Loading...

Follow CBD A Better You on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid
Leafy Drops
Review


Their Story...
Inspired by the wonderful benefits, Leafy Drops was born. We are a veteran owned company with a mission to help people. After leaving the service and being diagnosed with major anxiety and depression life was challenging with a constant battle between the mind. With little to no success after doing counseling its easy to feel hopeless again. On the search for holistic healing, CBD was introduced. Finally seeing success and wondering if others are in the same search, Leafy Drops story began. We started in 2018, just like the military, we make it our mission to provide high-quality CBD that can help you get the relief you’ve been searching for.


25% OFF CODE:
BETTERYOU25

I got a bottle of the 500MG.

Good stuff in every bottle!

I liked it!!!

Two ingredients: MCT oil and CBD.
Leafy Drops Wellness tincture unlocks an effective way to ingest CBD into your system by infusing MCT (Medium Chain Triglycerides). MCT oil provides an instant clean source of fuel for your body that powers up your performance. 

Clean pure taste, with NO after taste!

THC FREE,
made from Isolate,
3rd party lab tested with results provided on web site,
all natural,
vegan,
gluten-free.

Good stuff in every bottle!

Available CBD Tinctures:
250MG, 500MG, 750MG & 1200MG

and
for your pets
100MG


Topicals available:
500MG & 750MG


Go here to learn more:

25% OFF CODE:
BETTERYOU25








Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

NEWS FEBRUARY 13, 2019

Report: Lab tests of CBD oil reveals
'startling results', 
including pesticides and lead
A recent investigation found that some products contained contaminants that exceeded FDA standards
Image source: WNBC-TV video screenshot





Updated Feb. 14 at 2:37 p.m. ET: This story has been updated to include a statement from CBDistellery.
Cannabidiol oil, more commonly known as CBD, has become one of the hottest trends with claims that it can cure a host of ailments. But a recent investigation by WNBC-TV uncovered what it described as "startling" results after it had a variety of CBD products tested at Evio Labs in Miami.
"It's concerning and it's alarming," Chris Martinez, owner of Evio Labs, told WNBC after he reviewed the lab's results.
The report found that some of the products contained less CBD than stated on the package while others had none at all. Some of the brands contained pesticides and another was flagged by the lab for its high lead content.
CBD is a non-intoxicating chemical compound that is extracted from marijuana and hemp plants. Over-the-counter CBD products are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration. However, prescription CBD products are strictly regulated by the FDA. CBD is used as a treatment for everything from anxiety to chronic pain.
What are the details?
The investigative team bought three brands of CBD oil and four brands of gummies from online and brick and mortar retailers. Five samples of each brand were purchased. The labels were removed and the products were sent off to be analyzed.
Among the oils tested was Lazarus Naturals, which was purchased by an independent seller through Groupon. Its lead content exceeded the FDA standards for safety.
"It had four times the amount of lead than is approved. If a child gets their hands on these products, it could be life-threatening," Martinez told WNBC.
Lazarus Naturals said it wasn't able to verify that the sample was one of its products because they've had problems with counterfeits being sold by unapproved sellers.
A sample from CBDistillery contained a pesticide that exceeded the state of California's acceptable standards.
The company claimed that the product in question had been tested by "an accredited third-party lab" and it had passed its standards.
Every sample of Jolly Green CBD oil that was tested had less than half of the 500 mg. of CBD the product claimed to contain.
"It's not uncommon to see these inconsistencies across the board," Martinez said.
WNBC tested gummies from Green Roads, Hemp Bombs, Gold Line and a surgery recovery site called Dani's Doll House.
Green Roads was the only gummy brand that contained the amount of CBD advertised.
Two of the gummy brands had half the amount of CBD claimed and one brand contained none at all.

What else?
Martinez warned that many consumers are being misled by claims in some over-the-counter CBD brands.
"Until there is some type of regulation that levels off the playing field, patients are being duped into buying products that aren't really going to benefit them," he told WNBC.
Some companies have started putting QR barcodes on their packaging that allows consumers to scan and review the product's test results.

Statement from CBDistillery
CBDistillery told TheBlaze that the company is committed to providing safe, high-quality products consumers.
"We want to assure you that CBDistillery is committed to providing safe, high-quality hemp-derived CBD products to consumers and has robust testing and quality control procedures in place to ensure our products meet and comply with all applicable legal and state regulatory standards and requirements," company wrote in a statement to TheBlaze.
"Our testing and quality control, which includes testing by accredited and independent third-party labs, is designed to ensure our products meet all of the safety and quality standards set forth by the Colorado Department of Agriculture. This testing includes analyzing for the presence of harmful substances, including pesticides, to guarantee our products comply with the Colorado Department of Agriculture and state regulations and are only released once they successfully pass testing.
"Through this testing, the one product in question was part of a batch of products that passed testing conducted by an accredited third-party lab in compliance with these standards and was released based on those results. It is our mission to continue providing safe and high-quality products to consumers and abide by all required standards and regulations set forth by the Colorado Department of Agriculture," CBDistillery wrote.

Link to article...
https://www.theblaze.com/news/cbd-oil-tests-pesticides-lead?fbclid=IwAR3nkft2ZDIJY_LkNv3rTyX4nydthT12ZGohLlPh4-5JdAAAsoFglONRi7U&utm_campaign=theblaze&utm_content=buffer5d3f1&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
THE BENEFITS OF WHOLE-PLANT,HEMP DERIVED CBD
No matter what carrier oil you choose, 
you can count on Hemplucid products 
to deliver what is known as the 
“Entourage Effect.”

THE ENTOURAGE EFFECT
The Entourage Effect is the synergistic benefit of whole-plant, hemp derived CBD that contains a range of naturally occurring cannabinoids and terpenes to maximize the potency, effectiveness, and therapeutic scope of CBD.
Hemplucid’s lab test results (click on the “Certifications” tab above to see the different lab sheets for each strength of this product), display the wide variety of cannabinoids that are included in our tinctures: 
CBDV, CBG, CBC, CBN, CBDV, and more.

https://tinyurl.com/hemplucid
You’ll find that broad-spectrum or isolate CBD products are missing essential terpenes and additional cannabinoids. This means they cannot produce the full entourage effect, and lack the full range of benefits Whole-Plant CBD can provide to your body.




Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 


Cannabidiol is being touted as a magical elixir, a cure-all now available in bath bombs, dog treats and even pharmaceuticals. But maybe it’s just a fix for our anxious times.  By Alex Williams    Oct. 27, 2018


Photo Illustration by Eric Helgas for The New York Times


By Alex Williams
      Oct. 27, 2018

It’s hard to say the precise moment when CBD, the voguish cannabis derivative, went from being a fidget spinner alternative for stoners to a mainstream panacea.

Maybe it was in January, when Mandy Moore, hours before the Golden Globes, told Coveteur that she was experimenting with CBD oil to relieve the pain from wearing high heels. “It could be a really exciting evening,” she said. “I could be floating this year.”

Maybe it was in July, when Willie Nelson introduced a line of CBD-infused coffee beans called Willie’s Remedy. “It’s two of my favorites, together in the perfect combination,” he said in a statement.

Or maybe it was earlier this month, when Dr. Sanjay Gupta gave a qualified endorsement of CBD on “The Dr. Oz Show.”“I think there is a legitimate medicine here,” he said. “We’re talking about something that could really help people.”

Here’s how CBD became one of the buzziest skin care ingredients of the year.
So the question now becomes: Is this the dawning of a new miracle elixir, or does all the hype mean we have already reached Peak CBD?

Either way, it would be hard to script a more of-the-moment salve for a nation on edge. With its proponents claiming that CBD treats ailments as diverse as inflammation, pain, acne, anxiety, insomnia, depression, post-traumatic stress and even cancer, it’s easy to wonder if this all natural, non-psychotropic and widely available cousin of marijuana represents a cure for the 21st century itself.
The ice caps are melting, the Dow teeters, and a divided country seems headed for divorce court. Is it any wonder, then, that everyone seems to be reaching for the tincture?

“Right now, CBD is the chemical equivalent to Bitcoin in 2016,” said Jason DeLand, a New York advertising executive and a board member of Dosist, a cannabis company in Santa Monica, Calif., that makes disposable vape pens with CBD. “It’s hot, everywhere and yet almost nobody understands it.”

Cannabis for Non-Stoners
With CBD popping up in nearly everything — bath bombs, ice cream, dog treats — it is hard to overstate the speed at which CBD has moved from the Burning Man margins to the cultural center.

A year ago, it was easy to be blissfully unaware of CBD. Now, to measure the hype, it’s as if everyone suddenly discovered yoga. Or penicillin. Or maybe oxygen.

Even so, you ask, what is CBD? Plenty of people still have no idea. CBD is short for cannabidiol, an abundant chemical in the cannabis plant. Unlike its more famous cannabinoid cousin, THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), CBD does not make you stoned.

Which is not to say that you feel utterly normal when you take it.

Users speak of a “body” high, as opposed to a mind-altering one. “Physically, it’s like taking a warm bath, melting the tension away,” said Gabe Kennedy, 27, a founder of Plant People, a start-up in New York that sells CBD capsules and oils. “It is balancing; a leveling, smoothing sensation in the body mostly, and an evenness of attention in the mind.”

Comparing it to the feeling after an intense meditation or yoga session, Mr. Kennedy added that the CBD glow has “synergistic downstream effects” in terms of social connections. “Around others, I find myself more present and attentive, more creative and open.”

Moreover, you are unlikely to find yourself microwaving frozen burritos at midnight after taking CBD, unlike with pot.
Such quasi-religious talk is common among CBD’s disciples.
“I’m a 30 y.o. male who has not experienced a single anxiety free day in my adult life,” wrote one user on a CBD forum on Reddit earlier this month. “About 3 weeks ago I started taking CBD-oil 10 percent and I can’t even describe how amazing I feel. For the first time in 15+ years I feel happy and look forward to living a long life.”

Such testimonials make CBD seem like a perfect cure for our times. Every cultural era, after all, has its defining psychological malady. This also means that every era has its signature drug.

The jittery postwar era, with its backyard bomb shelters and suburban fears about keeping up with the Joneses, gave rise to a boom in sedatives, as seen in the era’s pop songs (“Mother’s Little Helper,” by the Rolling Stones) and best sellers (“Valley of the Dolls,” by Jacqueline Susann).

The recessionary 1990s gave rise to Generation X angst, Kurt Cobain dirges and a cultural obsession with newfangled antidepressants (see Elizabeth Wurtzel’s “Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America”).

Moon Mother Hemp Co. 

The defining sociological condition today, especially among millennials, is arguably anxiety: anxiety about our political dysfunction, anxiety about terrorism, anxiety about climate change, anxiety about student loan debt, even anxiety about artificial intelligence taking away all the good jobs.

The anxiety feels even more acute since the wired generation feels continuously bombarded by new reasons to freak out, thanks to their smart devices.
“You are inundated with terrible news, and you have no choice to opt in or out,” said Verena von Pfetten, 35, the former digital director for Lucky magazine who is a founder of Gossamer, a high-style magazine targeted to cannabis-loving tastemakers. “You open your computer, check your phone, there are news alerts.”
What a convenient time for Mother Nature to bestow a perma-chillax cure that seems to tie together so many cultural threads at once: our obsession with self-care and wellness, the mainstreaming of alternative therapies and the relentless march of legalized marijuana.

“That seems like a gift in these times,” Ms. von Pfetten said.

Photo Illustration by Eric Helgas for The New York Times

‘The New Avocado Toast’
The tsunami of CBD-infused products has hit so suddenly, and with such force, that marketers have strained to find a fitting analogy. Chris Burggraeve, a former Coca-Cola and Ab InBev executive, called it the “new avocado toast,” in an interview with Business Insider.

Then again, avocado toast seems so five years ago.
Fad chasers looking for the next-next big thing may want to check out the CBD-infused ricotta-and-honey toast at Chillhouse, the Instagram-ready coffee shop, nail salon and massage studio on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. And then retreat to Inscape NYC, a meditation and relaxation studio in Chelsea, to unwind with a stress-busting CBD Saturday session.

It would be false to suggest CBD is nothing more than an obsession for reiki-adjacent bicoastal millennials. According to the AARP website, CBD has become a popular treatment for pain and arthritis among baby boomers, some of whom may have been out of the cannabis game since they rolled their last doobie at a Foghat concert in 1975.

Even so, CBD seems to have found its natural target audience among the vegan-curious creative professionals who cluster in trendy hotels like the James New York-Nomad hotel, which offers a room-service CBD tasting menu featuring CBD-infused meatballs and sriracha-mayo House Tots. Or the Standard hotel outposts in Miami and New York, which sell $50 blood orange-flavored gumdrops by the upscale CBD brand Lord Jones in its minibars.

 
Blood orange and CBD-infused gumdrops by an upscale brand called Lord Jones, which is sold at trendy hotels.
Blood orange and CBD-infused gumdrops by an upscale brand called Lord Jones, which is sold at trendy hotels.

Such sumptuously packaged, premium-priced CBD products appeal to trend-conscious consumers in part because they promise a degree of indulgence — without the indulgence.

Despite its cannabis origins, CBD is not marketed as a recreational drug, but almost as its opposite: as a corrective to the ill effects of alcohol and even marijuana itself, which makes it catnip for hard-charging professionals who need to be fresh for a 7 a.m. breakfast meeting.


A detox drink under development called Sober Up, for example, will contain CBD and is supposed to support liver health and help prevent hangovers.
Fewer hangovers is also the sales pitch at Adriaen Block, a bar in the Astoria neighborhood of Queens that whips up CBD-infused negronis and old-fashioned cocktails. “You can maintain a conversation and know what you are saying,” said Zsolt Csonka, who owns the bar and mixes drinks there. “After two or three drinks, you’ll be able to go to the gym the next day.

When added to dishes like sesame shrimp toast at PopCultivate, a series of cannabis-centric pop-up dinners in Los Angeles, CBD (which is flavorless) can function as a social lubricant, just like a wine pairing, but without, according to proponents, the hangover.

“You become more engaged with your neighbors, talk more freely, and meet more people you dine with,” said Chris Yang, the molecular biologist turned chef behind the series.

But nowhere does the fervor for CBD seem greater than in health and beauty, where cannabidiol is often packaged with buzzy terms like “single origin,” “small batch” and “plant based.”


Among beauty products alone, CBD has already achieved cliché status, popping up in blemish creamssleeping masksshampoos, hair conditioners, eye serums, anti-acne lotions, mascaras, massage oils, soaps, lip balms, bath bombs, anti-wrinkle serums, muscle rubs and a Sephora aisle’s worth of moisturizers, face lotions and body creams. Even the bedroom is not safe from the CBD invasion, to judge by the spate of CBD sexual lubricants on shelves.

I replaced my entire beauty routine with only CBD products,” read a recent headline in Glamour magazine.

This earthy, artisanal aura plays well with devotees of, say, Goop, who are already conditioned, after years of aromatherapy, cryotherapy and homeopathy, to accept a natural wellness mantra over anything on offer by Big Pharma and the medical industrial complex.

As an alternative health regimen, CBD holds particular appeal to women, said Gretchen Lidicker, the health editor of Mindbodygreen, a wellness website based in New York, and the author of “CBD Oil Everyday Secrets.” Noting the preponderance of female-run CBD businesses, Ms. Lidicker, 26, said that it is “no surprise that women are leading the CBD movement.”
“Women have long felt ignored and dehumanized by the medical and health care industries,” she said. “They experience longer wait times for treatment. Their pain and suffering are more likely to be dismissed as anxiety or hysteria. And the male body has typically been the model for medical research.”

Such concerns seem to have helped fuel the CBD movement. In an era marked by a loss of faith traditional institutions (governments, banks, hospitals), CBD has flourished, perhaps because it seems new, mysterious and untainted by the mainstream.

It may or may not be a coincidence that one of the best-known CBD retailers in New York, the Alchemist’s Kitchenin the East Village, serves up cannabidiol tinctures and gel caps, alongside workshops on astrocartography, lucid dreaming and full-moon ancestral healing.




And devotees swear it works. “It really helps with pain, inflammation and the general anxiety that grips me 24 hour a day,” said Anna Duckworth, 34, the editor of Miss Grass, a website based in Venice, Calif., that W magazine called the “Goop of cannabis.”
“There are millions and millions of people who are just fed up and don’t want to take these drugs that make them feel bad,” she said, “and want to go a more nontoxic, natural route.”


Snake Oil or Wonder Drug?
There’s one problem with that approach. When people turn to CBD-infused coconut lattes to cure acne and erectile dysfunction, it is not easy to separate hype from science.

Skeptics who assume CBD is just 21st-century snake oil, however, may be surprised to learn that the substance is being studied as a potential treatment for maladies as diverse as schizophrenia, insomnia and cancer.

“CBD is the most promising drug that has come out for neuropsychiatric diseases in the last 50 years,” said Dr. Esther Blessing, an assistant professor at New York University School of Medicine, who is coordinating a study of CBD as a treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder and alcohol use disorder. “The reason it is so promising is that it has a unique combination of safety and effectiveness across of very broad range of conditions.”

The National Institutes of Health database lists about 150 of studies involving CBD as a treatment for conditions as varied as infantile spasms and Parkinson’s disease.

And the research has led to medical treatments. In June, the Food and Drug Administration approved a cannabidiol-based drug called Epidiolex as a treatment for severe forms of epilepsy, representing the first government-sanctioned medical use for CBD.

Preliminary research also indicates that CBD may be effective as an antipsychotic in reducing the symptoms of schizophrenia, with fewer side effects compared with current antipsychotic drugs, Dr. Blessing said.

CBD has also shown promise to reduce cravings among people addicted to opioids, according to a study published in Neurotherapeutics in 2015. It may fight cancer, too. The authors of a review published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology in 2012 wrote: “evidence is emerging to suggest that CBD is a potent inhibitor of both cancer growth and spread.”
That’s not to say that a CBD-laced gummy or two should be considered medicine.

“Most of the products where people are putting CBD in coffee or food, there’s no solid evidence that they contain enough CBD to do anything,” Dr. Blessing said. “A CBD coffee may only have five milligrams in it. In order to treat anxiety, we know you need around 300 milligrams.”


Don’t go chugging a shot of CBD oil just yet, though. Dr. Blessing said that much of the research is in its infancy, and the purity and dosage of some CBD consumer products may not reliable. And, she noted, CBD can have negative interactions with many medications, so potential users should talk to their doctors before taking it.”

There are legal hazards as well. As with all cannabis products, the federal government categorizes CBD products other than Epidiolex as a Schedule 1 drug, like heroin, according to the Drug Enforcement Administration. And cannabis remains illegal under federal law, even in states that have legalized marijuana for medical or recreational use.

Even so, the D.E.A.’s mission is to go after large-scale drug traffickers, not individual users, said Barbara Carreno, an agency spokeswoman. “We’re not swatting joints out of hands in Hilo, Hawaii, and we’re not going to focus on somebody who is buying lotion or ice cream that has CBD in it.”

Although there have been scattered raids of CBD retailers around the country, several states, including Alabama, Texas, Florida and Oklahoma, have passed laws approving specific CBD products to treat specific ailments. And CBD shops have cropped up nationwide, in Los Angeles, Oklahoma City and Austin, Tex., to name just a few cities.

In New York City, for example, CBD tinctures and other products can be bought at specialty shops, health food stores, yoga studios, flea markets, boutiques and even some corner delis. (The availability of CBD is perhaps not surprising, given Mayor Bill de Blasio’s continued efforts to reduce the penalties for low-level marijuana violations.)

Aside from a federal crackdown, the only thing that may eventually kill CBD’s momentum is hype itself, said Mr. DeLand of Dosist.


The frothy..
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
What we all have known all along, but now the DEA is waking up to it



The Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) is placing Epidiolex in Schedule V, the least restrictive schedule of the Controlled Substances Act.1

The drug is an oral solution containing cannabidiol (CBD), a chemical constituent of the cannabis plant, and it is expected to arrive on the market within 6 weeks.2

Previously classified as Schedule I,3 Epidiolex was approved in June to treat seizures associated with 2 rare and severe forms of epilepsy—Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS)—in patients aged 2 years and older.1-2 Manufactured by GW Pharmaceuticals and its US subsidiary Greenwich Biosciences, Epidiolex was the first product containing a purified drug substance derived from marijuana that the FDA approved for medical use.

CBD does not cause intoxication or the euphoria that comes from tetrahydrocannabinol, the primary psychoactive component of marijuana.3

Thursday’s announcement by the DEA marked the “final step” of the regulatory process for Epidiolex.

The placement of Epidiolex in Schedule V allows the company to move forward with making the product available to the market, according to Justin Gover, chief executive officer of GW Pharmaceuticals.2

“We are pleased that the DEA has placed Epidiolex in the lowest-restriction schedule, because it will help ensure that patients with LGS and Dravet syndrome, 2 of the most debilitating forms of epilepsy, can access this important new treatment option through their physicians,” he said in a statement.2 “We know there is excitement for a standardized version of cannabidiol that has undergone the rigor of controlled clinical trials and been approved by the FDA.”

Prior to receiving FDA approval, the Epidiolex clinical development program included 3 randomized, controlled Phase 3 clinical trials and an open-label extension study. The Phase 3 studies showed that Epidiolex added to other antiepileptic therapies, significantly reducing the frequency of seizures in patients with Dravet syndrome and LGS.4 

“Controlled clinical trials testing the safety and efficacy of a drug, along with careful review through the FDA’s drug approval process, is the most appropriate way to bring marijuana-derived treatments to patients,” FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said in a statement.3“Because of the adequate and well-controlled clinical studies that supported this approval, prescribers can have confidence in the drug’s uniform strength and consistent delivery that support appropriate dosing needed for treating patients with these complex and serious epilepsy syndromes."

The most common adverse reactions that occurred in patients treated with Epidiolex were somnolence, decreased appetite, diarrhea, transaminase elevations, fatigue, malaise, asthenia, rash, insomnia, sleep disorder and poor-quality sleep, and infections, according to GW Pharmaceuticals.4  

In a statement, Acting DEA Administrator Uttam Dhillion said that the agency is committed to working with federal partners in seeking ways to make the pharmaceutical research process more effective and efficient.

“DEA will continue to support sound and scientific research that promotes legitimate therapeutic uses for FDA-approved constituent components of cannabis, consistent with federal law,” he said.1

CBD and marijuana derived from marijuana remain illegal, with the exception of limited circumstances in which it has been determined to have a medically approved benefit. In those cases, including Epidiolex, the drug will be made appropriately available to the public for medical use, according to the DEA.1

Medicines in Schedule V have a low potential for abuse and a proven medical use. The DEA’s decision to move Epidiolex to Schedule V was based on clinical and non-clinical that evaluated the medicine’s potential for abuse and applies only to CBD products approved by the FDA. Other, non-FDA-approved CBD preparations remain in Schedule I.2 


References
  1. FDA-approved drug Epidiolex placed in Schedule V of Controlled Substances Act [news release]. Washington, DC; September 27, 2018: DOJ Office of Public Affairs. justice.gov/opa/pr/fda-approved-drug-epidiolex-placed-schedule-v-controlled-substances-act. Accessed October 1, 2018.  
  2. GW Pharmaceuticals plc and its U.S. subsidiary Greenwich Biosciences announce the DEA has rescheduled EPIDIOLEX® (cannabidiol) oral solution to Schedule V [news release]. London, UK, and Carlsbad, CA; September 27, 2018: GW Pharmaceuticals. ir.gwpharm.com/news-releases/news-release-details/gw-pharmaceuticals-plc-and-its-us-subsidiary-greenwich-0. Accessed October 1, 2018.
  3. FDA approves first drug comprised of an active ingredient derived from marijuana to treat rare, severe forms of epilepsy [news release]. Silver Spring, MD; June 25, 2018: FDA website. pharmacytimes.com/link/222. Accessed October 1, 2018.
  4. Biosciences announce FDA approval of EPIDIOLEX® (cannabidiol) oral solution – the first plant-derived cannabinoid prescription medicine [news release]. London, UK, and Carlsbad, CA; June 25, 2018: GW Pharmaceuticals. ir.gwpharm.com/news-releases/news-release-details/gw-pharmaceuticals-plc-and-its-us-subsidiary-greenwich. Accessed October 1, 2018.    
OCTOBER 01, 2018
Kristen Coppock, MA, Editor
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
You want 
"The Best"
CBD Oil you can get!




Many different strengths
to choose from to
your needs.

Tintures, capsules, softgels, gummies, 
topical, pet, vape
and yes even suppositories!

Full Spectrum and THC Free.

Click here:




Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
You want "The Best"?

Of corse you do!


Well here you go!

Weighing in at 500mg of CBD!

Muscle soreness, aches and pains?

Click here:











Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
This is the most comprehensive list of
on the internet.


We're #25!

Thank you for the nod!!!



Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Experts are worried that patients aren't getting what they think they are.

Jason Langley/Getty Images
With 29 states and the District of Columbia having now legalized medical cannabis, many consumers are trying out various types of extracts containing cannabidiol (CBD)—a relatively safe, non-addictive component of cannabis that does not generate a “high” and has shown potential for treating a variety of conditions, including painanxiety, and epilepsy.
But those buying CBD extracts online may not be getting what they signed up for, according to new research.
In a study of 84 CBD products sold by 31 companies online, blind testing found that only about a third of them contained the amount of CBD listed on the label (within 10 percent). And some of the products contained other components of marijuana that were not listed on the label, including delta-9-tetrahydrocannabibolic acid (THC), the psychoactive component of marijuana that does generate an intoxicating high.
Jason Langley/Getty Images
The study authors, who published their findings Tuesday in JAMA, suggest that extract sellers need better quality control and regulatory oversight to ensure that consumers are getting the correct, unadulterated dose they think they’re getting.
“People are using this as medicine for many conditions (anxiety, inflammation, pain, epilepsy)," first author Marcel Bonn-Miller, of the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, emphasized in a statement. "The biggest implication [of the study] is that many of these patients may not be getting the proper dosage; they're either not getting enough for it to be effective or they're getting too much."
For the study, Bon-Miller worked with colleagues from the Veterans Affairs San Diego Health Care System, nonprofit research organization RTI International, marijuana advocacy group Americans for Safe Access, and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The authors reported a variety of conflicts of interest, including receiving fees from the cannabis advocacy nonprofit organization, Realm of Caring Foundation, and Insys Therapeutics, which sells an opioid medication that has been at the center of scandal as well as a cannabinoid medication marketed for nausea.
The researchers swept the internet between September and October of 2016 for CBD products. They bought 84 products—spanning oils, alcohols (tinctures), and vaporization liquids—from 31 companies. Once the researchers got the products, they removed the labels and replaced them with blinded study identifiers and then sent them off to an independent lab for testing. Each product was analyzed three times for cannabinoid contents using high-performance liquid chromatography.
Only 31 percent of the 84 products tested were labeled accurately.
Products dubbed as “accurately labeled” contained 90 to 110 percent of the labeled value of CBD, while those dubbed “under-labeled” had more than 110 percent, and “over-labeled” had less than 90 percent.
Of the 84 tested, 26 (about 31 percent) were accurately labeled, 36 (42 percent) had more CBD than was on the label, and 22 (26 percent) had less. Vaporization liquid had the highest error rate, with only three of 24 products (12.5 percent) being accurately labeled and 18 (75 percent) containing more CBD that the amount listed on the label. Oils were the most spot-on; of 40 products tested, 18 (45 percent) were accurately labeled, while 12 (30 percent) had less CBD than was listed on the label.
For the 26 percent that had less CBD than expected, researchers worry that patients may not get the proper dose to see potential health benefits they would otherwise expect. But for the 42 percent that had more CBD than expected, researchers didn’t have the usual concerns of overdosing or addiction as they might have with other drugs. CBD has a strong safety profile with minimal toxicity and side-effects. It also has little evidence of an abuse risk.
The authors note that the inconsistent and unexpected amounts make it difficult for patients to see full health benefits consistently.
And the same range of inconsistency on FDA-regulated drugs was enough to prompt the agency to issue warnings to drug makers in the past, the authors point out.
As for the study’s look at unlabeled cannabinoids in the products tested, researchers found that these were generally uncommon, and, if they were found, they were at low concentrations. THC was the most common contaminant: About 21 percent of the 84 products contained THC, with concentrations as high as 6.43 milligrams per milliliter. That amount, the authors report, may be enough to intoxicate a child and therefore poses a risk.
The study’s limitations—beyond the conflicts of interest—include only focusing on products sold online. It’s not clear if products at dispensaries suffer the same inconsistencies, and there are state-by-state laws governing labeling. That said, earlier research led by Bon-Miller found that edible products bought from dispensaries in Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Seattle tended to contain less THC than was listed on the label.
In all, the researchers suggest that "these findings highlight the need for manufacturing and testing standards, and oversight of medicinal cannabis products."

Reposted story, original found here:
https://www.self.com/story/online-cbd-cannabis-extracts-mislabeled















Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 


Does your CBD oil PROVE
what's in the bottle?

Do you really know what you
are putting in your body?

You are taking CBD oil
to assist your body...right?

Can you trust what is says on the label?
NO YOU CAN'T!

The FDA did a test
and found
most are CBD products
on the market are
"mislabeled"


Some products have
too much THC in them
and some labeled 
CBD OIL
had
NO, NONE, ZERO, NADA
CBD oil whatsoever.

So how is that going to assist your body?
It's not!

Click here for their report
 Then click on 2015 Warning letters 









Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview