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I’ll be the first to admit that I’m extremely susceptible to beauty-related FOMO. One of my friends debuts new lavender hair? I book an appointment immediately. A fellow editor swears by a yet-to-be-released hydrating mask? I’ve already pleaded with PR to send me a sample. Very rarely does my try-first-and-ask-questions-later approach not result in either a new favorite product or a valuable what-not-to-do lesson to share with other beauty junkies.

So, after witnessing dozens of trusted makeup connoisseurs post Instagram stories with the ubiquitous jade roller for the past few months, I knew it was time to test one  for myself (especially since my love of beauty tools is well documented). A few clicks on my Amazon Prime account later, and I was the proud new owner of a trendy jade roller. The only problem was I had no idea how to use it! The first morning I just swiped it up and down my cheeks and forehead, hoping for some heretofore unknown epidermal magic to take place. Clearly, I needed to learn to walk before I could roll.

First, a little historical context from celebrity facialist Cecilia Wong: “Jade rollers date back thousands of years,” she explained via email. “The Chinese empresses and emperors were first to use it for smoothing out fine lines and wrinkles and to promote a brighter complexion.” And why jade over other stones? “In Chinese culture, jade is referred to as the ‘stone of heaven’ or ‘the emperor’s stone’ and is a symbol of purity, health, and spirituality. Only the emperors and empresses could afford to use it. Jade is believed to have healing properties, as it expels toxins, heals stressed organs, revitalizes the qi in the body, and slows down prematurely aging skin cells.” All of this, plus it looks super chic on my vanity.

My technique, as in how to even use a jade roller, could still use a little work, so I consulted the team at natural beauty brand Herbivore Botanicals—who manufactures their own jade roller—for some tips. “Start at the center of the face—under the eyes and cheekbones—and work your way out to the hairline. Then move down to the jawline, again starting at the center of the chin and moving out along the jawbone. To end, roll from the bottom of the ear down the neck towards the center of the jawbone—this helps to drain all the lymph to the lymph nodes.” Again, lymphatic drainage (aka flushing your body of toxins) is the goal here. That means less puffy morning face and more well-rested Wonder Woman complexion.

Both Wong and the Herbivore Botanicals team encouraged me to store the jade roller in the freezer overnight to help tighten the skin, combat swelling, and boost my overall glow. I also needn’t apply a ton of pressure, as the lymphatic system lies just beneath the skin. So with these tips in mind, I set off on a month’s worth of rolling, snapping selfies each day so I could track my progress.

I’m not sure whether starting this experiment in December—the month when mindful eating goals wither and die—was my best idea, but I quickly began to take note of how *exceptionally* puffy my face becomes after a night of wine and pasta. I’d wake up bleary-eyed and alarmed that my cheekbones, which are usually one of my favorite features, had all but disappeared. Roller in hand, I tackled each section of my swollen face—once on freshly-washed skin, and again later to help absorb my various serums and creams.

Four minutes of lymphatic drainage later, my features began to rebound. I started stretching out the time I dedicated to rolling, massaging, and generally babying my face. I even slowly weaned myself off that second-glass-of-wine habit when I’m out with friends. Literal self-reflection for upwards of an hour each week, all in hopes of chiseling your bone structure into top form, tends to make you wary of over-indulgence.

Overall, I’ve kept my jade roller within arm’s reach even after the month was up, and not just because it looks cute next to my perfume bottles. I can slather on moisturizer or eye cream in ten seconds flat, but spending a few extra minutes on my skin feels like a manageable degree of luxury. And my cheekbones have been on point ever since.

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There’s something refreshing about how beauty ideals have shifted from the (oft-dangerous) waif-like body goals of the early aughts to the healthy, natural, and curvy ones of today. (We’re going to ignore the questionably natural enhancements of the Kardashians, of course.) We’re all for the movement of eating nutrient-dense food for fuel and working out to feel our very best. But sometimes, we like to take a more targeted approach to toning, like, say, our butt. So whether you’re looking to build a little more back there, or want to lift and tone what you’ve already got, Equinox’s Becca Pace shows us her seven best moves for carving out a perky butt.

1st Position Plie

“Start with your heels up, then press them into one another. Bend the knees over the toes, and tuck the tailbone down, bringing the hips forward. Bring the knees slowly to center so they touch, then, using the glute muscles, pull the knees wide (as if to draw a line from wall to wall). This exercise targets the buttocks (glutes), the abductor muscles (inner thighs), as well as the hip flexor muscles. Do 15-20 pulls back.”

2nd Position Plie

“Start with your knees lined up over the toes, hip bones facing forward, and tailbone down. A common mistake is to over-turn out the feet, causing the knees to fall in. This can cause knee pain! Lift one heel high and sit deeper in the legs (‘grande plie’), switch heels, and sit deeper in the legs. As you move from right to left, drop the torso to the center of your mat, feeling the buttocks and inner thighs. Do 15-20 repetitions with each heel lifted.”

