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Whether you’re heading to the gym or going to work, you have to stay hydrated, especially since the weather seems to be delivering nothing but high temps these days. Bottled water is expensive and it’s horrible for the environment so anytime we can avoid buying plastic, it’s a good thing. You’ve probably noticed that the market is saturated with reusable water bottles these days making it tedious to just search for one, much less pick one out to buy. We’ve done the research for you by seeking out 10 reusable bottles that will definitely help you on your hydration mission.

1. A6 memobottle \\\ $28
2. Collar Water Bottle by Daniel Debiasi & Federico Sandri for Stelton \\\ $35
3. GIGI 500 ML by bkr \\\ $38
4. V2 17 oz. Glass Water Bottle by Soma \\\ $30
5. Poketo Canteen by Corkcicle \\\ $35
6. The LARQ Self-Cleaning Bottle \\\ $95
7. Under Wraps by S’well \\\ $42
8. Squireme Water Bottle \\\ $35
9. Coral Hidrate Spark 3 \\\ $55
10. Hip Bottle \\\ $15

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The following post is brought to you by A’ Design Award and Competition. Our partners are hand-picked by the Design Milk team because they represent the best in design.

The A’Design Awards and Competition deadline is approaching! The regular deadline ends on September 30th, though the late deadline ends on February 28th, 2020. However, to avoid late entry fees, submit your designs today and receive a free preliminary evaluation of your design!

If you’re a designer looking to gain exposure, obtain feedback from a grand jury panel of leading industry experts, and showcase your design concept on a world stage, the A’ Design Award and Competition is definitely worth entering. Other than the reasons just mentioned, you’ll also receive extensive PR and publicity, inclusion in the annual year book, invitation to a lavish gala to network and celebrate design, explore the opportunity to sell your winning design, and so much more! All winners, runner-ups and participants have nothing to lose but everything to gain from entering – you can learn more about the benefits here.

Whether you’re a designer in lighting, furniture, architecture, graphic, visual communication, or even hospitality, there’s no shortage of categories for you to enter under because the competition includes over 100 different categories of design awards. You don’t need a completed design either; you can submit a concept, prototype, or finished product. Explore all the different categories here and see where your design fits in.

Once you submit your design, you’ll get a free preliminary evaluation of your design. Then each design goes through a rigorous judging process with a grand jury of academics, press, fellow designers, and experts who are extremely knowledgable about design – there’s no better audience to get constructive feedback and critique from. Remember that the regular deadline ends September 30th, so be sure to plan ahead and apply today.

As a media partner of the A’ Design Award and Competition, we love sharing some of our favorite designs from last year’s competition throughout the year:

Image by Elena Prokhorova, Bogdanova Bureau, 2019

Bandage by Bogdanova Bureau

Image by Hanna Lantto, 2018.

Piilo by Hanna Lantto

Image by USE Brand Design Corp., 2018.

New Hope Seed Brand Gift Box Brand Gift Box by Yung-Li Chen – Fineherbsoap Co. Ltd.

Image by Ahmed Habib – Lines, 2018.

The Cube Private House by Ahmed Habib – Lines

Image by He Yang, Zhang Peinan.

The Sea Vibes Installation by ToThree Design

Image by Jordan N. Dery.

Olah Light by Maurice Dery and Jordan Dery

Image by Loomiosa Ltd.

Leaf by Daniel Mato

Image courtesy of QZENS Furniture & Design

Thorn by Yılmaz Dogan

Image by Serge Atallah, 2018.

Moon by Serge Atallah

Image by Li Xu.

Lizi Building block by Li Xu

Register here.

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When it comes to cookie cutter, shoebox-sized dorm rooms there are plenty of opportunities to let your personality shine, but not always a lot of space to do it (contrary to every college sitcom and movie ever). Have a look through Society6’s massive selection of creative back-to-school goods that will let everyone who sets foot in your living space know just how good your taste is!

Flipper Pillow Sham by Michela Buttignol

COFFEE READING Travel Mug by Sagepizza  

You gotta Risk it to get the Biscuit Laptop Sleeve by Lorien Stern

Geometric Lines Minimal Black and White Backpack by AEJ Design

Peach and Black Comforter by Becky Bicks

THINGS WILL WORK OUT Sticker by Matthew Taylor Wilson

Colorful ethnic decoration Serving Tray by Coco’s abstractions

Vanilla water Art Print by Tatjana Zlatkovic

Orange Watercolor Brush Strokes Rectangular Pillow by EnShape

Overthink This Funny Quote Coffee Mug by EnvyArt

Design Milk is proud to partner with Society6 to offer The Design Milk Dairy, a special collection of Society6 artists’ work curated by Design Milk and our readers. Proceeds from the The Design Milk Dairy help us bring Design Milk to you every day.

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WELCOME BACK, from Sofia Alvarado of Fi studio, takes classic pieces of furniture and brings them into the modern day. Resurrected with the use of vibrant colors, materials, and compositions, the feel of the collection is one of an era of uninhibited interior decor possibility. Free, dynamic, fun spaces that seek to share happiness, thoughtfulness, and individuality. On another level, Sofia says that WELCOME BACK is a tribute to the freedom of childhood that we leave behind, and the knowledge that you can grow while maintaining the wisdom of the past.

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Blue Bottle Coffee Daimaru is a minimalist interior located in Tokyo, Japan, designed by Schemata Architects. The new Blue Bottle location is situated in a Daimaru Department Store across from PAPABUBBLE, a separate space that Schemata Architects had designed in 2012.

This particular Blue Bottle location is unique in that the cafe stand allows for takeaway only – versus their general locations that provide seating. As the architects stated, the space is designed like a kind of industrial product rather than a space.

Due to the light hue of the floors, the architects wanted to avoid using white throughout the cafe stand. Instead, the stand is finished in natural materials, and has a warm beige saturation, similar to kraft paper. Schemata used hardboard, a type of high-density fiberboard, as the surface material.

Photography by Takumi Ota.

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There’s naturally plenty of reasons to visit Yosemite and this year brings a few more. In the documentary Free Solo, Alex Honnold scales El Capitan, a near-vertical slab rising from the Earth—and all without ropes. This thrilling, palm-sweating feat won an Oscar earlier in February and we all got to see the jaw-dropping landscape of Yosemite while at it; a mixture of adrenaline and bliss.

If that’s not enough, Autocamp has opened its new property in Yosemite with the help of Anacapa Architecture and Geremia Design. Autocamp Yosemite is a kind of design-forward, easy minimalism that doesn’t feel unnatural or out of place amongst more campy, dark wood lodges run by the National Park Service here.

It’s the most modern and sleek accommodation by far: the 4,000 square foot clubhouse has not only a stargazing deck and an outdoor swimming pool, but an instantly calming stretched fabric screen by Chambers Art & Design featuring Yosemite’s iconic Half Dome. The installation is lit up from behind by a pendant from Workstead which mimics the moon.

In an area known for camping and wildlife, fine dining may be hard to come by; the Clubhouse caters to cravings by hosting a marketplace of locally-made, artisanal food and beverages.

Elsewhere in the clubhouse, Geremia took cues from the mountains: contemporary lines are softened by rough-hewn materials. Deep, Croft House sofas and low slung club chairs by Estudio Persona are set on top of Kush Rugs.

Cabins and Airstreams also feature bedside rugs by Kush Rugs and pillows handmade in Chile by Treko. These soft, cozy details make every room look plush without being over-the-top. After all, when you’re here to visit Yosemite, you want to remember that you’re sleeping in the mountains.

What: Autocamp Yosemite

Where: 6323 CA-140, Midpines, CA 95345

How much? Rooms start at $324
Design draw: Sleek accommodations an hour away from Yosemite don an easy minimalism that doesn’t look forced or out of place when you’re returning from Half Dome.
Book it: Visit Autocamp Yosemite

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Meet the sofa inspired by Tetris, one of the 1980s most beloved games. Manga Arquitetura designed the Tetris Sofa because they wanted to make a comfortable seating option with defined lines. The main idea behind it was to create a transformative piece of furniture perfect for many different purposes: hanging out with family, working at an in-home office, or even sleeping on it when an extra bed is needed.

Because of its versatility and multi-functionality, this is the ultimate sofa for social get-togethers. That’s what makes it perfect for a home’s common space—it’s ready no matter what you need it for.

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When visitors enter the Prague offices of DDB, they’re unknowingly met with an optical illusion that forms the creative agency’s logo. The visual treat, along with the office, was created by B² Architecture to appear perfect at the entrance. As one moves around it becomes clear that it’s an anamorphic illusion that playfully projects color into the office space. Moving around the office, one would never know unless they spotted it at that specific vantage point upon entering.

Once inside, the black, white, and blue colors look to be organic shapes of color that liven the interior space up.

The clean white surfaces further inside draw visitors in where they’ll spot a colorful wall of upholstered stools, which are arranged to look like their logo. The wall display is used as a creative solution to store extra seating for when it’s needed. When a group meeting or presentation is happening, employees can easily pop a stool out and have a seat.

Situated in the middle of the offices is a yellow, semi-circular, arena-like space used for brainstorming. The glass walls keep visibility open while working as a surface to write notes and ideas. Curtains are available for additional privacy when needed.

Photos by Alexander Dobrovodsky.

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Ryan Crotty’s latest paintings are on view at the High Noon Gallery in New York through August 28th. Despite what your eyes are telling you right now, this canvas is not transparent, and the surface is not emitting light. Crotty has just found a new way to paint.

A Blind Rush, 2019, 14″x11″

Bait the Hooks, 2019 (detail)

Crotty’s primary tool is a customized piece of plexiglass that he uses like a squeegee to scrape paint across the surface of a canvas. Where the squeegee presses against the unseen wood support structure behind the canvas, the paint is almost entirely removed while the center of the canvas flexes under the pressure to accept greater degrees of paint. This process is repeated several times with multiple colors and layers to create a coating thick enough to produce a glass-like surface with other color transitions.

You don’t ever feel like you’re looking AT a Ryan Crotty painting… you feel like you’re looking THROUGH it. He produces an “x-ray” effect that reveals the unseen skeleton of the structure behind the canvas, while ALSO producing a beautiful painting on its surface.

I Willingly Offer Myself, 2019, 20″x24″

Grave This on Your Memory, 2019, 24″x20″

Ryan prefers to purchase the store-bought pre-stretched canvases where the low-quality frames are more likely to interfere (art students will know what I’m talking about). The canvas on those frames however, isn’t good enough, so he replaces the cheap white canvas with a thicker high-quality linen, and often moves or adds central support bars. In “Grave this on Your Memory” (above), the center support bar was lowered before he started painting.

Grave This on Your Memory, 2019, (detail)

Once the frame is modified and canvas replaced, a base layer of white modeling paste is often applied – it’s a thicker paint that creates ripples and imperfections in the initial surface.

Diviner, 2019, 20″x16″

The most surprising secret of his process is revealed when examining the sides of the paintings. Small gobs of paint collect on the edges of the canvas (below) to reveal a historical record of the exact order of colors applied to the surface. Examine them all and you’ll find only 3 colors: red, yellow, and blue. There is no green, purple, or orange paint in any of these. The ILLUSION of those colors is produced by the translucent laying of the 3 primary colors, carefully monitored and controlled in thickness and density.

LT-1.8, 2019 (detail)

LT-1.8, 2019, 24″x20″

Though he sticks with “primary colors”, it should be noted that the particular blue or yellow or red can vary from work to work, and Crotty is constantly changing and experimenting with the concentration, transparency, and addition of other solutions to change the effects.

Ryan Crotty is an experimentation addict. Not only does he keep detailed notes on the EXACT mixtures, order, and process of every single painting, but he’s constantly pushing into new territory. In “LT-1.8” (pictured above), he used a piece of wavy plastic (the type used for roofing on greenhouses) placed behind the canvas and moved for every layer of color. And in “Two Sides, One Story” (below), the left and right half of the painting were created separately to challenge himself to produce identical results on each half. Errors in his ability to replicate the exact pressure on each half of the painting result in the slight differences.

Two Sides, Same Story, 2019, 40″x30″

The smallest works in the exhibition (below) are the most unique. From a distance they appear to be dirtier than the rest, but on closer inspection feature an incredibly complex network of sharp black lines. In these, Ryan applied a thin layer of black paint as the final layer, followed by a thin sheet of plastic. While the paint was wet, he used the custom squeegee to smash the plastic into the paint before slowly pealing it off to reveal the pattern. The technique was inspired by a studio mistake that involved a paint-soaked spatula that was accidentally placed directly on his work table.

Slide out into the Heat, 2019, 14″x11″

Slide out into the Heat, 2019 (detail)

Slide out into the Heat, 2019 (detail)

The fact that this exhibition exists RIGHT NOW will come as an even greater surprise to those familiar with the New York art world. July and August are recognized as the “gallery off season” – a two month art drought where every gallery exhibits “group exhibitions” and closes their doors on weekends. But Jared Linge, owner of the High Noon Gallery took a chance this year with a revolutionary new idea: Stay open on weekends for the full summer, and give that summer spot to his most popular artist (who sold out his inaugural show a couple years ago). It’s a gamble that’s paying off for the gallery, the artist, and you.

Visit these works any weekend this summer and tell them Design Milk sent you (seriously) – it’s a tiny but welcoming space with incredibly joyful work that adds up to my #1 art pick this summer.

What: Ryan Crotty: Diviner
Where: High Noon Gallery, 106 Eldridge Street, New York
When: July 11 – August 28, 2019. Wednesday – Sunday 12-6pm… all summer.

All images courtesy High Noon Gallery. Detail images photographed by the author David Behringer. Studio images provided by the artist © Ryan Crotty 2019.

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Looking for functional outdoor furniture that’s also extremely comfortable and designed for use on minimal spaces, balconies, patios, and terraces? Then you’re going to want to keep reading on about Børge Mogensen’s Deck Chair Series. This series was originally developed for Mogensen’s own balcony in the late 1960s based upon his own needs using his ‘workshop method’ and focusing on utilitarian value.

Now Carl Hansen & Søn is now adding to its collection of outdoor furniture with the Deck Chair Series. The collection is composed of a deck chair with cushion and footstool, a side table, a tray, a dining table with matching chairs, and a wall mount. All of the furniture can be folded and hung on a wall mount when not in use to save on space. That quality, paired with the collection’s function and aesthetic are just as in line today as they were when first designed.

“The design of the Deck Chair Series is unique and therefore a perfect match for our outdoor collection – catering to a very concrete need for less voluminous furniture with high aesthetic value,” explains Knud Erik Hansen, adding that the materials and simple designs are just as suited to indoor use.

Originally made of untreated beech and ash, Carl Hansen & Søn is relaunching it in untreated, FSC®-certified teak – a hard, strong wood with a naturally high oil content that’s great for withstanding changing weather conditions. The seats of the footstool and the chair have been upholstered in weatherproof Sunbrella fabric, rather than the original canvas, for durability and easy maintenance.

“At long last, the furniture is being revived for the enjoyment of design enthusiasts all over the world,” said Thomas and Peter Mogensen, Børge’s sons who gave their blessing on the relaunch.

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