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A new course crafted to help business leaders create a powerful presence in the workplace is launching in June by RADA Business, the commercial arm of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, following the success of their existing leadership programme.

The leading global training and consultancy provider offers a range of leadership courses, including The Leading Role and Leadership in Action, working with delegates at a range of leadership stages to equip them with skills and techniques to communicate with authenticity and impact.

The Leading Role is their most senior leadership programme. It’s an intensive three-day course designed for those with at least 10 years’ leadership experience. It goes beyond the pages of leadership theory and allows participants to test, practise and build outstanding communication skills across the full spectrum of leadership characteristics. It bridges the gap between the leader you are and the leader you want to be.

Leadership in Action is a two-day course designed for those in the early stages of a leadership role who want to practise the skills and techniques needed to refine their own personal brand of leadership, and realise their own ambitions alongside the goals of their team. It’s perfect for leaders who are line-managing or heading a team for the first time.

Their newest course, Creating a Powerful Leadership Presence, sits between the other leadership courses to complete the three-tier programme. It’s designed for senior leaders, heads of, or those in directorial roles who have ample experience leading teams in the workplace.

Taking place over three days, the course will encourage participants to understand the intellectual, emotional and physical art of leadership. They will embark on a journey grounded in practical exercises, building on theatre training and role-play as a way to discover resilience and flexibility in any given scenario – both skills that will allow leaders to deliver their best performance in business. Two specialist leadership tutors offer in depth, individual coaching and feedback, alongside four highly skilled role-play actors.

Leaders will discover new techniques, learning how to lead with openness and honesty whilst adopting skills to help inspire those around them. It will allow participants to understand their surroundings and the behaviours of a powerful leader, adapting these skills into their own unique style, which they can introduce to their own company.

The course encourages leaders to drive change within their organisation by learning how to deliver difficult messages with authenticity, which in turn will encourage the best performance from their team. By mastering an authentic presence, leaders can introduce the value of vulnerability and encourage their team to do the same. It’s important for leaders to challenge people appropriately whilst still communicating with clarity to protect working relationships.

Katie Lightfoot, Client Manager at RADA Business said: “We’re delighted to be able to expand our course programme further with the addition of a new leadership course, where techniques from acting training will be used to help build greater leadership presence in business. It’s a way for participants to master the art of leadership with a course that is based on a collective understanding of the intellectual, emotional and physical art that is involved.

We have worked with many professionals, helping them to transform their performance at work, allowing them to flex their style and be ready for any given situation in business. Our aim is to change the lives of leaders by allowing them to discover how to lead with openness, honesty and be the most authentic version of themselves. By embodying the behaviours of a brilliant leader, delegates can inspire those around them and shape a culture in which everyone can do their best work.’’

The post RADA Business Launches New Personal Development Course to Master the Art of Leadership appeared first on CEO Magazine.

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Workplace stress is on the rise and the biggest drivers of stress are colleagues, new research1  from MetLife UK has found. Its study found employees say the major causes of tension at work are ongoing understaffing with underperforming colleagues adding to the pressure.

More than half (52%) of employees questioned said being understaffed is creating stress at their workplace while the same number blame colleagues not doing their jobs properly. Around two out of five (40%) say recruiting inexperienced staff contributes to stress.

Personal financial worries are adding to the stress mix with one in three (30%) employees admitting they struggle to stay on top of their finances while remaining fully committed at work, highlighting the need for employers to address the issue of financial wellness in the workplace.

The MetLife UK study found stress in the workplace is rising  – 57% of employees questioned say their job is more stressful than a year ago and just 22% say their job is not stressful. When MetLife UK last carried out the research in 2014 around 31% said their job was not stressful and less than half (48%) said their job had become more stressful in the past year.

There are grounds for optimism with signs that senior management is recognising the need to address the issue – the numbers of employees blaming pressure from their line manager for creating stress has slipped to 36% from 39% in 2014, while the numbers blaming stress on pressure to achieve performance targets has dropped to 38% from 45%.

Employers are making efforts to provide more support for staff on combating stress– around  64% of employees said their organisation offered some form of help in the workplace compared to 51% when the research was previously conducted.

Adrian Matthews, Employee Benefits Director, MetLife UK said: “Employees are telling us that a major cause of stress at work is unfortunately the people they work with. Either there aren’t enough of them, or the ones that are there are failing to deliver and making it harder for others.

“Add financial wellbeing to the mix and it is clear workplace stress is a growing issue. It’s an issue that employers need to address and the numbers suffering from it demonstrate that taking action will produce measurable results relatively quickly and without major investment.

“Employees need frameworks in place to support motivation and engagement at work as well as good overall physical and mental health and wellbeing. Team leaders and managers play an important role, and it is encouraging that the research shows signs of change, but clearly a lot more needs to be done.

“Group Risk products such as Group Life and Group Income Protection have a role to play in providing some of the support mechanisms for financial, mental and physical wellbeing.”

MetLife is established as the UK’s third largest Group Life provider by number of schemes it insures2 and the sixth largest Group Income Protection provider by in-force premium.

Independent Researchers Consumer Intelligence conducted 1,068 online interviews among a panel of UK adults aged 18+ in full time employment between 31st July and 1st August 2018.

Swiss Re Group Watch 2018 Report.

The post Lack of Staff and Poor Performers are Driving Workplace Stress appeared first on CEO Magazine.

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Employers need to understand more about the impact of personal financial worries on workplace mental health, but are struggling to agree best practice standards to address the issue, new research1  from MetLife UK has found.

More than six out of 10 (61%) senior HR executives have seen a rise in financial wellbeing issues affecting employee mental health and work performance, the nationwide study from MetLife UK shows.

Senior managers agree that addressing financial wellbeing will have business benefits – nearly two out of three (64%) say that tackling financial stress will help boost productivity and engagement in their organisation and 58% say there is growing momentum to provide support.

But businesses are concerned they do not understand enough about financial wellbeing – 67% say they need to know more about the link between financial wellbeing and mental health issues, while 66% say there needs to be more clarity on best practice on tackling financial wellbeing at work.

MetLife UK defines financial wellbeing by a combination of key factors: being in control of your finances; having the capacity to withstand financial shocks; having confidence in the future; and having choices on how to spend and save.

Adrian Matthews, Employee Benefits Director, MetLife UK said: “Financial wellbeing in the workplace is a growing issue for businesses, with organisations reporting a rise in concerns about the impact on mental health and company performance.

“Companies appreciate they need to understand more about the issue so they can provide support for employees, but at the same time there is concern that there are no agreed best practice standards on how to implement financial wellbeing programmes.

“There is no magic solution to improving financial wellbeing in the workplace, but a well-designed employee benefits programme is a good place to start. The potential business benefits  in terms of more productive employees are clear.”

MetLife’s research found 61% of HR managers believe financial wellbeing advice should be a part of Employee Assistance Programmes aimed at helping address mental health issues.

It is established as the UK’s third largest Group Life provider by number of schemes it insures2 and the sixth largest Group Income Protection provider by in-force premium.

The post Employers Need to Understand Financial Wellbeing Risk appeared first on CEO Magazine.

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The workspace of today has evolved far beyond the conventional offices portrayed in popular culture, which are typically comprised of sterile white cubicles and grey carpet tiles. What has remained the same, however, is the desire to utilise the space to encourage productivity among employees.

Employee habits are changing, including the way they work and collaborate. With productivity levels in offices across the UK falling to an all-time low,[1] it’s now essential for businesses to create a workspace that fosters productivity and collaboration among its employees.

By 2020, the global workforce is expected to be dominated by Millennials (22-37 years old) (35%) and Generation X (38-53 years old) (35%), with baby boomers (54-72 years old) accounting for 6%. With this in mind, designing workspaces to meet the needs of all generations of the workforce can be challenging, costly and time-consuming.