Bridge with Leg Extensions

“Start on the back with feet beneath the knees, shoulder blades pressing down, arms to the sides. Lift the hips. Press up to the balls of the feet and make sure they line up directly beneath the knees. Extend one leg to the ceiling. Keep lifted leg straight, and point the toes. Slowly lower the hips, then lift—pressing into the ball of the foot. This exercise works not only on strength in the buttocks, hamstrings, and lower back/core, but also works flexibility. Do about 10-12 each leg.”

Frog Leg Lifts

“Lie on your stomach, placing the forehead either on a yoga block or on stacked fists. Contract the abdominals. Turn hips out, and pull heels together so they touch. Hips stay connected to the floor, and spine stays neutral. Lift the heels toward the ceiling, pulling as much of the thigh off the floor as possible. Squeeze buttocks at the top and hold for a moment. Lower the thighs down slowly, keeping heels touching. This exercise strengthens the buttocks, lower back, core, and hamstrings. Common mistakes: pulling the chin up and ‘breaking’ the neutral neck position; lifting too fast, allowing the hips to lift as well. Do about 10-12 slowly with control.”

Back Attitude Leg Lift

“Start in 1st position plie. Shift weight into one leg, keep the standing leg bent. Connect the big toe of the lifted leg to the back of the standing heel, and turn the knee out. Keep the moving leg in the same position when lifting (aim to lift the outside of the knee higher than the heel). Slowly lower to starting position. This exercise targets the buttocks, the hamstrings, lower back, and hip flexor muscles. Do 10-12 repetitions on both legs.”

Parallel Leg Lifts

“Begin in 1st position plie. Step leg back directly in line with the hip and shoulder, and turn the leg in so that all 5 toes are facing the floor; flex the foot (pull toes toward the shin, push the heel away from the leg). Pull shoulders back, and aim collarbone to the ceiling. Lift the heel toward the ceiling (it may be a very small movement), keep the moving leg straight at all times. Standing leg can be straight or bent slightly. This exercise targets the lower back, buttocks, and hamstrings. Common mistakes: bending the moving leg; allowing the moving leg to turn out (not all 5 toes are facing down); collapsing forward in the upper body; and lifting the leg too high. Do 15-20 each leg.”

Down Dog Split Leg Lifts

“Start in Down Dog (lift hips high, and evenly distribute weight into the hands and feet). Point one foot, and slowly lift the leg to the highest point without kicking to get there, and control the leg back to starting position. Make sure that both shoulders stay wrapped down toward the floor (don’t allow one shoulder to pull up as the leg lifts). Do 12-15 each leg.”

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The most important lesson I ever learned about hair when I first started covering beauty was this: Your hair is really fabric. It’s not alive—what’s damaged and broken does not grow back no matter how many antioxidants are in the formula—but it can be treated to become smoother, shinier, and brighter. Almost like sending a silk blouse to the best dry cleaner. Hair can even be patched back up in areas that have been too worn away thanks to ingredients that can fill in little microscopic potholes in your strands (more on that later).

This is why, earlier this spring, I ended up at the enormous Ratti silk scarf factory near Lake Como in Italy. I’m not allowed to disclose exactly which brands commission their scarves with the famed 73-year-old house, but their racks upon racks of floor to ceiling silk scarf archives spanned a room the size of a suburban grocery store, and pretty much all the biggest luxury designers were accounted for. Running my hands across the edges of the thousands and thousands of scarves as I walked through the aisles, it did feel for a moment a bit like stroking a long row of thick, healthy hair. No wonder, then, that hair care brands use extracted silk proteins in their products.

“Silk proteins are used not only for their lightness but for their tensile strength,” says John Moroney, a stylist, educator, and global creative director for Goldwell, the hair care brand hosting us for this trip. “So, your hair is coated in something that makes it stronger, but still flexible.” In the case of the brand’s new Kerasilk styling line, silk is infused along with keratin so that it can take dry, highlighted, over-blow dried hair like yours truly’s (it’s frizzy-curly, too!) and make it, indeed, look and feel silky. You can find silk proteins in other brands like BriogeoJen Atkin’s Ouai, and cult-loved indie French brand Iles Formula, and some silk proteins, like the ones in Goldwell, are “cationic” which means they are actually attracted to damaged parts of the hair through negative and positive charges. Essentially, this is how a formula can patch us little breaks and broken spots in the hair.

But even the finest silk in the world is not resilient to anything you throw at it. You don’t, for example, throw your Hermès twilly into an old industrial dryer on full heat or leave a scalding iron sitting on it, but that is basically what we do to our head fabric (new word for hair—trademarking it!) when we rip through a blow dry or hold our flatiron on a bit too long. Add to that the damage of bleach and the naturally porous, dry nature of curly hair, and you have an explanation for the tortured ball of fluff I call my curly bob.

While it was wise to chop my hair short last year and start air drying my natural texture (I had had the ultra long hair and three times a week blowout for years—it was basically straw on the ends), it took me forever to figure out how to style my curls so that they look more like a sexy but messy Kim Basinger and less like a poodle on a staticky carpet. A couple tricks I learned: I now always use a mask instead of a conditioner (my favorite is Christophe Robin Regenerating Mask with Rare Prickly Pear Seed Oil); apply said mask with a comb and also to comb through while rinsing as well (this helps promise a smoother coating of ingredients); wait until my hair is about halfway dry before applying styling products; and, as now I’ve come to learn, use mousse. When I got back to my hotel room I found a collection of teeny tiny sample sized hair products including the new Goldwell Kerasilk Style Bodifying Volume Mousse. I remembered the advice I had gotten a few weeks earlier from hair guru Mark Townsend, who styles the Olsens, Gal Gadot, and Dakota Johnson, and had told me not to fear the mousse, no matter what ’80s connotations it used to have.

Well, he was right. Once my hair is halfway dry, I take a blob of mousse, carefully squish it between both hands (without crushing the blob entirely) and then rake my hands and fingers through my curls from the bottom up. The result: Defined curls that I can manipulate into waves by tugging on them as they dry, and from-the-roots volume rather than puff. Plus, Moroney tells me, the silk offers my hair a buffer from heat damage, and I usually touch up my hair on the second and third days with a T3 curling wand. While I have the big mousse can back at home now, that teeny one has since come in my toiletries bag home to New York, then France, Los Angeles, and, just this week, even back to Italy, so I can travel the world staticky poodle-free.

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It’s been 10 years since Mary Katrantzou debuted her kaleidoscopic prints and intricate embroidery, which have become synonymous with her brand. Can you believe it? A look inside her closet and a crazy-fun weekend wedding (for Cov alum Erica Pelosini) in Cannes later, and we’ve found ourselves sitting across from our dear friend in the middle of Hudson’s Bay The Room. We caught up with Katrantzou in Toronto to walk through 80 painstakingly curated pieces from her archives that are on display here through June—a nice sampling of the 180 designs from her decade-long career she showcased in her first solo exhibit at the Dallas Contemporary Museum this January. Although we got distracted by the exquisite work and details of her pieces up close, we did squeeze in some talk about how technology is fueling the change for sustainability in fashion, the most ambitious piece her team has ever worked on, and what her next collaboration will be.

On the mini-exhibit at The Room:

“We did a solo exhibition at the Dallas Contemporary Museum in January and it spanned over three months. It was 180 pieces from the archive and was blocked in colors. We were trying to find a thread throughout my work because everything is so thematic, so we decided to do it by color [for the Dallas exhibit]. I think the selection process at The Room was looking at what we exhibited at Dallas and trying to represent as many collections as possible so that you can the evolution from season to season. It’s pretty amazing to see them all together because it doesn’t even feel separate. There’s clearly a consistency that you don’t realize [as a designer]—there’s a brand DNA there that we didn’t recognize until we did the exhibition.”

How looking at her past collection when building the retrospective, inspired her next one:

“We realize that a lot of my work has been around this idea of collecting. So the theme of the collection is collection for September. It feels like every season we’ve done in the past is a piece of a larger puzzle. A lot of those collections were based on the idea of jewelry or perfume bottles or postage stamps—objects of art that have been around this idea of collecting. A lot of the techniques and the silhouettes have evolved through the years, so it’s kind of nice to revisit and say we want to take the idea of postage stamps but do outwear this time. It’s kind of showing an idea from the past from a different perspective. It’s reappropriating a lot of those ideas and adding new ideas to it.

“I think every designer should look back at their work as a challenge to understand their brand DNA. 10 years is kind of a good benchmark for every designer to say ‘OK, let’s look at what has happened. Let’s take that forward.’”

How technology is helping the movement towards sustainability:

“The beauty of technology is that it’s constantly advancing. Any innovation that happens in fashion is focused on the innovation that’s happening in textiles. A lot of the fabrics now are so reactive, so it allows you to build silhouettes and techniques, and you can push the boundaries of what some of these [textile] mills have been doing for hundreds of years. It’s pretty amazing how you can digitize an image these days to so many different techniques and what you can do with precision engineering. Because my work is so image-led and had to do with perfectly placing that print, embroidery, or that jacquard on the body required precision engineering. Now that everyone is focused so much more on where the clothes are coming from, and whether they did in a sustainable way—fashion is not the most sustainable industry in the world—it’s kind of amazing what these advances in technology are allowing you to do. What we’ve always done with precision engineering is limit waste. Obviously, it’s baby steps in the grand scheme of things, but the fact that you can be in London and see what your factory is doing in Italy via an app, is amazing. You can actually guide their cutting machine on your phone.”

