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heatherwitch:

I’ve been on up to 35 medications at once, and am now taking some 8 times a day. Here’s some tips and tricks I’ve built throughout the years:

Scheduling/remembering:
  • Make a schedule. Write down what you’re taking, when you have to take it, everything.
  • Set alarms.
  • If you have the time, separate them into piles for each session.
  • Make a checklist with all of the times you have to take it, and when you hit certain points, treat yourself to a set thing.
  • Find someone to hold you accountable. Someone who also has a ton of meds is ideal, but it doesn’t have to be.
  • If you must, prioritize them based on importance. 
When taking unpleasant meds:
  • If your meds are gross: take it with a spoonful of honey. 
  • If it’s a tablet crush it up and put it in a capsule instead (be sure to read the label, some need to stay as a tablet and aren’t meant to be crushed)
  • If you feel like it’s stuck in your throat (but isn’t actually), take a couple bites of food.
  • Make a cup of tea, I like herbal or ginger. Sip it between pills, but don’t try to swallow them with hot liquid.
  • Sometimes tinctures are worth mixing in drinks, sometimes it’s better to just take them straight and shorten the suffering time. 
  • If you can’t get them down, sometimes carbonated drinks can make it easier.
  • It’s okay to take breaks, I like to take a few gross ones then rock out to a song while sipping tea!
Motivation techniques:
  • Make it fun. Put some headphones in and dance and have a time while taking them. This was key for me when I had to do IM injections.
  • I like watching movie trailers, it’s distracting and rewarding and I only do it when I’m taking meds.
  • Put them in a cute bowl. Also get a cute waterbottle so you’re excited to us it!
  • Don’t let yourself do stuff until you take them. You may not want to take them, but you also aren’t gonna have anything fun to do until you do.
  • Get yourself a fancy drink (or bottle soda) that you only can have when you’re taking the meds.
  • Realize that it might not become easier/a habit. I’ve been taking a ton of meds for years and it still is hard. (And I forget all the time who am I kidding)
Other tips:
  • Keep a journal with a list of meds, current doses, and any interactions they may have.
  • Carry a list of medications with you in your wallet. 
  • It can be helpful to track the first week to a month of taking new meds and note changes in symptoms.

If you need someone to be proud of you, you can always send me a message/ask!

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fellowibders:

You wish so badly that pharmaceutical companies would keep in mind that not all people can easily swallow pills and they should not just be made in one size and one size only. 

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jostencredible:

In the spirit of all these ~~back to school~~ posts…

Hi, my name is Lexi. I’ve got Crohn’s disease and some fucked up kidneys. Here are my two cents on college and chronic pain.

1. Take all of your meds with you.
Seriously, even if it’s a huge gallon sized ziplock bag filled with meds you hardly ever need. Yeah, yeah, college dorms are small, but that is not the area to cut down on volume. (Hint: instead, bring 200% less clothes. Thank me later.)

2. Tell your teachers. ASAP.
If you’re too embarrassed to talk with them face to face, (e.g. ME) just send them a quick email right after the first class. Let them know right off the bat that if you email them in the future about being “sick,” you don’t mean a head cold. (And bam: now they’ll probably know your name!)

3. File disability paperwork.
Something I did NOT do right away and really regretted it. The word “disability” felt way too heavy, like I was making a way bigger deal about my health than I should be. Fuck that. Just file the damn paperwork, it’ll probably give you nice perks like more excused absences, etc. 

4. Prepare for hell.
Imagine the worst day possible. Prepare for it. For me, that meant food I could stomach (saltines, cans of soup, etc.) (do NOT be like me and forget a fucking can opener), my electric blanket, a shit ton of gatorade, pain medication, and my dad’s Netflix password. 

5. Find a doctor near you. 
Know where you’d go if things got so bad you could no longer deal with them yourself. Find out who is and isn’t covered with your health insurance, and write that shit down. I know it sucks. Just fucking do it.

6. Don’t hide.
Chances are, you’ll find others going through the exact same thing. I know it’s personal, but just tell people. Tell your roommate. Tell your study buddies. Put a fucking ad in the school newspaper. Remind yourself you are not alone.

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chronic-confessions:

It must be nice having people in your life who support you and don’t ignore your pain.
It must be nice having people who you can talk to without feeling judged.
It must be nice not fighting this all by your own.

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Hi chronic illnesses warriors

I’m a couple of weeks into my summer holidays. As per usual my body detests stopping and has failed me again.


I decided not to let crohns, arthritis, scoliosis, lupus etc. Stop me from having a good time. So I’ve tried to get out and see my family and friends. That has ended up with me being bedridden for 3 days now. I’m so down with these diseases.


I’ve also been trying hard to get support from my government as I’m not fit for work but they are doing their utmost to try and stop me from getting any support. It’s been 6 weeks since I’ve applied and no money. I’m literally worried about food for me and my dogs. It’s been horrible admitting that I’m unfit for work but I had to. And now they are basically saying I should be working etc. I need a solicitor but can’t afford one.


My Dad doesn’t really see how bad I am. As these are all invisible illnesses so he said to me yesterday “you need a job”. If I could work I would be working. I’m a very strong person but recently I feel useless and very weak. However he has given me a home and that’s amazing I will never forget that he did this. He is an amazing man and has helped me through the worst times of my life. I know one day I will have to help him too.


I’m still mourning my old life before I was sick.


I hope everyone is as well as can be. Be gentle with your body, mind and soul. Rest and take your medication. You are worthy of all these things.


Please feel free to message me. I love hearing from you guys and will try to reply to everyone.


Much gentle love

Crohns girl in pain

Xox

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thechronicchillpill:

if you actually think people who have ostomy bags/colostomy bags/literally any kind of medical device in them/on them shouldnt show off their body in public because its “inappropriate” or “gross” you seriously need to fuck off.

there is nothing, NOTHING, gross about the human body, disabled or not.

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All about IBD - 2M ago

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