Loading...

Follow Canadian Camping and RV Council on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

OTTAWA, May 6th, 2019 – Representatives from the Recreation Vehicle Dealers Association (RVDA) of Canada and the Canadian Camping and RV Council (CCRVC) visited Parliament Hill on May 2nd to discuss the impacts of the steel and aluminum tariffs on our industry and the need for implementation of a fair tax regime for small Private Campgrounds across Canada.

The RV sector, like many other industries, is part of an integrated North American market. With 95% of our RV products imported from the United States, steel and aluminum are major components for RV production and increased costs for either material because of the current tariffs have a significant impact on the affordability of our products. North American RV dealers are reporting price increases resulting from imposed tariffs.

“We are advocating that the government of Canada maintain pressure on the US to lift the steel and aluminum tariffs. While Canada has started the process to ratify the CUSMA, the government should ensure that ratification in Canada hinges with the removal of these tariffs” said Herb Cowen, chairman of the Board of RVDA. “The government should also provide additional support the industries impacted by these tariffs.”

RVing and Camping in Canada generate considerable economic benefits. The manufacturing, purchasing, servicing, and use of Recreation Vehicles contribute billions to the Canadian economy each year. In 2017, the RV industry supported 66,000 jobs and $6.1 billion in total spending. There are over 4,231 campgrounds including 2347 Privately Owned operated across Canada, each offering a unique experience for Canadians and international visitors.

The promotion of the RV sector and proper infrastructure in our existing parks are crucial to the growth of the RVing and Camping industries, as well as a prosperous Canadian tourism sector. Although the RV industry contributes billions to the national economy, Campgrounds across Canada need infrastructural improvements in order to accommodate new camping and RV technologies.

The Canadian Camping and RV Council continues to advocate the Federal Government to endorse change in the current Income Tax Act or to enact other Legislative changes that would clearly distinguish small family run campgrounds with less than 5 full time employees as an “active business” and thus eligible for the small business tax rate. “As it stands, small campgrounds are faced with a potential 300% tax increase and remains to be a significant threat not only to small private campgrounds but also to the entire RV and camping industry” said Robert Trask, CCRVC’s Chairman.

“A fair tax regime by the Canada Revenue Agency is critical for Canadian Private Campgrounds to make the necessary investment and infrastructural upgrades that enable Canadians and visitors alike to experience all that Canada has to offer” continued Trask.

“Together, the RV and Campground industries play an important role in the health of Canada’s tourism sector and make a significant contribution to Canada’s economy. The need to develop policies that support all travel and tourism, and recognize RVing as a prosperous tourism activity are essential to the RV industry.” concluded Herb Cowen.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

CCRVC Budget Brief 2019

Finance Minister Bill Morneau tabled the 2019 federal budget on March 19. This budget, the final one before the federal election scheduled for the fall, introduced several key measures affecting the bottom line of both businesses and individuals. What’s in it and not in it for Private Campgrounds?

The budget sets the tone for the government’s re-election effort ahead of a busy unofficial campaign season and the writ drop expected late this summer. In the lead up to the budget, seniors were expected to be an area of focus for the government, as well as housing affordability and rural infrastructure, especially for broadband internet. Themes of support for the middle class, helping working people get ahead, and supporting women and marginalized communities access equitable opportunities in the labour force carry through this budget.

The government has been battling scandal since the beginning of 2019 and this budget aims to turn the page on a period defined by high-profile resignations, opposition gains, and missteps on files important to the Liberals’ re-election hopes. Certainly, older Canadians and people struggling with adapting their skills and training to the labour force will benefit from measures tabled today. Other beneficiaries include rural communities and municipalities which will oversee the distribution of energy efficiency funding. In areas where the government has to

retain support targeted investments were made. Support from the liberal base, including women and youth, as well as environmentally conscious consumers and innovative businesses has the potential to be shored up after today’s announcement.

The Fiscal update

The federal government expects a deficit of $14.9 billion for the 2018-19 fiscal year, down from the original projection of $18.1 billion in last year’s budget, and $19.8 billion for the 2019-20 fiscal year, which includes a $3 billion contingency reserve. The deficit is then expected to decline to $9.8 billion for the 2023-24 fiscal year. Finance Minister Morneau did not include a timeline for balancing the budget. In 2015, the Liberals had pledged to balance the books this year.

Tourism industryBudget 2019 proposes to provide $58.5 million over two years, starting this year, to the Regional Development Agencies for the creation of a Canadian Experiences Fund. The Fund would support Canadian businesses and organizations seeking to create, improve or expand tourism-related infrastructure—such as accommodations or local attractions—or new tourism products or We will monitor this closely to see what may or may not be available for our campgrounds.

Budget 2019 provides $5 million to Destination Canada for a tourism marketing campaign to promote Canada as a Tourism destination.

Small Business

EI Training Support Benefit

Budget 2019, introduces an income support program for workers to help cover their living expenses, providing support for ongoing payments such as mortgage payments, electricity bills, and general life costs, while on training and without their regular paycheque. Under this new program workers will be eligible to collect EI to go on training for up to 4 weeks.

To reduce the burden of the new program on small businesses, the government introduces an EI Small Business Premium Rebate. Starting in 2020 any business that pays employer EI premiums equal to or less than $20,000 per year would be eligible for a rebate to offset the upward pressure on EI premiums resulting from the introduction of the new EI Training Support Benefit.

Canada’s Commitment: Universal High-Speed Internet for Every Canadian

In Budget 2019, the Government is announcing its commitment to set a national target, in which 95 per cent of Canadian homes and businesses will have access to internet speeds of at least 50/10 Mbps by 2026 and 100 per cent by 2030, no matter where they are located in the country. This is in keeping with the broadband internet speed objective set by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) for Canadian households and businesses across Canada.

It is estimated that by the time all currently planned broadband programs are in place, by 2021, about 90 per cent of Canadians will have reliable access to internet speeds of 50 megabits per second (Mbps) for downloading data and 10 Mbps for uploading data (also known as 50/10 Mbps). These are the speeds identified by the CRTC to enable Canadians to take advantage of cloud-based software applications, multiple government services (e.g. telehealth services, business support), online learning resources and high definition streaming videos. However, even with 90 per cent of Canadians covered, about 1.5 million Canadian households will still be underserved.                                        

Delivering high-speed internet to every Canadian, especially in more rural and remote areas, will help our businesses grow, create new jobs and connect more people to the resources, services and information we need to build a better future!

Parks Canada

The Government proposes amendments to the Parks Canada Agency Act to create a standard, one-year appropriation authority for the Agency to ensure that Canadians continue to enjoy Canada’s natural treasures in our national parks, heritage sites, and marine conservation areas.

What is not in the Budget?

Despite our persistent ask for the past 3 years, the Liberal Government and the 2019 Federal Budget does not include change in Private Campgrounds being classified as a “Specified Investment Business” and thus, the threat for Private Campgrounds who employ less than 5 Full time employees year-round remains. We have not given up, and we will continue to include in our messaging to government officials.

While not mentioned in this budget, we have been in dialogue with Policy Advisors in the Minister of Tourism’s Office pertaining to our ask for incentives and policy to attract seasonal workers, especially in rural and remote areas. We are encouraged by these discussions and will be communicating further as we hear about any developments.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

December 13, 2018

From the office of:

Blake Richards

Member of Parliament

Banff-Airdrie

I wanted to provide you with an update on the federal Government’s taxation rules regarding campgrounds.  Unfortunately, this Liberal government has decided to persist in waging war against small businesses. Many campgrounds continue to receive assessment notices from the CRA notifying them that they no longer qualify for the small business tax rate.

 Essentially, campgrounds are being told that they are “too small” to be a small business.  I have asked this Government multiple times to explain why they continue to unfairly target our campground owners, and the CRA minister and her officials have provided absolutely no reasoning.

 You can watch a video of my recent questions to CRA officials at the Finance Committee here.

 Further, as promised, I proposed a recommendation to the Pre-Budget Report in the liberal-dominated Finance Committee that would stop this unfair treatment, but, unfortunately, it was not included in the final report.

 Simply put, small businesses should not be penalized for being “too small”. As you know, campgrounds are active businesses, requiring a lot of work and they should qualify for the small business tax rate.

 They are an important part of our tourism industry, a billion dollar sector that creates hundreds of thousands of jobs across the country.

 It’s time for the Liberal government to recognize this and stop treating campgrounds unfairly. Please share this petition  http://www.blakerichards.ca/tax-fairness-campgrounds/to let the current Government know that this treatment is unfair.

 I will continue to fight for our campgrounds and the unfair tax raises that they are receiving.

 

 

 

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Economic Growth – Ensuring Canada’s Competitiveness

 Canadian Camping and RV Council

2019 Pre-Budget Submission 

Recommendation:

That the Federal Government amend the Income Act of Canada or by any other appropriate measure to clearly define, identify and recognize that income earned by small Private Campgrounds is to be considered as “active business income” for the purpose of determining their eligibility for the small business tax deduction.

 About the CCRVC

The Canadian Camping and RV Council (CCRVC) is a national association that represents Provincial Private Campground Owners’ Associations and Private Campgrounds across Canada including British Columbia Lodging and Campgrounds Association, Parks and Campgrounds Owners’ Association of Alberta, Manitoba Association of Campgrounds and Parks, Campgrounds in Ontario, Campgrounds in Quebec, New Brunswick Campground Owners Association and the Association of Atlantic Parks and Campgrounds.

CCRVC’s mission is to support the Canadian Camping and RV Industry, foster projects to enhance the camping experience for both Canadians and international visitors, work with federal decision makers to ensure a thriving Canadian tourism sector and to serve as Private Campground Owner’s Advocacy Voice on a National level.

As part of a $14.5-billion-dollar RV and Camping Industry, Private Campgrounds in Canada make a considerable contribution to our economy. In 2014, 5,768,650 or 22% of the total Canadian adult population in an economic survey were estimated to enjoy camping as a lifestyle. In the same survey, annual travel related expenditures totalled $2 billion, with another $850 million in non-travel related camping expenditures. The RV and Camping Industry creates over 60,420 full-time jobs for Canadians and generates $2.9 billion in total salary and wages.

Current Landscape and 2019 Budget Recommendation

Despite these robust financial figures which indicate that owning a Private Campground is a lucrative business and successful tourist destination in Canada, the classification of a Private Campground as being a Passive “Specified Investment Business” as opposed to an “Active Business” remains to be a considerable threat to our future.

Under the current Income Tax Act, the Small Business Tax Deduction is not available to a corporation that carries on as a Specified Investment Business if the business has a principal purpose of the business to earn income from real or immoveable property and employs LESS than 5 full time employees year-round.

We reference the CRA Bulletin released August 2016 and its arbitrary nature which describes how campgrounds may or may not be able to qualify for the small business tax deduction: http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/nwsrm/stmnt/2016/st160823-eng.html

Although the current tax classification has remained unchanged in decades (1970’s), a significant number of campgrounds across Canada have recently been denied the Small Business Tax Deduction and re-assessed as an Investment Business in the past 24 months. All of the impacted campgrounds have been in business for several years and had previously qualified for the Small Business Tax Deduction by the Canada Revenue Agency indicating that CRA has unquestionably changed their interpretation of the rule.

It is unrealistic to expect Private Campgrounds who operate on average for only 152 days in a calendar year, to maintain seasonal workers throughout the off season when they are not in operation so that they meet the minimal threshold of 5 full time employees year-round and qualify for the SBD under the tax rule as written.

However, there is an exception whereby a Campground could qualify for the SBD if they can prove to the CRA that they provide a number of “services and activities” as summarized in the CRA communication.

Private Campgrounds generally do provide several of the services/activities which have been listed as deciding factors in determining if a “specified investment business” is deemed “active” by the CRA: laundromat, snack bar and/or restaurant, washroom, showers, swimming pool, beach area, playground, recreation centre, Wi-Fi, propane, organized activities, and many more but we have several examples where this factor is now being either disregarded or overlooked by the Canada Revenue Agency.

Furthermore, families that own small private campgrounds are extremely active in their business performing accounting, marketing, customer service and other daily activities throughout the year unlike any investment business. Additionally, the vast majority of private campgrounds have invested significant infrastructure costs including water treatment systems, sewage and septic systems, electrical infrastructure, amongst others, that have improved their land use to that of a campground which should be considered to be a dividing factor from the perception of some as just collecting “rent” from a “farmer’s field”.

We estimate that 75% of our 2347 private campgrounds employ less than five full-time employees and thus are required the tedious task to prove annually that they are indeed an Active Business to CRA. The current rules and unclear tax obligation has impacted the financial forecasting of hundreds of small family run private campgrounds across Canada who are now withholding hiring additional part-time employees, infrastructure improvements and capital expenditures until the current threat is removed.