The piece that has taken her the longest to create:

“We just did an amazing piece that Cate Blanchett wore to Cannes [Film Festival]. It was inspired by the paint-by-numbers story, which was from Spring/Summer ’18. It was all based on this idea of nostalgia and the coloring books you used as a child that becomes the creative building block to your creative ideas as an adult. Cate’s stylist Elizabeth Stewart had her try on the dress last October, and she knew she wanted to do something special. We were waiting on confirmation that Cate would be going to Cannes, and in January it was confirmed that she was going to be leading the jury. We started creating this dress [right away] and it’s probably one of the most ambitious pieces we’ve ever done because it’s 15 meters of hand-embroidered paint-by-numbers. The weight needs to be carried with an under crinoline construction and it needed to fit Cate perfectly, so we had to do two fittings. It took four weeks straight on to be hand-embroidered and then it took another week to construct it. I’d say that is probably one of the most intricate pieces we’ve done.

“We have one displayed here that we call ‘The Beast’ and it’s again a paint-by-number and a very special friend and client of mine ordered that bespoke. It’s because their silhouette is so impactful but also they are fully hand-embroidered. It’s amazing that both pieces exist in the world: one in Cate Blanchett's private collection and the other that a very good friend of mine owns it.”

What her creative process looks like:

“It’s changed through the years. When I started, it was mostly about the print and that defined the silhouette. Now it’s a lot more about having a complete range, where the image is an important part of the narrative. My collections are usually quite thematic, so I don’t start with a time period or a muse, I start with the inspiration, which is usually an artist inspiration that kind of defines the collection.

“Last season it was about the beginning of Modernism—so taking it from the arts and crafts movement and William Morris’ textiles up to Bauhaus via Pointillism, and how it changes. William Morris and the decorative nature of his designs, and the more pragmatic and pure vision of Bauhaus are both parts of my work. At the beginning of the collection, we were trying to bleed one into another. We put a lot of images up on a mood board, trying to cross the gaps between the two. And you find a lot more similarities and synergy between the two as you do it. We were looking at Victorian tiles and how they were very similar to a Bauhaus building and bringing that into the collection. Then I’ll sketch and do different collages with a lot of the imagery on the body to see how it fits and scales. We will take those collages and it will inspire everything that we do with the silhouette and textile design. Then it’s back-and-forth between myself and my team. I’ll do something and I’ll give it to my print team and they’ll continue the design or they’ll find a reference and give it to me and I’ll place it on the body.”

Her next collaboration will be outside of her wheelhouse:

“Every collaboration you do, you do it because you want to understand more about that medium. It’s not only creating brand awareness beyond your audience, but it’s also about doing [a collaboration] with a leader in their field. When we did Moncler and Moose Knuckles, it was about doing a perfect piece of outerwear and we would never be able to do it at that kind level [on our own].

“At this point, any collaboration you take should be something that offers a diversification of your own product. I don’t know what would be an idea one—probably something within interiors or gifting. We have this idea that we want to do for our 10th anniversary. Working on a different product that has inspired the collection, because a lot of the collections have been inspired by objects, so we want to turn that on its head and take the object that inspired a print.”

The first thing she does in the morning:

“I look at my phone. Check if any urgent email or text message has appeared. And usually I’m late, so I get dressed and run out the door. If not, I’ll send a couple of emails to my team of things we need to go through that day.”

Her your ultimate breakfast:

“There is never a breakfast [laughs]. I think the only breakfast I have is when I’m traveling, but not today! Avocado and toast would be my favorite with a side of scrambled eggs—if I ever had the possibility of having it. But at home, it’s usually coffee.”

Favorite room service order:

“I love a mac and cheese, and when I’m being healthy I like a cobb salad.”

If she was to wear one color other than black:

“I do wear color when I’m on holiday. I think that’s how I define work life and holiday life. When you make so many decisions with color every day, you just want a uniform. And when I’m on holiday, I want to feel like I’m not working, so I go all out!”

The last thing she screenshotted:

Jane Fonda wearing my design at Cannes [Film Festival].”

If she was bartending a party, she’d make...

“A Moscow mule or a gin tonic. My go-to these days!”

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Just a few floors above one of Williamsburg, Brooklyn’s most idyllic streets, away from the din of construction and weekend shoppers, is what can only be described as a legitimate urban jungle. How many plants and animals are needed to be considered a jungle, you ask? We think upwards of 700 (over 400 varieties), plus an honest to goodness chicken, will suffice. Burgeoning horticulturalists prepare to take notes.

This bohemian oasis is home to model and entrepreneur Summer Rayne Oakes, who for 13 years has carefully cultivated her collection of greenery. “I haven’t done the final count,” she muses as we wander about the sunny space, slack-jawed. “I usually do a count around this time, for the different types of species and everything.” Despite the baffling amount of plants throughout the apartment, the overall vibe is one of serenity and calm, much like Oakes herself. A hammock sways between two wooden pillars as we discuss everything from her modeling career to her textile sources. The low hum of grow lights is punctuated only by the occasional flap of Kippee’s wings (her hen, preparing to lay her daily egg). Just another day at what might be New York’s greenest apartment.

As we prepare to leave, we finally ask if she believes that plants make people happy. “I think that they’re scientifically proven to show that people are happier around plants,” she says, smiling. “But no matter how many house plants you have, it will never replace the beauty of nature.” And with that bit of wisdom, we walk back out onto the Brooklyn sidewalk, and take an immediate right into Sprout Home, a plant store conveniently located on the ground floor of her building. We have a long way to go before our apartments reach jungle status.

Check out Oakes’ many tips for plant-lovers, why she still loves living in Williamsburg after all these years, and how exactly she wound up caring for a chicken in New York City.

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“All I can tell people, with my hand on my heart, is that Anthony Byrne is a feminist. Natalie Dormer is a feminist. And that scene was there to serve an emotional beat in the film.”

I’m sitting across from Natalie Dormer (Game of Thrones, Hunger Games, The Tudors) on a couch at the Four Seasons West Hollywood. The actress, dressed in bright purple pumps and the world’s best plaid skirt, is vehemently defending the use of female nudity in her latest film.

“It saddens me if people think is exploitative,” Dormer said of In Darkness, a movie she co-wrote with partner of 11 years, director Anthony Byrne. “But that’s their right as an audience member. That’s what art is. You spend eight years writing something that people will eventually watch, claim and make their own—and you have no control over how it’s interpreted.”

So, which is scene in question? The one where Dormer’s Sofia sleeps with the man who may have killed her sultry upstairs neighbor (played by the always seductive Emily Ratajkowski). It lingers on her naked breasts and back in a way that some reviewers have found artistic, and others have found gratuitous. Dormer, however, says it’s a love scene—not a sex scene—that was created to show “women, too, demonstrate connections sexually.”

“It’s so interesting how the same scene can get such different reactions from different people,” Dormer continued. “I think that [an individual’s interpretation] is often reflective of something in their own lives. What we don’t realize is that when we point at something and say ‘this is what this is,’ there are three fingers pointing back at us.”

Dormer’s character, while often nude, is also blind. It’s a major risk for the 36-year-old actor, especially considering Hollywood’s trend toward hiring actors who possess the same qualities as their character. (Think: Millicent Simmonds in A Quiet Place.)

“Do I think more disabled, transgender and minority actors should get work? 100%. That should be far more prevalent,” she declared. “But the idea that you can only play what you are is a direct contradiction to what acting is. With that school of thought, we would have never had Daniel Day Lewis in My Left Foot. Sean Penn would have never played Harvey Milk. Acting in its essence is becoming something you are not.”

To better understand the ability which she was to portray, Dormer spent several days at the Royal National Institute of Blind People in England. She met with blind and partially sighted people of all ages, genders and cultural backgrounds.

“There were all these myths about being blind that those generous people wanted to debunk. For example, I met this wonderful girl named Emily Davison—this bold young woman who is using social media to correct the idea that blind women don’t want to wear makeup, do their hair or be interested in fashion. It was so enlightening.”

Dormer, no stranger to glam, was inspired to hear of Davison’s dedication. But in her own life, she prefers a low key approach to fashion and makeup.

“I only wear heels for press days. Otherwise I’m in flats,” she finished. “And I use Aquaphor on my lips, the Mac pencil Fling in my brows and Caudalie vino spray all over my face. I’m not into fancy stuff, but those things I can’t live without.”

In Darkness opens in theaters this week.

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You’ve braved snowstorms and disrespectfully low temps. You’ve zipped yourself up in a puffy coat only to sweat through your cashmere sweater on a crowded subway car. And lest we forget, you’ve worn winter boots that, for a lack of a better description, aren’t cute. But alas!—Memorial Day is nigh, and you’re now free to go about your days in denim shorts, platform sandals, and sleeveless everything. We’re obviously excited—so excited that we’ve spent the better part of the weak dreaming up our Memorial Day outfits. Ahead, all the pieces we’ll be living in for the foreseeable future.

Leah Faye Cooper Senior Features Editor

1. 13 Bonaparte Judo Mini SkirtI just discovered this brand, and let me tell you, I’ve been missing out. Their take on denim is incredibly modern, and I’m a fan of the many small details, like the stitching, on this denim skirt. I’ll be buttoning it up and wearing it until Labor Day.

2. Tory Burch Scallop Wedge SlideOh hello, sandal of my dreams! I love a slide, I love a platform, and I love a shoe that I can wear all day long without sacrificing comfort for. About to buy these in every color.

3. Chloé Faye Shoulder Bag: I happen to really like my middle name, and I also happen to really like Chloé bags. So if I had to pick one, I’d definitely go with my namesake in this pretty shade of light green.

Ivanna Martinez-Gonzalez Social Media Associate

1. Worme “The Key” Maxi in redStarted by sisters Hannah and Melissa Collett, this brand is all about versatility. This maxi dress can be worn over my swimsuit and straight to a fun sunset cocktail hour. I love the “patriotic red” color of the dress, and the halter cut really complements any body shape.

2. Gala Is Love “Poessi” EarringsI’ll probably wear my hair up this summer more often than not, so my earring game needs to be strong. I love the intricate yet minimalist design on these silver earrings. Gala says, “your lobes will love to swing on these lovely sonnets.” Amen to that.

3. Sézane Jeannette Open Toe PumpMy family hosts a fun barbecue every Memorial Day weekend, and we do a lot of dancing. I like how this kitten heel is perfect for moving around without having to think of the painful aftermath of an actual heel. At the same time, it doesn’t give grandma vibes.

Daniella Deutsch Producer

1. Céline Cat Eye SunglassesThe perfect pair of cat-eye sunglasses do exist! Céline never fails to deliver the ultimate pair of shades, and these guys come in so many fun colors. The only accessories I need for the upcoming weekend are these sunnies and a great read.

2. Caroline Constas Arisi Striped SwimsuitI finally have a reason to press checkout on all the swimsuits lingering in my shopping carts, the majority of which are full pieces. The justification here being that not only can I wear them to the pool, but they can also double as bodysuits. This Caroline Constas number is particularly great, as the burst of colors complements the joy I’m feeling for warmer days.

3. Calvin Klein Denim ShortsJorts are all I can think about for summer. They give off some major middle-school vibes, but I need to make these Bermuda-length denim cutoffs a wardrobe staple. Sleek and cool, whether dressed down for a day at the beach or paired with a silk top for an evening barbecue.

Jodi Taylor Associate Editor

1. Céline Royal Blue Cat Eye SunglassesWow. I think I’m in love.

2. Puma Prevail OGIt’s no secret that I’ll be in sneakers all weekend long (and for the rest of my life, really). I thought my chance to snag these babies was long gone. Thankfully, I was wrong!

3. Topshop Black Satin Slip DressI like to keep things simple on the weekends, even if there’s a holiday attached to them. Slip dress, sneakers, a pair of sunnies, and a tequila soda with a splash of pineapple, and I am good to go.

Noah Lehava Senior Editor: Health and Wellness

1. Staud Sonny Mini DressDoesn’t this just scream IT’S F*CKING SUMMER!? I love the color and the little colorful fringe that lines the bottom hem. It’s so fun! It can totally be dressed up, but for this weekend of patios and parks, I’m pairing it down with a pair of sneakers and my pup, Walter.

2. Chimi SunglassesTo match my very yellow dress, very yellow sunglasses!

3. Nike Air Max 97I’ve had Air Max 97s on my wish list forever, and I think I’m finally going to pull the trigger on these. I love that they’re mostly white with a tinge of color subtly running throughout.

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Let’s be honest: There are few more picture-perfect destinations than the Greek islands. The combination of whitewashed buildings and cobblestone streets set against the bright blue sea (the Aegean, the Mediterranean, or the Ionian, depending on where you are) is so beautiful, it’s almost hard to believe it’s real. But if you don’t believe it now, once you visit, you—and all of your Instagram followers—definitely will. The big question, then, is which Greek island to hit up (after all, there are more than 200 inhabited islands in the country).

Search the best ones to visit, and you'll likely find a handful of recurring favorites: There are the big, iconic destinations like Santorini and Mykonos; and the small, more low-key options like Naxos, Corfu, Crete, and Paros. But head one nautical mile off the coast of Paros and you'll discover an even smaller island: Antiparos. This tiny haven (which has been visited by the likes of Madonna, model Iman Perez, and designer Ulla Johnson) with a population of only about 1,200 offers all of the beauty of the Cyclades, without the tourist frenzy. In fact, it’s almost impossible to not feel totally relaxed and rejuvenated while laying in the sun with a cocktail in hand. Pack your Cult Gaia, Le Specs, and your Araks bikinis, and get ready to bliss out with this guide to our Antiparos favorites.

STAY  

Artemis, a family-run hotel, definitely has the feeling of being a casual, inviting retreat free of stuffy bellhops and generic lobby music. You’re likely to be greeted by Jason, the adorable yellow lab who loves napping right in the open entryway; and Olympia and the rest of the staff have a way of providing the customer service you’d expect from a nice hotel (including local tips on where to go around the island) while also making you feel like you’re all just hanging out at home. All of that adds to the charm of the whitewashed property that sits steps from Antiparos port. The rooms are perfect in their simplicity: They’re almost all white—the walls, curtains, and slightly-distressed wooden bed frames and nightstands with neutral bedding and tile floors, all coming together to create a calming space to rest your head after a day of drinking rosé and enjoying the breeze on your terrace. There’s no pool, but you won’t miss it with the wealth of beaches on the island.

Antiparos, as a whole, is supremely chill, but if there is a “scene,” it’s at Beach House. The stylish and tiny (there are only nine rooms!) boutique hotel is kind of like the Soho House of the island. It’s perfect for people-watching (both Ulla Johnson and Iman Perez have been there), but also just as good for zoning out or diving into your latest read.

Beach House is tucked away in the secluded Apantima Bay about five miles from town; and you can spend all day lounging on the sunbeds and swimming in the calm waters (this sheltered cove is free from northerly winds). If you’re missing your weekly Barry’s class, rent a kayak or stand-up paddle board for some exercise and aquatic exploring. Once you’re done, cool off with a fresh juice or a couple cocktails and shuffle over to the beachside restaurant when you’re ready to nosh.

DO
Scuba Diving with Blue Island Divers

The Blue Island Divers shop, just steps from Artemis Hotel, is tiny and frill-free, but the PADI-certified dive center has everything you need for an adventure under the surface of the Aegean Sea—namely awesome instructors who know what they’re doing. Gary and his team seem like they just might spend as much time under the water as they do above it, yet they know very well how to teach and guide newbie divers who are still trying to figure out how to breath underwater. Of course, if you’re an experienced diver, they can also take you to discover what lies even deeper on an advanced dive. Either way, the bright blue waters, aquatic life, and wrecks off the coast of Antiparos are well worth the excursion.

Beach Hopping

Antiparos is surrounded by crystal-clear, turquoise waters (like Evian!); and you’ll have your pick of plenty of beaches to enjoy them from—whether your goal is to make a solid dent in your Goodreads reading challenge (or just catch up on a few celeb memoirs), take naps in the sun with the ~real life~ version of your “ocean” sound machine, or actually swim.

Walk just five minutes from the port for the sandy shores and shallow waters of Psaraliki (which actually encompasses two neighboring beaches, Psaraliki I and Psaraliki II), or head to the south end of the island to swim slightly deeper at Soros Beach and take in the views of the uninhabited Despotiko Island from Agios Georgios Beach. Rent a bike, scooter, or ATV from town to easily navigate the island and bounce from spot-to-spot.

Strolling Through Town

It’s worth taking a break from the beach to stroll along the main cobblestone street that runs through the center of the miniature, picturesque town. (After all, this is where you’ll get those so-beautiful-they-look-fake shots.) Admire and casually pose for “candids” in front of the Cycladic white-and-blue buildings accented by bright-pink bougainvillea, the fresh octopus drying in the sun outside the many casual eateries, and the ultra-relaxed goings-on in the platia, or square.

Exploring the Cave of Antiparos

Step back in time and get your (somewhat) educational fix for the trip with a visit to the Cave of Antiparos, which is about a five-minute drive inland from Apantima Bay (home of Beach House). Walk down the 411 concrete stairs to feel your glutes burn and explore the stunning stalactites, stalagmites, and inscriptions dating back all the way to the Stone Age.

EAT

There can’t possibly be a better way to start your day on Antiparos than by grabbing a seat (or perhaps a wicker egg swing—though admittedly they’re better for photo ops than dining) at this open-air café. Eat breakfast while you admire the harbor views and think about how #blessed you are to be on this magical island. Sip on a frothy iced latte and fuel up with a pastry, Greek yogurt, or omelet.

Lollo’s Pizzeria

Italians may get most of the credit for pizza, but Greeks do a damn good job with it, too. At least, they do at Lollo’s. The beachy-chic restaurant, which is right next door to Nautica, offers the same stellar view and similar laid-back, Cycladic vibes as its neighbor, but a totally different menu. Enjoy a leisurely dinner of thin-crust pies—the toppings, from tomatoes to prosciutto, are fresh and oh-so-good. Wash it down with a crisp white wine, and finish it off with some dessert pizza. (Apples and cinnamon? Don’t mind if we do.) Make a reservation in advance, though: This place fills up fast.

Cafe Margarita

Come for the people-watching; stay for the food. Cafe Margarita is situated right on Antiparos’ main drag, making it easy to sit and observe the passers-by—and maybe keeping an eye out for a celeb or two—while enjoying a fresh sandwich for lunch (the small veranda offers plenty of shade), or pasta and seafood for dinner. The atmosphere is perfectly casual—one of those places where it feels so right to stop in with your hair still salty from the ocean.

Taverna Peramataki

When you get woozy from too much sun at Soros Beach, head approximately one-minute inland to Taverna Peramataki. This little family-run spot has a spacious, covered terrace perched high enough so you can enjoy a stellar sea view while you eat. Taverna Peramataki oozes unassuming charm (including in the form of handwritten menus) and serves up tasty local fare like stuffed tomatoes, souvlaki, and oven-roasted pork.

This traditional Greek restaurant, steps off of Antiparos’s main street, is worth it for the atmosphere alone. There’s something almost magical about dining under a canopy of bougainvillea and fruit trees, lit by fairy lights in glass pendants hanging from the branches. In fact, this spot brings us right back to the so-beautiful-it-seems-fake thing. It just might even make you feel like you’ve stepped into the cheesiest rom-com with the ~most romantic~ sets.

Stroll down to the western end of the pedestrian street for dessert (or a mid-day, cool-down snack) at Vicky’s. The plethora of flavors of homemade ice cream (like cream cheese and salted caramel) offered are made with fresh, local ingredients and well worth a daily—or maybe twice-daily— visit. Hey, you’re on vacation.

SHOP
Mariliza

Skip the cheesy airport souvenirs (although we do love a tacky tee) and head home with something that you can’t find at home. Mariliza offers a solid selection of well-curated pieces made by Greek designers—including the owner, Mariliza Dimakou, herself.

Top photo: Courtesy of Beach House Antiparos

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Have you ever woken up on the last day of a blissful beach vacation and—SURPRISE—you find a mysterious dark spot has popped up seemingly overnight? Us, too! No matter how diligent we are with sunscreen (repeat after us: every. damn. day), it seems that by the end of summer we’ve collected a few more marks than just our natural freckles.

Unfortunately, once you hit your early 20s, those years of UV rays start to add up and materialize as hyperpigmentation. This type of discoloration can develop on your face, hands, chest, and anywhere else you’ve had prolonged sun exposure, and covering it up with tons of concealer is the last thing we want to do once temperatures creep past 80 degrees. In order to sufficiently care for our skin this season, we turned to renowned dermatologist Dr. Neil Sadick for tips on identifying this type of sun damage and, more important, how to get your complexion back to normal fast.

First, how do you know it’s a sunspot? “Both sunspots and freckles are small brown spots that form due to melanin overproduction,” says Sadick. “Freckles can develop due to genetics and environment, appear at a young age, and fade over time, but sunspots accumulate with age, especially after 40, and tend to get darker. Freckles usually are red or light brown, one to two millimeters wide with irregular borders, while sunspots are yellow to dark brown, bigger than two millimeters, with defined borders.”

Though the spots themselves are relatively harmless (unlike acne, they don’t cause deeper damage), their formation is a big neon sign that there has been overexposure to UV rays and possibly damage that could lead to something more serious, like skin cancers, so be sure to get an annual checkup with your dermatologist. The risk of developing pigmentation also increases with age thanks to years and years of UV exposure. “People with lighter skin and hair color and Caucasians over 40 years old are more susceptible.” All the more reason to make SPF 30 or higher a regular part of your skin-care routine ASAP!

Luckily there are some steps you can take both at home and in a doctor’s office to fade a sunspot, since most will not disappear on their own. “Over-the-counter products containing retinoids and/or hydroquinone are excellent choices for lightening and breaking down the pigment for more mild sunspots,” suggests Sadick. “Chemical peels containing alpha-hydroxy acid, glycolic acid, and/or phenol can also be done either at home or in the clinic. With both topicals and peels, a skin-patch test should always be completed prior to application to the whole face to prevent irritation and unwanted skin reactions.”

If you’re looking to remove a dark spot a little faster, there are several treatment options you can discuss with your dermatologist. Sadick recommends laser resurfacing, which not only removes the spots, but can also rejuvenate your entire face, neck, or chest. “Cutting-edge lasers like the Picosure from Cynosure or Picogenesis from Cutera can be safely used to remove sunspots in all skin types, with little to no downtime or side effects, and are more effective than at-home treatments alone.”

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Summer is hot enough without lugging around a bag that is quite literally the same size, if not larger, than your body. Especially given the cardinal rule of: the bigger the bag, the more that goes in it. Which is how we came to the decision that this summer, we’re going full steam ahead with mini bags (we’ll worry about where the f*ck we’re going to put our laptops later). Below, an assortment of brightly colored, leather, satin, sequined, and ring top minis we’re currently coveting. Sorry in advance for getting you hooked.

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