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Months have gone by since you said goodbye to your loved one. You’ve weathered the ups and downs of deployment, shipped out numerous care packages, said “I love you” to grainy Skype screens and snuggled the dog on the lonely nights. You are ready for homecoming! But military homecomings aren’t just what you see on the news; the reality of a homecoming can be very different. Your military homecoming may not always turn out perfectly, but it can still be a great day thanks, in part, to following some important tips.

Military homecoming tips military spouses need to follow

Wear clothes and shoes you feel comfortable in. 

You haven’t seen your loved one in months so it’s only natural that you want to look your best when the big reunion takes place. “Looking your best” is different for each person so I won’t even begin to suggest what kind of outfit to wear to your military homecoming. However, it’s important to select something you feel comfortable in and will feel comfortable in throughout the entire day. Military homecomings can happen in just about any environment: outside, inside, good weather, bad weather and everything in between. You should take that into account when you’re planning an outfit so you’re not freezing while waiting for the plane to land.

Go all out with decorating a sign and the house. Or don’t. 

I’m a big proponent of homecoming signs and will likely always make one for my husband’s homecomings, I recognize that for some folks, it may not be too high on the priority list. And you know what dear reader? That’s completely ok!

If you have the time, energy and resources to make a sign and/or decorate the house, do it. If you don’t, your loved one will still come home and still be happy to see you. The most important thing is you’ll be back together, not what snarky sign is on the door to your bedroom.

Make the decision to invite extended family and friends together with your loved one. 

The topic of who should be invited to military homecomings is definitely a controversial one among military spouses. Many feel that those first few moments back together should be shared just between spouses and children. Others take a “more the merrier” approach and believe in inviting extended family.

Ultimately, the decision on who should and should not be present is yours: you and your loved one who is returning home. Have an honest discussion about the pros and cons of adding members of the family to the homecoming. People will understand your decision, especially if it’s made with your loved one.

Don’t put too much pressure on the moment (or the ones that follow). 

There is a lot of buildup around military homecomings and expectations are usually pretty high going into that moment. Those high expectations can result in a bit of disappointment if things don’t work out exactly the way you’d envisioned during the long months alone. If you’re able to temper your expectations a little bit so they’re realistic (but you’re still excited), you may find yourself more satisfied with homecoming.

You and your loved one have each been through a life-changing event! So much happens during a deployment, including on the home front, that can change the people involved. It’s completely natural to need some “get to know you” time once reunited before things feel completely normal at home.

Give yourself grace and avoid comparing your homecoming to the others. 

Did your deployment unfold exactly like your neighbor’s or friend’s? No? Then why should your military homecoming? If you are constantly focused on what everyone else is doing or not doing, you won’t be enjoying the time you have with your loved one. Don’t worry if everyone made a sign, but you didn’t or if your friend is taking her husband on a post-deployment vacation, but you aren’t. Each couple is unique, each relationship is unique, each deployment is unique and so it each military homecoming.

Military homecomings are exciting times after the long, slow days of deployment! It can be tempting to over plan and place high expectations on the much-anticipated reunion. But following a few tips like the ones above can help you have the best experience possible!

Need care package ideas? I’m giving away 165+ ideas (plus what to put in them) here.

The post Military Homecoming Tips Military Spouses Need To Follow appeared first on Countdowns and Cupcakes.

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Deployment homecoming expectation: we’ll have this magical perfect reunion where I will look flawless.

Deployment homecoming reality: his plane was delayed 3 times, I got rained on and am now a bit sweaty from sitting in this hot airport.

I no longer look flawless.

He smells like he hasn’t showered in a week.

He doesn’t even care.

Neither do I.

That, dear readers, is an true description of my most recent homecoming. On one hand, it definitely was not what I’d been dreaming about for months on end. But on the other hand, it was exactly what I’d been dreaming about: he was home and safe. We were together and my heart was whole again.

That’s really all that mattered.

I know it’s tempting to fantasize about one of those tear-jerking homecomings you see on the news, especially when you’re in the depths of deployment. And some of you may have a video or photos just like that and that’s ok! But some of you won’t and that’s ok too.

Just like the deployment itself, each homecoming is going to be different. You cannot place too many expectations on those first few moments of being together again. What happened last time may not happen this time. What happens for your friend may not happen for you, even if your homecoming happens at the exact same time. Honestly, no matter how those moments unfold, they won’t be exactly like you pictured, but they will be uniquely yours.