If a small family run Private Campground has the SBD denied by CRA when filing their Corporate Tax Return, it results in more than a 300% Tax Increase (15% vs 50%) to the Private Campground which is unsustainable.

Campgrounds are recreational facilities offering the travelling and vacationing public access to campsites on a defined overnight and seasonal basis. However, under the current tax rule, private campgrounds are unfairly included in the same tax category as say an Apartment Building which is inappropriate and makes little sense. An Apartment Building or a Mobile Home Park offers year-round permanent living whereas a Private Campground offers seasonal and temporary recreational stays to travelling consumers.

Additionally, Private Campgrounds do not charge “rent” as described in the definition of a “specified investment business” in the Income Tax Act, but rather overnight campsite and amenity/service fees to temporary and seasonal camping enthusiasts.

CRA’s unclear tax distinction is adversely affecting the Camping and RV industry’s growth prospects and the threat could lead to campground closings and of equal concern, restrict needed improvements for the industry to remain competitive and attract foreign visitors which may be no longer affordable.

This will harm the entire industry ultimately leading to: reduced number of campgrounds available for domestic and international tourism, loss of jobs throughout the industry, substantial loss of tax income to all levels of Government, and diminished economic benefits in small communities across the country. Currently the RV and Camping Industry needs more campgrounds and we cannot possibly afford to lose camp sites that are necessary to facilitate the growth in the RV and Camping Lifestyle.

It is becoming increasingly apparent that a tax classification change that would have family owned private campgrounds qualify for the SBD that provides a clear understanding and policy for the Canada Revenue Agency to follow is necessary to finally remove any and all ambiguity that currently exists.

We hereby ask that the House of Commons Standing Committee of Finance include the following recommendation in your Report to the Minister of Finance ensuring our Private Campgrounds remain financially viable and competitive with similar camping destinations located in the United States.

Recommendation:

That the Federal Government amend the Income Act of Canada or by any other appropriate measure to clearly define, identify and recognize that income earned by small Private Campgrounds is to be considered as “active business income” for the purpose of determining their eligibility for the small business tax deduction.

Link to House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance – http://www.ourcommons.ca/Committees/en/FINA/StudyActivity?studyActivityId=10153612

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Burlington, Ontario – November 26, 2018 – The Canadian Camping and RV Council (“CCRVC”) and Go RVing Canada held joint Board Meetings for the first time November 21st-22nd, 2018 at The River Rock Resort in Richmond, BC. The meetings enabled the respective Boards to learn more about each Canadian RV and Camping Industry stakeholder while sharing ideas for the future that will truly benefit Private Campgrounds across Canada.

Go RVing Canada’s Board is comprised of Chairman Jim Gorrie from GNR Camping World in Winnipeg, President Chris Mahony and Directors representing RVDA of Canada and the Canadian Recreational Vehicle Association. The Canadian Camping and RV Council’s Board consists of Chairman Robert Trask of Chesley Lake Camp, Executive Director Shane Devenish,  Directors from RVDA of Canada and Canadian Recreational Vehicle Association and Directors from the Provincial Campground Owners Associations across Canada.

On November 21st during Go RVing Canada’s Board Meetings, Chris Mahony confirmed that they will continue with the #BringBackWildhood theme for 2019 which has seen several advertising awards for Go RVing Canada. In other exciting news, Go RVing Canada announced that they have developed a seasonal camping microsite on www.gorving.ca which is scheduled to be available by the end of 2018. Stay tuned for this exciting feature!

Go RVing Canada shared their extensive 2019 Media and Digital Platform with the CCRVC’s Board of Directors. Go RVing’s Digital Media will drive conversion to the following KPIs (objectives) on www.gorving.ca : 1) RV Affordability Tool – Find out how affordable RVing really is 2) RV Comparison Tool – Find the right RV for your family 3) Dealer Locator – Find your closest RVDA Dealer and 4) Trip Planner that gives campers a great tool to search for Campgrounds across Canada.

Go RVing Canada’s PR Agency reported that total media PR for 2018 YTD has resulted in 90,437,405 impressions! A truly astounding figure. GoRVing.ca visits are up by 8% over 2017 with over 1.4 Million searches in 2018 including nearly 350,000 clicks to locate campgrounds to make it easier for our consumers to find your business. 

Finally, Chris Mahony went over the benefits of CCRVC Campground’s signing up for the Marketing Tie-In Program which gives Campgrounds an exclusive opportunity to gain valuable photos, videos and other marketing assets.

Private Campground owners can learn more about the Tie-In Program by clicking on this link – Go RVing Canada Campground Tie-In Program

During Canadian Camping and RV Council’s Board Meeting on November 22nd, a number of key initiatives were discussed. CCRVC developed a new Mission Statement – 1) to promote a thriving and vibrant Canadian Camping & RV Industry and its Vision Statement 2) to provide for the betterment and support of the Camping and Recreational Vehicle Industry in Canada through collaboration, advocacy, education and research.

CCRVC’s annual RV & Camping Industry’s Parliament Hill Lobby Day along with the RVDA of Canada is scheduled for May 1st-2nd, 2019. The following key messages will be included during meetings and presentations with Federal Government:

1) To recommend change in Income Tax Act or by other means to ensure that Small Private Campgrounds are classified as an “Active” corporation and thus eligible for the Small Business Tax Deduction

2) To convey our need for more Campgrounds and Campsites to align with the increase in RV ownership statistics.

3) To re-enforce the need for seasonal part-time employees especially in rural and remote areas

The CCRVC Board reviewed Canadian RVing and Camping Week 2018 which was held May 22nd-May 27th this year and we would like to to again thank the twenty-seven (27) RVDA Dealers and sixty-nine (69) Campgrounds who collectively raised over $28,000 in support of Make-A-Wish® Canada.

The highlight of the week occurred on May 26th when a new RV was presented to six (6) year old Atticus and his family on behalf of Make-A-Wish® Canada, Canadian Camping and RV Council, RVDA of Canada, CRVA and Go RVing Canada.

We would also like to thank Parkbridge and all the staff at Goreski’s Landing for their tremendous hospitality during the event.

It was suggested that the Canadian Camping Week format stay during the week after the May long weekend in its current format to serve as the unofficial kick-off of our camping season while offering special discounts and events to camping enthusiasts by our campgrounds. However, there were discussions that merited the fundraising event postponed until later in the summer that would offer additional media exposure to the Canadian RVing and Camping Industry at a time when all campgrounds across the country are open and full. More information will be provided as it is available.

Finally, CCRVC’s Board of Directors formalized a 3-year plan with goals set for the betterment of the Canadian RV and Camping Industry. The areas of focus included-

1) CCRVC remains actively engaged in political, public and policy and is active in its advocacy efforts with all levels of Government in conjunction with our Industry Partners on issues that may affect the RV and Campground Industry in Canada.

2) Continue to join the RVDA of Canada in its RV and Camping Industry Lobby Day held annually in Ottawa.

3) CCRVC’s communication strategy to update private campgrounds on issues and events of common interest.

4) CCRVC provide resources and statistics to stakeholders within the RV and Camping Industry.

5) Conduct on-line surveys with private campground owners to identify areas of opportunity and challenges.

6) CCRVC investigate means to provide online seminars and other avenues to educate Private Campground Owners and their staff to help maximize their efficiency and profits.

The Canadian Camping and RV Council’s next Board Meeting will be held in Ottawa, Ontario on April 30th, 2019 followed by our Parliament Hill reception on May 1st and the Canadian RV & Camping Industry Lobby Day on May 2nd. 

If you have any questions or suggestions on CCRVC, please contact Shane Devenish via email shane.devenish@crva.ca

About CCRVC:

The Canadian Camping and RV Council is an Association comprised of Provincial Campground Owners and Provincial Associations, the Canadian Recreational Vehicle Association (RV Manufacturers & Suppliers) and the Recreational Vehicle Dealers Association of Canada. In an Economic Survey conducted in 2014 by the CCRVC, the Canadian Camping and RV Industry contributed $4.7-billion to the economy with 5,768,650 Canadian adults, or 22% of the total adult population enjoying the RV and Camping experience. The Canadian RV and Camping Industry generated more than $1-billion in total taxes at the Provincial and Federal level while employing 60,420 full-time workers and generating $2.9 billion in total salary and wages www.ccrvc.ca

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Release – April 26th, 2018

The Recreation Vehicle Dealers’ Association of Canada (RVDA) and Canadian Campground and RV Council (CCRVC) hosted a joint advocacy push on Parliament Hill from April 25-26th 2018.

On April 25th members of both associations gathered for a reception Commonwealth Room that was attended by a record 50 MPs and Senators from all parties, in addition to a number of parliamentary staff. The reception gave RVDA and CCRVC representatives an opportunity to informally discuss issues related to the RV and camping industries in Canada, while enjoying some Ottawa hospitality and getting a first hand sense of a busy evening of parliamentary proceedings.

The group began its meetings on Parliament Hill on April 26th with a breakfast hosted by Alaina Lockhart, Parliamentary Secretary for Small Business and Tourism. Lockhart, who has a CCRVC member in her riding, spoke about the actions that the government has taken to encourage tourism and support small businesses. This conversation served as an excellent start to a full day of meetings.
The RV and camping industry was featured prominently in the House of Commons during the day. During question period, Banff-Airdrie MP Blake Richards asked the Minister of National Revenue about the need to ensure that campgrounds have access to small business tax rate, highlighting the actions of RVDA and CCRVC delegates in Ottawa.

RVDA and CCRVC also participated in a press conference in the Charles Lynch Room, highlighting messaging on the need for tax fairness as well as for increased investment in federal campgrounds. The news release led to media stories in British Columbia and Prince Edward Island.

In total 48 meetings were held with MPs, Senators and Officials. Representatives were able to secure a number of commitments from legislators that will help to encourage investments and regulatory changes to assist Canada’s RV industry over the years to come.
CCRVC Key Messages Presented:

The Canadian Camping and RV Council (CCRVC) is a national, volunteer federation of the Provincial Private Campground Owner Associations and their members. CCRVC was incorporated in 2013 by the RVDA of Canada and the Canadian Recreational Vehicle Association with a mandate to provide for the betterment and to support the Canadian RVing and Camping Industry in Canada. ell as for increased investment in federal campgrounds. The news release led to media stories in British Columbia and Prince Edward Island.

Canada’s RV and Camping Industry includes 2347 Private Campgrounds, 450 RVDA Dealers and CRVA Manufacturers who collectively employ 60,000 Canadians and contribute over $14.7 billion to Canada’s GDP.  In 2016, over 5.8 million Canadians or 22% of the adult population engaged in camping activities coast-to-coast.
Our Private Campgrounds offer an opportunity for middle-class families to spend time together, create life-long memories and discover Canada’s natural landscape. Camping is an affordable activity for the Middle Class and creates a strong sense of community that is unique to this form of travel accommodation across Canada.

Current issues and policies currently impacting Private Campgrounds

CCRVC strongly advocates that the Government of Canada recognize the income earned by campgrounds as “active business income” for the purpose of determining eligibility for the small business deduction. Private Campgrounds throughout Canada have been asking the Federal Government, specifically the Minister of Finance, to endorse changes in the current Income Tax Act that clearly distinguishes family run campgrounds with less than 5 full time employees as an “active business” and thus eligible for the small business tax deduction.

The potential classification of a Campground being assessed as a “Specified Investment Business” is ambiguous and up to determination by the Canada Revenue Agency remains the #1 threat to not only Private Campgrounds but to all RV and Camping Industry Stakeholders.
During a compliance test conducted in 2015 by the Canada Revenue Agency, 3000 Small Businesses were audited by the CRA. Out of the 3000, 70 were Private Campgrounds and of the number 10 were denied the SBD and re-assessed at a 300% tax rate increase, some retroactively 2-3 years. This threat is preventing campgrounds from increasing investment and improvements in their business and stifled additional seasonal hiring due to monetary concerns.

We conducted a survey of our 2347 Private Campgrounds in March of 2018 and the issue is still their # 1 concern. Given this, we hereby ask for your support with the Minister of Finance to enact a clear change in the classification of small private campgrounds.

CCRVC supports the need for increased investment in Canada’s tourism marketing strategies by Destination Canada to support the RV and Campground Industry.

CCRVC was pleased with increased expenditures to Destination Canada from the Federal Government in the past (2) Federal Budgets to encourage Canada as a travel destination. We believe that Private Campgrounds have benefited along with our Hotels in the growth of Canada’s Tourism sector.

We encourage Destination Canada’s advertising and messaging to include more references towards RV and Camping opportunities in their programs.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Why should you belong to an association? For most people considering purchasing a membership, what this question really means is, what will I get out of belonging to an association? Will the money be worth it? What an association gives to its members is carefully coordinated and offered so that members receive the most benefit. These benefits span from saving money to upholding an important piece of legislation. Be fully informed before non-member competitors.

We are on information overload these days, and information can make it to us in a variety of ways from a variety of sources. An association has curated, dependable content that would be of highest relevance for you. You come to know about legal battles or upcoming changes before your non-member competitors, which enables you to act (if needed) and adapt more quickly. You’re “in the know.”

 

Affect change at the highest levels.

There is always change. Sometimes for the better. Sometimes for the worse. That change doesn’t just happen. Your association is your advocate in governmental affairs to help preserve or defend legislation that works or doesn’t work to your benefit. Associations work with legislatures all the time. By belonging to an association, you help turn up the volume – and you have the opportunity to voice opinions to people who will listen and bring those concerns to the people who make the policies and laws. If you feel so inclined, you can get even more involved and be a “boot on the ground.”

 

Save money.

Many associations have relationships with suppliers, which in turn offer discounts simply because you are a member of that partner association. These suppliers could be for goods, such as office supplies or grocery items; or services, such as legal advice. Also, members get discounts on advertising (specialized lower rates) for any large-scale communication by the association, such as magazines and email newsletters. These discounts usually justify the cost of membership.

 

Boost your reputation.

Membership means something, and frankly, it impresses people when they realize you’re a member of an organization – especially if the organization has a standout reputation. You become affiliated with that reputation and good will. In turn, you make the association brand into something special, too, by how you act and conduct business.

 

Access membership directories.

Only members are included in association directories, which could come in the form of a printed publication, a digital publication, or both. Sometimes, associations are affiliated with other larger, similar associations, which will publish member directory information at their level, too, which is double the exposure for your business. Printed publications and digital publications spread your brand and gets it in front of consumers who are most likely to be interested and take action.

Access to free marketing material.

Many associations provide marketing materials such as flyers, posters, and scripts that you can download and use in your own business. The content is focused on your industry or a special event, and includes the association logo, showing a member’s affiliation. This material is created to help members save time and resources while also helping them promote the benefits of their business or industry, or to tout a special event.

At the very heart of membership though, is the willingness and desire to connect with others in your industry and affect the future of your industry in a way you can’t do on your own. What you get out of an association depends on what you put in to the association – and that includes taking advantage of the suite of benefits the association provides. Then, joining will definitely be “worth it.”

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

New Economic Impact of the Canadian Recreation Vehicle Industry

Shows Growth in all Sectors

 Richmond, BC. May 17, 2018 – The Recreation Vehicle Dealers Association (RVDA) of Canada and the Canadian Recreational Vehicle Association (CRVA) are releasing their updated study, showcasing the economic impact of the Canadian recreation vehicle (RV) industry.

The study, conducted by The Portage Group Inc and urbanMetrrics inc, showcased that in 2017, the RV sector generated an estimated 66,000 jobs and delivered $4.7 billion in added value to the Canadian economy from an initial expenditure of $6.1 billion.

“The purpose of the 2018 Economic Impact of the Canadian RV Industry is to update the estimate of the level of economic activity supported by the RV industry in Canada. The findings show that not only does RVing continue to be an exceptional way to travel, but it also has a considerable impact on the Canadian economy,” said Jean-François Lussier, RVDA of Canada Chairman of the Board. “Our updated study also reveals that approximately 2.1 million (or 15% of) Canadian households own an RV which is up from years prior. “

“The economic activity generated by the RV industry is considerable and multi‐faceted. It includes manufacturing, sales and service of RVs as well as, expenditures to use, store, maintain and travel in RVs” stated CRVA Chairman, Jeff McDermott. “The study reveals that expenditures associated with RV ownership and use account for 78% of the total value added to the Canadian economy.”

In order to determine the level of economic activity supported by the RV industry in Canada, the impacts of RVs were broken down through four distinct domains. Key findings are outlined below:

RV Manufacturing:

The total value of recreation vehicles manufactured in Canada was approximately $470 million in 2017. Of this total production value, some $376 million—or 80%—was exported to markets outside of Canada, with the balance representing domestic consumption of locally-made RV products.

As detailed below, the value of recreation vehicles manufactured in Canada in 2017—including direct, indirect and induced impacts—generates significant value for the Canadian economy.

  • ± $355.3 million in value added to the Canadian economy;
  • ± 5,400 full-time years of employment;
  • ± $229.3 million in labour income across Canada; and,
  • ± $88.7 million in tax revenue to municipal, provincial and national governments, in the form of personal tax, corporate tax, and other taxes.

 RV Retail Sales and Service:

The total value of recreation vehicles sold and serviced in Canada in 2017 was approximately $3.4 billion. In calculating the economic impact of RV retail activities, however, it is important to note that only the gross retail and wholesale markup components represent the unique contributions of retail sales and service activities.

As detailed below, the value of recreation vehicles sold in Canada in 2017 generated:

  • ± $681.4 million in value added to the Canadian economy;
  • ± 10,300 full-time years of employment;
  • ± $432.0 million in labour income across Canada; and,
  • ± $149.3 million in tax revenue to municipal, provincial and national governments, in the form of personal tax, corporate tax, and other taxes.

Non‐Travel Related RV Expenditures:

Overall, total non-travel related recreation vehicle expenditures for 2017 are estimated at some $1.7 billion. This substantial spending on items such as storage, insurance, as well as other equipment and accessories (excluding repairs) yields a significant economic impact across Canada.

  • ± $1.5 billion in value added to the Canadian economy;
  • ± 17,900 full-time years of employment.
  • ± $830.9 million in labour income across Canada; and,
  • ± $571.9 million in tax revenue to municipal, provincial and national governments, in the form of personal tax, corporate tax, and other taxes.

Tourism Related RV Expenditures:

RV owners spent a total of approximately $3.3 billion on various goods and services while travelling throughout Canada in 2017. This spending generates a significant benefit to local municipalities, the provincial/territorial economies, as well as spread more broadly across Canada at the federal level.

  • ± $2.1 billion in value added to the Canadian economy;
  • ± 32,300 full-time years of employment;
  • ± $2.7 billion in labour income across Canada; and,
  • ± $1.1 billion in tax revenue to municipal, provincial and national governments, in the form of personal tax, corporate tax, and other taxes.

In sum, the RV sector stimulates economic activity and creates jobs for Canadians across the country. Across all four subsectors, total RV industry expenditures for 2017 have been estimated at approximately $6.1 billion. Moreover, the Canadian RV industry was a significant driver of tax revenues, with the industry contributing $1.9 billion in tax revenue to municipal, provincial and national governments, in the form of personal tax, corporate tax, and other taxes.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

April 26, 2018

Representatives from the Recreation Vehicle Dealers Association (RVDA) of Canada and the Canadian Camping and RV Council (CCRVC) are on Parliament Hill today (April 26) to discuss the need for implementation of a fair tax regime for campgrounds across Canada and the need for increased investments in tourism policies and infrastructure upgrades.

“RVing and camping in Canada has a considerable economic impact. The manufacturing, purchasing, servicing and use of recreation vehicles contributes billions to the Canadian economy each year,” said Jean-Francois Lussier, RVDA of Canada chairman, in a press release. “In fact, in 2011, the total economic activity associated with the Canadian recreation vehicle industry reached $14.5 billion. There are over 4,231 campgrounds across Canada, each offering a unique experience for Canadians and international visitors.”

But the continued growth success of the RV and camping industry is not assured. The promotion of the RV sector and proper infrastructure in Canada’s existing parks are crucial to the growth of the RVing and camping industries, as well as a prosperous Canadian tourism sector. The RVing industry contributes billions to the national economy, but campgrounds across Canada require infrastructural improvements in order to accommodate new camping and RV technologies.

“Our industry needs to be sure that we will be governed by a fair tax regime, including being eligible for the small business tax deduction,” said Robert Trask, chairman of the CCRVC. “Without clarification from the government, our members face retroactive tax increases of as much as 300%. Having campgrounds pay a higher tax rate than billion-dollar corporations is dumbfounding.”

During a compliance test conducted in 2015 by the Canada Revenue Agency, 3,000 small businesses were audited by the CRA. Of the campgrounds that were audited, one in seven were classified as a “specified investment business” and denied the small business deduction. The reclassification means as many as three years of substantial retroactive tax increases. Without clarifying the uncertainty, campgrounds are unable to increase investment and improvements in their business and cannot hire additional seasonal hiring due to financial concerns.

“A fair tax regime and investment in the necessary infrastructural updates for small businesses would benefit the family-owned campgrounds and RV dealerships that enable Canadians and visitors alike to experience the all that Canada has to offer,” concluded Lussier. “Canadians deserve the opportunity to enjoy our country’s natural beauty and heritage. The RV and camping industry help make that possible.”

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview