Loading...

Follow CorporetteMoms on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

I have a pair of Taryn Rose heels, and they are basically the only heels I can tolerate nowadays. I am not sure if this is technically a “comfort” brand, but I think they’re super well-designed to alleviate most of my complaints about wearing heels. The footbed is much more cushioned than a regular heel, the fabric outer is stretchier on initial wearing than leather, and the heel is padded. The bottom of the shoe also has a textured grip so you feel more rooted to the ground. I happen to like this shape, which is more classic than the ones I own, and I also really love this “natural stretch linen” color for the summer. The shoe is available at Zappos for $70–$140, depending on the color. Tess Pump

This post contains affiliate links and CorporetteMoms may earn commissions for purchases made through links in this post. For more details see here. Thank you so much for your support!

The post Accessory Tuesday: Tess Pump appeared first on CorporetteMoms.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

This dress looks like a simple but well designed maternity dress that will last you throughout your pregnancy. My favorite part is the way the dress is folded and then drapes over the “bump.” I like how the neck is modest and the sleeves are three-quarter length. I can see this looking nice under a blazer, or it can be dressed down too. It also seems to be seasonless, so it would be a great investment for all year or through multiple pregnancies. The dress is available at Nordstrom for $139 in black and raspberry and is on sale at A Pea in the Pod for $111. Ivybridge Jersey Maternity Dress

Building a maternity wardrobe for work? Check out our page with more suggestions along both classic and trendy/seasonal lines.

This post contains affiliate links and CorporetteMoms may earn commissions for purchases made through links in this post. For more details see here. Thank you so much for your support!

The post Maternity Monday: Ivybridge Jersey Maternity Dress appeared first on CorporetteMoms.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

We’ve been doing our Washable Workwear Wednesdays for a while now, and I’ve learned there are a few brands that one can reliably look to for washable clothes. So if you’re on the hunt, I thought we’d round them up:

This post contains affiliate links and CorporetteMoms may earn commissions for purchases made through links in this post. For more details see here. Thank you so much for your support!

1. MM.LaFleur

A lot of dresses and tops from MM.LaFleur are washable — and readers love the fit and style. The brand also offers plus sizes. Pictured

2. Boden 

Not only is Boden one of Corporette readers’ favorite places to shop on the Internet, but a TON of their dresses are washable, particularly their ottoman dresses. Bonus: they sell kids’ clothes too, so you can do one-stop shopping. The brand offers sizes up to 18, as well as short and tall styles. Pictured.

3. Halogen

Many pieces in Halogen’s line of affordable clothing are washable workwear, including dresses, blazers, and more — and much of it is available in regular, petite, and plus sizes. Pictured.

4. Lands’ End

Corporette readers love Lands’ End washable ponte dresses, but do note that their suiting pieces are mostly machine washable as well. The brand also offers plus, petite, and, occasionally, tall sizes. Pictured.

5. Ming Wang

You can get Ming Wang‘s stretchy, travel-friendly pieces — all of them washable — at Nordstrom. The brand also offers plus sizes! Pictured.

6. Eileen Fisher

Not only does Eileen Fisher focus on the human rights aspects and environmental impact of its supply chain through Vision 2020 (and is otherwise friendly to ladies who prefer slow fashion workwear), but most of the pieces are machine washable. Another pro: most pieces are also available in petites and plus sizes. Corporette readers love this pair of pants so much they call them the magic pants for work. Pictured.

7. Vince Camuto

Vince Camuto’s affordable, cute dresses are great for desk to dinner, and the brand makes a ton that are machine washable. Pictured.

8. NYDJ

Whether you’re a mother or not, Not Your Daughter’s Jeans (aka NYDJ) has a ton of washable workwear, some of it with a bit of secret shaping power, including blouses, dresses, pants and more. In fact, readers think they make one of the best pants for work! Pictured.

9. Hobbs London

Hobbs London has a ton of washable workwear — including machine washable suiting! The brand is available at Bloomingdales as well as at Hobbs. Pictured: the Mina Blazer.

