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Swinging at Bad Pitches

My neighbor was telling me about her 12-year old son’s struggling little league performance.

She said her son was trying so hard at every turn at bat to get a hit. Not even a home run, but just a hit.

Each time when it was his turn, he would step up to the plate and make his stance ready for the pitch. And with all his might and determination, he step into the swing and… miss the ball.

In 15 games, he hasn’t made a hit. His spirit is shook and she feels terrible for him. As a former little league mom myself, my heart breaks for her and her son.

As I looked for encouraging words to say, she shed some light on what she thinks is the problem.

My friend said about her son, “It’s not like he isn’t trying. I don’t think there is anyone on his team who would disagree with me that he gives it 100% every time he is at bat. No one wants a hit more than him—and I think his whole entire team wants it for him just as badly. But I have tried to advise my son on this one observation… he is swinging at bad pitches. It doesn’t matter how bad you want it if you keep swinging at bad pitches.”

When she said this, a light went off in my head.

I immediately thought of the hundreds, if not thousands of job seekers, who have reached out to me over the years saying they are dejected by making 100, 200 even 400 resume submissions to job postings… super tailored resumes and applications submitted to many postings… only to never get an interview.

And to punctuate the pain even more, they often receive a “Thanks, but no thanks” email within 5-6 minutes of submitting that resume that took two hours to customize before sending.

These job seekers want the interview bad.

They are putting in the leg work they are told is needed to land a job.

They give it 210% every time they are making a submission.

But they still have a zero batting average because they are using the wrong job search tactic for them…

… they are swinging at bad pitches.

Or at least the wrong pitches for them.

So many job seekers are simply looking for their next job the wrong way.

They are too dependent on job boards.

They are waiting for recruiters to call.

They think a perfectly written resume or profile alone will magically land interviews in their lap.

And these bad pitch job search swings leave them interview-less.

To land interviews, you need to look for a job the most effective way.

And the most effective way is NOT on job boards.

The most effective way is to reach out to people directly. People you know and people you don’t know.

And in my 7 Job Landing Steps to Land Your Ideal Job eBook will show you what to do to tap your network, grow your network, ask your network for direction and land interviews for great jobs.

Here is the link:

7 Job Landing Steps to Find Your Ideal Job

Start hitting the right pitches and knock it out of the park.

Be well!

Lisa

Lisa Rangel – Executive Resume Writing Services

Chameleon Resumes

The post Swinging at Bad Pitches appeared first on Chameleon Resumes.

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My Little LinkedIn Networking Hacks

This past week I reached out to 9 LinkedIn connections.

Rather imperfectly.

Every week I reach out to 5-15 people.

Here is how it happened this past week:

(1) I thought of someone I haven’t spoken with in a while. I grabbed my phone and I put on my calendar on Monday A.M. “Reach out to John Jones.”

(2) I scrolled through LinkedIn while watching TV on my couch. I looked for two connections I haven’t chatted with in a bit of time. I mark my calendar on Monday A.M., “Reach out to Richie Cunningham and Margaret Simpson”

(3) I go through prior client lists and pick two people I want to reconnect with. What do I do next? You guessed it… I make a note to call those two people Monday A.M.

(4) I did a college search and looked for – few people I graduated with and hadn’t connected with in a loooong time. And put 4 of those people on my Monday A.M. calendar slot.

… and then this Monday A.M. came.

I ended up having a full calendar on Monday already besides the time I needed to do these reach outs.

I could either put them off until tomorrow until I can call… or I decided to send quick emails instead while in line at one of the appointments I had on Monday.

Yep—during waiting periods, I sent 9 LinkedIn messages or emails to reconnect with 9 people.

Here are the stats…

5 replied back resulting in:

2 phone calls are scheduled.

One in-person meeting

One multiple voicemail exchange happening, but I’m sure we will connect soon.

And one more person I need to reply back to still…

Not bad… eh?

And I did it imperfectly. I didn’t wait until I could do it perfectly… because if I am being honest with myself, I may not have done it at all.

How do I know?

Because some weeks I didn’t do it at all.

So I prefer to do it when scheduled.

And why not do it at the time of finding the name?

Good question…

I found that when I find the name and call at the same time, it’s two tasks—so I end up calling less people overall.

When I split up the tasks (find people to reach out to first, then reach out to people another time), I end up connecting with more people in the long run.

So that’s one of my many little LinkedIn networking hacks.

And if you want to learn more hacks on how to write your profile to land interviews, register for my next LinkedIn masterclass training session.

Here is the link: http://chamres.com/71618BL

Pick from either Tuesday, 7/16 or Thursday, 7/18 at 1:30 p.m. ET and learn more hacks proven to work by me, our coaches and our clients.

Reserve your free spot for the session of your choice: http://chamres.com/71618BL

See you then!

Lisa

Lisa Rangel – Executive Resume Writing Services

Chameleon Resumes

The post My Little LinkedIn Networking Hacks appeared first on Chameleon Resumes.

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Is your schedule so jammed packed that there isn’t room for something miraculous to happen?

Are you so blinded by focus that you can’t see opportunities that come to you from out of no where?

I have a story for you…

I was in NYC recently for a business meeting. It was a rare day where I allowed extra time to get there and, as a result, figured I would use that time to get a walk in.

Well, about 10 minutes into the walk, I run into a business friend. As we start to chat, she was headed into the restaurant we were standing in front of to have lunch on her own.

She asked me if I wanted to join her.

Now… if I was hyper-scheduled like normal, I would have had to say no.

But I had the time. So I said “YES!”

For the following hour, we caught up on her career, her relationships and her life. It was awesome. And I was able to share some updates, too!

This on-the-fly meeting could have happened as a planned event if we exchanged 7-8 emails and scheduled it out a couple of weeks from now.

But instead, spontaneity was able to rule the day! Yeah!

In this case, I deepened a relationship that day. Who knows what will come of it… if anything. We don’t always have to know what’s coming before we invest time with someone.

But I can tell you nothing would have come from it if I said no and didn’t have the time.

I like to think in possibilities.

And I am glad this was made possible.

So how do you create space for spontaneity?

Go through your schedule.

Is there one thing you can drop indefinitely or postpone for today? Do it then…

And then go do something that puts you out in the world. Go walk. Strike up a convo with a stranger in an elevator (crazy, eh?). Sit at a lunch counter and chat with a fellow patron.

I believe you will be pleasantly surprised.

Reply back and tell me how it goes… or if you think I am out of my mind.

Be well!

Lisa

Lisa Rangel – Executive Resume Writing Services

Chameleon Resumes

The post Make Space for Spontaneity appeared first on Chameleon Resumes.

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The LinkedIn Premium Career Membership is the least expensive way to join LinkedIn at $29.99/mo or $288/yr, if you opt to join for the year at the start. You can try LinkedIn Premium for free for 30 days before upgrading, so that can help you decide if it is right for you.

In full disclosure, I am a paid moderator for LinkedIn Premium Career Group since 2012. And I have been a paying member since 2007. I believe it is worth it. However, when I am asked, “Should I join LinkedIn Premium?” my answer is always, “Use the free membership. If it suits what you need, then you don’t need to upgrade. If you find that you want to take advantage of some of the benefits, then upgrade using the 30-day trial and decide from there.” (Note: My expertise is with LinkedIn Premium, so that’s what this article focuses on. This is not meant to be a summary of LinkedIn Premium Business, Sales Navigator or Recruiter Lite, which are separate options to consider in their own right.)

If you have already joined or are considering joining, these are benefits you can capitalize on from you LinkedIn Premium Career Membership:

(1) Post questions about challenges in your job search in the exclusive LinkedIn Premium Career Group, only accessible to members, for the members to answer your questions. You won’t be job searching alone.

(2) Use the expanded search function to develop a list of contacts at companies where you want to work so you can reach out to them directly. 70% of hires happen through networking (employee referrals, social media connections and personal contacts… so this is key!)

