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Release – April 26th, 2018

The Recreation Vehicle Dealers’ Association of Canada (RVDA) and Canadian Campground and RV Council (CCRVC) hosted a joint advocacy push on Parliament Hill from April 25-26th 2018.

On April 25th members of both associations gathered for a reception Commonwealth Room that was attended by a record 50 MPs and Senators from all parties, in addition to a number of parliamentary staff. The reception gave RVDA and CCRVC representatives an opportunity to informally discuss issues related to the RV and camping industries in Canada, while enjoying some Ottawa hospitality and getting a first hand sense of a busy evening of parliamentary proceedings.

The group began its meetings on Parliament Hill on April 26th with a breakfast hosted by Alaina Lockhart, Parliamentary Secretary for Small Business and Tourism. Lockhart, who has a CCRVC member in her riding, spoke about the actions that the government has taken to encourage tourism and support small businesses. This conversation served as an excellent start to a full day of meetings.
The RV and camping industry was featured prominently in the House of Commons during the day. During question period, Banff-Airdrie MP Blake Richards asked the Minister of National Revenue about the need to ensure that campgrounds have access to small business tax rate, highlighting the actions of RVDA and CCRVC delegates in Ottawa.

RVDA and CCRVC also participated in a press conference in the Charles Lynch Room, highlighting messaging on the need for tax fairness as well as for increased investment in federal campgrounds. The news release led to media stories in British Columbia and Prince Edward Island.

In total 48 meetings were held with MPs, Senators and Officials. Representatives were able to secure a number of commitments from legislators that will help to encourage investments and regulatory changes to assist Canada’s RV industry over the years to come.
CCRVC Key Messages Presented:

The Canadian Camping and RV Council (CCRVC) is a national, volunteer federation of the Provincial Private Campground Owner Associations and their members. CCRVC was incorporated in 2013 by the RVDA of Canada and the Canadian Recreational Vehicle Association with a mandate to provide for the betterment and to support the Canadian RVing and Camping Industry in Canada. ell as for increased investment in federal campgrounds. The news release led to media stories in British Columbia and Prince Edward Island.

Canada’s RV and Camping Industry includes 2347 Private Campgrounds, 450 RVDA Dealers and CRVA Manufacturers who collectively employ 60,000 Canadians and contribute over $14.7 billion to Canada’s GDP.  In 2016, over 5.8 million Canadians or 22% of the adult population engaged in camping activities coast-to-coast.
Our Private Campgrounds offer an opportunity for middle-class families to spend time together, create life-long memories and discover Canada’s natural landscape. Camping is an affordable activity for the Middle Class and creates a strong sense of community that is unique to this form of travel accommodation across Canada.

Current issues and policies currently impacting Private Campgrounds

CCRVC strongly advocates that the Government of Canada recognize the income earned by campgrounds as “active business income” for the purpose of determining eligibility for the small business deduction. Private Campgrounds throughout Canada have been asking the Federal Government, specifically the Minister of Finance, to endorse changes in the current Income Tax Act that clearly distinguishes family run campgrounds with less than 5 full time employees as an “active business” and thus eligible for the small business tax deduction.

The potential classification of a Campground being assessed as a “Specified Investment Business” is ambiguous and up to determination by the Canada Revenue Agency remains the #1 threat to not only Private Campgrounds but to all RV and Camping Industry Stakeholders.
During a compliance test conducted in 2015 by the Canada Revenue Agency, 3000 Small Businesses were audited by the CRA. Out of the 3000, 70 were Private Campgrounds and of the number 10 were denied the SBD and re-assessed at a 300% tax rate increase, some retroactively 2-3 years. This threat is preventing campgrounds from increasing investment and improvements in their business and stifled additional seasonal hiring due to monetary concerns.

We conducted a survey of our 2347 Private Campgrounds in March of 2018 and the issue is still their # 1 concern. Given this, we hereby ask for your support with the Minister of Finance to enact a clear change in the classification of small private campgrounds.

CCRVC supports the need for increased investment in Canada’s tourism marketing strategies by Destination Canada to support the RV and Campground Industry.

CCRVC was pleased with increased expenditures to Destination Canada from the Federal Government in the past (2) Federal Budgets to encourage Canada as a travel destination. We believe that Private Campgrounds have benefited along with our Hotels in the growth of Canada’s Tourism sector.

We encourage Destination Canada’s advertising and messaging to include more references towards RV and Camping opportunities in their programs.

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Why should you belong to an association? For most people considering purchasing a membership, what this question really means is, what will I get out of belonging to an association? Will the money be worth it? What an association gives to its members is carefully coordinated and offered so that members receive the most benefit. These benefits span from saving money to upholding an important piece of legislation. Be fully informed before non-member competitors.

We are on information overload these days, and information can make it to us in a variety of ways from a variety of sources. An association has curated, dependable content that would be of highest relevance for you. You come to know about legal battles or upcoming changes before your non-member competitors, which enables you to act (if needed) and adapt more quickly. You’re “in the know.”

 

Affect change at the highest levels.

There is always change. Sometimes for the better. Sometimes for the worse. That change doesn’t just happen. Your association is your advocate in governmental affairs to help preserve or defend legislation that works or doesn’t work to your benefit. Associations work with legislatures all the time. By belonging to an association, you help turn up the volume – and you have the opportunity to voice opinions to people who will listen and bring those concerns to the people who make the policies and laws. If you feel so inclined, you can get even more involved and be a “boot on the ground.”

 

Save money.

Many associations have relationships with suppliers, which in turn offer discounts simply because you are a member of that partner association. These suppliers could be for goods, such as office supplies or grocery items; or services, such as legal advice. Also, members get discounts on advertising (specialized lower rates) for any large-scale communication by the association, such as magazines and email newsletters. These discounts usually justify the cost of membership.

 

Boost your reputation.

Membership means something, and frankly, it impresses people when they realize you’re a member of an organization – especially if the organization has a standout reputation. You become affiliated with that reputation and good will. In turn, you make the association brand into something special, too, by how you act and conduct business.

 

Access membership directories.

Only members are included in association directories, which could come in the form of a printed publication, a digital publication, or both. Sometimes, associations are affiliated with other larger, similar associations, which will publish member directory information at their level, too, which is double the exposure for your business. Printed publications and digital publications spread your brand and gets it in front of consumers who are most likely to be interested and take action.

Access to free marketing material.

Many associations provide marketing materials such as flyers, posters, and scripts that you can download and use in your own business. The content is focused on your industry or a special event, and includes the association logo, showing a member’s affiliation. This material is created to help members save time and resources while also helping them promote the benefits of their business or industry, or to tout a special event.

At the very heart of membership though, is the willingness and desire to connect with others in your industry and affect the future of your industry in a way you can’t do on your own. What you get out of an association depends on what you put in to the association – and that includes taking advantage of the suite of benefits the association provides. Then, joining will definitely be “worth it.”

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New Economic Impact of the Canadian Recreation Vehicle Industry

Shows Growth in all Sectors

 Richmond, BC. May 17, 2018 – The Recreation Vehicle Dealers Association (RVDA) of Canada and the Canadian Recreational Vehicle Association (CRVA) are releasing their updated study, showcasing the economic impact of the Canadian recreation vehicle (RV) industry.

The study, conducted by The Portage Group Inc and urbanMetrrics inc, showcased that in 2017, the RV sector generated an estimated 66,000 jobs and delivered $4.7 billion in added value to the Canadian economy from an initial expenditure of $6.1 billion.

“The purpose of the 2018 Economic Impact of the Canadian RV Industry is to update the estimate of the level of economic activity supported by the RV industry in Canada. The findings show that not only does RVing continue to be an exceptional way to travel, but it also has a considerable impact on the Canadian economy,” said Jean-François Lussier, RVDA of Canada Chairman of the Board. “Our updated study also reveals that approximately 2.1 million (or 15% of) Canadian households own an RV which is up from years prior. “

“The economic activity generated by the RV industry is considerable and multi‐faceted. It includes manufacturing, sales and service of RVs as well as, expenditures to use, store, maintain and travel in RVs” stated CRVA Chairman, Jeff McDermott. “The study reveals that expenditures associated with RV ownership and use account for 78% of the total value added to the Canadian economy.”

In order to determine the level of economic activity supported by the RV industry in Canada, the impacts of RVs were broken down through four distinct domains. Key findings are outlined below:

RV Manufacturing:

The total value of recreation vehicles manufactured in Canada was approximately $470 million in 2017. Of this total production value, some $376 million—or 80%—was exported to markets outside of Canada, with the balance representing domestic consumption of locally-made RV products.

As detailed below, the value of recreation vehicles manufactured in Canada in 2017—including direct, indirect and induced impacts—generates significant value for the Canadian economy.

  • ± $355.3 million in value added to the Canadian economy;
  • ± 5,400 full-time years of employment;
  • ± $229.3 million in labour income across Canada; and,
  • ± $88.7 million in tax revenue to municipal, provincial and national governments, in the form of personal tax, corporate tax, and other taxes.

