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What is CPRT?


CPRT stands for Child Parent Relationship Therapy. In this class, you as a parent will learn valuable skills used by the play therapist in order to build a better relationship with your child. Through the understanding of how to conduct a mini play session with your child at home, you will be able to assist your child and strengthen the most important relationship in your child’s life. You will learn the skills necessary to make this a special time of bonding between you and your child, including limit-setting, being with, and encouragement. CPRT puts you on the path to bring healing in your child’s life and develop a bond that will last.

Join us for a ten week CPRT class where you will learn skills essential to building a health and deeper relationship with your child. With the support of myself and other parents in the class, you will learn to use play therapy skills at home in order to prioritize your relationship with your child. We will be going through the CPRT manual by Garry Landreth and “How to Talk so Kids will Listen and Listen so Kids will Talk” by Adele Faber.

Should you take this class?


The short answer, if you are a parent, then YES. But more specifically, if you are struggling to connect with your child or your child is going through a difficult transition in life, both you and child could greatly benefit from this class. Through the course of this class, you will be conducting play sessions at home with you child and will receive feedback from me and other parents in the class. You will also be provided with all the materials in the workbook to assist you through this time.
 
What now?


You may be thinking, “How in world am I supposed to fit a 1.5 hour class, a 20 minutes play session, and reading for 10 weeks into my already busy schedule?” And my question is, “How can you not?” You are the most important person in the life of your child. And taking this class, learning how to strengthen that relationship is one of the most valuable things you can do for your child and for yourself. So do both yourself, your child, and your whole family a favor and sign-up for one these classes. You can join us for one of these classes every Wednesday from June 5 to August 14 at 10:30am-12:00pm or 6:00pm-7:30pm. You can sign-up by contacting the office at 817-723-1210 or info@compassioncounseling.us.

By: Kelsey Poskey, LPC-Intern at Compassion Counseling
Supervised by: Chris Covington, LPC-S

The post What is Child Parent Relationship Therapy? appeared first on Compassion Counseling.

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By: Linda “Mickey” Jensen, Practicum Counselor

Are you new to therapy or would you like to improve your role in the therapeutic process? Check out these helpful tips to learn a bit more about the therapeutic process.

  1. Get the most out of your session time…a therapy hour is actually 45 minutes, so plan to be early and make the most of your experience by allowing time to “catch your breath, collect your thoughts, and prepare for your session.”
  2. First order of business…take care of payment, insurance questions, and scheduling prior to the start of your session. It can feel a bit awkward to come out of a session after just having an emotional breakthrough to then have to change gears to make a payment and navigate a calendar. Do yourself a favor and get the business items out of the way before your session.
  3. Let the work begin…when you enter into therapy, you and your therapist are establishing what is called a therapeutic relationship.” So, once the business is done, next on the agenda is addressing any issues you may have regarding your relationship with your therapist. Maybe you felt angry after the last session, you’re thinking about ending therapy early, or you have been worrying about what the therapist thinks of you. Your thoughts and feelings about therapy and your relationship with your therapist are important because they will impact the whole therapy process. Make them a priority for discussion.
  4. You are the expert on you…therapy is more about helping you come to your own conclusions than having the therapist make decisions for you or give you advice. This may feel frustrating at times, but it will be beneficial to you in the long run.
  5. Do good work between sessions…therapy works best when you take what you’ve learned and apply it to the rest of your week. Between sessions, journal your reflections from your last session, complete the challenge provided by your counselor, and notice areas in your life you’d like to explore.

Taken from Psychology Today’s article “21 Tips for Clients in Psychotherapy: What Should You Talk About in Therapy?” by Ryan Howes, PhD, ABPP

Check out this link for the full article and additional helpful ideas: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/in-therapy/201005/21-tips-clients-in-psychotherapy

The post Tips for Clients in Therapy appeared first on Compassion Counseling.

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By: Katrina Land, Practicum Counselor

In the last year, I have begun working with children in foster care, along with the wonderful individuals who have chosen to give of their time, talents, and treasures to care for these wonderful–though perhaps challenging–children. The work of taking care of a child is challenging enough for a mother who has spent 9 months carrying a child in her womb, feeling the kicks, sacrificing sleep, and spending months in discomfort, but all of this leads to incredibly deep bonding with a child. By the time she delivers, the love has already grown to cover sleepless nights, endless diaper changes, and the various individual challenges of each unique child. The fathers, who upon meeting their children for the first time, see a resemblance and understand that their own DNA is imprinted within this child’s being.

For those who choose to take on the task of caring for a child, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, without this genetic and time-tested bond, I have the utmost respect. The intentional choice to foster or adopt is a noble goal. The sad reality is that many assume that it will be similar to caring for a child of their own, but it’s not. The children who have come to need a foster home have some circumstance in their lives that have made it impossible for them to remain with their families – if they still have a family. This is a trauma, and as we know in the mental health field, trauma impacts neurological development.

A normal healthy attachment can become disrupted at this point, or perhaps there never was a healthy parental attachment to begin with. The mental, emotional, and physiological impact that this has on a child is significant. That’s why those who step in and provide foster care have such a huge role in the lives of these children. They are able to help the children process what is happening, or simply provide love and care that is needed for an indefinite period of time.

When you are caring for children, remember the following:

Be patient.

Every person’s story is unique, and it takes time for anyone, child or adult, to open up and trust someone with their story.

Work on your stuff.

Your perspectives from your own family of origin will impact how you treat children in your care, both positively and negatively.

Live in the moment.

Every time you take a minute to connect with a child has a positive impact.

Take care of yourself.

When you are feeling stressed and overwhelmed, give yourself permission to take a break. Go for a walk, take a shower, read a book, find something that recharges you.

Know that you ARE making a difference!

“It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men.” -Frederick Douglass

The post Foster Care/Adoption appeared first on Compassion Counseling.

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By: Sonja Jackson, LPC

I don’t think that it is just a coincidence that we celebrate Thanksgiving before Christmas. God knew what He was doing. During this time of year, we are bombarded with ad after ad telling us what new electronic gadget or piece of clothing we NEED. And not only that, we can get it at a great price. It is hard not to catch the I-wants, to long for the newest, greatest and best and to find yourself being discontent with that “old thing”, whatever it is. To help prevent ourselves from catching the I-wants, I encourage us get the I-have immunization. Begin now to give thanks for what we have already.

Even if life is full of challenges right now, we have many things for which to be thankful. Think about it. What do you already have? And ultimately who gave it to you? Look around. Do you have a home? Give God thanks for it. How about your family and friends? Give God thanks for them? Are you able to breath? Give God thanks for lungs that work and the air that you can breathe. Everything we have comes for the hand of a good and gracious God. Take time each day this month to write down one thing for which you are thankful.

The post The I-haves: Immunization against the I-wants appeared first on Compassion Counseling.

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