(3) Take on-demand courses through LinkedIn Learning, which comes with your membership 

(4) Use the LinkedIn interview preparation feature to prepare for your next interview, which is included with your membership. 

(5) Research salaries for your target roles and similar roles to be best prepared for your interviews and negotiate your highest salary when you land an offer. 

(6) Use the “profile viewers in the last 90 days” feature to see who is looking at your profile so you can reach out to them directly and use the data to continue to further improve the optimization of your profile to attract the right people.

(7) Use the allotted LinkedIn InMails that come with the membership to reach out to hiring managers directly that are not within your first degree connections to increase your ability to be noticed after submitting your resume to a job posting. (Here is an article that can help you make the most of using LinkedIn InMails to increase your ability to obtain a reply: https://chameleonresumes.com/dont-be-ignored-7-strategies-to-increase-linkedin-inmail-replies/)

Hope this helps you make your decision. Good luck! 

Lisa

Lisa Rangel – Executive Resume Writing Services

Chameleon Resumes

The post 7 Ways to Use Your LinkedIn Premium Career Membership appeared first on Chameleon Resumes.

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I believed I didn’t deserve an A+.

So when I was in 6th grade, I asked my teacher to lower my A+grade in math.

Yep, I did this. Here is the story:

My friends and I received our report cards.

All my friends didn’t do well in math. One person failed. Another got a D. Another a C+.

They were all so upset. I felt terrible for them.

Me? I got an A+. Math was my thing in grade school.

When I realized my friends all had bad grades, I felt bad that they felt bad.

Then I felt terrible that I had an A+. I felt so terrible, that I started to cry.

Next, I went to my 6th grade teacher, Mrs. Patunas, all sniffing and teary-eyed, and I asked her to lower my grade.

She looked at me rather incredulously and repeated what I said for confirmation, “Lisa, you want me to lower your grade?”

Me: “Yes… I want you to lower my grade. I don’t deserve it.”

Mrs. Patunas proceeded to pull out the grade book (remember those?!?) and scroll down the list of students to the line with my name. She proceeded to show me my grades and say, “”But Lisa, I can’t lower your grade. Here are your grades. 98…103…100…97”.

You get the gist, etc…

Ms. Patunas continued, “You earned the A+.”

Despite being a math whiz in grade school and knowing how averages work, I couldn’t wrap my head around the fact that I earned that A+ and my friends simply didn’t earn the A+. In hindsight, I also didn’t want to stand out. I didn’t want to be different than my friends.

Through my 20’s I had this pattern of downplaying what I do and/or not valuing what I did.

I didn’t want others to feel bad because I did well… crazy town, eh?

Yeah, I have some issues LOL. I have thankfully worked through them. But it was no easy feat for me.

And I see executives, professionals, and college grads do this same type of thing every day.

They don’t value what they do and as a result, they have a hard time showcasing their achievements on their resume.

Do you need help articulating your value on paper to bring attention to your achievements on your resume?

If so, I have created Three Easy-Plug-In-Info Resume Templates.

Once you have purchased these templates, pick one and start to follow the instructions I wrote for you to create your own strong, achievement-based document that will better convey your value to decision makers.

Get your templates here and give yourself an A+ for valuing your career enough to get the help you need in writing the achievement-based resume you deserve.

Be well…

Lisa

Lisa Rangel – Executive Resume Writing Services

Chameleon Resumes

The post Why I Asked My Teacher for a Lower Grade appeared first on Chameleon Resumes.

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Recently, one of our ChamTribers wrote to me saying, “Everyone says it’s my age, so it doesn’t matter what I write” as the reason why his 8-page resume wasn’t getting any traction.

Or… I don’t know… it could be the 8-page resume.

He told me he is 50+ years old… so it must be his age, he says.

Here is my twist on the classic Henry Ford quote, “If you think you’re not getting interview calls because of your age, you’re right.”

** If you are going back so far on your resume that you have 8 pages, you are showing your age.

** If you have 2+ pages to your resume, chances are you overcompensating with too much information to mask your age.

** If you start your resume with something like “Over 30+ years of experience…” you are leading with age.

Seniority doesn’t win in an achievement-seeking world.

Yet here is Don.

He is over 50 years old, too. And here is what he said after landing his dream job:

He is over 50 and age didn’t get in the way of him landing his dream job.

So if you want to learn how to write an achievement-based resume that doesn’t lead, bleed or depend on age to show how qualified you are, join me on Tues. June 18th or Thurs. June 20th at 1:30pm ET when I will be presenting my How to Design A Powerful Resume to Land 6-Figure Interviews and Get the Offer! masterclass training where we cover this topic in detail.

Here is the link to reserve your spot for the session of your choice:

http://chamres.com/61820BL

Words matter at any age. And they matter even more when you are an older job seeker, and you want to be considered on merit.

So join me and learn how to fix this.

Be well!

Lisa

Lisa Rangel – Executive Resume Writing Services

Chameleon Resumes

The post Do Resume Words Matter for Older Job Seekers? appeared first on Chameleon Resumes.

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Imagine after 14 years of solid performance reviews, management changes and you start receiving unfounded poor performance reviews.

If this started to happen to you, would you think your days were numbered at your job?

Or would you hang on hoping the new management will eventually see you do good work?

What about if publication after publication wrote about how your profession will be replaced by artificial intelligence or automation in 3-5 years? Would you preemptively prepare for a new career or figure out how to work within the new ways of your profession? Or would you just hope it doesn’t happen to you?

You would be surprised how many people ignore the clear-as-day signs before them that their job is in jeopardy.

I don’t say this critically.

It’s tough admitting your job is in jeopardy… especially if it’s been a great run for you up to this point.

Keep in mind, as my mom always says, “This too shall pass.”

I have come to learn this applies to bad things AND good things.

Everything passes at some point. Even great jobs.

And you should always be ready.

These are two recent conversations I’ve had:

(1) I had a detailed conversation with a mid-50 year old senior professional who came to realize his job is in jeopardy since he started receiving bad reviews after a long successful stretch.

He came to the realization his time may be limited and he needs to be ready.

(2) I had a chat with a millennial who knows her job will be gone in 3-5 years (if not sooner) and she is getting ready for it now. But she doesn’t understand how senior professionals who are 10-20 older that her in the same department aren’t getting ready for the likely similar demise. She said, “It’s like they think their 80-hour work weeks are going to prevent the inevitable.”

Imagine that. Pretty insightful millennial, if you ask me.

—> So ask yourself this question:

What signs are you ignoring in your profession?

You know the answer.

You know you have signs that you have to stop ignoring and start preparing yourself for what’s next.

Start here: Three Easy-Plug-In-Info Resume Templates

Get the 3 interview-generating resume templates I have designed that have landed our clients interviews.

Included with the 3 resume templates are:

**Detailed instructions on how to write achievement-based bullets that set you apart in a task-based world.

**3 streamlined resume layouts to choose from that will help draw the hiring managers eye through the document to keep their attention to increase the odds of getting a call for an interview.

**Peace of mind that you are using resumes designed by a successful recruiter who knows what gets past ATS and grabs hiring managers attention.

So start facing what you know you have been ignoring and begin to take care of your future with this one step:

Three Easy-Plug-In-Info Resume Templates

You will feel so much better that you did.

Be well…

Lisa

Lisa Rangel – Executive Resume Writing Services

Chameleon Resumes

The post Are You Ignoring Signs Your Job Is in Jeopardy? appeared first on Chameleon Resumes.

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“What makes good content to post on LinkedIn?”

A common question. And a good question.

After all, if you are told by me and other LinkedIn job search experts to be more active on LinkedIn, how are you supposed to do that and not look like uninformed poser?

After all, if you are told by me and other LinkedIn job search experts to be more active on LinkedIn, how are you supposed to do that and not look like uninformed poser?

Even better question.

Not all posted content is created equal. You can certainly look like you simply like he sound of your own voice (or your fingers typing on a keyboard) if what you post is cheesy humble-brag fodder consistently. This doesn’t build followers.

So here are some guidelines when creating content for posting on LinkedIn that will attract employees and hiring managers from quality companies:

(1) Think “What would the person I want to attract want to read?”

The answer to this question should get you to hone in on who your audience is, and what they want to read. What they want to read will populate your content idea list.

(2) Aim to be of service to your audience.

Are you looking to attract hiring managers? What questions would they have around hiring people who do what you do? Create content that answers those questions.

(3) Promote other quality content that follows points #1 and #2.

This not only garners exposure for the person whose content you are promoting, it promotes you as the person who turned your audience on to an informative resource.

Curious as to what actual content to share and write? Where to get topics?

I cover that in my next “How to Create your LinkedIn Profile to Generate 6-Figure Job Interviews Faster” masterclass training on Tues. 6/4 or Thurs. 6/6 at 1:30 p.m. ET.

Why do I cover this topic in my LinkedIn Profile writing training session?

Because a successful profile takes more than just writing it. The activities you do on LinkedIn, like posting, are just important to landing interviews as the writing of the profile.

Choose between Tuesday 6/4 or Thursday 6/6 at 1:30pm:

http://chamres.com/6466BL

No one else is covering this info in any other LinkedIn training. So don’t miss it.

Be well…

Lisa

Lisa Rangel – Executive Resume Writing Services

Chameleon Resumes

The post How LinkedIn Posts Boost Profile Views appeared first on Chameleon Resumes.

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Nowadays, people of all ages are applying for positions at all levels.

No longer are just the younger people applying to entry-level jobs and senior people applying to executive-level jobs.

{Mind blown}

Millennials and GenYers are applying at every level, and are often just as qualified for different reasons, so they are not going away.

This means that it is imperative for older job seekers to lead with merit and not with seniority.

Compare apples to apples.

As someone with 25+ years of work experience, I can tell you that seniority does not matter as much as it once did.

Think of it this way: Do you know someone with 25+ years of experience who is ineffective in their job?

I do. I am sure you do, too.

So here is a truth you must accept if you want to start overcoming ageism and get yourself hired. I am giving this one away for free. Are you ready?

TRUTH: Simply having years of experience does not automatically qualify someone for a job.

{Breathe… it’s going to be okay… I promise}

If you lead with age (when you say you have 30+ years of experience, you are basically saying you are not 32 years old, right?), you can’t get upset if they reject you on age.

Right?

So I suggest not leading with age…

If your younger competitors are being judged on merit and accomplishment, shouldn’t you want to be evaluated on the same parameters?

Yes…

Don’t be a Seniority Slug, instead be a Merit-based Marvel.

To get hired on merit, you need to lead with merit IN EVERY PHASE OF YOUR JOB SEARCH!

My “Beat Ageism & Get Hired” eManual ($97 for a limited time) will empower you to promote yourself on what you can do—so you can beat your competition and land the offer.

** Tap the network that I know you have by using the steps I provide in my “Beat Ageism & Get Hired” eManual – you will be astounded by this underground network that you believe you didn’t have.

** Land interviews by NOT applying through job postings – it’s a tactic that generates 70% of hires and I am certain you are not using it effectively or at all.

** Position yourself to be the candidate to hire because of what you can do for the company—and not solely because you have the most experience.

Get the well-paying, fulfilling work you deserve by leading with merit. And in my “Beat Ageism & Get Hired” eManual ($97), which is $100 off the normal price for a limited time, I will show you how…

This deal is only available until Monday, May 27th at 11:59 p.m. ET. I am offering this to you (plus $191 in Bonuses) for just $97!!

Be well!

Lisa

Lisa Rangel – Executive Resume Writing Services

Chameleon Resumes

The post Are You a Seniority Slug? appeared first on Chameleon Resumes.

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Ageism and other -isms are certainly not right.

Yet they happen.

We can’t control how hiring managers, or anyone else for that matter, think.

However, we do have a choice.

We can choose to be a victim or a victor in these situations.

Let me give you an example:

When I started recruiting in the late 90’s, I worked on Wall Street at a financial recruiting firm that oozed massive amounts of testosterone. Some of my male colleagues were uncomfortable being beat by women.

How do I know?

I was accused of cheating when I beat them in production or acquired a specific new client first… because it seemed incredulous to them that I could beat them fair and square, so I must have cheated (insert eye role emoji here). I didn’t cheat.

A few of my female colleagues and I had to wake the company up to maternity leave programs. (And the company expeditiously did put the policies in place.)

After being at the company for a few years, I was a ‘senior’ player at 31 years old.

Few people were married in our firm and many were single. Going out after work and on the weekends was big… you were in the minority if you were married and didn’t go out.

It was a great place to work, but lordy, unconscious biases existed at every angle.

Should I have complained?

I don’t know. No one really was mean spirited, except a couple of those dudes who didn’t like being beaten by a chick. But I beat them, so I didn’t care that they were upset. LOL.

Maybe I was too naive to think I could have complained.

In hindsight, for that time period, looking back, I still wouldn’t have complained.

Why? I believe it made me better.

I know it’s not fair that women and every other protected class have to typically do more than the norm to get ahead.

And I am glad today things are changing and there are formal avenues to make complaints and have the complaints taken seriously.

But if I look back on it, the biases others held made me better.

How? I simply made sure I didn’t act like any of their assumptions. I blew all of the assumptions out of the water.

And I kicked ass.

They couldn’t apply any of those biases to me. Well, they tried. But they didn’t stick.

I don’t think what I did is a guaranteed plan to avoid bias of any kind. I am not one of these people who arrogantly think -isms don’t exist because I overcame it or I didn’t experience it first hand.

I know it exists. But I never embraced it as an excuse. I wasn’t letting it get in my way. My mindset was one of a victor.

Again, I understand this mindset isn’t a guarantee that it would never happen to me. I get that. I don’t think I am special. I know many people in protected classes who genuinely worked just as hard and had those biases stick unfortunately. Victor mentalities are not a guarantee it won’t happen.

But victim mentalities almost guarantee you see it as a reason when it’s not the reason for holding you back. When you look for -isms, sometimes that’s all you see.

I see people who wear their -ism like a cloak and it’s the reason for anything bad happening to them. They never look at any other possibilities that they can control as to why they aren’t getting interview calls.

Not getting job interview calls?

The victim assumes it must because they are 54 years old. And they never look at the fact that they start their resume with tasks without achievements (and also highlight the fact they are a seasoned 20+ year experienced executive and wonder why no one calls).

The victim assumes it must be because they were home with their kids as a stay-at-home parent for 6 years, and employers must be biased against parents. When in actuality, they haven’t been clear on what they want next and employers want people who want their job and not just a job.

The victim assumes it must be because their name sounds like they may not be from the US. When in actuality, when we comb through the job description, their resume doesn’t speak to one thing the prospective employer needs. Just because the candidate thinks he can do the job, doesn’t mean he is qualified for the job—no matter what his name is.

Bias exists.

Legislation can rule it away (although current political conditions are moving away from those protections), but ruling it away still won’t eliminate it entirely… ever.

The only thing you can do is be your best self day to day at work and on paper.

And bring attention to your achievements.

Achievements are -ism-less.

Achievements are the ultimate equalizer.

Achievements smash stereotypes.

So have an achievement-based resume ready to go when needed (which having a resume ready to go goes positively counters some biases, too!)

I have created three interview-generating. templates here ($47) and you get all three in this bundle:

Three Easy-Plug-In-Info Resume Templates

Included with these templates are instructions on how to write achievement-based bullets to outshine all your competitors.

One of the best things you can do to fight -isms are to continue to be the best version of yourself and then promote it!

Get your templates here:

Three Easy-Plug-In-Info Resume Templates

Be well…

Lisa

Lisa Rangel – Executive Resume Writing Services

Chameleon Resumes

The post How to Have Your Achievements Thrive in a Biased World appeared first on Chameleon Resumes.

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