kidney care in South Florida.

The post Finding the Best Dialysis Center in Jupiter appeared first on Coastal Dialysis & Nephrology In Jupiter Florida.

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Chronic kidney disease, or CKD, results from a number of different conditions, such as high blood pressure, diabetes, lupus, kidney stones, polycystic kidney disease, or even frequent urinary infections. CKD is a condition in which your kidneys are unable to do their job of cleansing your body and blood from wastes and excess.

Without your kidneys to flush out unwanted materials, you’ll begin to feel sick and your body starts to become weak and deteriorate. It goes without saying, kidney care is of the utmost importance.

The weakness you feel with CKD can be a deterrent when it comes to physical activity or exercising. Many kidney doctors recommend against it for CKD patients. However, studies show the benefits of exercise are substantial on an individual with CKD not being treated with dialysis.

As CKD is often caused by high blood pressure or diabetes, exercise plays a big role in helping to manage those conditions to prevent CKD from becoming worse.

At Coastal Nephrology in Jupiter, we recommend our kidney patients incorporate light exercise into their treatment. Your renal physician, Dr. Abbas Rabiei, works with you to create an exercise plan.

Just as your diet is important to follow strictly, so is regaining your strength through exercise. Resistance training in small increments may help to slowly improve your physical functioning. More research has been done on the effects of aerobic exercise, and it shows benefits for CKD patients. Particularly in pre-dialysis patients, a little aerobic exercise each day has shown great improvement in one’s oxygen consumption and ability to control blood pressure.

Dr. Rabiei starts you off with a low intensity exercise program. He progresses you slowly through your program as is tolerable to prevent injury and ensure that you can continue. The benefits of a healthy diet in conjunction with exercise does wonders to help prevent CKD from taking over.

In severe cases your kidneys may be lost altogether, forcing you to look either to transplant or dialysis. Through natural methods however, you can retain your kidneys and their remaining functioning, potentially even turning back the clock a bit to become a healthier you.

Coastal Dialysis Center in Jupiter serves CKD patients, and we make kidney care our top priority. We want to make yours as healthy and efficient as possible. Call Dr. Rabiei today for an appointment at 561-253-8121.

The post Should You Exercise if You Have Chronic Kidney Disease? appeared first on Coastal Dialysis & Nephrology In Jupiter Florida.

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Kidney failure is a serious condition that requires immediate attention by a kidney doctor, or nephrologist. Aside from kidney transplant, dialysis is the best procedure to treat sufferers of this condition.

Some dialysis patients are able to return to mostly normal lives outside of treatments. However, there are certain recommendations to keep in mind when it comes to proper care and maintenance of kidney health.

The function of your kidneys is to filter your blood of waste, excess fluids, and excess salt. Dialysis is used when your kidneys can no longer perform the functions they need to. Instead, your nephrologist connects a machine to your bloodstream through tubes which draws in your blood to be cleansed and returned back to you through one of two processes: hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis.

During Dialysis in Jupiter, Be Sure to Maintain a Healthy Diet

Keep your kidney health in check by following the special renal diet given to you by your kidney doctor at Coastal Dialysis Center, Dr. Abbas Rabiei. Micromanaging your diet may not sound like a fun time, but keeping the amount of salt and fluids you consume in check is extremely important for proper maintenance between treatments.

For example, while your body needs sodium to help control your body’s fluid levels, you can easily accumulate too much without your kidneys to help regulate. Too much sodium can cause you to have high blood pressure. Similarly, while you cannot live without water, dialysis patients need to be mindful of exactly how much they are consuming each day so it doesn’t build up and make work harder for your heart.

The same can occur with minerals such as phosphorus, which promotes healthy bones, and potassium, which promotes muscle health. Too much of a good thing without the proper filtering system will cause a terrible disturbance to your overall health. Dialysis patients receive dietary counseling to address these concerns.

Exercise is Also Important During Dialysis, But Discuss Your Physical Activity Plan With Your Kidney Doctor First

While maintaining a kidney-healthy diet is important, you can also keep your kidneys happy by staying active. Physical activity improves the functioning of your bones and muscles, including your heart. When your heart is happy, you reap more benefits from the foods you eat.

Exercise also helps you get rid of waste by pushing it into your blood. Your next dialysis treatment will eliminate the waste. It is very important you discuss your exercise plan with your nephrologist before getting started.

Our Patients Undergoing Dialysis in West Palm Beach, Jupiter, & Surrounding Areas Receive the Best Possible Care

Patients at Coastal Dialysis Center experience firsthand the care our kidney doctor in Jupiter and West Palm Beach takes in provides. Kidney failure is a force to be reckoned with. But with the combination of top-notch kidney care, a proper diet, and exercise, nothing will stop you from living a normal life. Call us today at (561) 253-8121 to learn more about or to schedule an appointment for dialysis.

The post Supporting Your Health Through Dialysis appeared first on Coastal Dialysis & Nephrology In Jupiter Florida.

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Kidneys. What exactly are those bean shaped organs and how do we keep them functioning at their best? Kidneys act as an essential filtering system in the body, removing waste products and toxins through urine.

These mighty organs work to regulate the body’s blood pressure, control the production of red blood cells, balance body fluid, produce vitamin D for strong bones, and much more. It’s a good idea to keep kidneys in the best of health for an overall healthy life.  

Eat Healthy for Optimum Kidney Function

It’s no secret that the human body should be fueled by the most nutritious foods for kidney health. Be sure to fill your plate with fresh fruits and vegetables and foods high in omega-3 fatty acids. Fill your fridge with such foods, and you’ll be more likely to reach for them when hunger strikes. Make a habit of avoiding foods high in fat, sugar, and sodium, and reduce your intake of processed foods .

Hydrate for Improved Kidney Health

Water is essential for aiding the kidneys in their filtration process. Do your best to drink enough so that your urine is nearly clear. Drinking half your bodyweight in ounces of water daily is a good rule of thumb. Soda and sugar-filled drinks, though they hydrate somewhat, are not a replacement for water. If you find yourself craving a flavorful drink, opt for 100% cranberry juice or unsweetened herbal tea.

Exercise to Keep Kidneys in Peak Working Condition

Poor kidney health is linked to high blood pressure and adult onset diabetes. People who regularly engage in physical activity are significantly less likely to develop such problems. Take a daily walk. Join a yoga class. Get a gym membership. Ride your bike. Lift weights. Train for a triathlon. Whatever activity suits you best, do it.

Visit to a Nephrologist (Kidney Doctor) in Jupiter to Track Kidney Health

If you suspect that you have kidney issues, or you just want to get checked out, schedule a visit with Dr. Abbas Rabiei, internist and nephrologist in Jupiter specializing in diagnosing and treating kidney conditions. Dr. Rabiei will work with you to determine a plan for proper kidney care and treatment of any conditions that may be present. Call for an appointment with Dr. Rabiei today at (561) 253-8121. We look forward to working with you in bringing your kidneys to ideal health!

The post How to Keep Your Kidneys Healthy appeared first on Coastal Dialysis & Nephrology In Jupiter Florida.

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Kidneys are organs that most people think very little about until something goes wrong with them. Kidneys work hard to flush toxins and excess debris from our bloodstream. When all is well, we are able to urinate without pain, frequency, or urgency. When something goes wrong, however, kidney troubles can throw a curve in our functionality.

Kidneys: What is Their Function?

Kidneys are two bean-shaped, fist-sized organs that rest just below your ribcage on either side of your spine. Their purpose is to filter out waste and regulate electrolytes, while also controlling your body’s fluid balance. As the kidneys do their work, all refuse collects as urine and travels down narrow tubes called ureters to your bladder.

What is a Kidney Stone?

A kidney stone is the buildup of salt and minerals that can occur during the kidneys’ filtration process. This buildup creates a stone-like formation that can range in size from a sugar crystal to a ping pong ball. Typically, these stones go unnoticed unless they dislodge and cause a blockage in the ureters.

What Causes Kidney Stones?

There are many possible causes of kidney stones. Most commonly, a change in diet and lack of water consumption can throw off your body’s natural balance of water, salt, and minerals, thus causing a stone to form.

If a person has existing health conditions such as gout or Crohn’s disease, their body is at greater risk for forming kidney stones. A family history of kidney issues could also put a person at higher risk.

What are the Symptoms of Kidney Stones?

If you experience any of the following symptoms, you should contact your doctor immediately.

  • Blood in urine
  • Change in the smell or appearance of urine
  • Pain in kidneys and/or during urination
  • Sharp lingering pain in the lower back or abdomen
  • Vomiting, fever, and/or chills along with urinary changes
What Treatments for Kidney Stones Does a Kidney Specialist in Jupiter, FL Offer?

Though smaller kidney stones will pass without a person noticing and without requiring treatment, passing kidney stones that are large can be excruciatingly painful. It is important to visit a kidney doctor who knows how to get rid of kidney stones properly.

While some cases can be treated with mild pain relievers and drinking large amounts of water, other cases may require a more in-depth treatment plan. Some stones can be broken into smaller pieces through the use of shock waves. This method helps a stone pass with less intensity.

In rare situations where natural passing or the use of shock waves isn’t enough, board-certified kidney specialist and internist, Dr. Abbas Rabiei may utilize other treatments, such as using a ureteroscope to break up the stone. In the severest of situations, Dr. Rabiei may need to make a small incision in the lower back to remove the stone completely.

Don’t ignore the signs of kidney stones any longer – stones can lead to chronic kidney disease and ultimately renal failure requiring dialysis. Please call kidney doctor, Dr. Abbas Rabiei at Coastal Nephrology, Dialysis, & Internal Medicine today at 561-253-8121.

The post What Causes Kidney Stones appeared first on Coastal Dialysis & Nephrology In Jupiter Florida.

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Diabetes is a disease characterized by high blood sugar and the body’s inability to produce or process proper amounts of insulin. As of 2015, the International Diabetes Federation reported an average of over 400 million people living with diabetes worldwide.

Given poor diet and lifestyle choices, the number of people affected by diabetes (especially type 2) is on a rapid rise. Many people suffering from prediabetes, or impaired glucose intolerance, aren’t even aware of their condition.

When the body experiences constant high levels of blood sugar, the small, intricate blood vessels of the kidneys can suffer severe damage. Once these vessels are damaged, the kidneys are no longer able to efficiently filter waste. This results in kidney damage caused by diabetes, a condition known as diabetic nephropathy. About 40 percent of insulin-dependent diabetics eventually develop diabetic nephropathy.

Diabetic Nephropathy Symptoms

During the early stages of diabetic nephropathy, you may not experience any noticeable symptoms. As the disease progresses and kidney function is diminished, blood pressure rises. This leads to swelling of the feet, ankles, and legs. Nausea and loss of appetite may occur, along with vomiting after meals. Symptoms usually worsens over time and can lead to other health issues.

Renal Failure From Diabetes / Diabetic Nephropathy

Left untreated, nephropathy may lead to renal failure (kidney failure) requiring dialysis and possibly a kidney transplant. Proper management of diabetes may help you avoid permanent kidney damage, along with treatment for nephropathy which is aimed at slowing progression of the disease. High blood pressure is also treated if necessary.

Importance of Regular Doctor Visits to Monitor Diabetes

People suffering from or at risk of diabetes or should visit their doctor frequently. Through regular blood and urine tests, your doctor can detect diabetes. Diabetic nephropathy and other diseases affecting the kidneys are also detectable in the earliest stages. Early diagnosis and intervention means better treatment outcomes.

Your doctor will also let you know how you can reduce your risk of nephropathy. Risk factors include being a diabetic that smokes, and having high cholesterol, high blood sugar, or high blood pressure. Both type I and type II diabetics are at risk.

Avoid Diabetic Nephropathy and Its Consequences With a Kidney Specialist

Jupiter kidney specialist Dr. Abbas Rabiei has helped many patients with diabetes avoid the severe health implications of kidney damage. Through patient education and comprehensive health care, which includes close symptom monitoring and regular lab work, he empowers his patients to take charge of their health. Call Coastal Nephrology today at 561-253-8121 for an appointment with leading kidney doctor in Palm Beach County, Dr. Rabiei.

The post How Diabetes Leads to Kidney Disease appeared first on Coastal Dialysis & Nephrology In Jupiter Florida.

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Learn About Phosphorus and Your Diet

Phosphorus is the second most abundant mineral in the body next to calcium.  It makes up 1% of a person’s total body weight. It is present in every cell and tissue but 85% are mostly found in the bones and teeth. This mineral plays an essential role in the total functioning of the body and it is very important in staying healthy. The following are the functions or importance of phosphorus:

  • Formation of bones and teeth.
  • Utilization of carbohydrates and fats and in the synthesis of protein for growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.
  • Production of ATP, a molecule that the body uses to store energy.
  • Works with the B vitamins.
  • Assists in the contraction of muscles, in the functioning of kidneys, in maintaining the regularity of heartbeat, and in nerve conduction.
Phosphorus and Kidney Disease

Kidneys help regulate phosphorus in the body by removing excess amount of it. This mechanism is done by a part of the kidneys which is the glomerulus, the structure that does the filtration. However, in cases of kidney disease, the organ cannot perform its function and thus, resulting in an accumulation of phosphorus in the blood, a condition known as hyperphosphatemia. In this condition, due to an inverse relationship between phosphorus and calcium, the calcium level in the blood will decrease and could lead to bone disease.

Recommended Amount of Phosphorus

Even though phosphorus is an essential part of our diet, however, too much ingestion of it can stress the kidneys especially in cases of kidney disease. It can result to further aggravation of the condition or declining of the organ’s function. This is the reason why, it is recommended to reduce our intake of phosphorus-rich foods. As much as possible, it should be limited only between 800 mg to 1,200 mg each day.

Sources of Phosphorus

Almost every food contains phosphorus but the main food sources are the protein food groups of meat and milk. As general rule, the foods rich in proteins are also rich in phosphorus. According to the University of Virginia, when you look at the food label, those foods containing greater than 150 mg or greater than 15 percent of the Daily Value are high in phosphorus, those foods containing 51-150 mg or 5-15 percent of the Daily Value are medium high and those containing 0-50 mg or less than 5 percent of the Daily Value are low in phosphorus. So, before buying any foods look at the label first to make sure or monitor the amount of phosphorus you consume.

Foods High in Phosphorus
  • Avoid canned fish like salmon, sardines because phosphorus is used as a preservative. Tuna fish is probably the most popular canned fish.
  • Soda pop, beer, canned ice teas

Speak with Dr. Abbas Rabiei for a more complete list.

Management of Phosphorus in Kidney Disease

In order to avoid complications or any serious problems brought by kidney disease, there is a need to monitor phosphorus level in the blood. The normal phosphorus level is 3.5 to 5.5 mg/dL. To keep it within this normal limit, the help of the dietitian and the doctor is needed. They can give specific guidelines to follow and also prescribe medication such as phosphate binders. Adherence to the said intervention is needed to ensure successful result.

What does a renal diet consist of?

Kidney function is essential in removing waste material from your body that you consume when you eat. The kidneys eliminate waste products such as dietary protein called urea, as well as excess sodium, potassium and phosphate. When your kidney function is impaired, you may accumulate these products in your system, which can cause your body harm. Your doctor will recommend that you adhere to a strict “Renal Diet” to lessen this accumulation and its effects.

A simple guide to a renal diet:

Low potassium diet (Based on 2000 mg potassium per day diet restriction)

What does a renal diet consist of?

Kidney function is essential in removing waste material from your body that you consume when you eat. The kidneys eliminate waste products such as dietary protein called urea, as well as excess sodium, potassium and phosphate. When your kidney function is impaired, you may accumulate these products in your system, which can cause your body harm. Your doctor will recommend that you adhere to a strict “Renal Diet” to lessen this accumulation and its effects.

The post Phosphorus and Your Diet appeared first on Coastal Dialysis & Nephrology In Jupiter Florida.

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What are my risk factors to becoming a diabetic?

Diabetes mellitus type II is the clinical diagnosis of having persistent elevated blood glucose because your pancreas does not produce enough insulin and your liver produces too much sugar. A person is at risk of developing diabetes based on predisposing factors such as: high calories and fat diet, being overweight, hypertension, high cholesterol, age, gender, race, smoking, high blood glucose level, lack of exercise, and family history. As a person gets older their risk for developing diabetes goes up. A person who is diabetic is at risk of developing chronic kidney disease, heart disease, or stroke.

How can I reduce my risk factors of becoming a diabetic?
  • Weight management. Achieving a body mass index (BMI) of 18.5 to 25 may indicate optimal weight based on your height and weight. A BMI over 25 indicates you are overweight, and a BMI of 30 indicates you are obese.
  • Physical exercise or activity on a daily basis
  • Smoking cessation
  • Balance diet based on a 1800-2000 calories per day diet
  • Reducing your blood pressure
  • Reducing your total cholesterol level
  • Reducing you blood glucose level
What is a diabetic diet?
  • 8 serving of protein per day. 1 serving=1 ounce. Protein consists of lean meat, fish, poultry, pork, beans, reduced-fat cheese, and egg.
  • 14 servings of carbohydrates per day. Carbohydrates consist of low-fat or 1% milk, light yogurt, starchy vegetables, fruits, bread, pasta and grains.
  • 3 or more servings of non-starchy vegetables such as broccoli, lettuce, tomatoes, green beans, cauliflower, carrots.
  • 5 servings of fat.  Fats include margarine, olives, nuts, salad dressing, and mayonnaise, etc.

The post Diabetic Diet and Weight Management appeared first on Coastal Dialysis & Nephrology In Jupiter Florida.

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October 19, 2013

Managing a Renal Diet – Helpful Tips 

What does a renal diet consist of?

Kidney function is essential in removing waste material from your body that you consume when you eat. The kidneys eliminate waste products such as dietary protein called urea, as well as excess sodium, potassium and phosphate. When your kidney function is impaired, you may accumulate these products in your system, which can cause your body harm. Your doctor will recommend that you adhere to a strict “Renal Diet” to lessen this accumulation and its effects.

A simple guide to a renal diet:

Low potassium diet (Based on 2000 mg potassium per day diet restriction)

HIGH POTASSIUM FOODS(AVOID)

(greater than 201 mg of potassium per serving)

LOW POTASSIUM FOODS

(less than  or equal to 200 mg of potassium per serving)

RECOMMENDED SERVING SIZE

 

Fruits
  • Bananas, melons, oranges, nectarines, kiwi, mango, papaya, prunes, pomegranates, and cantaloupe
  •  Dates, dried fruits, dried figs
  • Apple, blueberries, cranberries, grapes, grapefruit, peaches, pears, pineapple, raspberries
  • Fresh fruit: 1 small or ½ large
  • Canned or frozen fruit: ½ cup
  • Berries: 1 cup
  • Grapes, cherries : 12
  • Dried fruit: ¼ cup
  • Juices: 4 oz or ½ cup
Vegetables
  • Avocados, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, sweet potatoes, parsnips, pumpkin, vegetable juices, white potatoes, winter squash
  • Tomato and tomato-based products (puree, sauce or juice)
  • Deep-colored and leafy green vegetables (such as spinach)
  • White beans, black beans, refried beans, baked beans, lentils, red beans, lima beans, garbanzo beans, split peas
  • Asparagus, cabbage, carrots, celery, corn, cucumber, eggplant, green or wax beans, green peas or beans,  lettuce (iceberg), onions, radishes, turnips, water chestnuts
  • Cooked: ½ cup
  • Raw: 1 medium or 1 cup cut up
  • Juices: 4 oz or 1/ 2 cup
  • Nuts: ¼ cup or 1 oz
  • Seeds: 2 tablespoons
  • Legumes, dry beans, peas, cooked: ½ cup
 

 

  • Specially Prepared Potatoes:
  1. Peel and slice into 1/8 inch pieces
  2. Soak 1 cup potatoes in 5 cups of water for 2 hours
  3. Drain and rinse
  4. Cook in large amount of water
  5. Drain, mash, fry or serve plain
Others
  • Milk, yogurt
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Bran and bran products
  • Chocolate, granola, molasses, peanut butter
  • Salt substitute
  • Rice, noodles,  pasta, bread and bread products (not whole grains)
  • Angel cake, yellow cake, pies without chocolate or high potassium-fruit, cookies without nuts or chocolate
  • Meats, poultry, fish: 1 ounce cooked
  • Milk or Milk substitute: 4 ounces or ½ cup
  • Egg: 1 egg or ¼ cup egg substitute
  • Cheese: 1 oz
  • Cooked pasta, rice: 1/3 cup
  • Cereal, cooked: ½ cup
  • Cereal, ready-to –eat: 1 cup
  • Bread: 1 slice
  • Hamburger bun: ½ bun
  • Peanut butter: 2 tablespoons
  • Oils, margarine: 1 teaspoon
  • Mayonnaise: 1 tablespoon
  • Salad dressing: 2 tablespoons
  • Cookies: 1 cookie
  • Ice cream, sorbet, gelatin: ½ cup
  • Cake, 2 x 2 inches: 1 piece
  • Fruit pie: 1/6 of 8-inch pie
  • Sugar, jelly, jam: 1 table spoon
 

Low sodium diet (Based on 2000 mg sodium per day diet restriction)

HIGH SODIUM FOODS (AVOID)

 

LOW SODIUM FOODS RECOMMENDED SERVING SIZE

 

  • Table salt
  • Seasonings like soy sauce, steak sauce, oyster sauce, barbeque sauce, teriyaki sauce, garlic salt or onion salt
  • Most canned foods and frozen dinners (unless they say “low sodium”)
  • Pickled, cured, smoked or process meats, like ham, bacon, sausage or cold cuts
  • Salted starches, like chips, crackers, bread, cereals, and cookies (One serving contains: 150mg of sodium)
  • Canned or dehydrated soups like package noodle soup
  • Most restaurant foods, take-out foods, and fast foods
  • Commercial broths and gravies
  • Commercial mixes
  • “Instant Cereals”
  • Chocolate candy, chocolate desserts
  • Fresh foods:
  •   Fruits
  • Vegetables, starchy (1 serving  contains: 23 mg of sodium)
  • Meat (beef, veal,  or pork)
  • Fish
  • Poultry
  • Dairy products (milk, egg, cheese)
  • Frozen vegetables
  • Fresh seasoning (garlic, onion, lemon juice, pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, black pepper, low-sodium/salt-free seasoning blends)
  • Fresh or dried herbs and spices (basil, bay leaf, curry, ginger, sage, thyme)
  • Vinegar, regular or flavored
  • Homemade or low-sodium soups.
  • Canned food without added salt
  • Snacks
  • Unsalted popcorn, pretzels, plain tortilla or corn chips
  • Meats, poultry, fish: 1 ounce cooked
  • Milk or Milk substitute: 4 ounces or ½ cup
  • Egg: 1 egg or ¼ cup egg substitute
  • Cheese: 1 oz
  • Cooked pasta, rice: 1/3 cup
  • Cereal, cooked: ½ cup
  • Cereal, ready-to –eat: 1 cup
  • Bread: 1 slice
  • Dinner roll, biscuit: 1 small
  • Cornbread (2” square): 1 small
  • Melba toast: 4 each
  • Graham crackers (2” square): 2 each
  • Tortilla, flour (6”): 1
  • Doughnut: 1
  • Hamburger bun: ½ bun
  • Fresh fruit: 1 small or ½ large
  • Canned or frozen fruit: ½ cup
  • Berries: 1 cup
  • Grapes, cherries : 12
  • Dried fruit: ¼ cup
  • Juices: 4 oz or ½ cup
  • Cooked vegetables: ½ cup
  • Raw vegetables: 1 medium or 1 cup cut up
  • Juices (vegetable): 4 oz or 1/ 2 cup
  • Nuts: ¼ cup or 1 oz
  • Seeds: 2 tablespoons
  • Legumes, dry beans, peas, cooked: ½ cup
  • Peanut butter: 2 tablespoons
  • Oils, margarine: 1 teaspoon
  • Mayonnaise: 1 tablespoon
  • Salad dressing: 2 tablespoons
  • Cookies: 1 cookie
  • Ice cream, sorbet, gelatin: ½ cup
  • Cake, 2 x 2 inches: 1 piece
  • Fruit pie: 1/6 of 8-inch pie
  • Sugar, jelly, jam: 1 table spoon
  • Popcorn, sugar coated: 1 cup
  • Jell-O: ½ cup

Low phosphorus diet (Based on 1000mg of phosphorus per day diet restriction)

HIGH PHOSPHORUS FOODS (AVOID) RECOMMENDED SERVING SIZE
Fruit
  • Dried fruits
  • Meat, poultry, and fish: 1 serving of 7-8 ounces
  • Non-dairy creamers or Milk substitute: 4 oz or ½ cup
  • Egg: 2 egg or ½ cup egg substitute
  • Cheese: 4 oz
Vegetables
  • Lima beans, black beans, red beans, black-eyed peas, white beans, and Garbanzo beans, kidney beans, split peas, lentils
  • Dried vegetables
Others
  • Dark, whole or unrefined grains
  • Refrigerator doughs like Pillsbury
  • Chocolate
  • Beer and cola soft drinks
  • Dairy products such as milk, cheese, pudding, yogurt, and ice cream
  • Nuts and peanut butter

*Calcium-rich foods can increase your phosphorus level*

Low protein diet (Based on 7-8 ounces or 70-80 grams of protein per day diet restriction)

HIGH PROTEIN

(One ounce of meat or meat equivalent contains: 7 grams of protein)

LOW PROTEIN RECOMMENDED SERVING SIZE

 

Animal Source:
  • Beef
  • Pork
  • Veal
  • Chicken
  • Turkey
  • Fish
  • Shellfish (Clams, Oysters, Shrimp, Lobster, Crab)
  • Liver
  • Venison
  • Tuna
  • Salmon
  • Eggs (1 egg=1 ounce of protein)

Dairy Products

  • Milk
  • Cheese

Other

  • Protein bars
Plant Source:
  • Breads
  • Cereals
  • Grains
  • Vegetables
  • Fruit
  • Meats, poultry or fish (fresh or frozen): 1 ounce cooked
  • Milk or Milk substitute: 4 ounces or ½ cup
  • Egg: 1 egg or ¼ cup egg substitute
  • Cheese unsalted (low sodium): 1 oz
  • Cheese, aged (Brick, Cheddar, Colby): 1 ounce
  • Cereal, cooked: ½ cup
  • Cereal, ready-to –eat: 1 cup
  • Peanut butter: 2 tablespoons
  • Clams: 1-1/2 ounces
  • Oysters: 2 ounces
  • Shrimp: 1 ounce
  • Lobster: 1-1/2 ounces
  • Crab: 1-1/2 ounces
  • Tuna (fresh or unsalted, packed in water): ¼ cups
  • Salmon(fresh or unsalted):1 ounce
 

 

The post Managing a Renal Diet appeared first on Coastal Dialysis & Nephrology In Jupiter Florida.

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