So make your sign, but don’t worry if the letters are a little crooked. Pick out a great outfit, but don’t worry if your hair didn’t come out exactly the way you wanted it. Have someone take a picture of the moment you’re reunited and celebrate that moment above all the other ones of the day. It’s the one that matters, no matter what it looks like.

Comparing your homecoming to anyone else’s or even your previous ones will only leave you feeling unhappy.

The same goes for the moments that come after getting home; reintegration is not always smooth and not always full of romance. You both have gone through a life-changing experience: spending months apart, dealing with your own stressors and life issues without much (if any) input from your loved one. It’s natural to have a bit of awkwardness in those first moments as the buzz wears off and you have to adjust to another person in your space. Give yourself grace during the adjustment period.

No matter what the news and Instagram likes to tell you, not every deployment homecoming is picture perfect. But it doesn’t have to be in order to give you butterflies and make you feel like all is right with the world again.

If you have a deployment homecoming in your future (whether it’s your first or your 15th), don’t make yourself crazy. Enjoy the moment (whatever it looks like) and bask in that moment of being back together with your loved one.

Do you have questions about deployment homecomings? Leave them below and I’ll get back to you!

Need care package ideas? I’m giving away 165+ ideas (plus what to put in them) here.

The post The Reality Of A Deployment Homecoming appeared first on Countdowns and Cupcakes.

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“Call it a clan, call it a network, call it a tribe, call it family: whatever you call it, whoever you are, you need one.”

Jane Howard says it best: you can’t get through life without support from a group of like-minded people. People who understand you, support you and cheer you on. When you find that group, the passion and energy is contagious. Perhaps it’s a group of people who share a major hobby, maybe it’s co-workers who relate to your daily struggles and triumphs or friends who are in the same stage of life. You may even have more than one tribe, but you definitely need one.

But as much as people shout from the rooftops about how wonderful tribes are, they usually leave out a bit piece of the equation: how to find the elusive group of people who just get you. It’s not as easy as snapping your fingers; finding that group takes work and putting yourself out there. While stepping outside your comfort zone may be scary, it’s really the only way to step into a group of people that you’re meant to find.

But it can be hard!

I get it.

To be honest, I had a hard time finding my military spouse tribe.  I had great work friends, people who shared my hobbies and a wonderful support system in my family, but none of them truly understood this new role I was taking on when I fell in love with my husband.

Despite going to each event with lots of hope, I struggled to connect with other spouses at social events because I was new and attended so infrequently thanks to living an hour away. I never had time to get to know people before they moved on and I trudged through the ups and downs without ever really feeling like I had someone to go to. I had all these emotions about being part of the military lifestyle and, without knowing if they were normal or not, felt terribly ill-equipped to handle things.

In short, I felt like I wasn’t cut out to be a military spouse.

I felt like I wasn't cut out to be a #militaryspouse. That is until I found my tribe.
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As I googled acronyms and how to put together care packages, I found this whole world of military spouses who openly talked about the ups and downs of their lives. Their words held encouragement and humor and a few sobering realities that kept me grounded. Reading their blogs made me feel normal and I began to worry a bit less about whether I was cut out for this life.

Essentially, I’d found my tribe without even realizing I was looking!

Throughout the years, I’ve developed true friendships with military spouses all over the world. I’ve drawn inspiration from them, both virtually and in person. Our shared connection to the armed forces bridged differences in every other aspect of our lives and we’ve connected. I have cheered for them, cried with them and celebrated with them. They got me and I got them.

It’s made a world of difference.

Thanks to my online military spouse community, I know that whether or not I attend the monthly lunches my husband’s command hosts (always during the work week!), I will have a group of people who I can turn to with complete understanding. Since then, I’ve really blossomed and made connections that would have seemed impossible six years ago.

All thanks to finding my tribe.

Do you have a tribe? How did you find them?

The post Finding My Tribe appeared first on Countdowns and Cupcakes.

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There are so many amazing military spouses out there kicking butt on a daily basis that deserve to be recognized and I’m excited to feature one of them each month with my Military Spouse Profile series. If you’re interested in sharing your story (or know someone who might), please send me an email!

Introduce yourself to my readers! Tell us a little bit about who you are.

Hey Countdowns and Cupcakes readers,  I’m Elizabeth-the blogger and creative mind behind Our Darling Adventure. When I’m not writing (for the blog or just for fun), you can find me trying to get my two-year old to eat her veggies, watching Netflix on the couch with the husband or heading off on our next great adventure around upstate New York.

What inspired you to start your blog or business?

Honestly, the loneliness of military life inspired me to start blogging. I was a brand new milspouse living far away from family and friends with a husband preparing for deployment. I stumbled upon a blog written by a military spouse and was inspired to join the community. The rest, as they say, is history!

What’s the main message you hope your blog shares with your readers?

My passion is helping women of all stages and military affiliation strengthen their marriages and family life. I love sharing my own personal adventures as a military spouse and first-time mom to encourage other spouses.

What is your favorite part of being a military spouse?

Definitely getting the chance to explore the world with my family!

Tell us a little bit about your journey as a military spouse-the ups and downs, lessons learned, etc.

Oof, where do I start? I’ve learned so much in the six years I’ve spent as a military spouse but probably the most important lesson I’ve learned is to always look for the silver linings because there always is one.

I had a horrible attitude about being stationed in Hawaii for the first two years we were there and it really affected my physical and mental health. After I changed my attitude, I learned to love living in Hawaii and my husband and I even made the decision to move back at the end of the year!

What’s the number one piece of advice you would give a new military spouse?

Attitude is everything. In military life, we rarely have as much control over our lives as we’d like but keeping a good attitude will help us make the most of difficult situations.

What or who has been the biggest help or source of support to you in your role as a military spouse?

Along with my husband Zach, I’d have to say that the military spouse blogging community have been a huge help to me through the past few years. The military spouse friendships I’ve made through blogging have supported me through some tough times and I’m so glad I found this community.

Do you have a favorite place the military has taken you? What is it and why?

So far, I’ve lived in Hawaii and upstate New York so picking Hawaii is a total no-brainer! (This former New England girl has been spoiled by all the aloha beaches.) I’m so excited to be going back and spending more time exploring the islands and really taking advantage of the experiences Hawaii has to offer.

Just for fun:

  • Favorite Netflix binge-worthy watch? I’m a big fan of Parks and Recreation but I’ve also loved binge-watching The Crown lately. (Anyone else excited for Season 3?)
  • What’s your favorite hobby? Other than blogging, my favorite hobby would have to be memory keeping. I love telling stories about my family’s adventures! Graphic design is a very close second though.
  • Chocolate or vanilla? Vanilla-no contest. 
  • Tell us a random fact about yourself. When I was in middle school, I wanted to be either an FBI Agent or a writer. The FBI thing obviously didn’t work out but writing is still my passion!

Thank you to Elizabeth for joining us this month! I love her comment about attitude being everything – that’s a lesson I have really taken to heart since becoming a military spouse. Plus anyone who’s a fan of The Crown gets a thumbs up in my book! Check her out on her blog, Instagram, YouTube, Facebook and Pinterest.

Need care package ideas? I’m giving away 165+ ideas (plus what to put in them) here.

The post Military Spouse Profile: Elizabeth From Our Darling Adventure appeared first on Countdowns and Cupcakes.

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Raise your hand if you’ve been bitten by the travel bug this summer? I love traveling with my husband; it’s great quality time and we often travel together shortly after deployment to reconnect. But planning any sort of trip as a military family can be a bit tricky, whether it’s coordinating leave schedules or traveling at odd times of the year. Even with the added logistical issues, there are some vacation tips for military families that make traveling easier and a lot more fun!

Vacation Tips for Military Families

Consider booking trips during the offseason.

Everyone in the world wants to travel during the summer and I get it. But sometimes military life gets in the way of family summer vacations: deployments, TDY or a PCS can totally derail a traditional vacation. So it’s time to get creative with when you go on vacation.

I genuinely enjoy traveling to places during the offseason for a few different reasons. It’s usually a bit cheaper and places aren’t nearly as crowded. When we traveled to Ireland, even the most popular tourist destinations were fairly empty, giving us more time to explore at our own pace (and fewer strangers in the background of our pictures). We ate at whatever restaurant we wanted and never had to wait in line. To be fair, when you travel during the offseason, some places may be closed or under renovations; two things we’ve run into, but more often than not, everything is still operational.

Traveling during the offseason gives military families more flexibility when it comes to vacation. If you’re open to different times of the year, you can work around almost any work schedule and fit leave in during a convenient time.

Always ask about military discounts, but look for other discounts too!

Military discounts are wonderful, but they aren’t the only game in town. Coupon codes, sales and discount travel sites may give you a better deal than a military discount would.  For example, my husband and I have gone on quite a few “dream” vacations that would have been just that without the help of discount sites. We’ve used Groupon and Living Social to go to London, Rome, Barcelona and Ireland. Those trips were wonderful, with lodging, air fare, transportation and a few adventures included, and we were able to afford them solely because they were so heavily discounted.

Oftentimes hotels have deals with popular tourist destinations that will give you a discount or package a few attractions together at a lower rate. Additionally, hotels may be able to help you skip lines or book tours that are usually fairly crowded.

Be a tourist in your own town.

One of the good things about moving frequently as a military family is that there is always a new place to explore! Not every vacation needs to involve hours of travel –  you can play tourist right in your town. Try new restaurants, visit local parks, check out a Blue Star Museum and ask for recommendations from new neighbors on what to see/eat/do.  The beauty of this kind of vacation is that you can have it whenever you want! A long weekend or even just an afternoon can offer quite a bit of quality family time and a little mini family vacation.

Take advantage of unique military partnerships or features. 

As difficult as the military may make it sometimes to fit in a vacation, there are some military perks that can help with your travel plans. For example, Space A travel may help you get you to your destination, depending on the timing and where you’d like to go. Definitely check out military hotels and resorts as a lodging option; this website has a great breakdown of the different options.

Plan for changes to your plan. 

If there’s one thing military life has taught me, it’s that plans change, quickly and without much warning. No matter how much work you put into planning your vacation, it could quickly fall apart if orders are changed or a surprise deployment pops up. Spend the extra money to get the travel insurance so that you can reschedule or recoup some of the money you spent if you have to cancel the trip.

These vacation tips for military families can help save money and stress when planning quality time together. Whether you’re exploring a new country or simply trying a new restaurant in your town, military families should always seek to create new memories together.

What’s your favorite vacation tip for military families?

The post Vacation Tips For Military Families appeared first on Countdowns and Cupcakes.

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Here’s to the ones who sacrifice. Those who find gear in the dark. Those who hug tightly and love fiercely. Those who do birthdays, weekends, holidays, graduations, bedtime stories and date nights solo. Those who give up careers, who sleep alone, who love long distance and spend every waking moment longing to be reunited with a loved one.

To the ones who sacrifice: I see you. I see the red and puffy eyes that tell me you’ve been crying. I see the fatigue and worry on your face that tell me you haven’t heard from your loved one in a while. I see how often you check your phone, hoping for a call or a message. I see the way you hug that person goodbye, as if it’s the very last time you will. I see the way you nervously pace back and forth in the airport as you wait to be reunited with your loved one.

To the ones who sacrifice: I know you. I know your pain and your fear. I know how you toss and turn at night because you made the mistake of watching the news before bed. I know how hot and fast the tears are as they fall when you can’t keep it together anymore. But I also know how desperately you try to keep them at bay. I know the struggle and pressure you feel keeping up with daily life when your heart and mind are elsewhere. I know the sense of relief that washes over you when you hear the door open every night and boots cross your threshold.

To the ones who sacrifice: I want to help you. You are not alone in this journey, no matter how lonely you may feel. There is a wide variety of individuals and organizations ready to help you, myself included. Reach out to friends, to neighbors, to me and unload some of the burden when it gets too heavy to carry. We are stronger together and can do this with each other’s help.

To the ones who sacrifice: I appreciate you. This life can be thankless and oftentimes, quite unglamorous. I appreciate the support you give your spouse as they serve the country. I appreciate the support you give each other as you find your way through deployments, PCS and all the ups and downs of military life.  I appreciate the wild creativity you show on a daily basis as you make your own careers, figure out ways to get it all done when you’re all alone and make this life work FOR you instead of AGAINST you. I appreciate the strength and resiliency you show every single day.

To the ones who sacrifice: thank you.

The post To The Ones Who Sacrifice appeared first on Countdowns and Cupcakes.

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We all have dirty little secrets that we don’t share with the world: that one closet that’s a complete disaster, a super guilty pleasure we don’t indulge in front of anyone, the white lie we tell when we want to get out of plans or the negative thought we occasionally harbor that don’t make us seem very nice. Even if you don’t want to admit it, you totally have at least one! I know I do and, in the spirit of keeping it real here, I want to share one with you.

You ready for this?

Sometimes I resent my husband.

Yeah. Not really something I’m proud to admit, but it’s true and when it happens, I don’t feel good about it.

I don’t do it on purpose, but when he’s gone again and I’m stuck at home dealing with all the at-home things, a little bit of resentment creeps in. When he’s on a training trip and gets fun goof-off time and I have worked 21 days straight for events, it creeps in.  When he agrees to deploy for the second time in a year and leaves on the day I come down the flu, it creeps in. When he’s not here to help me get through a rough day, it creeps in.

I try and banish that resentment as quickly as possible because a) it’s not a terribly flattering look no matter what color shoes you wear and b) I know none of it is truly his fault and that odds are, he’d rather be home too. But I’d be lying if I said I was always immediately successful and that it didn’t come back.

So how do I get over it? This is going to sound cheesy, but I think of as many reasons I love him as possible. After all, it’s harder to resent someone who you love because they get as excited about wiener dogs as you do. Sometimes I get over it after just a handful of reasons and sometimes it takes a few more. But it usually works and I’m back to my normal self.

Do you have a military spouse confession you’d like to make?  or share it in the comments!

Need care package ideas? I’m giving away 165+ ideas (plus what to put in them) here.

The post Military Spouse Confession appeared first on Countdowns and Cupcakes.

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When you marry someone in the military, you take on a variety of different titles. Military spouse, “finder of PT clothes at 4 am”, PCS master, holder of all the important forms…the list goes on and on. But perhaps the most controversial is the D-word: dependent. It, along with the shortened version “dependa,” has come to represent a lot of negative traits, so much so that many military spouses hate being called a dependent.

The phrase “I’m more than just a dependent” has become a bit of a battle cry for military spouses intent on developing their own identity, separate from being a service member’s spouse. And I get it: we are all more than just who we married and to only be classified and described by that one aspect of our life can be frustrating. For example, in addition to being a military spouse, I’m a business owner, a non-profit communications professional, a dog mom, a daughter, a friend and so on. I’m more than just a dependent.

But at the end of the day, I am a dependent and I don’t mind that.

That’s right: I don’t mind being called a dependent. While I certainly don’t love the negative connotations that come with that title, I do recognize it as being accurate.

As proud as I am of my independence, I do depend on my husband and have even before the military called me a “dependent”.


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Yes, I do my own things: have hobbies, friends, sources of happiness beyond my marriage. Yes, I make my own money. Yes, I could live a very full life without him. After all, I did before I met him!

But a marriage is more than a financial transaction and I depend on my husband for so much more than his paycheck.  I depend on him for emotional support: for a hug after a really bad day or after a really good one, for a soft place to land when I’m upset, for a idea sounding board. I depend on him for encouragement, for help around the house, for killing the bugs, for making dinner when the day has been too long.

I definitely depend on my husband. But he depends on me too.

He depends on me to handle things while he’s deployed, to rub his back when he’s stressed, to keep track of admin tasks, to offer emotional support when work is hard.

This mutual dependence is the case in every relationship and no one bats and eye. Just because the military puts a label on it, me depending on him isn’t suddenly a bad thing. I’m ok with being a dependent.

Does being called a dependent bother you? Why or why not?

Need care package ideas? I’m giving away 165+ ideas (plus what to put in them) here.

The post I Don’t Mind Being A Dependent appeared first on Countdowns and Cupcakes.

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Happy Military Spouse Appreciation Day! I thought it would be fun to have a different type of post today. Instead of trying to explain the military spouse lifestyle through words, I thought I’d let the numbers do the talking!

My life as a military spouse by the numbers:

Years together: almost 6

Years married: 3.5

Deployments: 4 (about 1.5 years total)

PCS: 0

TDYs: more than I can count

Military balls: 1

Promotion ceremonies: 1

Care packages sent: 32

Special occasions spent solo: 15

What isn’t captured in these numbers is the total amount of time we’ve spent apart. It’s not because I didn’t want to share, but rather because I honestly don’t remember anymore. We’ve spent THAT much time apart.  But when I add deployments to what I do remember, we’re looking at well over half of our relationship.

Think about that for a second. Imagine being in a committed relationship with someone, loving them, living with them, being married to them and having them be gone for over half of your relationship.

But my life is not unique by any means. Military spouses all over the world experience similar to mine: they sleep alone a lot, celebrate holidays solo, move frequently and say more than their fair share of “see you laters”. That’s why Military Spouse Appreciation Day is so important. I’m so proud to be a part of the military spouse community and am humbled everyday by the strength and sacrifice the men and women who hold down the home front show.

What are your military spouse numbers?

The post My Life As A Military Spouse appeared first on Countdowns and Cupcakes.

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They live among you, almost indistinguishable from the general public, going about life just like a normal person. But these aren’t normal people: they are military spouses. Brave, resilient and facing their own unique life challenges, military spouse cannot be defined by a singular definition, but they all have one thing in common: they need a good friend. Between nights and holidays alone, moving frequently and the unpredictability of military life, a strong support network is a must for a military spouse.

In 2015, there were approximately 1 million military spouses in the United States. Whether you realize it or not, odds are you either have or have had a military spouse in your life, even if you’re a civilian. Were you friends with them? Were you a GOOD friend to them? There is a difference between the two and being a good friend to a military spouse requires some slightly different traits than a civilian friendship.

How to be a good friend to a military spouse

Be there to listen. 

The military lifestyle brings with it a crazy mess of emotions and having someone to vent those emotions to is hugely helpful! You may not be able to relate 100% to everything they’re going through, but you can still be there. Be empathetic, supportive and listen actively.

Oh and a word of advice: don’t equate a week-long business trip to Chicago to a 6 month deployment in Iraq. They are not the same thing.

Invite them to open up, but be ok if they can’t or don’t. 

Sometimes I don’t want to freaking talk about military life. I want to forget my husband is deployed, I don’t want to dwell on the fact that life is changing, I want to escape from all that for a bit because it’s too emotionally draining to rehash it over and over again. Sometimes I literally can’t talk about what’s going because I either don’t know or am not allowed to say.

A good friend to a military spouse needs to understand this and not take it personally when the conversation isn’t flowing. Just letting your friend know that you’re there and ready when they are is a huge help.

It’s the little things. 

A full blown weekend trip with drinking, dancing and a college flashback? That’s awesome! But it’s not always the best fit for a military spouse. If they’re solo parenting during deployment or other separation, who will watch their little ones? If they’re in a crazy season of life (moving!), taking that much time away may stress them out more than anything else.  Personally, during my busiest military spouse times, I don’t have the mental energy to commit to a girls’ weekend and would much rather have a quiet night in with a few close friends.

Instead of planning a big blow out, invite them over for dinner where you cook and clean up! Or plan a trip to the movies, a massage or just a long walk. Or agree to watch their kids so they can take a solo trip to Target! Smaller events still get military spouses out of their solo bubble, but they don’t add stress.

Lend a helping hand. 

When my husband is gone, the house doubles in size when it’s time to clean, cars break, dogs injure themselves and I get sick. Murphy’s Law hits military spouses like a ton of bricks and we need extra hands sometimes! Many of us don’t have family nearby so our friends, both civilian and military alike, serve as our main support system.

Cut the grass for them, fix the leaky faucet, take care of the healthy child while the other one battles the stomach flu. The list of ways to be helpful goes on and on. The key is to not ask and just do it. Don’t give us a chance to turn you down when we actually really need to say yes!

Be understanding. 

Much like anyone, life’s ups and downs can affect friendships. Perhaps a stressful time (i.e. right before a deployment) cause a military spouse friend to fade away a bit. Maybe a homecoming has the same effect. Maybe a news story puts your friend on edge because it hits to close to home and they’re quieter than normal. Maybe they come down with a full-blown case of the deployment grumps and are just flat out cranky.

As a civilian, it can be hard to understand the why behind these changes in your friend, but it’s what military spouses need. We need to know that even if you don’t hear from us for a few weeks as we prepare our family for deployment, you will still be there when we come up for air. We will return that favor over and over again!

Military spouses make great friends so be a great friend to the military spouse in your life!

Need care package ideas? I’m giving away 165+ ideas (plus what to put in them) here.

The post How To Be A Good Friend To A Military Spouse appeared first on Countdowns and Cupcakes.

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