 RV Retail Sales and Service:

The total value of recreation vehicles sold and serviced in Canada in 2017 was approximately $3.4 billion. In calculating the economic impact of RV retail activities, however, it is important to note that only the gross retail and wholesale markup components represent the unique contributions of retail sales and service activities.

As detailed below, the value of recreation vehicles sold in Canada in 2017 generated:

  • ± $681.4 million in value added to the Canadian economy;
  • ± 10,300 full-time years of employment;
  • ± $432.0 million in labour income across Canada; and,
  • ± $149.3 million in tax revenue to municipal, provincial and national governments, in the form of personal tax, corporate tax, and other taxes.

Non‐Travel Related RV Expenditures:

Overall, total non-travel related recreation vehicle expenditures for 2017 are estimated at some $1.7 billion. This substantial spending on items such as storage, insurance, as well as other equipment and accessories (excluding repairs) yields a significant economic impact across Canada.

  • ± $1.5 billion in value added to the Canadian economy;
  • ± 17,900 full-time years of employment.
  • ± $830.9 million in labour income across Canada; and,
  • ± $571.9 million in tax revenue to municipal, provincial and national governments, in the form of personal tax, corporate tax, and other taxes.

Tourism Related RV Expenditures:

RV owners spent a total of approximately $3.3 billion on various goods and services while travelling throughout Canada in 2017. This spending generates a significant benefit to local municipalities, the provincial/territorial economies, as well as spread more broadly across Canada at the federal level.

  • ± $2.1 billion in value added to the Canadian economy;
  • ± 32,300 full-time years of employment;
  • ± $2.7 billion in labour income across Canada; and,
  • ± $1.1 billion in tax revenue to municipal, provincial and national governments, in the form of personal tax, corporate tax, and other taxes.

In sum, the RV sector stimulates economic activity and creates jobs for Canadians across the country. Across all four subsectors, total RV industry expenditures for 2017 have been estimated at approximately $6.1 billion. Moreover, the Canadian RV industry was a significant driver of tax revenues, with the industry contributing $1.9 billion in tax revenue to municipal, provincial and national governments, in the form of personal tax, corporate tax, and other taxes.

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April 26, 2018

Representatives from the Recreation Vehicle Dealers Association (RVDA) of Canada and the Canadian Camping and RV Council (CCRVC) are on Parliament Hill today (April 26) to discuss the need for implementation of a fair tax regime for campgrounds across Canada and the need for increased investments in tourism policies and infrastructure upgrades.

“RVing and camping in Canada has a considerable economic impact. The manufacturing, purchasing, servicing and use of recreation vehicles contributes billions to the Canadian economy each year,” said Jean-Francois Lussier, RVDA of Canada chairman, in a press release. “In fact, in 2011, the total economic activity associated with the Canadian recreation vehicle industry reached $14.5 billion. There are over 4,231 campgrounds across Canada, each offering a unique experience for Canadians and international visitors.”

But the continued growth success of the RV and camping industry is not assured. The promotion of the RV sector and proper infrastructure in Canada’s existing parks are crucial to the growth of the RVing and camping industries, as well as a prosperous Canadian tourism sector. The RVing industry contributes billions to the national economy, but campgrounds across Canada require infrastructural improvements in order to accommodate new camping and RV technologies.

“Our industry needs to be sure that we will be governed by a fair tax regime, including being eligible for the small business tax deduction,” said Robert Trask, chairman of the CCRVC. “Without clarification from the government, our members face retroactive tax increases of as much as 300%. Having campgrounds pay a higher tax rate than billion-dollar corporations is dumbfounding.”

During a compliance test conducted in 2015 by the Canada Revenue Agency, 3,000 small businesses were audited by the CRA. Of the campgrounds that were audited, one in seven were classified as a “specified investment business” and denied the small business deduction. The reclassification means as many as three years of substantial retroactive tax increases. Without clarifying the uncertainty, campgrounds are unable to increase investment and improvements in their business and cannot hire additional seasonal hiring due to financial concerns.

“A fair tax regime and investment in the necessary infrastructural updates for small businesses would benefit the family-owned campgrounds and RV dealerships that enable Canadians and visitors alike to experience the all that Canada has to offer,” concluded Lussier. “Canadians deserve the opportunity to enjoy our country’s natural beauty and heritage. The RV and camping industry help make that possible.”

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As a national association in the RVing industry, we directly benefit from the hard work of the GoRVing Canada coalition. Each year, GoRVing Canada rolls out new and innovative marketing campaigns that highlight local industry partners – campgrounds, dealerships, and manufacturers – and promote the RV lifestyle.

GoRVing Canada’s campaign, “Bring Back Wildhood,” has proved to be a unique approach that plays off the consumer’s sense of nostalgia. It takes us back to a time when adventure was always just around the corner –

“We stare at our phones instead of the stars and make appointments instead of memories. But it wasn’t always that way.” 

It encourages consumers to regain their youthful sense of wanderlust and reconnect with the great outdoors.

The “Bring Back Wildhood” campaign in 2018 will focus on seasonal camping at many of our CCRVC member campgrounds through a 60-second online video, a six-second video clip for online bumper ads, a four-minute lifestyle video, and a 30-second TV commercial. All of this content will be shared on CCRVC social accounts as well, using the hashtag #BringBackWildhood.

Go RVing Canada recently announced the evolution of “Bring Back Wildhood,” which will launch March 1st.

GoRVing Canada: Bring Back Wildhood - 2018 - YouTube

The Canadian Camping and RV Council will do its best to provide private campground owners across Canada with RV and Camping Industry News in order to keep you informed with quarterly newsletters. Sign up to receive these newsletters here.

Please contact us at info@ccrvc.ca if you ever have any questions.

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Canadian RV and Camping Week takes place May 22-27 this year, and we knew you wouldn’t want to be left out!

Known as the unofficial kick-off for the RVing and camping season in Canada, it is a chance for RVers, campers, and campgrounds to come together to not just to enjoy the great outdoors, but to support a good cause. Last year, many campgrounds across Canada helped raise funds for Make-A-Wish® Canada to help young Parker’s wish came true of owning a pop-up trailer so that he and his family can enjoy more time camping, fishing, and hiking.

If you plan to be included, March is the perfect time to get the word out about your discounted campsite rates on reservations made for the fourth annual Canadian RVing and Camping Week. Download and complete the registration form to let us know in which promotions and events you would like to participate.

We would like to thank all participants who took part in last year’s Canadian RV and Camping Week. Due to your involvement, we were able to generate more than $20,000 to support life-changing wishes for children with critical illnesses through our partnership with Make-A-Wish® We’re looking to increase that number even more this year, but we need your help! So, spread the word and get involved in 2018.

Keep your eyes out for more information on how to donate and for some of the amazing camping community activities happening the week of the event.

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As the CCRV prepares for its annual Parliament Hill Day on April 26, 2018,  we want to ensure your voice is heard so that we can bring core issues of concern that are important to you to the attention of federal decision makers. Please answer this two-question survey by Friday, March 23, 2018. Thank you for your participation!​
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Canadian RV and Camping Sectors Lobby in Ottawa
 April 6, 2017
 Representatives from the Recreation Vehicle Dealers Association (RVDA) of Canada and the Canadian Camping and RV Council (CCRVC) are on Parliament Hill today (April 6) to discuss the need for increased investments in tourism policies and infrastructure upgrades and the need for implementation of a fair tax regime for campgrounds across Canada.

As this year marks Canada’s 150th anniversary, the RVDA of Canada and the CCRVC would like to ensure that individuals and families are able to explore Canada’s natural heritage both throughout this camping season and for generations to come, according to a release.

RVing and camping in Canada has a considerable economic impact; the manufacturing, purchasing, servicing and use of recreation vehicles contributes billions to the Canadian economy each year. In fact, in 2011, the total economic activity associated with the Canadian recreation vehicle industry reached $14.5 billion. There are over 4,231 campgrounds across Canada, each offering a unique experience for Canadians and international visitors.

The promotion of the RV sector and proper infrastructure in our existing parks are crucial to the growth of the RVing and camping industries, as well as a prosperous Canadian tourism sector. The RVing industry contributes billions to the national economy, but the more than 4,321 campgrounds across Canada require infrastructural improvements in order to accommodate new camping and RV technologies. As stated by RVDA Chairman Sam Parks, “RVing and camping are large components of tourism, both internally and externally. There is a crucial need for this to be recognized by Destination Canada as a viable growth area for tourism in Canada.”

A fair tax regime and investment in the necessary infrastructural updates for small businesses would benefit the family-owned campgrounds and RV dealerships that enable Canadians and visitors alike to experience the all that Canada has to offer. At present, campgrounds face an approximate 300% increase in their tax bills. Robert Trask, Chairman of the CCRVC, explains this will result in campgrounds facing “a larger tax rate than major billion dollar corporations which is dumbfounding.”

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