Loading...

Follow The DIY Dog Mom | Dog Recipes on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

There are so many health benefits your dog receives when you feed him/her sardines or other oily fish like herring or mackerel. The #1 benefit is that your dog is receiving a natural source of rich omega 3 fish oils – you are literally feeding the source of the fish oil. I stopped feeding fish oil to my raw fed dogs, Izzy and Hudson, (Mylah still gets some because she is a whole different story) and started feeding them the whole fish itself. Not only do my dogs LOVE to eat a whole fish, they also receive pretty amazing health benefits from these fish. I go over the health benefits in more detail below.

Oily Fish to Feed Dogs

  • Sardines
  • Mackeral
  • Herring
  • Trout
  • Smelt

The fish mentioned above are all oily fish that are low in the food chain and therefore low in mercury and other environmental contaminants. They also provide rich omega 3’s and plenty of antioxidants. 

I try to feed Izzy 3-4 whole prey sardines per week and here’s why:
  • Sardines are great for preventing cancer and dental disease in dogs
  • They are rich in antioxidants
  • Sardines balance the fats in other protein sources I feed throughout the week
  • Sardines are naturally rich in Vitamin D. Did you know dogs can’t produce their own Vitamin D and therefore rely on it from food? A study was evaluated by Dogs Naturally Magazine that evaluated dogs low in Vitamin D being at risk for cancer.
  • They contain a good amount of Ubiquinol Coq10 which is important for cardiovascular health
  • They’re great source of Vitamin B-12

Adding in Fish to Kibble – Even if you are feeding your dog kibble or freeze dried food you should still add in an oily fish like sardines! You don’t have to purchase them whole prey either. You can purchase canned sardines in water with no salt added and feed them to your dog. As with anything new you feed to your dog be sure to start off slow. Start with 1/4 of the fish and work your way up. If I have run out of whole prey sardines I will usually split a can of sardines between Hudson and Izzy for one meal. Sometimes I give Hudson an entire can of sardines in his meal, he is 80lbs for context. It just depends on what they are eating that week.

If you feed your dog sardines or another oily fish you do not need to be adding fish oil to their food. You never want to overfeed one food source to your dog (or yourself!).

Are You Worried about Feeding the Bones?   Put simply, no. I don’t worry about this because my dogs have gotten really good at chewing through the bones and chewing whole pieces of their food before swallowing. If you are worried you can only feed the canned sardines or try to find deboned fish.

Feeding Fish to Help Dogs Skin & Allergies

One of the reasons I started feeding my dogs whole prey fish was because I wanted to see if Hudson’s allergies would improve. He has environmental yeasty flare-ups and I control them through diet, bathing, and all-natural topicals. While diets in the past have helped his overall skin and allergies to subside, I want to try and prevent the allergic flare-ups and thought fish could help. I have noticed that on days I feed him a whole prey herring (a 12lb fish whole) he is never itchy. We will see how this goes in terms of preventing flare-ups as I continue. So far feeding him these fish only make his allergies and skinhealth improve!

Xox,
Alicia
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The health benefits of golden paste for dogs is kind of a never-ending list! So if you aren’t giving your dog golden paste daily with your dog’s meals I highly recommend you start ASAP! Here are some of the benefits…

  • natural detox (helps get rid of lumps and bumps on dogs, it has significantly decreased a lump on my dog Izzy)
  • anti-inflammatory – great for dogs with arthritis or to prevent it
  • aids in allergy relief
  • great for the liver (protects it against toxins), heart and digestive tract
  • anti-cancer AND can help in the treatment of cancer

I feed my dog’s golden paste twice a day with their two meals morning and night. Turmeric doesn’t last too long in the body so you can feed it in smaller amounts multiple times a day. As with any new food or supplement, start slow. 1/2 a tsp for larger dogs and 1/4 tsp for smaller dogs. My 50lb dog now gets 1 tsp total a day and my 80lb dog gets 1.5 tsp total a day.

I got this recipe from Dr. Judy Morgan and it is the best one I have found so far. She did a video explaining it more!

Ingredients & Instructions

Warm the water in a pan and add in the turmeric. Slowly stir together until it turns into a paste. Turn off your stove at this point. Add the coconut oil, fresh ground pepper, and Ceylon cinnamon and mix well! Serve with the next meal! Store in the fridge for about two weeks. This amount of paste lasts me a little longer than two weeks with my two big guys but I keep feeding it until it is finished. I make this recipe about every three weeks give or take.

Contraindications for using turmeric and golden paste include animals undergoing surgery, with gallbladder disease, surgical patients, diabetes mellitus, gastroesophageal reflux disease, hormone-sensitive tumors, and animals with iron absorption problems.

How to make Golden Paste for your pets - YouTube

Xox,
Alicia

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

When I first started feeding my dogs raw food I was overwhelmed and somewhat confused. That was over five years ago. I have learned a ton and made it a priority to educate myself to benefit my dogs and so I could teach other dog parents about feeding raw food. The raw feeding learning curve doesn’t happen overnight. With that said, not all dogs can tolerate a raw diet. I feed my dogs as individuals and if there comes a point when raw isn’t working for them I switch it up.

One of the most beneficial things I have learned is how to choose the right protein and additional foods to feed each of my dogs. If you are in my Facebook group, I just did a live video yesterday about how I feed my dogs as individuals. I couldn’t imagine feeding Izzy the same foods as Hudson or Mylah because the three of my dogs are so different. That is what I think a lot of us forget. We just think, ‘oh feed all three this and it’s fine!’. But that mentality really doesn’t work because every dog is different. Dogs all share the scientific fact that they are carnivores BUT every dog will react to certain foods in a different way. Just in the same way we as humans are different and require (and like) different foods, we need to think of our dogs like this.

So, how do you choose the best foods to feed your dog? For Izzy and Hudson, I use TCM Food Energetics. Mylah is a completely different scenario because she has multiple medical issues so I am going to keep her out of this and focus on the best raw foods for your specific dog using Izzy and Hudson as examples.

Using TCM Food Energetics

In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), food energetics are used to look at how food affects our bodies from a neutral, cool and warm standpoint. So instead of evaluating foods based on protein, calories, and carbs like Western culture does, TCM looks at vitamin and mineral content in addition to the sensations foods have on our bodies. For dogs suffering from allergies – warm and hot foods must be avoided. When you look at your dog’s behavior and then pair it with TCM food energetics I bet you might see some ways you can improve your dog’s diet.

For example, for a long time, I fed my dog Hudson chicken because he loves chicken. He would have allergic skin flare-ups… but he also loved chicken. Raw chicken really messed with his skin so sometimes I would cook it for him too. Ultimately, feeding chicken just wasn’t working long term for him. When I applied TCM food energetics to Hudson, I realized he is a dog who runs warmer. It’s a running joke that we call him a furnace because he makes us warm when he snuggles with us and it never lasts because he often gets overheated (he is a warm / even a hot (yang) dog is what I found.

So, Hudson needs to be on a diet of cooling foods – and guess what? His skin irritations have decreased! I have also made an effort to include many anti-inflammatory natural supplements into his diet like golden paste and flax seed paste.

How do you figure out which are the best raw foods to feed your dog using this method?

Start by using the descriptions below of a neutral, cool or warm dog and then match it to the infographic I made above! Then start incorporating those foods into your dog’s diet. As with any new food being introduced to your dog, take it slow!

Neutral Dog: The Yin and Yang of your dog are in balance – your dog is able to develop and maintain warmth while showing qualities of coolness by being quiet and an inward but confident dog. If you want your dog to be balanced then try using neutral foods to harmonize your dog’s body.

Cool Dog (Yin):  Your dog shows signs of being cooler if they are a cuddler and seek out warmth in the bed or under blankets. Some clinical signs are fatigue or weakness. If your dog has a poor appetite or issues with diarrhea and losing weight – these can be signs of needing warmer foods and being out of balance.

Warm Dog (Qi Tonic): This is a dog who likes to lie on a cool floor and seeks out areas that are cooler. They aren’t super interested in cuddling because they get overheated. These dogs will pant, be thirsty and can be restless at night. They also might have dry skin. If a dog is running hot (yang) they are often dogs who show signs of inflammation and are overly active or outward.

My dogs:

Hudson – runs warm and has been hot in the past. So I feed him cooling foods mainly but some neutral foods as well (he does well with pork).

Izzy – has been pretty much a neutral dog but has shown some signs of being warmer so I introduced some cooling foods which are helpful for her especially in the summer because she has a thick warm coat.

Xox,
Alicia

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

I want to connect with readers even more, on an easier daily basis. That’s why I had the idea to create an exclusive group where we can connect face-to-face (well, Facebook-to-Facebook) with the common goal to share more information to help our dogs live longer, healthier lives.

I know you are a DIY dog mom like me. So why not find one place where we can post our questions, remedies, and information so we (and our dogs) can all benefit? I created a Facebook group for us to do just that.

Join the DIY Dog Moms: Holistic Remedies, Raw & Home-Cooked Food group now!

*Even if you don’t feed your dog raw or home-cooked food yet, that’s ok! There’s so much to learn about how you can incorporate healthy foods into your dog’s diet.*

So, will you join me and others in helping our dogs live longer, happier and healthy lives? Join now!

Xox,
Alicia

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

There are so many health benefits your dog receives when you feed him/her sardines or other oily fish like herring or mackerel. The #1 benefit is that your dog is receiving a natural source of rich omega 3 fish oils – you are literally feeding the source of the fish oil. I stopped feeding fish oil to my raw fed dogs, Izzy and Hudson, (Mylah still gets some because she is a whole different story) and started feeding them the whole fish itself. Not only do my dogs LOVE to eat a whole fish, they also receive pretty amazing health benefits from these fish. I go over the health benefits in more detail below.

Oily Fish to Feed Dogs

  • Sardines
  • Mackeral
  • Herring
  • Trout
  • Smelt

The fish mentioned above are all oily fish that are low in the food chain and therefore low in mercury and other environmental contaminants. They also provide rich omega 3’s and plenty of antioxidants. 

I try to feed Izzy 3-4 whole prey sardines per week and here’s why:
  • Sardines are great for preventing cancer and dental disease in dogs
  • They are rich in antioxidants
  • Sardines balance the fats in other protein sources I feed throughout the week
  • Sardines are naturally rich in Vitamin D. Did you know dogs can’t produce their own Vitamin D and therefore rely on it from food? A study was evaluated by Dogs Naturally Magazine that evaluated dogs low in Vitamin D being at risk for cancer.
  • They contain a good amount of Ubiquinol Coq10 which is important for cardiovascular health
  • They’re great source of Vitamin B-12

Adding in Fish to Kibble – Even if you are feeding your dog kibble or freeze dried food you should still add in an oily fish like sardines! You don’t have to purchase them whole prey either. You can purchase canned sardines in water with no salt added and feed them to your dog. As with anything new you feed to your dog be sure to start off slow. Start with 1/4 of the fish and work your way up. If I have run out of whole prey sardines I will usually split a can of sardines between Hudson and Izzy for one meal. Sometimes I give Hudson an entire can of sardines in his meal, he is 80lbs for context. It just depends on what they are eating that week.

If you feed your dog sardines or another oily fish you do not need to be adding fish oil to their food. You never want to overfeed one food source to your dog (or yourself!).

Are You Worried about Feeding the Bones?   Put simply, no. I don’t worry about this because my dogs have gotten really good at chewing through the bones and chewing whole pieces of their food before swallowing. If you are worried you can only feed the canned sardines or try to find deboned fish.

Feeding Fish to Help Dogs Skin & Allergies

One of the reasons I started feeding my dogs whole prey fish was because I wanted to see if Hudson’s allergies would improve. He has environmental yeasty flare-ups and I control them through diet, bathing, and all-natural topicals. While diets in the past have helped his overall skin and allergies to subside, I want to try and prevent the allergic flare-ups and thought fish could help. I have noticed that on days I feed him a whole prey herring (a 12lb fish whole) he is never itchy. We will see how this goes in terms of preventing flare-ups as I continue. So far feeding him these fish only make his allergies and skinhealth improve!

Xox,
Alicia

The post Sardines & Oily Fish for Dogs appeared first on The DIY Dog Mom.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview