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Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), and indirect objects (io) in the following sentences.

1. The car dealer gave Jim a low price for his old car.

2. Will wanted a job at the ranger station.

3. My neighbors brought me some candy and a basket of fruit for my birthday.

4. We gave the man the name of a lodge near Trial Lake.

5. An unknown donor gave the hospital a million dollars for research.

6. The frightening experience taught the child some important lessons.

7. You should have given Boyd and me more time.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. gave = v; dealer = subj; price = do; Jim = io; the/car = adj modifying dealer; a/low = adj modifying price; for his old car = p ph modifying either gave or price; for = prep; car = op; his/old = adj modifying car

2. wanted = v; Will = subj; job = do; a = adj modifying job; at the ranger station = p ph modifying job; at = prep; station = op; the/ranger = adj modifying station

3. brought = v; neighbors = subj; candy/basket = do; me = io modifying brought; my = adj modifying neighbors; some = adj modifying candy; a = adj modifying basket; of fruit modifying basket/for my birthday modifying brought = p ph; of/for = prep; fruit/birthday = op; my = adj modifying birthday

4. gave = v; we = subj; name = do; man = io; the = adj modifying man; the = adj modifying name; of a lodge modifying name/near Trial Lake modifying lodge = p ph; of/near = prep; lodge/Trial Lake = op; a = adj modifying lodge

5. gave = v; donor = subj; dollars = do; hospital = io; an/unknown = adj modifying donor; the = adj modifying hospital; a/million = adj modifying dollars; for research = p ph modifying gave; for = prep; research = op

6. taught = v; experience = subj; lessons = do; child = io modifying taught; the/frightening = adj modifying experience; the = adj modifying child; some/important = adj modifying lessons

7. should have given = v; you = subj; time = do; Boyd/me = io modifying should have given; more = adj modifying time



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An indirect object is really a prepositional phrase in which the preposition to or for is not stated but understood. It tells to whom or for whom something is done. The indirect object always comes between the verb and the direct object. Example: She gave me a gift. The indirect object always modifies the verb. It may have modifiers and be compound. It is used with verbs such as give, tell, send, get, buy, show, build, do, make, save, and read. Example: She sent the man and me a gift.

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), and indirect objects (io) in the following sentences.

1. At the mall Pam bought her children two new toys.

2. Tomorrow you should send your friend a thank you card.

3. The veteran pitcher threw the rookie hitter a fast-breaking curve ball.

4. The public defender gave her client her best advice.

5. Eric showed his math teacher a problem with the question.


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. bought = v; Pam = subj; toys = do; children = io modifying bought; two/new = adj modifying toys; her = adj modifying children; at the mall = p ph modifying bought; at = prep; mall = op; the = adj modifying mall

2. should send = v; you = subj; card = do; friend = io modifying should send; a/thank you = adj modifying card; your = adj modifying friend; tomorrow = adv modifying should send

3. threw = v; pitcher = subj; ball = do; hitter = io modifying threw; the/veteran = adj modifying pitcher; the/rookie = adj modifying hitter; a/fast-breaking/curve = adj modifying ball

4. gave = v; defender = subj; advice = do; client = io modifying gave; the/public =adj modifying defender; her = adj modifying client; her/best = adj modifying advice

5. showed = v; Eric = subj; problem = do; teacher = io modifying showed; his/math = adj modifying teacher; a = adj modifying problem; with the question = p ph modifying problem; with = prep; question = op; the = adj modifying question



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.
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An indirect object is really a prepositional phrase in which the preposition to or for is not stated but understood. It tells to whom or for whom something is done. The indirect object always comes between the verb and the direct object. Example: She gave me a gift. The indirect object always modifies the verb. It may have modifiers and be compound. It is used with verbs such as give, tell, send, get, buy, show, build, do, make, save, and read. Example: She sent the man and me a gift.

Instructions: Rewrite the following sentences so each has an indirect object.

1. I asked an important question of my mother.

2. Grandpa read the nursery rhymes to the grandchildren.

3. She bought a new dress for herself.

4. He did a great favor for the whole town.

5. The artist showed his most famous painting to the viewers.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. I asked my mother an important question.

2. Grandpa read the grandchildren the nursery rhymes.

3. She bought herself a new dress.

4. He did the whole town a great favor.

5. The artist showed the viewers his most famous painting.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
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An indirect object is really a prepositional phrase in which the preposition to or for is not stated but understood. It tells to whom or for whom something is done. The indirect object always comes between the verb and the direct object. Example: She gave me a gift. The indirect object always modifies the verb. It may have modifiers and be compound. It is used with verbs such as give, tell, send, get, buy, show, build, do, make, save, and read. Example: She sent the man and me a gift.

Instructions: Find the verb, direct object, and indirect object in the following sentences.

1. The new manager offered Jay a higher position.

2. This spring Carl told us his plans for the summer.

3. Many jobs don't pay the employees much money.

4. Mr. Blower read the neighbor children some interesting stories about Australia.

5. Mr. Smith, my broker, sold my parents some stock yesterday.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. offered = verb; position = direct object; Jay = indirect object

2. told = verb; plans = direct object; us = indirect object

3. do pay = verb; money = direct object; employees = indirect object

4. read = verb; stories = direct object; children = indirect object

5. sold = verb; stock = direct object; parents = indirect object



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
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An indirect object is really a prepositional phrase in which the preposition to or for is not stated but understood. It tells to whom or for whom something is done. The indirect object always comes between the verb and the direct object. Example: She gave me a gift. The indirect object always modifies the verb. It may have modifiers and be compound. It is used with verbs such as give, tell, send, get, buy, show, build, do, make, save, and read. Example: She sent the man and me a gift.

Instructions: Find the verb, direct object, and indirect object in the following sentences.

1. Has Terri shown Jeanne and Barbara her new ring?

2. The new highway saved the travelers several miles.

3. Did the workers give the spies confidential information?

4. Will Jim get us tickets to the game?

5. I bought Ila and Jeff two big pieces of cake.


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. has shown = verb; ring = direct object; Jeanne/Barbara = indirect objects

2. saved = verb; miles = direct object; travelers = indirect object

3. did give = verb; information = direct object; spies = indirect object

4. will get = verb; tickets = direct object; us = indirect object

5. bought = verb; pieces = direct object; Ila/Jeff = indirect objects



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.
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An indirect object is really a prepositional phrase in which the preposition to or for is not stated but understood. It tells to whom or for whom something is done. The indirect object always comes between the verb and the direct object. Example: She gave me a gift. The indirect object always modifies the verb. It may have modifiers and be compound. It is used with verbs such as give, tell, send, get, buy, show, build, do, make, save, and read. Example: She sent the man and me a gift.

Instructions: Find the verb, direct object, and indirect object in the following sentences.

1. Has your boss sent you a notice about the next convention?

2. John read his tiny nephew an exciting story.

3. Our father built the family a redwood picnic table.

4. The doctor sent me a bill for his services.

5. We gave my mother a book for her birthday.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. sent = verb; notice = direct object; you = indirect object

2. read = verb; story = direct object; nephew = indirect object

3. built = verb; table = direct object; family = indirect object

4. sent = verb; bill = direct object; me = indirect object

5. gave = verb; book = direct object; mother = indirect object



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.
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View quiz on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), and prepositional phrases (p ph) in the following sentences.

1. The woman in the green suit is Martha, our favorite neighbor.

2. Oh, Grant, there is no electricity in our house now.

3. The racer ran past in a big hurry.

4. The river past our house winds down into a steep valley.

5. Come in and don't stand outside in the cold.

6. The rookie basketball player was caught off his guard.

7. The mythology stories are well-known and exciting.

8. That old shoe is well-worn and completely worthless.

9. Will you climb up the ladder and through the window and open the door for me?

10. These sentences with more concepts are becoming longer and harder.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. is = v; woman = subj; Martha = pn; neighbor = app; the = adj modifying woman; our/favorite = adj modifying neighbor; in a green suit = p ph modifying woman; in = prep; suit = op; a/green = adj modifying suit

2. is = v; electricity = subj; Grant = na; no = adj modifying electricity; now = adv modifying is; in our house = p ph modifying electricity or is; in = prep; house = op; our = adj modifying house; (oh = interjection; there = introductory there)

3. ran = v; racer = subj; the = adj modifying racer; past = adv modifying ran; in a big hurry = p ph modifying ran; in = prep; hurry = op; a/big = adj modifying hurry

4. winds = v; river = subj; the = adj modifying river; down = adv modifying winds; past our house modifying river/into a steep valley modifying winds = p ph; past/into = prep; house/valley = op; our = adj modifying house; a/steep = adj modifying valley

5. come/do stand = v; you (understood) = subj; in = adv modifying come; n't/outside = adv modifying do stand; in the cold = p ph modifying do stand; in = prep; cold = op; the = adj modifying cold

6. was caught = v; player = subj; the/rookie/basketball = adj modifying player; off his guard = p ph modifying was caught; off = prep; guard = op; his = adj modifying guard

7. are = v; stories = subj; well-known/exciting = pa; the/mythology = adj modifying stories

8. is = v; shoe = subj; well-worn/worthless = pa; that/old = adj modifying shoe; completely = adv modifying worthless

9. will climb/ (will) open = v; you = subj; door = do; the = adj modifying door; up the ladder modifying will climb/through the window modifying will climb/for me modifying will open = p ph; up/through/for = prep; ladder/window/me = op; the = adj modifying ladder; the = adj modifying window

10. are becoming = v; sentences = subj; longer/harder = pa; these = adj modifying sentences; with more concepts = p ph modifying sentences; with = prep; concepts = op; more = adj modifying concepts



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
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Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), and prepositional phrases (p ph) in the following sentences.

1. Do you remember the name of the new senator from Utah?

2. Our work on the space shuttle requires all sorts of ability and knowledge.

3. The new rocket is troublesome for many nations.

4. Who painted the outside of this house before?

5. Wait for me outside.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. do remember = v; you = subj; name = do; the = adj modifying name; of the new senator modifying name/from Utah modifying senator = p ph; of/from = prep; senator/Utah = op; the/new = adj modifying senator

2. requires = v; work = subj; sorts = do; our = adj modifying work; all = adj modifying sorts; on the space shuttle modifying work/of ability and knowledge modifying sorts = p ph; on/of = prep; shuttle/ability/knowledge = op; the space = adj modifying shuttle

3. is = v; rocket = subj; troublesome = pa; the/new = adj modifying rocket; for many nations = p ph modifying troublesome; for = prep; nations = op; many = adj modifying nations

4. painted = v; who = subj; outside = do; the = adj modifying outside; before = adv modifying painted; of this house = p ph modifying outside; of = prep; house = op; this = adj modifying house

5. wait = v; you (understood) = subj; outside = adv modifying wait; for me = p ph modifying wait; for = prep; me = op



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.
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Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), and prepositional phrases (p ph) in the following sentences.

1. A building in ancient Rome was destroyed accidentally by an old buried bomb.

2. The welcomed blue shadows stretched across the road and the park.

3. On a hill in Hawaii stands an old bunker.

4. Bill walked along the ridge of the mountain during the snow storm.

5. This down pillow like a foam one is really soft.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. was destroyed = v; building = subj; a = adj modifying building; accidentally = adv modifying was destroyed; in ancient Rome modifying building/by an old buried bomb modifying was destroyed = p ph; in/by = prep; Rome/bomb = op; ancient = adj modifying Rome; an/old/buried = adj modifying bomb

2. stretched = v; shadows = subj; the/welcomed/blue = adj modifying shadows; across the road and the park = p ph modifying stretched; across = prep; road/park = op; the = adj modifying road; the = adj modifying park

3. stands = v; bunker = subj; an/old = adj modifying bunker; on a hill modifying stands/in Hawaii modifying hill = p ph; on/in = prep; hill/Hawaii = op; a = adj modifying hill

4. walked = v; Bill = subj; along the ridge modifying walked/of the mountain modifying ridge/during the snow storm modifying walked = p ph; along/of/during = prep; ridge/mountain/storm = op; the = adj modifying ridge; the = adj modifying mountain; the/snow = adj modifying storm

5. is = v; pillow = subj; soft = pa; this/down = adj modifying pillow; really = adv modifying soft; like a foam one = p ph modifying soft; like = prep; one = op; a/foam = adj modifying one



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.
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Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), and prepositional phrases (p ph) in the following sentences.

1. The defendant's lawyer was not available for comment.

2. Sherry, where have you placed my book of jokes?

3. I still live in that wood house near the railroad tracks.

4. The rooms of the office were old and musty.

5. I love everything about your idea for a party.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. was = v; lawyer = subj; available = pa; the/defendant's = adj modifying lawyer; not = adv modifying was; for comment = p ph modifying available; for = prep; comment = op

2. have placed = v; you = subj; book = do; Sherry = na; my = adj modifying book; where = adv modifying have placed; of jokes = p ph modifying book; of = prep; jokes = op

3. live = v; I = subj; still = adv modifying live; in that wood house modifying live/near the railroad tracks modifying house = p ph; in/near = prep; house/tracks = op; that/wood = adj modifying house; the/railroad =adj modifying tracks

4. were = v; rooms = subj; old/musty = pa; the = adj modifying rooms; of the office = p ph modifying rooms; of = prep; office = op; the = adj modifying office

5. love = v; I = subj; everything = do; about you idea modifying everything/for a party modifying idea = p ph; about/for = prep; idea/party = op; your = adj modifying idea; a = adj modifying party



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.
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