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hosky69:

Farnese and Serpico.
From berserk official guide book.

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projectcosplay:

amenokitarou:

Today I take a break from crafting and take look at another part of Cosplay: posing.
I’ll start with my favorite pose…It’s known as the “3-point landing” in animation… but in my eyes it is “The Unnecessary Cool Landing” pose, aka Black Widow’s Leg Splay… An Excuse for Fanservice …Etc

Here are the 5 pointers:
(1). Shift body weight to one side and bend the knee. Open the knee to the side to widen the pose. 
Now splay your other leg to the side. Straighten this leg.
(1*) Depending on the flavour of your character, you might want to bend your second leg also. If you do, place your second knee on the floor, and also open it to the side, so the pose doesn’t become narrow.

(2) Lift chest to straight upper back for a strong looking pose. This will also help you left your chin and eyes without having to roll your eyes uncomfortably.

(3) The landing arm. Generally looks good when the opposite arm is in front. (Eg. The side with the knee up is the front side, so the side with the straight leg/knee down gets the landing arm in front).
(3*) The floor hand. Depending on the flavour of your character, you could generally touch the floor, press your palm down, or even close your fist and knuckle down on the floor.

(4) Always do something with your other arm. An extension backwards generally looks dynamic).

(5) Now if you want to add a little motion, you could lift one of your heels off the floor. Just one. Back or front, decide on the direction you want to be moving. (Lifting both usually ends up retarded… At least for me D:)

Happy shooting!

If you are looking for EPIC shots, this is a pose I highly recommend.

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AYYYYYYY 

YES. Literally all of this is craft foam glued to an empty box. I used a box because an actual book would be too heavy and the book needs to hang from my waist. All I did was pick a box from the pantry that was the height x width x depth that I wanted for my book. 

Then I traced the box sides and cut in lines in foam to make fake looking pages and glued them on. Then I traced the entire length of the book to make it a jacket cover and glued it on. Then the details and strap! The spine is a thicker EVA foam I dremel sanded the sides down so they were rounded. The clasp is a button, and the silver plaque on the spine is a googly eye. 

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azimedes:

azimedes:

Heat Transfer Vinyl

Okay dudes I wanna teach you some magic today.  I get a LOT of questions about what I use for designs on my Zelda costume as well as on my Matt Miller jacket.  You can buy it on eBay pretty easily.  I get mine here.

This stuff looks amazing and it’s SO CLEAN when you apply it.  It also isn’t overly shiny, so it looks pretty great on most fabrics, which is why I prefer it to painting fabric.  SO here is how the stuff works:

  1. Heat transfer vinyl has two sides—a glossy and a matte side.  You’re going to want to draw your design on the matte side, as that’s where it has the adhesive.
  2. Draw your design and cut it out.
  3. Place it matte side down, glossy side up on the fabric you’re using.
  4. Iron!  I put my iron on the highest setting just to be sure it sticks but some times this can warp the vinyl if you’re not careful.  You’ll want to go over it a few times.
  5. Peel off the glossy side and bam! You’re done and you have a kickass design on your fabric!

Hey guys, I wrote this tutorial a million years ago but I’ve been getting questions about Matt Miller again so HERE U GO.

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azimedes:

COSPLAY FRIENDS: I just found this app called Dress Measurements that’s super helpful. It lets you create a profile with specialized body measurements you can keep on hand. Reblog to save a life.

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aicosu:

unrequitedstar:

melonberrymint:

Lately I’ve been seeing a lot of decoden and polymer clay questions about what to use to as a gloss/glaze. Almost every time the first response is “Clear nail polish, duh!”.

This needs to stop if people want to be creating quality items. Sometimes I’m afraid to buy handmade things for fear that they have been sealed with clear nail polish and they will deteriorate over time. I want to buy things that will last!

I’ve reblogged this before - but it’s sooooo important. crafting signal boost 

Oh jeez, I didn’t even know that was a thing. No - never use nail polish thats a horrible idea. 

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cosplaytutorial:

How NOT to build a HUGE sword prop for cosplay

For the first cosplay project I decided to make entirely on my own, I got REALLY ambitious. I had completely fallen in love with Shunya Yamashita’s design for THIS figure.

Tutorial by:  Otakitty
Tutorial Link: http://otakitty.blogspot.ca/2014/08/how-not-to-build-huge-sword-prop-for.html

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angualupin:

angualupin:

biggest-gaudiest-patronuses:

fightthemane:

hostagesandsnacks:

childrentalking:

itwashotwestayedinthewater:

fabledquill:

killerchickadee:

intheheatherbright:

intheheatherbright:

Costume. Chitons.

Marjorie & C. H. B.Quennell, Everyday Things in Archaic Greece (London: B. T. Batsford, 1931).