Phil Sugden, director at flexible workspace expert, Portal, explores the ways CEOs can design their workspace to boost productivity and attract talent, while also keeping costs to a minimum.

Avoid dangerous assumptions

Attitudes towards work-life balance have shifted considerably over the last decade. While the assumption may be that Millennials and Generation Z employees’ value work-life balance most, research suggests 94% of baby boomers also want a flexible work schedule that provides quality of life.[2]

Whether a business is expanding, refurbishing an existing office or relocating, flexibility must be built into the heart of every workspace. While the assumption may be that trends like hot desking embrace flexibility, research has shown that the lack of ownership of a space can make employees feel less valued as a result.[3]

One size fits no-one

To create a productive and successful workplace, office design must move beyond generalisations and recognise that one size does not fit all. Designing an office to promote optimum efficiency is about creating the space and work environment that incorporates the right tools needed to meet the unique needs of your organisation.

As a result, businesses relocating offices to accommodate their design requirements should take into consideration how each of their employees approach their work.

Today’s employees are used to working in a variety of different spaces to suit their task. In settings where a combination of individual and collaborative work is required, activity-based working can provide far greater flexibility, while increasing productivity and collaboration.

Organisations embracing activity-based working should create versatile areas for employees to work at through the day, according to their task. This includes designated meeting areas, secluded spaces for quiet time and concentration and breakout spaces.

Breakout spaces

Introducing a designated area for employees to meet and socialise away from the main office creates a ‘home from home’ feel, while fostering a workplace culture that promotes creative thinking and employee wellbeing.

Breakout areas do not need to take up excessive space, and can be created on a low budget. Businesses can enhance their existing space by simply fitting comfortable furniture, such as sofas and tables, which work to enhance the interaction between employees and provide a space for ad-hoc meetings and brainstorming sessions.

Maximise private spaces

When relocating offices, it’s important to consider that while the open-plan workplace may work for some, there are still a substantial number of office workers across all ages that prefer private areas to maximise efficiency when working individually.

Workplaces operating within creative industries, where interaction and team-work is encouraged, are more likely to benefit from open plan offices. However, offices without private areas can be particularly problematic in workplaces that require high levels of concentration or frequent telephone contact, such as in financial, technological and contact centre environments.

Installing segregating panels on desks can reduce distractions and background noise, while also offering employees a sense of privacy. By offering this option, businesses can reap the collaborative benefits of the open plan, without sacrificing productivity. 

Add some colour to the workday

Colour schemes are an example of how businesses are communicating their brand values through their workspace, while leaving a lasting impression on clients.

Bright colours bring life to a workspace, whether by reinforcing your brand identity or by creating a personality, unique feel and atmosphere for every area and space.

Under a traditional model, businesses are highly restricted in how they can design their office to communicate their brand values. Additionally, the possibility that businesses may need to expand, reduce, reallocate or relocate their workforce can be extremely costly and entirely impractical.

With flexible managed office models like Managed Office Solutions (MOS), office design is determined by the occupier and not the provider, and can be bespoke to the business’s requirements. This integrated approach manages each component of the process, while providing the expert knowledge that most organisations don’t have internally.

[1] https://www.ft.com/content/6ada0002-9a57-11e8-9702-5946bae86e6d

[2] https://workplaceinsight.net/generations-differ-on-what-makes-them-happy-at-work-but-all-want-more-flexibility/ 

[3] http://www.bbc.co.uk/guides/zgjmtfr

The post How Workplace Design Drives Productivity appeared first on CEO Magazine.

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Microsoft Corp. and online education leader OpenClassrooms are announcing a new partnership to train and prepare students for artificial intelligence (AI) jobs in the workplace. The collaboration is designed to provide more students with access to education to learn in-demand skills and to qualify for high-tech jobs, while giving employers access to great talent to fill high-tech roles.