10. Betabrand

As Betabrand explains on its website, “Brand-new ideas spring to life on our site every day [and] our fans co-design and crowdfund them into existence.” The brand (or “online clothing community,” as it labels itself) became known for their yoga pants for work, but they’ve expanded heavily — their WorkIt collection has a TON of dresses, blazers, and more, all of them blending athletic performance fabrics with traditional workwear shapes. (If you’re a new customer, use this referral link to get $15 off your first order!) Pictured: yoga pants for work.

11. Karen Kane

Karen Kane offers dresses, skirts, blouses and more for work, many of them machine washable and available in regular and plus sizes. This $108 dress — often on sale for even lower! — has been a reader favorite, and comes out in new prints and colors in long-sleeves and short-sleeves every season (you can often find previous seasons on Amazon!). Pictured.

12. Pivotte

There’s less selection at workwear startup Pivotte, but I must say I’ve been living in the drapey washable wool cardigan I bought for myself — I highly recommend — and as of 2019 they have a ton of great washable pants. Pictured.

Ladies, have you found any other reliable brands for washable workwear? What are your favorites?

Psst: if you’re looking for washable pants for work or stylish travel dresses for vacation and beyond, check out our roundups over at Corporette.  

N.B. This post was originally written Aug. 10, 2016, but substantially updated on July 20, 2019. 

The post The Best Brands for Washable Workwear appeared first on CorporetteMoms.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
CorporetteMoms by Corporettemoms Staff - 4d ago

Some of the articles of interest to working mothers that we’ve seen around the web recently…

  • Harper’s Bazaar provided details about a summer collaboration with Stitch Fix and body-positive fashion blogger Katie Sturino.
  • Skift discussed CBD oil-based beauty products, and where to find them.
  • Refinery 29 shared 15 skin-care items that are pregnancy-safe.
  • Refinery 29 also explained why so many women are going freelance after they have children.
  • CNBC shared career advice from Mika Brzezinski, founder of Know Your Value, a platform to help women get ahead in the workplace. 
  • The Atlantic discussed how some families are being run like businesses.
  • The New York Times shared how to start an online moms’ group for emotional support.
  • The New York Times also explained why children still need to have fun while playing sports.
  • The Washington Post also took a look at why avoiding anxiety probably makes it worse.
  • The Washington Post also reported Toys R Us is back — but not how you remember it.
  • Essence shared Serena Williams’ reaction to critics of her activism, who say she should pay more attention to playing tennis: “The day I stop fighting for equality and for people that look like you and me will be the day I’m in my grave.”
  • For your Laugh of the Week: McSweeney’s shared a preschooler’s guide to managing a personal assistant.

Also, do be sure to check out the news update over at Corporette!

On Corporette Recently…

Did we miss anything? Add ’em here, or send them to news@corporettemoms.com. Thank you!

The post News Roundup appeared first on CorporetteMoms.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

My toddler is just starting to grasp the concept of “look with your eyes and not with your hands.” Prior to that, if he wanted to look at something on the counter and I picked him up, his hands immediately darted out for the most dangerous or hot object present. Now that he has a little bit more self-control, I am considering getting him a “learning tower” so that he can see what’s happening in the kitchen or “help” me with what I’m doing. I like how this particular version has a safety bar and adjustable height and isn’t hideous. This version by KidzWerks is $135 at Amazon and is eligible for Prime. Child’s Standing Tower

This post contains affiliate links and CorporetteMoms may earn commissions for purchases made through links in this post. For more details see here. Thank you so much for your support!

The post Weekend & Family Friday: Child’s Standing Tower appeared first on CorporetteMoms.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

For this week’s installment of our Week in the Life of a Working Mom series, I’m happy to introduce CorporetteMoms reader A, who lives in Tokyo with her husband and two daughters and works in organizational development. Our usual caveat applies: Please remember that this is is a real person who has feelings and isn’t gaining anything from this, unlike your usual friendly (soul-deadened, thick-skinned, cold-hearted, money-grubbing) blogger — so please be kind with any comments. Thank you! — Kat

If you’d like to be featured (anonymously or otherwise), please fill out this form! You can see all posts in this series here.

First, Some Basics About This Working Mom…

Name: A
Location: Lives and works in Tokyo (from the West Coast originally; have been in Japan for 15 years)
Job: Organizational development for a global consumer goods company (and working on doctoral dissertation)
Age: 36
Home Situation: I live in a 50-square-meter apartment with my husband (in-house lawyer) and two daughters. Kid #1 is six and Kid #2 is three. The kids share a room.
Childcare Situation: Nursery school 50 hours a week for my three-year-old, and school plus after school childcare in the same building from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. for my six-year-old. Cost: $300 for two kids (government-subsidized). We also have a babysitter do pickup and watch them until 8:00 p.m. two days a week. 

How is the work-life balance in your industry in general? What are common ways of juggling responsibilities that you see your colleagues and coworkers doing?  
Work-life balance in Japan in general is TERRIBLE, though thanks to government pressure it’s getting a bit better. The most common way my coworkers juggle responsibilities is to work flexible schedules (my company has a really good flex time system). As far as I know, people don’t outsource domestic work that much — it’s still seen as a luxury in Japan, though that is changing too.

How do you handle household chores, such as laundry, grocery shopping, housecleaning, etc.? Who does what, and when — and how often? 
We have a cleaning service come twice a month, and I outsource eight loads of laundry a month to a laundromat that picks up and delivers. Heaven! We also use grocery delivery and Amazon a lot. Amazon has same-day delivery in Tokyo — I can order something on my subway commute to work and find the package waiting on my doorstep when I get home. My husband does breakfast and all weekend cooking.

A Week in My Life

Sunday

Sleep until 8:00 a.m.! My husband has got up with the kids and made scones for breakfast. He brings me scones and coffee in bed. This is amazing. Usually, we both get up with the kids and wrangle them while we try to make breakfast. I don’t know what has happened today, but I like it! We spent the next hour or so trying to clean up the apartment, and then go out with the kids. We drop in to our gym to change our membership, and then eat Indian curry with the kids.

After lunch, husband plays with the three-year-old in the park and I take the six-year-old to eat cupcakes. She has just started elementary school, so I am trying to spend extra one-on-one time with her. We all come home around 4:00 p.m. and spend the evening preparing for the week ahead.

We used to spend a lot of time on the weekends doing laundry that had accumulated over the week. But I started outsourcing laundry a few months ago to a laundromat that picks up and delivers. It has made a huge difference in the amount of time we can spend together.  

Monday

Everyone gets up at 6:30 a.m. My husband prepares breakfast while I pack the three-year-old’s nursery school bags. My older daughter prepares her bag. Japanese schools teach independence from a very young age, so she can pack her own bag, dress herself, keep track of her own homework, etc. I and the kids are of the door at 7:45. My older daughter rides on the bicycle with me while I take her little sister to nursery school. Then I drop my older daughter off at school at 8:15 a.m. After the double drop-off, I ride the subway to work. It takes about 20 minutes. It’s not my favorite time of day, because subways in Tokyo are stupidly crowded. But I listen to podcasts and get through.

I work a lot with people in Europe and North America, and they are one day behind Japan. So that means I get very few emails coming in on Monday because those regions are still on the weekend. This is great, because I have time to do intellectual work and plan for the week ahead. I work hard on Mondays, usually grabbing a quick lunch at the office cafeteria.

I leave the office at 5:30, ride the subway 20 minutes, get right on the bicycle, and go pick up my daughters. The house cleaner comes on Mondays while I am at work, so on days when I can leave the office at 5:15, I spend 15 mins sitting alone in our clean apartment before I have to do pick up. It is the best 15 mins of the week.

I pick up both kids on the bike, prepare something quick for dinner, give them a bath. My husband usually gets home at 8:30 and does bedtime. I clean up a bit, book laundry pickup for tomorrow, and go to bed.

Tuesday

On Tuesdays, I get up at 5:00 a.m. and go to the gym. There is a 24-hour gym a few minutes on foot from our apartment, and I really enjoy my morning workouts. I get home about 6:15, and we do the morning routine again. This time, my husband does double drop-off and I enjoy ten minutes of quiet at home (and maybe another cup of coffee!) before getting on the subway.