Wait, wait…. Is that seriously it? How their clothes go?

that genuinely is it

yeah hey whats up bout to put some fucking giant sheets on my body

lets bring back sheetwares

also chlamys:

and exomis:

trust the ancients to make a fashion statement out of straight cloth and nothing but pins

Wrap Yourself In Blankets, Call It a Day

Ok, yes, but guys, look

Prior to the Industrial Revolution, fabric was EXTREMELY time consuming to make, and as such, was extremely valuable. You have to grow your fiber, either in the ground or on an animal. You have to process the fiber. You have to spin the fiber. And spin, and spin, and spin. Spinning technology prior to the late Middle Ages consisted of a drop spindle. It takes forever and a day to spin enough thread to make fabric using a drop spindle – 10-30 times longer than to weave it, depending on how thick your yarn is and what weaving technology you are using. Then, once you are done with that endless task, you need to weave it. The examples in this post are all from Greece, where they used the warp-weighted loom, which is actually a rather efficient piece of weaving technology, but it’s still not as fast as the treadle loom (another late Middle Ages invention) and in no way comparable to a modern industrial loom (essentially the same machine as a treadle loom, but automated (except warping, which is still hell on earth even in 2018)). You know the saying “women’s work is never done”? That saying refers to the fact that unlike, say, field work, or mining, or smithing, spinning and weaving were started before dawn and carried on until after dusk, every day of the year, and there was always, always need for more.

After all of this, every piece of fabric that is made represents literally hundreds of hours of work. It is so valuable it was a standard form of currency before the invention of money. Egyptians piled linen high in their tombs as a show of wealth – and that linen was stolen by the grave robbers along with the gold and other precious artifacts. Textiles were one of the most valuable things you could steal when you pillaged a city. A primary reason for the warfare and raiding that was a consistent part of pre-modern Mediterranean/Near Eastern history was to acquire female slaves to produce textiles. Yes, cooking, cleaning, and sex were also reasons to acquire female slaves, but the economic reason was for textile manufacturing.

So if fabric is that valuable, you’re not going to waste it. You’re not going to make something tightly tailored, because as anyone who sews can tell you, cutting fabric to fit produces a lot of waste. In addition, the cloth of the ancient world was often much more loosely woven than cloth today, which is partly to do with weaving technology but most to do with the fact that the denser the cloth, the more threads there are in it, which means the more threads you have to spin for it, which means the time you have to spend making it has just gone up dramatically. Loosely woven cloth ravels like hell when you cut it, again as anyone who sews can tell you, and that makes it much more difficult to sew something nicely tailored. Needles and scissors are also items we take for granted, but are, in their modern form, relatively modern inventions and have, historically, been tricky items to make.

Thus, most of the clothing of the ancient Mediterranean/Near East was based on the rectangles of fabric that come directly off the loom. Much of China’s historical dress is similar, at least in the time frames we’re talking about. Throughout European/North African/Middle Eastern history, and in China until silk changed the game (at least for the rich), tailoring skill and technology has lagged behind cloth production skill and technology.

The famous painting from the early Renaissance where the woman is wearing a dress constructed using a truly obscene amount of fabric? That painting is often held up as an example of the sharp increase in the availability of material goods that is the hallmark of the European Renaissance (especially because it is of a merchant family and not nobles), and it is that. But it is also an example of a mode of dress that was difficult-to-impossible to achieve before the invention of the flyer wheel (for spinning) and treadle loom (for weaving), which made cloth take considerably less time to make and therefore considerably cheaper, and which also made cloth considerably more amenable to tailoring.

So yeah. You too would make fashion out of sheets if it took you most of a month of full-time work to produce one sheet.

I also want to point out that much of the historical dress of Sub-Saharan Africa and the Americas (in the places where cloth was used) is similar, it’s just based on narrow rectangles sewn together rather than large rectangles, because these are places where the backstrap loom and/or tubular loom remained the mainstay of weaving technology. Backstrap looms produce narrow lengths of cloth (15-18 inches is usually the limit), so with that weaving technology + some sewing, you get things like Central and South American ponchos and much of the traditional dress of Central and Western Africa.

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cosplaytutorial:

How NOT to build a HUGE sword prop for cosplay

For the first cosplay project I decided to make entirely on my own, I got REALLY ambitious. I had completely fallen in love with Shunya Yamashita’s design for THIS figure.

Tutorial by:  Otakitty
Tutorial Link: http://otakitty.blogspot.ca/2014/08/how-not-to-build-huge-sword-prop-for.html

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pisaracos:

Wig Hack Wednesday #4 !
Today I wanna introduce a no-sew-no-glue method to add volume to your wig with a jumbo braid (or braiding hair). Using this method will save you time and money because you’ll be getting more bang for your buck! Jumbo braids are pretty cheap and can range from around $2-$8 depend on quality of the hair fiber. Usually, they are used to add thickness to braid hairstyles, but you can use it for any “big-hair” hairstyle, really. Be careful when using hair dryer or heat tools with jumbo braids because they cannot stand as much heat-styling as other wig fibers. For this tutorial, I’m using a jumbo braid in marshmallow from Arda Wigs.
- Untie the end of the jumbo braid. Separate and cut a small piece of weft from it. Keep in mind that you’ll need the piece to be double of the length you would want for the final product because you will be folding the piece in half.
- Use a crochet hook to go under the elastic band of the wig and grab the folded hair
- Bring the hook back through the same hole, making sure the latch closes before you pull it through the hole
- Grab the hair with your fingers, twist it once and hold
- Bring the hair from the hanging side and pull it through the twisted loop without tightening the loop
- Bring the loop to the opposite side and twist it again
- Pull the hair from the hanging side through the loop again
- Pull and tighten the knot so it’s as small as possible
- Keep adding more hair to the other elastics and different sections of the wig. You can tease it for more volume!

I used this method to make a Sage Madara (Naruto) wig and it produced great result with high volume but still very light-weight. I hope this helps you create cool wigs with super volume at low cost (looking at Steven Universe people…lol )

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