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Summer is here, which means all your depressive symptoms should be immediately lifted by the lovely, warm weather…right? If only! Since the sun is out, it’s easy to assume you will feel happier and want to be outside doing the things you love. However, it comes as a surprise to many people when that doesn’t automatically happen.

Summertime depression is real, and there are ways to cope with it. For some, it may be that their Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) gets worse in the summertime, but for others it can be a condition known as summer Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). This is depression that occurs only in seasonal months, like spring and summer, but is absent in other months altogether. SAD is common during winter months, but can still occur just as easily in the summer.

Here are some ways to help you cope with the summertime blues:

Accept that summertime depression exists. If you notice that you only get depressed in the summer, use that as an indicator to figure out potential solutions during this time. By acknowledging it exists, you can try to not beat yourself up about it and find validation that it’s a real and legitimate mental health concern.

Let go of what you think summer “should” be like. Maybe you have associations with childhood summers of going to the beach, attending parties, swimming, etc. But first, ask yourself if you still enjoy all of the things you think summer “should” include, and then find ways to do the things you actually enjoy, with people who share those same interests.

Realize your own expectations. If you have certain expectations of doing specific summer activities, but don’t get around to them, accept that it happens and move on. Don’t let it linger too long or think too much about not meeting those expectations.

Stay cool. Literally. Studies show that high outdoor temperatures are correlated with depression and anxiety, with an increase in mental health emergencies happening as the mercury climbs. It could be due to heat stress, or the fact that hot temperatures makes it hard to sleep. Drink lots of water and do your best to stay cool.

Get out of the house. Maintaining relationships and having a social support system, whatever that looks like for you, is important to being happy. Increasing interaction and staying connected and in community, whether one-on-one with a close friend or stopping by a neighborhood BBQ for even 30 minutes, reduces isolation, loneliness and will help lift your mood.

Ask for professional help. Depression is hard to deal with alone, and sometimes you’ll need extra guidance from a professional to help you work through it. If you’re stuck in a cycle of feeling defeated and can’t seem to motivate yourself, it might be a good time to seek therapy or counseling.

Ready for professional help to kick the summertime sadness? Or the wintertime sadness? Or the anytime-of-year sadness? Our team of counselors are some of the most trusted in Denver. Request a free phone consultation and let a member of our counseling team assess your needs and help you determine which of our therapists is best equipped to support your emotional needs.

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There are an estimated 83.1 million people living in the United States that were born between 1982 and 2000. In fact, according to the United States Census Bureau, this generation—the Millennial generation—is set to surpass the prior generation—the Baby Boomers—to become the largest living generation in history.

Each generation is defined by the specific fluctuations in focus that occur. The Baby Boomer generation—those born between 1946 and 1964—prioritized things like cultural identity. Most Boomers can be characterized as being either conservative and reserved or as being a proponent of change. Thanks to inheriting some benefits from their parents’ generation, and an economy that still offered affordable homes, “The American Dream” was still very reachable for them.

Following them, the Millennial generation shifted its focus away from things like religion and historical awareness and prioritized technological access, cultural diversity, and workplace fulfillment. This generation is described as being the most educated, accepting, and focused on their wellbeing. However, despite this, and despite having relatively affordable healthcare, certain health conditions have increased in prevalence.

The Blue Cross Blue Shield Health Index reports that from 2014 to 2017, major depression has increased in Millennials by 31%. Most researchers agree this uptick in depression is largely due to the societal pressure to do more—live further away from their job, work longer hours, and produce more output—all with fewer resources—living in more densely populated areas, earning less money than previous generations, and paying off massive student loan debt. Among other things, this has caused many Millennials to become unable to achieve certain “rites of passage” into adulthood—rites that the previous generations were afforded.

These achievements, such as paying rent, buying a home, or buying a car, which were once easily attainable, mark important milestones in a person’s life. These milestones are the markers by which many determine if they are satisfied with the path their life is moving on. When these things become difficult or impossible to afford, it becomes harder to remain optimistic. As a result, many Millennials are being forced to accept that they may not be able to live the same way as their parents did—perhaps even to their disappointment. However unreasonable the situation may be, it does not mean it’s easy to digest. Because of this, it is no wonder so many members of the Millennial generation are struggling with depression.

When dealing with depression, it’s important to seek treatment as soon as possible to reduce the amount of time it takes away from living a normal life. Traditionally, this means attending regular sessions with a counselor or therapist. This level of treatment is enough for many, though some individuals may also benefit from holistic supplements, antidepressant medications, or other pharmacological interventions.

Therapy for depression is highly effective—just having a neutral third party to talk to can work wonders for a person’s mental health. A therapist can work with an individual to help them identify situational triggers that may heighten their depressive symptoms, and help them develop healthy coping mechanisms for dealing with their symptoms.

Think You Could Use the Help of a Therapist?

Creative Counseling Center is here for you. We’re happy to offer a free consultation to any new patient in need of counseling and curious whether our practice is a good fit for them. Whatever your age—and whatever you’re struggling with—counseling could make all the difference. Complete the brief form below to be connected with a member of our counseling team and start your journey towards mental well-being.

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The post Why Millennials Suffer from Depression More Than Other Generations…and What We Can Do About It appeared first on Creative Counseling Center.

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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a type of therapy that helps individuals change their thoughts in order to change maladaptive or problematic actions and behaviors. CBT is a form of talk therapy that identifies negative thought patterns, and—over time—helps people change the behaviors that manifest as a result of those thought patterns.

The foundation of CBT therapy is all about mindset. It’s based on the concept that we create our own experiences—including pain—and that pain can be alleviated by changing the thought patterns associated with it. The theory is that if individuals can develop better coping skills for chronic pain conditions, CBT therapy could help with a variety of physical disorders or health issues.

Traditionally, CBT has been a powerful therapeutic modality, used by therapists to help those suffering from mental health issues. But now, research is showing it’s great for physical health, too. Of course, mental health and physical health are entwined—what affects the mind will also affect the body.

CBT is known to help with depression, anxiety and chronic pain. If the perception of pain stems from the brain, it makes sense that an induvial could reduce physical pain symptoms by changing the thoughts and behaviors that cause it. Pain causes stress, and stress affects the way pain is controlled by the brain… and CBT therapy reduces the arousal of those stress hormones.

According to the Journal of Psychiatric Practice, CBT is also an effective treatment alternative for patients taking opioids for non-cancer pain. It helps patients understand that their pain is a stressor, like all other stressors, which anyone can learn to cope with. Therapy for pain patients may include relaxation training, cognitive restructuring, and exercise—all designed to improve the quality of life and decrease pain.

Studies have also shown that CBT works to reduce the frequency of seizures. In a recent study, patients who engaged in four weeks of CBT had a 40% reduction in seizures, according to Yoko Nagai, PhD, of Brighton and Sussex Medical School in England.

The bottom line is CBT therapy is highly effective—not just for mental health, but for physical conditions, too. Whatever you may be struggling with—depression, grief or loss, anger management, or physical pain, etc.—Cognitive Behavioral Therapy may be a great solution.

Ready to Give CBT Therapy a Try?

Our team of counselors are the best in Denver. Request a free phone consultation and let a member of our counseling team assess your needs and help you determine which of our therapist would be best equipped to support you.

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You’ve done the work and sought the support of a therapist who can help guide you in shifting unproductive thoughts and behaviors towards healthier ones. This step alone…getting started with a therapist…is to be celebrated as getting started is one of the most difficult steps in the therapeutic process.

Once you begin seeing your therapist, the first few sessions can feel challenging—particularly if you don’t have prior counseling experiences. You may have a lot of questions about why your therapist acts a certain way. For instance, why is my therapist so quiet? So talkative? Why is he or she looking at me this particular way? Maybe you think he or she ask too many questions, or not enough questions…

You may walk away from these initial sessions feeling puzzled. Perhaps you were expecting a therapist who just “gets” you and will help fix your problems. A snap of their fingers and, boom, you get to feel better! However, in order to get the most out of your counseling sessions with any therapist, it’s important to understand the importance of self-advocacy. and speaking up for yourself, voicing concerns, and asking productive questions.

Here are a few things to keep in mind to help you advocate for yourself and ensure you get the most out of counseling with any therapist:

1. Voice your wants and needs. As much as we wish we were, therapists aren’t mind-readers. We spend a limited amount of time with you each week. To make your session more productive and effective, we invite you to voice concerns, needs, and feelings you might be experiencing with regard to the therapeutic relationship.

2. Communicate your goals and expectations. We feel it’s important to meet our clients where they are in each session. This may mean that, while you and your therapist have discussed your overall therapeutic goals, you might feel venting or going off on a tangent in any given session would be more productive based on what’s going on for you in that moment. We are here for you and will follow your lead.

3. Ask for what you want. While venting can be productive, if you feel like that’s all you’re doing, let your therapist know what approach you prefer instead. If you want “tough love” or to be redirected, we want to know! Many therapists can be more directive in a session, if that’s what you desire.

4. Express frustrations and disappointments. If you become frustrated in therapy because you feel your needs are not met, let your therapist know. Open communication is part of healthy relationships, particularly in therapy. Let your counselor know when you’re feeling “stuck” or spinning your wheels so they can adjust their approach, revisit goals, reassess where things are to best help you continue moving you forward.

The relationship you have with your therapist is just like any other: communication is key. If you struggle with communicating your needs, wants, desires, disappointments and frustrations, one of the safest spaces to practice and hone your skills is with a counselor, in a therapeutic setting. In the end, open communication will allow your therapist to provide you with the best possible therapeutic experience and outcome.

Are You Ready to Talk to a Counselor?

Creative Counseling Center employs some of the best therapists in Denver, each with a unique therapeutic specialty. We work with children, teens, and adults, treating a variety of conditions, including abuse and neglect, depression, anxiety, grief and loss, anger management, life transitions and more. We would love the opportunity to partner you with one of our therapists who’s best equipped to support you and your goals for counseling. Request your free phone consultation today!

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The post Getting the Most Out of Therapy: The Importance of Advocating for Yourself appeared first on Creative Counseling Center.

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Your child has been exhibiting maladaptive behaviors: outbursts, tantrums…just bad behavior in general. Initially you didn’t think much of it—it’s just a phase, right? But as weeks turn into months or years, you begin to realize that your child’s behavior is more long-term than the “phase” you originally thought it was. And you’re also realizing that your child may need counseling.

While it’s never too late to seek child counseling, you’ll achieve better outcomes if you call a counseling center as soon as your child shows those initial signs of aggression, anger, depression or anxiety. This is for a number of reasons:

1. Unhealthy coping mechanisms are easy to form…and hard to break. The time you spend wondering if your child needs therapy and waiting to see how their behavior patterns play out in the long-run is time that your child is practicing and reinforcing unhealthy coping mechanisms. Children don’t have the maturity to connect confusing emotions with events happening in the world around them. To cope, they become angry, aggressive, overreactive, withdrawn…behavior and tendencies you probably don’t want them suffering with long-term. Left unaddressed in an effective manner, these behaviors quickly become a child’s default coping mechanism. The sooner your child can get into counseling, the easier it is to replace unhealthy coping mechanisms with those that are more productive.

2. Bad behavior ebbs and flows. Often times, a child will act out for a few weeks…and then go back to being their typical, well-behaved self. However, all those unhealthy coping mechanisms are lying latent. It’s only a matter of time before they resurface—and when they do, the bar can be raised each time and they can be worse than before. Bad behavior, left untreated, will only get worse in time. Therapy helps stop that cycle and correct bad behaviors before they get too far out of control.

An important point to remember is that when your child acts out, they illicit some kind of reaction from you. This may or may not be intentional—albeit subconscious—on your child’s behalf. When your child exhibits maladaptive behaviors, learning to respond properly is as important as teaching your child to better cope with his or her feelings. Your child’s therapist works with your child only 50 minutes per week—you’re with them the majority of the time, and it’s important that you have enough take-home tools and information to support your child between sessions with their therapists.

At Creative Counseling Center, our therapists take an integrative approach to child counseling and parental coaching, ensuring that parents are provided tools and ways to support their child’s progress. We help parents understand exactly what they should (or should not) be doing to ensure their child continues to progress. No parent is perfect and every child is different. With that in mind, our therapists can help you tailor your parenting style to match your child’s unique needs.

Your child’s behavioral development is nuanced and complicated. We encourage you to seek counseling services—both for them and you—at the first sign of maladaptive behavior. This is the best way to ensure your child continues to grow and develop in a healthy direction. Taking a proactive approach to counseling—rather than reactive—can prevent a whole slew of behavioral struggles and mental health issues in the future…for both of you.

Do You Think You or Your Child Could Benefit from Counseling?

We are happy to offer a free phone consultation to all new clients. During your phone consultation you’ll be able to explain your unique circumstance, learn about the counseling services we offer, and determine whether it makes sense to schedule an in-person appointment with a member of our therapeutic team. Whether we believe counseling is a good fit for you or not, we’re happy to discuss your struggles and point you in the direction we feel is best for your needs.

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The post Is it “Just a Phase” or Does Your Child Need Counseling? appeared first on Creative Counseling Center.

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Divorce is stressful…not just for the couple, but for everybody involved—children included. It’s easy to turn inward while going through a divorce and remain focused on processing your own feelings of sadness, stress, anger or anxiety. But, if you have children, it’s important to understand that your child is suffering, too. In many ways, your child’s feelings may actually parallel your own, yet they don’t necessarily have the knowledge or skills to copy with or understand their emotions.

The psychological impact of divorce on children manifests in many ways, although some children may deal with it better than others. The first year following a divorce is the hardest for children, as they may feel a great deal of stress, anger, anxiety and guilt—whether they show it, know it, or not.

Divorce typically impacts children in one or several of these ways:

Emotional impact. For young children, it’s hard for them to understand why they suddenly have two homes. They often worry that, since the parents stop loving each other, it could mean their parents may stop loving them. They may also assume they did something wrong or blame themselves for the divorce. Many of these feelings are subconscious, making it particularly difficult for a child to identify what they’re feeling, oftentimes resulting in maladaptive behaviors.

Stressful events. Stressful events may include losing contact with one parent, changing homes or living situations, adjusting to a new school, and loss of routines to which they’ve become accustomed and comfortable with. Some families will also struggle with financial hardships, which can change their daily lifestyle and deepen the impact of divorce on children caught in the crossfire.

Remarriage. Adults often enter into new relationships and may even remarry within 4-5 years of a divorce, which means children must continue to adapt to changes in lifestyle. Children thrive with routine and consistency. When a new step-parent—and possibly step-siblings—enters a child’s life, this can add heightened stress and uncertainty.

Mental health problems. Children of divorced parents may be at an increased risk for developing mental health issues, such as depression and anxiety. Some may even have behavioral problems, such as impulsive behaviors or conflicts with their peers. Studies show that some children may score lower on academic performance tests, which is subsequently linked to higher dropout rates.

Parents play a huge role in how their children adjust to a divorce. Here are strategies that can reduce the psychological obstacles that divorce presents to most children:

Never put children in the middle. Remember, you are an adult and your children are watching you. Hostility, such as screaming and threatening each other in front of the children has been shown to negatively impact them and cause serious behavioral problems. Don’t ask your children to choose between two parents, or use them to send messages to each other. Feeling caught in the middle tends to cause depression and anxiety in children of divorce.

Maintain a healthy relationship with your children. Your children don’t know what you’re thinking or planning so life feels very uncertain. Good energy, minimized conflict and positive communication helps children adjust better during this highly stressful process. A healthy parent-child relationship increases a child’s performance in school and other areas of their lives which helps maintain self-esteem and confidence.

Use consistent discipline. Rules and parenting styles may differ once two households are established. If parents cannot align and agree on a single set of rules, second best is for each parent to have well-communicated rules for their household and consistently follow through on discipline to set healthy boundaries and show you’re a reliable and stable parent during this difficult time.

Support your children. If your children feel well-supported by you, they’ll have the confidence to better deal with challenges that come their way. Teach them that divorce is not the end, and that they have the mental strength to get through it, and assure them you’ll be there for them at every turn. Teach them to interpret, manage and express their emotions and behaviors in a healthy way. If your children feel loved and secure, it will help them deal with any fears of abandonment.

Seek professional help. By taking care of yourself, you are becoming a better parent. Consider therapy to help you and your child cope with the stress and anxiety of divorce. We offer free consultation for all new clients—request your free consultation and see if one of our therapists could support you and your family during this challenging time.

Free Counseling Resources: 10 Ways to Help Children Through Divorce

Download our free guide, 10 Ways to Help Children Through Divorce and get free counseling advice to guide you along your journey. If you are struggling to manage your feelings before, during, or after your divorce, please contact us for a free consultation. Having a therapist to talk to could be exactly what you need to walk through this situation with dignity and grace.

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The post The Real Impact of Divorce on Children: What Parents Need to Know appeared first on Creative Counseling Center.

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Making the decision to see a therapist isn’t always an easy one. From choosing a therapist, to the feelings of fear and anticipation that build-up prior to your first session, to the uncertainty that exists about the journey you’re about to take, you may find you have so many different emotions popping up that you don’t actually know how you feel!

However, most of those fears and uncertainties are answered within 15-minutes of your first counseling session. And once you begin to connect with your counselor—once you start identifying and addressing the sources of your stress, sadness, anxiety or depression—life can change in the most beautiful ways.

Here are 6 unexpected ways your life may change after you begin counseling:

You’ll begin to “see beyond” the surface.
Counseling challenges you to dig deep into your psyche and spend time talking about you, your fears, your anxieties, and your struggles. You’ll begin to recognize patterns of behavior, and define the stories that have shaped you into the person you are. As you get deeper into the therapeutic process, chances are you’ll begin looking deeper into the events of your everyday life, examining the impact they may have on your personal development or identifying your own role in the way your day-to-day life unfolds.

You might start “zoning out.”
Therapy has a tendency to make people more reflective about their lives, and everything in them. Your therapist will ask a lot of open-ended questions to catalyze self-curiosity and awareness…and you may begin to ask yourself those very same questions about the relationships you engage in, the conversations you have, and the choices you make. Don’t be alarmed if you get lost in a reflective conversation with yourself from time to time—it’s normal!

The way you “fit in” with other people may change.
Before beginning therapy, chances are you made yourself think, speak and act a certain way in order to fit in with those around you. However, therapy works to reshape you in ways that serve your life…not anybody else’s. If your family, friends, and colleagues are emotionally mature and intelligent, your transformation will likely be well-received. However, you’ll soon find that some people will resist the changes within you—and that’s okay. It’s not your job to make sure everyone likes you. It is your job to make sure you’re the best version of yourself.

Destructive behavioral patterns will be easier to identify…in others.
Let us preface this by saying (1) you cannot control the behaviors of others and (2) being in therapy in no way entitles you to cast judgement on others. That being said, so many of the destructive behaviors we adopt have been passed down to us by previous generations of family members. Once you identify those behaviors in yourself with the support of a therapist, you’ll undoubtedly begin to see those behaviors as they manifest in your family members. But here’s the amazing thing: you can be the person who stops that behavior from begin passed down to future generations!

You’ll begin to label your emotions.
Working with a therapist will teach you a lot about your feelings—for example, not every feeling is simply sadness or anger or happiness or fear. There are dozens of emotional nuances, and coming to understand those nuances will give you a stronger grasp on how to navigate your emotions in your everyday life.

You’ll have a lot of questions…and possibly fewer answers.
Diving into your past and figuring out why you act the way you do under certain circumstances will, of course, answer a lot of the questions. It makes sense that the more you learn about yourself, the more curious you’ll become, and the more questions you’ll have. Some of those questions you’ll be able to answer while other questions you either can’t answer or aren’t ready to explore. And that’s okay. Self-curiosity is still a healthy part of the therapeutic process!

Working with a qualified therapist can reap huge rewards in your life. Sometimes, just exploring and talking about the circumstances in your life can be enlightening enough, not the mention the fact that your therapist will ask questions to guide you along a path of vibrant self-discovery. Your inner thought patterns will begin the change, as will your outer behaviors. In the end, therapy helps people discover and develop their greatest self, substituting destructive patterns for productive ones, and tackling life with a healthier emotional and mental capacity.

Contact Creative Counseling Center

Whether you are in the process of finding a therapist, or already have a therapist but feel you’re not connecting and making progress, Creative Counseling Center is happy to offer a free phone consultation to all new patients. Let us know what you’re struggling with, and what your goals are. We can partner you with a member of our therapeutic team best equipped to support you and get you started on your journey towards self-discovery and transformation.

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Anxiety can be overwhelming. It casts a shadow on our lives. Even though we can read article after article about how to deal with anxiety, one of the best ways is to implement a few self-care strategies that better manage the day-to-day anxious thoughts and feelings.

Living in and experiencing the present is our best choice; being anxious about the unknown and projecting into the future prohibits us from enjoying the moment we’re in.

Here are some simple anxiety-relieving strategies. Do a few of these for just 15-20 minutes each day to notice a difference in your anxiety levels.

1. Deep breathing. Taking long, deep, belly-focused breaths when you first wake up will set a calming tone for your day. Avoid shallow breathing from your chest, as that type of breathing has been known to actually cause anxiety.

2. Practice self-care. Carve out time for yourself, and do something you enjoy. Take a day trip. Get a massage. Read a book. Get out in nature. Do something that you enjoy.

3. Acceptance. Accept that anxiety is a part of you, but set the intention that you will not let it take over your life.

4. Curb financial spending. Dealing with money is a huge stressor in most people’s lives. Debt can keep you up at night and give you feelings of hopelessness. Look for little ways to cut your daily or monthly expenses—things like trading out cable for Netflix, lowering your heat/AC bills, cooking at home instead of eating out, drinking Starbucks twice a week instead of daily—these little things add up to a big monthly cost and will give you a better grasp on your budget, thereby relieving some anxiety.

5. Get rid of clutter. Studies show if you keep your workspace or house free of clutter, it ends up affecting how organized you feel about your life in general.

6. Go to bed early. Getting 7-8 hours of sleep is crucial to good health. Sleep deprivation leads to anxiety and depression, as it amplifies your brain’s anticipatory reactions.

7. Cut back on caffeine and sugar. Caffeine and sugar have been linked to anxiety as caffeine can elicit heart palpitations and trigger panic attacks. Sugar is a stimulant along with processed foods, and both can increase inflammation.

8. Exercise. Working out produces endorphins and is a natural way to boost your “feel good” emotions. It’s also a quick and immediate feeling of positivity post-workout!

9. Challenge beliefs. Challenge your negative thoughts and beliefs when anxiety pops up. Remember, feelings are not always right, rational, or reality so asking yourself, “Is this actually true?” can help you feel grounded again.

10. See a therapist. Seeking a professional for support will often provide you with better insight to get to the root cause of your anxieties.

No one is exempt from anxiety—it strikes us all at one point or another. However, if anxiety is preventing you from being present and available in the moment, and is holding you back from experiencing your life to the fullest, it might be a good time to take action and do something. Refer to these 10 tips to manage anxiety, or download our e-Book to learn more about self-care and why it’s so important for keeping anxiety at bay.

Download our FREE e-Book: The Little Book of Self-Care

Maybe you’re not sure whether you need counseling or psychotherapy, but wherever you’re at in your journey, Creative Counseling Center is here to help. Complete the brief form below to request a free phone consultation and we’ll answer your questions and guide you in the right direction based on your needs and goals.

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In short, Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) is a therapeutic technique that involves tapping the energy points around the body to reduce tension and promote a better sense of well-being. Though skeptics may claim it lacks scientific foundation, Harvard Medical School did a major study showing the benefits of EFT.

Research showed that by touching the body’s meridian points—our energy points—brain activity, specifically in the amygdala, was reduced. The amygdala is the part of the brain that engages in a “fight or flight” mode. When a fear or anxiety is triggered, our amygdala becomes flooded with cortisol, which you may know better as the stress hormone. With EFT therapy, however, Harvard’s study showed the stress accompanied by whatever problem a participant was facing, seemed to slip away.

Dr. Dawson Church, an energy psychology expert and one of the leading advocates of EFT therapy, performed an EFT study where 83 subjects participated in a one-hour long tapping session. He compared the results with those who receive traditional therapy and those who received no treatment all; his research showed a 24% reduction in cortisol in EFT subjects vs. no difference in subjects receiving traditional therapy.

One of the benefits of EFT is, once a person is instructed where to tap and what to say, it can be done anywhere…no equipment or medications needed.

EFT has been known to help with:

· Reducing stress. A 2012 study published in the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease had subjects categorized into 3 groups: an EFT group, a psychotherapy group, and a no treatment group. Results were that the EFT group had a decrease in cortisol, along with improved psychological distress.

· Reducing muscle tension, joint pain and headaches. A 2013 controlled study found that EFT tapping reduced the severity of headaches, and helped manage chronic injuries.

· More effectively coping with depression and anxiety. A 2016 study published in the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease discovered that, through 14 different EFT treatment trials, EFT led to a decrease in anxiety in those who were suffering from psychological distress.

· Improving sleep, energy levels and overall health. A study of 86 women suffering from fibromyalgia found that, after completing eight weeks of EFT therapy, there was a significant decrease in anxiety and depression, and an increase in energy levels, vitality, and mental health.

· Improving Athletic Performance. A 2009 study published in Open Sports Sciences showed that EFT, when used on basketball players for 15 minutes, improved their free throw and vertical jump immediately after the session.

Creative Counseling Center offers EFT therapy, often leveraging it in conjunction with talk therapy. This integrated approach enables our clients to process emotional pain more effectively, and eliminate the mental blocks that prevent them from moving forward in their lives. If you are suffering from anxiety, depression or chronic stress, contact us for a free phone consultation today!

Contact Creative Counseling Center

Maybe you’re not sure whether EFT tapping could help you, but wherever you’re at, Creative Counseling Center is here to help. Request a free phone consultation using the brief form below and we’ll answer your questions and guide you in the right direction based on your needs and goals.

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The post Emotional Freedom Technique: What Conditions Can EFT Therapy Treat? appeared first on Creative Counseling Center.

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Lily Reinhart, the star of TV show Riverdale, recently announced on her Instagram: “Friendly reminder for anyone who needs to hear it: therapy is never something to feel ashamed of. Everyone can benefit from seeing a therapist. Doesn’t matter how old or ‘proud’ you’re trying to be.”

When celebrities admit they’re in therapy, it’s a good reminder that asking for help is perfectly normal, and that it’s also perfectly normal for anyone to attend therapy—no matter who you are. Even the Obamas have talked openly about attending couple’s therapy. Too often, the stigma is that someone must be clinically insane to need therapy, but, in reality, it can be a completely routine addition to a healthy person’s life. Who couldn’t use a friendly ear to bend from time to time, or an outside perspective on the challenges we face in our daily lives?

Therapy is the act of talking to a professional about the struggles you’re facing—from anxiety, depression, relationship issues, sexual issues, family, school, jobs, you name it. Whatever internal struggles you are dealing with, having a professional—someone who is completely unbiased and trained to help you achieve better mental health—can be incredibly helpful. Therapy isn’t about being told what to do—it’s about answering the right questions, and exploring and communicating emotions, and having a safe place to process them in a healthy way.

Therapy is about the maturity and growth that comes along with self-reflection…not about being “crazy” or “insane.” Some problems simply cannot be delved into alone, and having a professional who’s equipped to support tougher issues, rather than just talking to friends and family, can alter the outcome of the therapeutic journey.

Celebrities speaking openly about their therapy is one helpful way to change the stigma of therapy. There are ways non-celebrity folks, like you and me, can work towards a more positive image of what therapy is and who might benefit from it:

1. Talking openly about your struggles with friends and family. Part of the stigma of therapy is this idea that everyone lives a perfect life, so going to therapy must be for “crazy” people. But if you openly talk about life’s daily struggles, this helps those around you understand that we all share hardships. That asking for help, really, is just part of life.

2. Sharing with friends that you go to therapy for additional support and growth. We go to mechanics when our cars need fixing, and we go to the gym to make our bodies fit. So how is it any different to go to therapy to improve our mental health?

3. Supporting family and friends who are in therapy. Praise and acknowledge others for getting professional support when most people would be afraid to admit it.

Our therapists see folks struggling with a wide array of issues, ranging from parenting struggles, anger management, and grieving the loss of a loved one, to depression, anxiety, psychiatric conditions, trauma recovery and more.

Need an Ear to Bend?

There’s a saying: a problem shared is a problem cut in half. Sharing your problems with us will lighten your load a bit! We offer a free consultation to new clients—complete the brief form below to request yours today!

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The post Asking for Help is Okay: Changing the Stigma of Therapy appeared first on Creative Counseling Center.

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