I spent a lot of time at work finalizing details for a trip to Europe I am taking next week. In addition to the work stuff, I do a lot of organizing of babysitters and housecleaning. My company pays for childcare and housecleaning while I travel. (I go overseas maybe once a month.) It’s great, but it does involve some work to organize everything. We use a shared Google calendar to keep track.

Today, the babysitter is picking up both kids and feeding them dinner. So I don’t have to be home until 8:00 p.m. I finish work at 6:00 p.m. and I spent a glorious 90 minutes in a cafe by myself doing final edits on my doctoral dissertation. Sometimes on Tuesdays my husband and I will arrange to meet at 7:30 and eat a quick meal in a local sushi place together before we both go back home.

After I get home, it is the usual evening routine. My daughter’s nursery school and elementary school provide lunch, so we don’t have to deal with that.

We asked A to tell us more about her degree: 

It’s in sociology. I did all my coursework and fieldwork when I was working a much more flexible job. Now I’m just doing final edits. It’s going much more slowly than I’d like — if I just had a month off I could knock it out instead of working in bits and pieces but at least I’m making progress. I do a lot more work on it when I’m traveling for work.

Wednesday

On Wednesdays, my husband gets up early and goes to the gym. I get up at 6:30 with the kids, prepare breakfast, and get everyone ready for the day. Today, I drop off the kids. It’s raining, so we have to put rain covers on the bike and I have to make sure to leave extra time to get changed after I come home.

Today is a brainpower-heavy day at work. I am interpreting in a meeting between Japanese management and some of their overseas counterparts, and nobody is saying what they really think. I can only interpret what people actually say, so I spend a good bit of effort trying to get everyone to be honest and say what they really think. This takes a huge amount of brainpower, so I go out around 3:00 p.m. get a coffee and a donut.

I leave at 5:30 p.m. and pick up both kids on the bicycle. Today, I do not feel like cooking so I order delivery. My husband comes home at 7:30 p.m., so he helps with bath and bedtime well I organize laundry pickup.

Thursday

It’s the same morning routine. Woke up at 6:30 and out of the door at 7:45. Today my husband does the double drop-off. Our younger daughter has an outing to the zoo, so we have to prepare a special “bento box” lunch for her. She insisted that papa prepares her lunchbox, because his cooking apparently tastes better. Win for me! I hate cooking. My husband prepares the lunchbox while I shower and get dressed.

I have a fairly relaxed day at work, with not too many meetings and nothing urgent. I know that next week is going to be really busy because I am traveling, so I duck out of the office and take a nice afternoon walk around the Tokyo station area.

Today, the babysitter is picking up the kids. I finish work at 6:30 and probably should spend an hour finishing my dissertation, but I don’t feel like it. Instead, I go drink a beer in a cafe and read a novel for an hour. When I get home, my husband is already there and he is dealing with evening routine.

Friday

I go to the gym this morning. I get back at around 6:30 and we get everyone fed and dressed and out the door. My husband is working at home today, so he takes the kids.

I have a medium busy day at work but get everything done. At 5:30 p.m., I put the auto-responder on my email, grab my laptop, and leave the office. My husband picks up the kids, and everyone is home by 6:30. He cooks dinner.

After dinner, the kids want to go to the store and buy ice cream for themselves. We are a little nervous, but we agree to let them try. They hold hands and walk to the store. I’m actually following them from a distance, but they don’t know that. It’s cute to see them holding hands and enjoying their “freedom.” My older daughter has just learned how to count money, so she pays for the ice cream herself and looks quite proud of herself.

They come home feeling excited at their independence. They have a little ice cream party, take a bath, then go to sleep. Once both kids are sleeping, my husband and I enjoy a glass of wine and a documentary about some French chef. We usually hate each other’s taste in TV, but the one program we can agree on is cooking documentaries.

Here’s what A had to say when we asked her about the differing views in Japan and the U.S. regarding kids’ independence:

People here believe that kids need to understand that they’re members of society and can make a contribution to their families and communities even when they’re small. And part of that involves learning to be independent so that you can help other people. Independence and responsibility to contribute and pretty closely linked. I like this approach — I see my older daughter developing into a confident and caring little girl. And it makes parenting a whole lot less stressful! It helps a lot that Tokyo is a very safe city, despite its size.

Saturday

We go hiking. It’s pretty easy to get to the mountains from Tokyo. We take the train for about an hour and a half to some fairly easy mountains. My younger daughter struggles a bit but she gets to the top of the mountain. We enjoy a picnic lunch before climbing down, eating ice cream at the train station and getting the train to Tokyo.

I’m leaving on an early afternoon flight tomorrow, so I spent the evening packing for the trip so I can hang out with my family as much as possible in the morning.

Thanks so much to A for sharing a bit of her life as a working mom! Readers, what’s your biggest takeaway from her week of work in organizational development as well as her general work/life balance?

Stock photo via Stencil.

The post Week in the Life of a Working Mom: Organizational Development Professional in Tokyo appeared first on CorporetteMoms.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

This is probably the ugliest but most useful accessory that I own. I am high-waisted, with not much of a butt to speak of, so almost every pair of jeans that I own slips down on me. Not only is the slipping uncomfortable, but it creates a muffin top. Instead of constantly hiking my jeans up, I bought this belt to be invisible under shirts. It’s hideous and elastic, but it has a flat buckle so it really is invisible and you can’t tell I’m wearing it. The belt is adjustable and it really is strong enough to keep my pants where they should be. (Editor’s Note: I also happen to have this not-exactly-stylish belt and wear it all the time to combat the dreaded waist gap. –Kate) Now to just continue closing my eyes and pretending this crop top trend doesn’t really exist…. The belt is $14.95 at Amazon in several color options and is eligible for Prime. Adjustable Stretch Belt With No-Show Buckle

This post contains affiliate links and CorporetteMoms may earn commissions for purchases made through links in this post. For more details see here. Thank you so much for your support!

The post Make My Life Easier Thursday: Adjustable Stretch Belt With No-Show Buckle appeared first on CorporetteMoms.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

I love the construction of this dress from Hobbs. The wrap portion looks intentional and well constructed in a way that a lot of wrap dresses or waist-accentuating ties aren’t. The wrap looks substantial, and I like how it looks a little higher on the side and is part of the dress, rather than just a tie around the waist with loops. I also really like the pattern, and how the wrap matches but also breaks it up a little bit. And of course, for me it wins points by being a V-neck and having a cap sleeve. Plus, it’s machine washable and lined. The dress is available at Bloomingdale’s for $290 in sizes 2–14. Tahlia Tie-Waist Dress

Looking for other washable workwear? See all of our recent recommendations for washable clothes for work, or check out our roundup of the best brands for washable workwear.

This post contains affiliate links and CorporetteMoms may earn commissions for purchases made through links in this post. For more details see here. Thank you so much for your support!

The post Washable Workwear Wednesday: Tahlia Tie-Waist Dress  appeared first on CorporetteMoms.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Travel back in the CorporetteMoms time capsule… Here’s what was on our minds in previous years. 

One year ago…

Two years ago…

Three years ago…

Four years ago…

Five years ago…

Earlier…

The post Previously, on CorporetteMoms… appeared first on CorporetteMoms.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

When my son started facing forward in his convertible car seat and we adjusted his straps, all of a sudden I was hearing a little voice saying “Neck hurt!” from the back seat. Also, when tightening the straps, they would rub against his neck on either side as the straps were moving, and he would cringe. I loved the brand Aden + Anais for newborn swaddle blankets, sheets, etc., and Kat recommended these strap covers to me. I ended up fishing out the ones that came with the car seat itself, and I was lucky that they ended up being where I looked in the back of my closet. If you want a soft and cute option for the car seat, these look adorable and are machine washable. I also like that these have snaps, as the ones that came with my seat have velcro, and I don’t love washing velcro along with the rest of his clothes. They are $8.99–$13.26 at Amazon; select colors and patterns are eligible for Prime. Car Seat Strap Covers

This post contains affiliate links and CorporetteMoms may earn commissions for purchases made through links in this post. For more details see here. Thank you so much for your support!

The post Nursing/Postpartum Tuesday: Car Seat Strap Covers appeared first on CorporetteMoms.

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview