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The latest issue of the European Journal of International Law opens with the third instalment of Martti Koskenniemi’s The Politics of International Law series. This post offers some reflections on Koskenniemi’s article, although it is not intended as a full response to it. First, a disclaimer in the style of Liliana Obregón1 and many others…

The post The Politics of International lawyers: Whose Legacy Is at Stake? Reflections on Martti Koskenniemi’s series on ‘The Politics of International Law’ appeared first on Critical Legal Thinking.

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Key Concept Shortly after the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) in 1948, the English translation of Hannah Arendt’s essay was published under the title ‘The Rights of Man: What Are They?’1 This essay was later incorporated in Chapter 9 of The Origins of Totalitarianism and became known as one of the…

The post Hannah Arendt: The Right to Have Rights appeared first on Critical Legal Thinking.

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11-12 OCTOBER 2019 Call for Contributions Looming ecological disaster; the rise of nationalist authoritarianism; the stubborn persistence of systematic oppression based on race, gender, sexuality and other axes of social difference, the dismantling of any semblance of social security and solidarity: as we prepare ourselves to enter the third decade of the 21st century, there…

The post BIRKBECK LAW REVIEW ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2019 ‘DYSTOPIAS HERE AND NOW: CRITICAL THOUGHT AT THE ENDS OF TIME’ appeared first on Critical Legal Thinking.

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We take it for granted that the very wealthy use trusts to leave their wealth to their children. Have they not always done so? After all, the aristocracy has used one or another variant of the trust form for centuries to pass on rolling hills, country piles and precious heirlooms. So what has changed? A number…

The post Law & Critique: Property and the Interests of Things appeared first on Critical Legal Thinking.

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In 2018 both Bruno Latour and Giorgio Agamben published books addressing the epistemological crisis. Climate skepticism, false news and social media echo chambers have led to a profound, divisive and ugly politicisation of knowledge in the West. Latour and Agamben both chart this process and attempt to establish some sort of ‘real’ upon which consensuses…

The post CfP: What is Real about Law and Technology appeared first on Critical Legal Thinking.

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The central and uniting demand of the sex worker rights movement around the world is the decriminalization of consensual adult sex work. This is based on the recognition that criminal law intervention makes sex workers less rather than more safe, and that sex workers are engaged in a legitimate form of work, not the commission of a crime. A core task…

The post The Future of Sex Work: Labour unfreedom & Criminality at work appeared first on Critical Legal Thinking.

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Fantastic animals, evil criminals, notorious neighbourhoods, mysterious objects, invisible ideologies, unspoken laws: monstrosity can take different shapes, crossing the boundaries between the visible and the thinkable, reality and imagination, human and nonhuman; as an uncanny atmosphere always on the verge of being materialised and individualised in the monsters that populate collective imagination, biological taxonomies, legal…

The post Event: Monstrous Ontologies: Politics Ethics Materiality appeared first on Critical Legal Thinking.

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The inaugural conference of the International Economic Law Collective is entitled: ‘Disrupting Narratives and Pluralising Engagement in International Economic Law Scholarship, Teaching and Practice’, and will take place on the 6th and 7th of November 2019 at the University of Warwick. International economic law (IEL) as an arena of scholarship, policy and practice has developed exponentially over the…

The post CfP: The International Economic Law Collective appeared first on Critical Legal Thinking.

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These notes belong to the same project on constitutional spaces that Panu Minkkinen has been working on for some time, and this piece was first published on his own blog. He says there that these notes represent a first attempt to look at the intersections of constituted power, architecture, and urban planning.  ‘Plano piloto’ Perhaps the…

The post Brasília: Constituent Power, Architecture, Urban Planning appeared first on Critical Legal Thinking.

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It is generally accepted in the Law and Development literature that law has multiple, and often conflicting roles in setting development agenda and its outcomes. On the one hand, it can be complicit in creating, perpetuating and/or expanding inequalities, violence and social tensions, and on the other hand it can have emancipatory potential as it…

The post CfP: Resistance to development projects in Latin America: Taking stock of the role of law appeared first on Critical Legal Thinking.

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