OpenClassrooms is the leading online education-to-employment platform in the world, with millions of students across 170 countries. OpenClassrooms will recruit 1,000 promising candidates throughout France, the UK, and the U.S.

The masters-level online program combines OpenClassrooms programming with Microsoft content and project-based tasks tailored to the AI roles that employers are aiming to fill. The fully online program is intentionally designed to produce high-quality graduates in large numbers by leveraging OpenClassrooms’ popular platform together with up-to-date content and built-in connections to employers looking to fill AI roles. This model benefits students and employers, who gain a cost-efficient pipeline for recruiting new talent.

The demand for next-generation artificial intelligence skills has far outpaced the number of candidates in the job market. One estimate suggests that, by 2022, a talent shortage will leave as many as 30% of AI and data skills jobs open.

“The demand for AI and machine learning opportunities has never been stronger,” says OpenClassrooms co-founder and CEO Pierre Dubuc. “We’re excited to be an innovation partner to Microsoft to usher in new tactics that will bring top talent to the workforce.”

Students who complete the program are guaranteed a job within six months or they will receive a full refund from OpenClassrooms. They will also earn a masters-level diploma accredited in Europe through OpenClassrooms, which is based in Paris, France. The company is actively seeking accreditation in the U.K. and U.S.

“As AI is changing the way we work and the nature of jobs, we have a responsibility to ensure graduates are prepared for the workplace of tomorrow,” says Jean-Philippe Courtois, Executive Vice President and President, Global Sales, Marketing and Operations at Microsoft. “We are excited to partner with OpenClassrooms to help equip people with the skills and opportunities they need to thrive in the digital economy.”

The post Microsoft And OpenClassrooms To Train Students To Fill High-Demand AI Jobs appeared first on CEO Magazine.

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With the average UK consumer exposed to dozens of advertisements every day, standing out from the competition has become a challenge for all businesses. However, many companies’ obscure branding and unclear marketing are driving away customers, new research has revealed.
 
Studio Graphene asked an independent, nationally representative sample of more than 2,000 UK respondents to correctly identify what the following 10 companies do based on their names and logos – Medopad, Quantexa, The Plum Guide, vTime, OLIO, Seatfrog, Lightful, Spectral Edge, Waldo, Lexoo. All of these are UK-based businesses that raised more than £3 million in Series A investment in 2018. 
 
The survey found that on average only a fifth (21%) of consumers could match a business’ name and logo to its description. The best performer was Medopad – the HealthTech firm, aided by the inclusion of ‘med’ in its name, was correctly matched to its service offering by 40% of respondents. Conversely, a mere 8% recognised that Waldo was an online retailer of contact lenses. 
 
Studio Graphene then asked the sample about their general perceptions toward logos and branding, and how important they are when it comes to using a company’s product or service.
 
The research found that the majority of consumers are inundated with adverts they do not understand. Half (51%) said they regularly see adverts in the media and struggle to identify what product or service is being advertised. Moreover, 61% avoid engaging further with a company if it is not immediately obvious what they offer, while 55% feel too many new businesses today opt for obscure names that do not relate to their offering.
 
Studio Graphene’s study also found that 42% of people said branding plays an important role in their purchasing decisions. Furthermore, two thirds (67%) typically go for well-known brands when making an expensive purchase, such as a car or a holiday.
 
Ritam Gandhi, founder and director of Studio Graphene, commented: “Today’s research underlines two things: how important branding is within consumers’ financial decisions; and just how many businesses are failing to brand themselves effectively. Indeed, with the average person exposed to hundreds of advertisements each day – whether in a newspaper, on TV or via social media – confused branding can result in businesses losing potential customers.
 
“Whether you’re a startup or large enterprise, business leaders cannot overlook the importance of clear branding. A company must create a brand and market it in a way that is simple, memorable and relevant.” 
 

The post Poor Branding Putting Companies at Risk of Losing Customers appeared first on CEO Magazine.

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 StartUpNV will host its first angel investing workshop Thursday, Apr. 11. with investor expert Bill Payne. The $49 half-day workshop, teaching aspiring angels the end-to-end process of angel investing, will take place from 12:30 – 4:30 p.m. at AFWERX, in Las Vegas. Attendees will learn how to negotiate term sheets, source and structure new deals, understand the basics of due diligence, and how to properly value a company.

StartUpNV will use its U.S. Economic Development Administration grant to fund this workshop. “The mission of this grant is to educate investors and encourage formation of regional early-stage funds,” said Jeff Saling, Executive Director for StartUpNV. “While we rank #1 in the US for startups, Nevada ranks 49th in startup capital investment. Our mission is to be a catalyst for more investment.”

The interactive workshop includes guest speakers, panel discussions, and interviews to help attendees understand the world of startup investing. Legendary investor Bill Payne, lead instructor of the Angel Capital Association will moderate. Payne is an active angel investor, advisor to entrepreneurs, and has successfully invested in over 50 startup companies. Additional experts for the workshop include Bill Arent, Director, City of Las Vegas Economic Development; Kathy Priebe, Sierra Angels; Bill Botts, Rebel Venture Fund; Mark Brennan, Brennan Capital Partners; George Moncrief, tech scout at AFWERX; Matthew Fritz, Rebel Venture Fund; Zachary Miles Esq. AVP Economic Development, UNLV; Leith MartinExecutive Director, Center for Entrepreneurship, UNLV; and Jeff Saling, Co-Founder & Executive Director for StartUpNV and FundNV.  

AFWERX is located at 3773 Howard Hughes Pkwy, Las Vegas NV 89169. Register HERE for the workshop. 
Registration begins 12:30 p.m., the workshop is from 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., and is followed by a happy hour. Pitch Fest begins at 5:30 featuring local startups where investors get to apply what they’ve learned. For more information about StartUpNV and details surrounding this event, visit StartUpNV.

About StartUpNV 
StartUpNV is a non-profit (501c3) state-wide business incubator for scalable Nevada startups providing expert mentorship and access to a network of capital partners for funding through vehicles like FundNV. Learn more about StartUpNV at www.startupnv.org.

The post Nevada’s Startup Incubator Helps Investors Learn The Art Of Angel Investing On April 11th appeared first on CEO Magazine.

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With the second gender pay gap reporting deadline fast approaching, nearly a quarter of UK employees (23%) believe that reporting should be introduced in their organisation. Introduced in the UK in 2018, the gender gap reporting requires large companies to report on their gender pay gaps annually, based on a ‘snapshot date’ of 31 March for public sector organisations, or 5 April for private and voluntary sector employers.

The study also reveals that employee tolerance of the pay gap between men and women is wearing thin, with over two-thirds of employees (68%) saying they would consider looking for another job if they found out there was an unfair gender pay gap at their organisation.

The ADP Workforce View in Europe 2019 surveyed over 10,000 employees in the UK, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland and Spain, delving into how employees feel about current issues in the workplace and the future of work. Unequal pay has been in the spotlight over the last few years and remains a serious problem across the continent, with women paid on average 16% less than men.

Of the four generations in the workplace, the findings show that Millennials feel the most strongly about the gender pay gap. Over a third (26%) of those aged 16-34 believe that gender pay gap reporting is necessary in their organisation, while over three quarters (81%) say they would consider leaving for another job if they found out their employer was paying men and women unequally.

The prospect of gender pay gap reporting is most popular amongst employees in Spain (34%), Switzerland (34%) and Italy (30%), while in contrast, just 11% of those in the Netherlands agree. This is despite the country dropping 16 places in the 2017 global gender equality rankings (World Economic Forum).

Meanwhile, Italian workers are most likely to consider looking for another job if they discovered there was an unfair pay gap at their company (73%), followed by British and Spanish workers (68%). At the other end of the scale, employees in France are the least likely to consider making a move (54%). 

Jeff Phipps, Managing Director at ADP UK, commented: “The Workforce View report shows that workers’ attitude towards inequality is changing, especially when it comes to the gender pay gap. Employees are prepared to vote with their feet, risking severe engagement, performance and reputational issues for the companies concerned.

“Despite widespread calls for change, the gender pay gap appears deeply ingrained in workplaces in the UK, and the best way to move the needle is to approach it from a social, political and organisational perspective. Communities, the government and companies need to work together to redefine gender roles in society; provide policies that nurture and prepare women for positions of power, and businesses should design a workplace that works for everyone and ensure that women are getting a fair chance to progress in their career.” Phipps concluded. 

The post UK Employees Running Out Of Patience With Gender Pay Gap appeared first on CEO Magazine.

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The entrepreneurial dream is alive and well in the UK reveals new research collated by Direct Line for Business.1 Some 5.3 million people (10 per cent) dream of becoming their own boss in the future, embracing a career as a freelancer.  This is in addition to the 8.6 million (16 per cent) who currently freelance and are either full-time self-employed or carry out contract work alongside their main jobs.  A further one in eight (12 per cent) Brits have previously freelanced.

Breaking into freelance work is something many people will only consider if they have a nest egg saved up, especially if an initial contract or client hasn’t been secured.  Overall, 71 per cent of self-employed workers saved up money before going freelance, leaving a plucky 29 per cent who admitted that they had nothing saved before starting their business.

The average freelancer saves up £16,000 before setting up their own enterprise, a significant chunk of money and the equivalent of 70 per cent of the annual salary in the UK.2  Most do this to allow for potential shortfalls in monthly income (43 per cent), to ensure they have funds to purchase essential business goods (34 per cent) and to build up a fund for holidays or sick leave (16 per cent). For more than two thirds (69 per cent) of the self-employed people who saved up money before going freelance, this money was enough to meet their needs. This should all be encouraging news for the one in 10 Brits (5.3 million people) who have never been self-employed but dream of one day setting up their own business.

It isn’t just money that needs to be considered by prospective freelancers before leaving full-time employment, as they will be taking sole responsibility for tax and legal issues. On average, self-employed workers spend seven months and three weeks preparing to go freelance. The majority (73 per cent) spend time preparing to become self-employed, whether that is by reading up on tax implications (27 per cent) or identifying target markets and audiences (25 per cent). However, nearly one in three (30 per cent) spend less than a month getting ready to go it alone.

Jazz Gakhal, Managing Director at Direct Line for Business said: “Going freelance is an exciting prospect, with the idea of becoming your own boss extremely tempting. There are pros and cons, of course, as independent contractors can often earn more by charging day rates, but don’t benefit from paid holiday, pensions and sick leave. Any budding entrepreneur should consider the value of these additional benefits as well as any change in salary before making the leap.”

Dealing with tax issues is one of the biggest concerns for freelancers before setting up shop, with a third (33 per cent) seeing this as a major hurdle for going it alone. Other issues include not getting paid when on holiday and being able to meet existing financial commitments (both 26 per cent). One in five (20 per cent) worries about marketing and bringing in new clients and the same amount again about not being able to save for a pension (19 per cent).

Table one: Concerns for potential freelancers

Top concerns for freelancers

Percentage who list this concern

Dealing with tax issues

33%

Not getting paid when on holiday

26%

Being unable to meet existing financial commitments

26%

Marketing and bringing in new clients

20%

Not saving for a pension

19%

Source: Direct Line for Business, 2018

Jazz Gakhal, Managing Director at Direct Line for Business said: “If you do provide a professional service to clients, either as a contractor or freelancer, it’s important to have the right insurance in place. Direct Line for Business offers flexible insurance that can be personalised to reflect the ever-changing needs of your business so you don’t have to take out a new policy every time your role, premises or revenue changes, which saves time and hassle. In addition, we don’t charge admin fees to make mid term changes to your policy.

For more information about Direct Line’s small business insurance for contractors and freelancers visit the website! 

The post 5.3 Million Brits Want To Go Freelance appeared first on CEO Magazine.

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Ahead of daylight savings this weekend, The Workforce Institute at Kronos Incorporated has released part two of a global survey examining how employees across eight nations view their relationship with work and life, asking the simple question, “What would you do with more time?”

These results from The Workforce Institute at Kronos and Future Workplace came from a survey of nearly 3,000 workers across the U.K., Australia, Canada, France, Germany, India, Mexico and the U.S. Part one, “The Case for a 4-day Workweek?,” uncovered that 75 percent of workers say it should take less than seven hours each day to do their job – yet specific time-wasters attribute to two in five employees working more than 40 hours a week, with 71 percent saying work interferes with their personal lives. Part two asks employees: If you could get these lost hours back in your day, what would you do with more time?

News Facts

  • People wish they could spend more time with family, travelling, and taking better care of their mental and physical health.
    • With more time, the top five things people worldwide wish they could do more of are spend time with family (44 percent); travel (43 percent); exercise (33 percent); spend time with friends (30 percent); and pursue their hobbies (29 percent).
    • Rest and relaxation were also big themes, as 27 percent of people worldwide said they would want to get more sleep and nearly one-quarter (22 percent) would focus on mental health. More sleep is a universal desire regardless of age – from Gen Z (27 percent) to Baby Boomers (26 percent)
    • While all nations rate spending time with family and travel as their top two desires, the remaining top five “more time” wish lists vary by country. For instance, employees in France, Germany, the U.S., and the U.K. listed “sleep more” as a top five-priority; U.K. and India workers wish they had time to learn a new skill or hobby; people in Mexico and India would spend more time watching TV, movies, or listening to music; and Mexico employees were the only ones to have “read more” in their top five.
    • On the bright side, 62 percent of all workers agree that their job offers enough flexibility to have a healthy work-life balance, while only 14 percent either disagree or strongly disagree.
  • What would you do with more time at work? Personal development leads the way.
    • Regardless of age, role, level, or country, all employees wish they could spend more time developing new skills, as it was the top-rated answer for both individual contributors (44 percent) and people managers (40 percent) alike – with exactly half of Gen Z respondents and 47 percent of Millennials craving more time to develop skills. 
      • A whopping 66 percent of employees in India wish they had time to develop new skills, with the U.K. (49 percent), Mexico (48 percent), and Australia (47 percent) following suit as the nations where more professional development is desired the most.
    • People managers specifically would spend more time with people, as four of their top six answers include developing or training employees (no. 2); building relationships with their team (no. 4); coaching or mentoring others (no. 6 – tie); and helping customers (no. 6 – tie).
    • While helping customers was the second highest-rated wish for individual contributors (31 percent) – and a greater desire the older the worker – the remaining top-five desires fall squarely in the personal maintenance camp: take a meal break (no. 3); take a mental break / meditate (no. 4); and catch up on work (no. 5).
    • Both managers and employees – especially in Australia – wish they could spend more time on long-term or significant projects (27 percent and 23 percent, respectively), and 23 percent of employees wish they had more time to innovate, brainstorm new ideas, or find a better way of doing things. However, U.K. employees were the least likely to do this, with only 19 percent stating this.
    • Workers in Mexico (37 percent), Canada (27 percent), and Germany (26 percent) would use extra time to exercise during the workday. On the opposite spectrum, only 13 percent of U.K. employees would use extra time to exercise, but 32 percent wish there was more time to eat.
    • Workers in Australia, the U.K., and the U.S. apparently feel the busiest, as they are most likely to spend additional time in the day simply catching up on work. While organisations in France need to watch out, as one in four French workers would spend extra time looking for a new job compared to the worldwide average of 16 percent.

The post Workers Worldwide Provide Their Work/Life Wishlist appeared first on CEO Magazine.

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