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The recently opened Lolly-Laputan Kids Restaurant is the first educational family restaurant in China where kids can enjoy learning with entertainment. Designed by Wutopia Lab the exterior façade of the restaurant is made of aluminum panels with punctures of various sizes on it to create an effect of ripples woven together. Behind these ripples, a world between reality and dreams takes center stage.
The front lobby is a circular space surrounded by a forest of lights, which is composed of 1000 acrylic tubes that are able to simulate the effect of sunlight shining through thick layers of leaves to provide a unique forest experience, with the reflection of the mirrored wall.
The central area is the Cloudy Town, the wonderland for kids. Here, they can enjoy endless clouds made of acrylic, with tree houses, slides, ball pit hidden in between, surrounded by the dining areas. This whimsical restaurant cleverly caters for a both adult and child effortlessly without brash colours or gimmicks.

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Located within a former Holiday Inn in the Toronto’s fashionable Annex neighbourhood, the 188-room Kimpton Saint George Hotel marks the first outpost of the Kimpton hotel branch in Canada.
Local interior design firm Mason Studio completed hotel as an ode to the Toronto’s layered architectural and artistic heritage. The lobby strikes a balance between the Annex’s bohemian spirit and the affluence of greater Yorkville with its display of craftsmanship. Numerous millwork arches are intended to visually guide guests throughout the space, while paying homage to Toronto’s diverse architectural style and eras.
A bright 100-square-metre meeting space called the Peregrine Room, meanwhile, contrasts the moody tones of the lobby lounge to reinforce the concept of distinct neighbourhoods within the city.
The apartment-like guest rooms continue to relay the story of Torontonian culture and design with bespoke furniture, many of which are curved or rounded, record players with Canadian vinyl, and locally-crafted decorative objects.
Inside each of the room’s oak-and-rattan armories is a white resin squirrel figurine by art duo Greatbeard – a playful nod to the city’s famous albino squirrels.
Among a sea of beige are accents of greens, blues, golds, are greys that reflect Canada’s vast expanses of untouched nature. Vintage black-and-white photographs from a couple’s vacation to Toronto appear at each guest entry – a reference to the city’s post-war history. The main entrance features a black wood awning punctuated with pin-like lights spelling ‘Kimpton’ in Braille lettering, which takes cues from the once-omnipresent marquee signs throughout the district.

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Kaggeboda is a small and unique summer house located in the forest of the Stockholm Archipelago, Sweeden. Designed by Andren Fogelstrom Kaggeboda three cabins are placed in relation to one another, creating a  diversity of indoor and outdoor spaces. The blackened plywood of the facades gives strong character that relates to the surrounding pine trees.
Generous windows and skylights allow for the interior to be bathed in natural daylight, whist the inbuilt furniture and high ceilings both contribute to the feeling of serenity, the material creates beauty through its simplicity. The largest of the three buildings contains the wood-burning stove, a small kitchen, a bed and a sofa. The second house has a study and guest room, and the smallest of the three is currently used for storage and has the flexibility to be changed into a bathroom.
The Kaggeboda project is like a small village, or a house in three parts. It’s all about the connection to the outside,  you have to go out to get anywhere or do anything. This summerhouse is very much about living ‘the small life’ – being outside within moments of waking up or spending all day preparing a meal in the outdoor kitchen.

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Ornate gold columns and chequered marble floors nod to the past life of Danish furniture brand Paustian‘s latest showroom, which has opened in a building renovated by Danish architecture practice Aarstiderne Architecture collaboration with brand’s in-house design team. The Paustian showroom takes over a now-defunct bank that dates back to 1868. Located in Stroget, a pedestrianised shopping area at the heart of Copenhagen, the store comes as part of the brand’s move to be more accessible.
It joins three other showrooms dotted across Denmark: one in Ostbanen, which occupies an old train station, another in Aarhus which is located inside an 18th-century mansion, and the flagship in Nordhavn, which is set within a building designed by Danish architect Utzon.
The new central branch features an expansive ground floor punctuated by the bank’s original gold pillars, which rise up to a mottled, vaulted ceiling. Veiny marble structural pillars, mahogany wall panelling and the distinctive checkerboard flooring have also been preserved throughout.
Keeping major interventions to a minimum, the practice has inserted large panels of glazing in the store’s front facade to flood the space with natural light and allow passersby on the street to glimpse inside.
Throughout the entire process, the aim has been to preserve the original architecture, while still revitalizing the building with new functions.

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The Old Meets New house is located in Tra Vinh, Vietnam, known for its fresh air, hospitality, and rustic charm. Not being heavily urbanised, the city retains plenty of traditional pagodas and residential areas. Before planning the house Block Architects wondered how the new house would interact with the surroundings, especially the buildings nearby, so that they could form a harmonious combination without dimming the spirit and individuality of the house itself.
Bricks form an outer shell to cover and protect the entire house. They are also used to filter the inner microclimate. Buffers such as lobbies, porches and voids are arranged to circulate fresh air.
The floor plan draws its inspiration from traditional three-part country houses, which include three main areas in the heart and two bedrooms on either side. These areas lay parallel to the adjacent empty land in order to harness natural wind and light.

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Ephemeral Edge is a weekend retreat located three hours north of New York City. As a retreat, the goal of the project was to contrasts the rapid sense of time and pressure of the city and extend the enjoyment and sensuousness of the everyday passage of time that is often highlighted in the open landscape.
Designed by Dean-Wolf Architects, the sense of extended time is accomplished by taking advantage of the forested hillside which contains a constructed pond with distant views. The design responds to four site conditions: the curving edge of the pond, the torqued banks necessary to construct the pond, the spindly edge of the forest clearing, and the quiet beauty of the distant view.
Internally the sun fills the intimate spaces of the house with the light and shadow of the forest. The pond and the distant view are always present.  At the entry, where the dining space aligns with the distant view, doors open through the house, joining the intimate table to the larger landscape.

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Located in Shanghai’s business centre, Omakase is a new restaurant offering kaiseki ryori, a traditional Japanese, multi-course, cuisine that traces its origins to the dishes served at the centuries-old tea ceremony. Designed by local practice Shanghai Hip-pop Design, Omakase deliberately avoids the aesthetic of traditional Japanese interiors.
Inspired by the time of year when cherry blossom petals fall gently to the ground in the breeze, the restaurant has been conceived in a glimmering-pink oneiric space that evocatively complements the culinary delights of kaiseki ryori.
Spread over two floors, the restaurant envelops its guests in a pink glow, courtesy of the illuminated glass floor and a series of up-lighted glass partitions decorated with painted cherry blossom petals and dewdrops. The diffuse swathes of mellow pink lighting imbue the space with a romantic tranquillity whereas the semi-transparent partitions tiptoe between privacy and openness further enhancing the sense of mystery.
Standing out against the neon-pink surroundings in amber luminescence, a cubic core on the entrance level contains a private dining room while a staircase that leads guest to the upper floor emanates an amber glow. The same amber glow distinguishes the bar counter on the same level, and the dining tables and counters upstairs which loom seductively amid the “suspended” pink cherry blossoms.

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New York studio Champalimaud transformed a 1920s residence that was destroyed by a hurricane into a luxury holiday home on a resort in Dorado, Puerto Rico.
Called Su Casa, the property forms part of the Dorado Beach Ritz-Carlton Reserve, which was also ravaged by the Caribbean island’s deadly Hurricane Maria in 2017. The residence was built in 1928 by Clara Livingston, a pilot whose father owned the 1,400-acre property in Dorado, to replace a wooden plantation house that was wrecked by the 1903 Hurricane San Felipe.
Livingston sold the property to Laurence Rockefeller, a third generation of the wealthy American Rockefeller family, who turned the house and the surrounding lush site into the Dorado Beach resort in 1958.
Luxury hotel group Ritz Carlton took over the property in 2012 and has run the house as a private holiday home for families and large groups. In 2018, it enlisted New York-based studio Champalimaud to oversee the renovation of the home, following the aftermath of the hurricane. Principal designer Anna Beeber and fellow principal Elisabeth Rogoff designed the renovation with the aim to restore the key characteristics of the residence. Livingstone had completed in the mission-style, choosing thick concrete walls to bolster from future damage, long wooden eaves and Spanish clay tiles.
The design team also wanted to makes the most of its surrounds, which includes greenery, a colourful tiled patio at the entrance and a grand infinity swimming pool that extends towards the Atlantic Ocean.
Champalimaud pared back the material palette, transitioning from dark wooden window frames and terracotta flooring to lighter and brighter finishes such as limestone and pale timbers. Livingstone’s original antique wooden furniture is peppered throughout, alongside pieces that Champalimaud custom made in New York, as well as designs by studios including Allied Maker and Minotti. A highlight of the property is a series of colourful murals created by Puerto Rican artists.

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Architect Jake Moulson reworked a dilapidated UK, Dublin townhouse, creating a dramatic interior that can b best described as seductive, flamboyant, restrained and spectacular! The project, called D2 Townhouse, involved renovating a five-storey listed Georgian house that had fallen into disrepair, as well as a coach house in the garden that has become overgrown.
An external cladding system of cast-iron panels was prototyped digitally and features a repeating pattern that has also been used for the railings in the garden and doorways through the house. Gleaming brass furniture curves around the exterior of the parlour, which is painted a deep blue to contrast with the metal. Leather seating niches are set into some of the brass units, and cupboards are hidden in the others.
The kitchen has a sci-fi style row of surfaces made from thermoformed Corian that has been pressed into an undulating shape. A white-painted cupboard made in a neo-Georgian style hides the fridge and other appliances behind a patterned panel.
The family’s art collection is displayed in a room the architects called a “godless chapel” at the back of the house, which has been opened up with a double-height window and a glazed curved bay.
Its floor is made of steel decorated with laser-etched designs in the Adamesque style, an 18th-century neoclassical school of architecture and design. A colourful patterned ceiling in the library was painted by artist Morag Myerscough, and charred timber was used for the wainscotting of the corridors. “Channelling D2 Townhouse’s Georgian inheritance, with its formality, flamboyance, pomp and procession, Jake Moulson wanted to reinvigorate an imagined life, give the house back its body, to re-dress it sharply against the aged grit and grain of its surfaces, and to love it where it had been neglected,” said the studio.

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A genuinely clever concept with a daring aesthetic that’s memorable, hair salon USFIN by George Livissianis, has been presented with the 2019 Premier Award at the Australian Interior Design Awards (AIDA). The way George Livissianis’ USFIN has reinvented the standard hair salon and given considerable thought to the customer experience and employee satisfaction was a key factor in it being awarded the Premier Award for Australian Interior Design, as well as the Award for Retail Design. A juror described the project as sophisticated and “a bit sexy,” which is exactly how you want to feel after leaving a hairdressing salon.
Celebrating its 16th anniversary this year, the 2019 Australian Interior Design Awards boasts a stellar line-up of the country’s very best interior design projects. Maintaining the high standards the awards are known for, this year’s entries exhibit a fearless design approach that pushes boundaries to reinvent typologies, experiment with spatial planning and innovate to improve the user experience.
On Friday 31 May, the annual Australian Interior Design Awards were presented at a gala celebration in Melbourne, with 550 of Australia’s most esteemed interior design and architecture practitioners and professionals in attendance. Below is snapshot of some of the awarded projects.

Premier Award for Australian Interior Design George Livissianis for USFIN

Premier Award for Australian Interior Design George Livissianis for USFIN

Emerging Interior Design Practice -Award Pierce Widera

Emerging Interior Design Practice -Award Pierce Widera

Residential Design Award – Kennedy Nolan for Oak House

Residential Design Award – Kennedy Nolan for Oak House

Residential Design Award – Kennedy Nolan for Oak House

Residential Design Award – Kennedy Nolan for Oak House

Residential Decoration Award Arent&Pyke for Under the Tree

Residential Decoration Award Arent&Pyke for Under the Tree

Hospitality Design Award – Carr for United Places Botanic Gardens

Hospitality Design Award – Carr for United Places Botanic Gardens

Hospitality Design Award – Carr for United Places Botanic Gardens

Workplace Design Award – BVN for BVN Sydney

Workplace Design Award – BVN for BVN Sydney

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