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There’s a science to maximum performance and productivity. Daniel Pink talks about the research that shows how morning people (larks), night owls and everyone in between (third birds) can find the perfect timing to do their best work. Dan also gives a number of helpful hacks on how to take the perfect breaks, the ideal nap and even how to take a caffeine fueled nap (a nappucino) to boost your productivity.

Welcome to Episode 233 of the podcast. Listen and access the show notes below or search for the Carey Nieuwhof Leadership Podcast on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts and listen for free.

Guest Links

 DanPink.com | Facebook | Twitter

Assessments | Resources | When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing

7 Million Downloads Means FREE Starbucks For YOU!

The podcast has reached over 7 million downloads! What better way to celebrate this milestone than with FREE coffee, right???

All this week I’m giving away FREE Starbucks! Make sure you’re following me on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter and turn on the notifications for each platform so you don’t miss out when the giveaway posts go live.

It’s my way of saying THANK YOU for listening to the show and for sharing the episodes with your friends, 7 million times over. I’m so grateful!

Giveaways offered December 11th-17th, 2018. 

Episode Links

Maximize giving at your church. Visit Pushpay.com/Carey to receive an exclusive offer for podcast listeners and discover why churches see an increase in giving by using Pushpay’s digital mobile strategy.

What are you doing in 2019 to help grow your people spiritually? Visit RedLetterChallenge.com/Carey and save 10 to 40% on the 40 day church package that’s right for you.

Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World by Adam Grant

3 Insights from Dan

1. Everyone experiences 3 stages within a typical work day

Wether you’re a morning person (Lark), night owl or somewhere in-between (Third Bird), we all move through the day in three broad stages, usually in this order: Peak, Trough, and Recovery.

Peak – the most vigilant stage of the day. It’s the best time for intentional work that requires focus with no distractions.

Trough – the mid afternoon lull where distractions come easily. This is the best time to do administrative-type work like attacking the inbox and completing routine paperwork.

Recovery – mood is typically high, but vigilance is not. Work that requires mental looseness, brainstorming, creativity, etc. is best accomplished in this stage.

2. Being intentional with your time produces the best results

So if the most productive time of day is at the beginning, how do you block those peak hours without frustrating coworkers or missing out on other things going on in the office (like meetings)?

Like so many things in life, it’s a trade off. If you want to make yourself accessible during your peak work hours there are going to be costs (like being less productive). If being available to your team is more important than doing your vigilant work, then be accessible to your team. But remember, that period of peak vigilance is fleeting.

In most cases, people who think they need access to you at the start of the day can actually wait a couple of hours and meetings can be rescheduled for set times later in the day. It may be tough at first to get a team on board, but once everyone is educated about the benefits of the process and on the same page about the three stages (Peak, Trough, Recovery), you’ll all start seeing results. Being intentional with your time is the key.

3. Breaks are a crucial part of performance

Breaks aren’t for lazy workers. Breaks are actually crucial for performance. 15 to 20 minutes is best, but if you’re short on time, even a quick five minutes can still have a big impact on your day. A little can go a long way, but here are a few tips so you can get the most out of your time:

Social time is better than alone time. Be in community with others.

Get outside. Escape the office and breathe in fresh air.

Moving is better than stationary. Get the blood flowing.

Fully detach. Don’t talk about anything work related until break time ends.

Quotes from Episode 233

We should be making our timing decisions based on science, not based on intuition. @DanielPink
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We have to get past this notion that breaks are a deviation, a concession, soft. They are not. Breaks are a part of our performance. @DanielPink
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Endings have a disproportionate effect on how we remember entire experiences. Be intentional about endings...Because endings have a disproportionate weight than other elements of the episode. @DanielPink
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Read or Download the Transcript for Episode 233

Looking for a key quote? More of a reader?

Read or download a free PDF transcript of this episode here.

Solve the Problems Most Leaders Miss: Didn’t See It Coming Will Help

If you want practical help overcoming some of the biggest challenges leaders face, my new book Didn’t See It Coming: Overcoming the 7 Greatest Challenges That Nobody Expects and Everyone Experiences tackles the seven core issues that take people out: cynicism, compromise, disconnectedness, irrelevance, pride, burnout, and the emptiness of success and provides strategies on how to combat each.

I wrote the book because no 18 year old sets out to be cynical, jaded and disconnected by age 35. Yet it happens all the time.

The good news is, it doesn’t have to be that way.

Here’s what top leaders are saying about Didn’t See It Coming:

“Seriously, this may be the most important book you read this year.” Jud Wilhite, Lead Pastor, Central Church

“Powerful, personal, and highly readable. ” Brian Houston, Global Senior Pastor, Hillsong

“Whatever challenge you’re facing, whatever obstacle you’re hoping to overcome, whatever future you dream or imagine, there is something powerful for you here.” Andy Stanley, Founder, North Point Ministries

“Uncommonly perceptive and generous…You have to read this book.” Ann Voskamp, NYT bestselling author

“Masterful.” Reggie Joiner, CEO Orange

“Deep biblical insight, straightforward truth, and practical wisdom to help you grow.” Craig Groeschel, Pastor and NYT bestselling author

“This book is sure to help you.” Daniel H. Pink, NYT bestselling author

Over the years, one of the things I’ve enjoyed most about being a public speaker is having opportunities to hang out with Carey…It’s not a matter of if you’ll run into these challenges; it’s a matter of when. Be prepared by spending a little time with a leader who has already been there.” Jon Acuff, NYT best-selling author

“Nieuwhof’s book provides expert guidance…with an accuracy that pierces the heart.” Nancy Duarte, CEO Duarte Inc.

“A refreshingly transparent guide for all leaders in a wide variety of industries.” Bryan Miles, Co-Founder and CEO, BELAY

You can learn more and get your copy of Didn’t See It Coming here.

Subscribed Yet? 

Subscribe for free and never miss out on wisdom from world-class leaders like Brian Houston, Andy Stanley, Craig Groeschel, Nancy Duarte, Henry Cloud, Patrick Lencioni, Francis Chan, Ann Voskamp, Erwin McManus and many others.

Subscribe using your favorite podcast app via

Apple Podcasts

Spotify

Google Play

Stitcher

TuneIn

Spread the Word. Leave a Rating and Review

Hopefully, this episode has helped you lead like never before. That’s my goal. If you appreciated it, could you share the love?

The best way to do that is to rate the podcast on Apple Podcasts and leave us a brief review! You can do the same on Stitcher and on TuneIn as well.

Your ratings and reviews help us place the podcast in front of new leaders and listeners. Your feedback also lets me know how I can better serve you.

Thank you for being so awesome.

Next Episode: Donnie Griggs

So many leaders write off small towns and villages as places not worth investing in. Donnie Griggs would beg to differ. He tells the story of how he planted a church in a town of 9,000, only to see it grow to one with 1600-1800 people in small towns and villages. Donnie talks about how to find leaders, survive the fishbowl and what works and what doesn’t in a smaller setting.

Subscribe for free now and you won’t miss Episode 234.

The post CNLP 233: Daniel Pink on the Science Behind Perfect Timing, How Morning People, Night Owls and Everyone Else Can Maximize Productivity and Effectiveness appeared first on CareyNieuwhof.com.

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Talk to any church leader, and they’ll tell you it feels more challenging than ever to get people to come to church on a Sunday.

Even in growing churches (like ours), the competition for peoples’ time, attention and devotion seems to get more intense every year.

You’ve felt it too.

So what’s up? And where is future church attendance heading?

I’m a firm believer in the future of the church and the gathered church. It’s here to stay not because we always get it right, but because the church is Jesus’ idea, not ours.

Still, with everything in the culture changing, how do you navigate toward a better future?

One step is to start asking solid questions.

Why? Because usually the future isn’t pioneered by the clarity of the answers nearly as much as it by the quality of the questions.

Asking the right questions will lead you to better answers.
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Ask the right questions, and you’ll eventually get the right answers.  Fail to ask the questions, and you’re sunk.

Here are ten questions I’m asking right now and I’ve seen other leaders ask. I think they can help frame your discussion and move you toward better answers and a strategy to match.

I’ve also included my hunch when it comes to an answer to the questions, not because I’m certain it’s right, but because answering the question moves you toward a more strategic and proactive future.

So, with that in mind,  here are 10 really big questions about future church attendance.

1. Will infrequent church attendance become the universal default?

If you grew up in church, you were likely raised never to miss a Sunday. Well, those days are pretty much gone. I outline ten reasons for that in this post.

Frequent church attendance (say 2-3 weeks a month) seems to be most prevalent among

  • Volunteers
  • Long time (and older) church attendees
  • Families with very young children
  • Some new attendees and new Christians (at least for a season)
  • Quite honestly, lower-income families for whom travel is not an option

For everyone else, regular church attendance is giving way to non-engagement or online attendance.

As infrequent in-person attendance becomes more normative, it raises a series of other questions.

Hunch

Infrequent church attendance is usually a sign that people don’t see value in what you’re doing. And that’s a problem.

When parents who never ever miss their kids’ soccer practice regularly miss church, it’s a sign that they’re more engaged in soccer than they are in church. In other words, they just don’t see the value in attendance.

Want to drive engagement? Here are some ideas.

2. Does infrequent attendance lead to lower devotion among Christians?

Some might argue frequent church attendance is not an indicator of devotion to Christ. But the bigger question is Is infrequent church attendance a sign of lower devotion to Christ?

Obviously, there is nothing that inherently says that’s the case, but generally speaking, people are less committed to things they attend less often.

Naturally, the goal of faith is to get people to commit to Jesus, not to a local church, but still, as I outline here, Christ and his church are intricately connected.

But consider this: showing up at the gym once a month rather than 3 times a week usually communicates something. Skipping a weekly date with someone you’re supposed to be in love with is usually a sign of something deeper.

People usually commit to things they’re devoted to. Until they’re no longer devoted to them.

Hunch

Infrequent attendance is almost always a sign of lower devotion. We participate in the things we value most.

Infrequent attendance is almost always a sign of lower devotion. We participate in the things we value most.
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3. Will online church replace in-person attendance for many?

So if people aren’t attending church as regularly anymore, then what’s the new normal?

In addition to simply staying away, many are substituting online options for in-person attendance. The launch of Churchome’s Global App is one more step in that direction.

The last decade has seen an explosion of online options for Christians, most of which are free: from social media to podcasts and to services streamed both live and on demand.

The opportunities are endless and will only grow from here.

Even if your church doesn’t have any online presence, don’t worry—thousands of other ministries do. There’s no way to shield your congregation from a changing world.

And actually, come to think of it, there’s shouldn’t be. The church has always adapted to a changing world because Jesus loves the world.

There's no way to shield your congregation from a changing world. And actually, come to think of it, there's shouldn't be. The church has always adapted to a changing world because Jesus loves the world.
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Hunch

While I think that (at least at this point) increased in-person engagement almost always leads to higher devotion, for some people online will be their only form of church. I don’t love this, for reasons stated elsewhere in this post, but if you ignore your online strategy, you lose the chance to reach new people, even if it means some of your less-devoted people step back.

4. Does online participation feed consumption or drive engagement?

One of the key goals for Christians is to engage the mission in front of us: to share the love and salvation of Christ with the world.

But does online participation drive Christians into deeper engagement with that mission or does it drive us deeper into consumerism?

The challenge with technology, of course, is that we are both its parent and its child. We shaped it, but we’re unclear on how it’s shaping us.

The challenge with technology, of course, is that we are both its parent and its child. We shaped it, but we're unclear on how it's shaping us.
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So, given the rise of digital options, are Christians increasingly seeing their faith as something to be consumed?

The Gospel by nature demands sacrifice, engagement, and risk.

Christianity at its best has never been about consuming much and contributing little. We shouldn’t start now.

In many respects, online consumption builds the kingdom of me. We’re called to build the Kingdom of God.

Hunch

When you design your online strategy, you can shape it to fuel consumption or to fuel engagement. While many churches will shape it to fuel consumption, the more effective churches will shape it to fuel engagement.


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5. What happens to evangelism in a low attendance world?

Of all the things that concern me most about lower attendance patterns, this one is the highest on my list.

If you’re consuming your faith online and only attending sporadically, how do you invite your friends into that? That’s right, you don’t.

Sharing a pin on Instagram is not the same as personally sharing your life with a friend.

Sure, theoretically, you can share your faith around a kitchen table. But let’s be honest, not many people actually do that. And something tells me that most people who attend infrequently rarely share their faith.

Christians should live like the good news is good, not just for them, but for everyone.

If you're consuming your faith online and only attending sporadically, how do you invite your friends into that? That's right, you don't.
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Hunch

Many Christians will continue to see their faith as something to be enjoyed, not shared. But they won’t be the future church.

The future church will be followers of Jesus who unite around a mission to change the world through the love and hope of Christ.

Many Christians will continue to see their faith as something to be enjoyed, not shared. But they won't be the future church.
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6. What happens to discipleship in a virtual environment?

Christian maturity is not marked by how much you know, it’s marked by how much you love.

And love has an outward thrust.

Christian maturity is not marked by how much you know, it's marked by how much you love.
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Sure, to grow as a disciple you need to consume. So listen to messages and podcasts, take online seminary classes… do what you need to do.

But consumption has never been the goal of true discipleship. Jesus never asked you to be a disciple; he called you to make disciples.

If your mantra in avoiding other Christians on Sunday and consuming what you feel like on Monday is to build yourself up, you’ve lost the mission.

Hunch

The future church will be filled with Christians who realize they’re called to make disciples, not just be disciples.

The future church will be filled with Christians who realize they're called to make disciples, not just be disciples.
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7. How much of a virtual experience actually translates?

With more and more congregations streaming their services, it raises the question of what happens on the other end?

First, I suspect the attention span of viewers and listeners is fractured and intermittent. Watching while running on the treadmill is not the same experience as being in the room live when something is taking place. Listening while cooking dinner and while the kids are running up and down the hall is not the same as being seated and attentive for a sermon. Sure, people have been distracted in church for centuries, but it’s a different kind of distraction.

Second, even if you sit in rapt attention to what’s being streamed on your device, is it the same as being in the room? If you only watched online for a year or attended for a year, would your faith be different?

Hunch

Because so online content consumption is often done while people multi-task, it will lead to a distracted discipleship if that’s the only form of church people experience.

8. Is a digital relationship with Christianity enough?

As physical attendance continues to decline and digital engagement increases, will it be possible to have 100% or near 100% digital relationship with Christianity, much the way you have a completely virtual relationship with gaming, movies or Hollywood?

I really think something gets lost by a mainly digital experience.

A high percentage of couples today meet online. But no couple who meets online wants to stay online: the goal is to meet in person and (maybe) start a life together.  Should Christians be different?

If the goal is to do life together, to engage in a mission together, to quite literally change the world together, well… that involves actual human relationships.

But in a world where more and more are choosing virtual connection over real, we’ll have to see what that produces.

Church online will increasingly become a front door for growing congregations, and back door for declining congregations.
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9. What happens to kids whose parents only attend online?

This one bothers me more than most. Parents will often skip out on attending church because they’re busy or want a day off.

And parents can easily catch up on a message and maybe even still get to a small group.

But what about kids?

We’ve built a relational ministry at our church for all ages based on the Orange strategy and curriculum because, well, I think the Gospel is inherently relational.

You can’t download a relationship or a friendship.

When parents skip church, kids lose far more than the parents.

What happens to a generation of kids who grow up relationally disconnected? Actually, I think we’re seeing the results of that already. Just read the news.

When parents skip church, kids lose far more than the parents.
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10. Will fragmented individual believers carry the mission forward?

Whether the future trends are toward more online engagement or just more sporadic attendance with no online supplementation, the question is whether fragmented individual believers will carry the mission forward?

The church has always been strongest when it’s been a movement of people gathered around a common set of mission, vision, values and strategy.

The hyper-individualism of our current culture (I’ll do what I want when I want to) runs at crossed-purposes to the Gospel and the mission of the church.

I realize many Christians argue they’re done with church (I wrote about that here… the will curl your hair), but that still doesn’t change my view that the only one who believes Christians are better off alone is the enemy.

The only who believes Christians are better off alone is the enemy.
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76% of people say preaching influences church attendance

As much as worship and so many other touch points impact how we are the church, 76% of people say the message is a main factor in whether they attend a church. No surprise, since it’s the majority of the service.

So how do you preaching a way that connects with today’s culture WITHOUT selling out?

The Art of Better Preaching Course is a 12 session video training with a comprehensive, interactive workbook that will help you create, write, and deliver better sermons. The course contains the lessons Mark Clark (lead pastor of  Village Church, a growing mega-church in post-Christian Vancouver) and I have learned, taught, and used over decades of being professional communicators.

This is the complete course you need to start preaching better sermons, including:

  • 7 preaching myths it’s time to bust forever
  • The 5 keys to preaching sermons to unchurched people (that will keep them coming back)
  • How to discover the power in the text (and use it to drive your sermon)
  • The specific characteristics of sermons that reach people in today’s world
  • Why you need to ditch your sermon notes (and how to do it far more easily than you think.)
  • How to keep your heart and mind fresh over the long run

And far more. Plus you get an interactive workbook and some bonus resources that will help you write amazing messages week after week.

In the Art of Better Preaching, Mark and I share everything we’ve learned about communicating in a way that will help your church grow without compromising biblical integrity. We cover detailed training on everything from interacting with the biblical text to delivering a talk without using notes, to writing killer bottom lines that people will remember for years.

Don’t miss out! Check it out today and gain instant access.

So… What Do You Think?

I really don’t want this to sound like a negative post. I am hugely invested in the digital space, as is our church. But I see the digital world as a front door into a more meaningful encounter, not a back door into something less powerful.

I do believe the future will be amazing for the church if we ask the right questions, seize the moment prayerfully, and begin to innovate.

These questions above aren’t just strategic questions, they’re theological and philosophical questions.

The church is far from dead, but asking the right questions will breathe life into it.

Is there any question you’d add to this list?

Any hopeful answer you’d like to offer?

Scroll down and leave a comment.

The post 10 Really Big Questions About Future Church Attendance (And 10 Hunches) appeared first on CareyNieuwhof.com.

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Christine Birch has been part of three large churches in both Canada and the US.

How do you connect people in a large church, and how do you connect them at your church? Christine shares her experiences on both sides of the border as they apply to large and small churches alike.

Welcome to Episode 232 of the podcast. Listen and access the show notes below or search for the Carey Nieuwhof Leadership Podcast on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts and listen for free.

Guest Links

 Instagram | Facebook | Connexus Church

Episode Links

Looking for a great gift this Christmas season? How about one that offers practical help for overcoming some of the biggest challenges in leadership and life? Learn more about my best-selling book, Didn’t See It Coming and give the gift that could prevent or heal the scars of burnout in the new year by visiting didntseeitcomingbook.com.

My 5-day study called Beating Cynicism is now on YouVersion! So many of you are connecting with the cynicism chapter in Didn’t See It Coming, so I put together this FREE study. Beating Cynicism will help you identify your inner cynic and offer practical ways to reclaim optimism in your heart, relationships, faith and life.

Canadian Church Leaders Podcast (CCLP 020): Danielle Strickland on Becoming a Great Communicator, Knowing When It’s Time to Move On and Being a Rebel At Heart

unSeminary

Understanding Email Anti-spam Laws in U.S., Canada, E.U.

The E-Myth Revisited: Why Most Small Businesses Don’t Work and What to Do About It by Michael Gerber

The Canadian Church Leaders Conference mentioned in this episode occurred June 2018. Registration for future events is not available at this time.  

3 Insights from Christine

1. Posture your church so that guests feels expected and accepted

People assume that community will just happen organically, but no matter the size of your church it takes intentionality and hustle. Size doesn’t have anything to do with how warm or cold a church can feel to a new attender and church staff must develop a welcoming posture to ensure a guest feels expected and accepted.

2. Make your follow up with new guests quick, personal and generous

Connexus Church has a great system for following up with guests. It isn’t time consuming and offers personal notes with generous gestures to make people feel welcomed into community. Here’s an overview your church can use and modify to fit your needs.

First Sunday: Connections Card & Small Gift (example: coffee mug)

Week One: Handwritten Post Card from a volunteer, BombBomb Email from Campus Pastor, Personal Phone Call from a staff member

Week Two (Attender): Hand written, stamped and addressed Note with Gift Card

Week Two (Absent): If a family doesn’t return,  mail a hand stamped and addressed Letter with incentive to return (example: coupon for a free book)

If attenders opt in to receive emails, send regular invitations to attend a new members style class and any current events happening on campus.

3. Honouring the personal space and privacy of attendees shows them respect and protects your church, too

Never force attendees to identify themselves. Instead, respect personal space by allowing them to remain anonymous until they feel comfortable being known. In the mean time, make sure that those next steps are clear and easily available so people can engage your church when they are ready.

If people have volunteered email addresses to receive information about your church you have the responsibility to continue communicating to them until they opt out, but take the time to learn about anti-spam regulations to protect your church from legal battles.

Quotes from Episode 232

No matter what your church size is, we have to make sure that we're posturing ourselves so that a new guest feels expected and then accepted once they have identified themselves. Christine Birch
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Doing a better job on follow up can be the difference between you being a growing church and a flat church. @cnieuwhof
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The average church sees 1 in 10 of their first time guests return, I'm not content with that. If they are opting in to be communicated with, I'm going to keep pointing them away from anonymity towards community. Christine Birch
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The average first time guest or newer guest doesn't realize how good the experience of community can be and they're going to push against it. Christine Birch
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If you can find someone to count the offering, you can find somebody to have coffee with new people. @cnieuwhof
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Read or Download the Transcript for Episode 232

Looking for a key quote? More of a reader?

Read or download a free PDF transcript of this episode here.

Solve the Problems Most Leaders Miss: Didn’t See It Coming Will Help

If you want practical help overcoming some of the biggest challenges leaders face, my new book Didn’t See It Coming: Overcoming the 7 Greatest Challenges That Nobody Expects and Everyone Experiences tackles the seven core issues that take people out: cynicism, compromise, disconnectedness, irrelevance, pride, burnout, and the emptiness of success and provides strategies on how to combat each.

I wrote the book because no 18 year old sets out to be cynical, jaded and disconnected by age 35. Yet it happens all the time.

The good news is, it doesn’t have to be that way.

Here’s what top leaders are saying about Didn’t See It Coming:

“Seriously, this may be the most important book you read this year.” Jud Wilhite, Lead Pastor, Central Church

“Powerful, personal, and highly readable. ” Brian Houston, Global Senior Pastor, Hillsong

“Whatever challenge you’re facing, whatever obstacle you’re hoping to overcome, whatever future you dream or imagine, there is something powerful for you here.” Andy Stanley, Founder, North Point Ministries

“Uncommonly perceptive and generous…You have to read this book.” Ann Voskamp, NYT bestselling author

“Masterful.” Reggie Joiner, CEO Orange

“Deep biblical insight, straightforward truth, and practical wisdom to help you grow.” Craig Groeschel, Pastor and NYT bestselling author

“This book is sure to help you.” Daniel H. Pink, NYT bestselling author

Over the years, one of the things I’ve enjoyed most about being a public speaker is having opportunities to hang out with Carey…It’s not a matter of if you’ll run into these challenges; it’s a matter of when. Be prepared by spending a little time with a leader who has already been there.” Jon Acuff, NYT best-selling author

“Nieuwhof’s book provides expert guidance…with an accuracy that pierces the heart.” Nancy Duarte, CEO Duarte Inc.

“A refreshingly transparent guide for all leaders in a wide variety of industries.” Bryan Miles, Co-Founder and CEO, BELAY

You can learn more and get your copy of Didn’t See It Coming here.

Subscribed Yet? 

Subscribe for free and never miss out on wisdom from world-class leaders like Brian Houston, Andy Stanley, Craig Groeschel, Nancy Duarte, Henry Cloud, Patrick Lencioni, Francis Chan, Ann Voskamp, Erwin McManus and many others.

Subscribe using your favorite podcast app via

Apple Podcasts

Spotify

Google Play

Stitcher

TuneIn

Spread the Word. Leave a Rating and Review

Hopefully, this episode has helped you lead like never before. That’s my goal. If you appreciated it, could you share the love?

The best way to do that is to rate the podcast on Apple Podcasts and leave us a brief review! You can do the same on Stitcher and on TuneIn as well.

Your ratings and reviews help us place the podcast in front of new leaders and listeners. Your feedback also lets me know how I can better serve you.

Thank you for being so awesome.

Next Episode: Daniel Pink

There’s a science to maximum performance and productivity. Daniel Pink talks about the research that shows how morning people (larks), night owls and everyone in between (third birds) can find the perfect timing to do their best work. Dan also gives a number of helpful hacks on how to take the perfect breaks, the ideal nap and even how to take a caffeine fueled nap (a nappucino) to boost your productivity.

Subscribe for free now and you won’t miss Episode 233.

The post CNLP 232: Christine Birch on Connecting New People Who Come to Your Church appeared first on CareyNieuwhof.com.

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One of the more perplexing questions people ask is “What am I truly called and gifted to do?” Jon Thompson, Preaching and Vision Pastor of C4 Church and adjunct faculty at Tyndale Theological Seminary, answers that question both for people in the marketplace AND church leaders. We also dive into why operating outside of your calling and gift set is both dangerous and draining.

Welcome to Episode 231 of the podcast. Listen and access the show notes below or search for the Carey Nieuwhof Leadership Podcast on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts and listen for free.

Guest Links

ThrivewithConvergence.com | Instagram | Twitter | C4church.com

Spiritual Gifts – C4 Church Sermon Series

Canadian Church Leaders Podcast, Episode 011 (CCLP 011): Jon Thompson and Barry Parker on Transitioning Stuck Churches into Growth, Reaching Your Community and A Big Initiative for Toronto

Episode Links

What are you doing in 2019 to help grow your people spiritually? Visit RedLetterChallenge.com/Carey and save 10 to 40% on the 40 day church package that’s right for you.

Maximize giving at your church. Visit Pushpay.com/Carey to receive an exclusive offer for podcast listeners and discover why churches see an increase in giving by using Pushpay’s digital mobile strategy.

3 Insights from Jon

1. If your spiritual gifts aren’t obvious to you, seek them out

Pray – Ask, from a trinitarian standpoint, for the Father, Son and Holy Spirit to show you what gifts you have been given.

Read Scripture – Find out what the Bible has to say to you about your gifts.

Community Advice – Often people around you can more clearly see the gifts that you may be dismissing.

2. Knowing and understanding your calling category is crucial in ministry

Jon has found four ways people can receive a call to vocational ministry. There’s no superior type of calling, but it’s crucial to know yours in order to thrive. When you’re calling is clear, you can do it well. But if you’re unsure of what brought you to ministry in the first place, your journey is in danger because you’ll eventually doubt your ability to lead.

  1. The “I have no choice” calling: Experiencing a spiritual encounter that can’t be ignored.
  2. The “Gifting” calling: All your spiritual gifts led you to thrive in ministry.
  3. The “Family” calling: The Spirit worked through years of prayer or molding form the generation(s) that came before you.
  4. The “Community Affirmation” calling: Being affirmed and appointed to lead by the people within your community.

“By the work of the spirit within family” – Some of us are called into ministry because of the work of the Spirit through our families.

3. Steward spiritual gifts well by living out 1 Corinthians 13

Without love, it doesn’t matter how many gifts you discover, how powerful they are, or the amount of influence they provide.

The reason why we all like Jesus so much isn’t because of all the things he can do, but because of the way he loves. Jesus is 1 Corinthians 13 incarnate.

As a leader, pray over 1 Corinthians 13 daily, because it doesn’t matter how you’re anointed or appointed – clinging to love is the only thing that’s going to maintain your calling and your spiritual gifts in the long run.

Quotes from Episode 231

Most of us who are Christians love Jesus deeply, but we don't trust him. @pastorJon_T
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If sovereign calling in any form is the inception point in the power, love is the way you make it in the long term. @pastorJon_T
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Calling has been lost in the church in many ways. If we don't regain calling, we're going to be in real trouble. @pastorJon_T
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You can have right gifts and still sin with them. @pastorJon_T
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The pastor's role is not to dismiss experience but to evaluate it. @pastorJon_T
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Calling is not just the bedrock for perseverance, calling is the bedrock for the authority to stand up in the first place. @pastorJon_T
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A lot of people walk away from their calling before God has walked away from their calling. @cnieuwhof
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Read or Download the Transcript for Episode 231

Looking for a key quote? More of a reader?

Read or download a free PDF transcript of this episode here.

Solve the Problems Most Leaders Miss: Didn’t See It Coming Will Help

If you want practical help overcoming some of the biggest challenges leaders face, my new book Didn’t See It Coming: Overcoming the 7 Greatest Challenges That Nobody Expects and Everyone Experiences tackles the seven core issues that take people out: cynicism, compromise, disconnectedness, irrelevance, pride, burnout, and the emptiness of success and provides strategies on how to combat each.

I wrote the book because no 18 year old sets out to be cynical, jaded and disconnected by age 35. Yet it happens all the time.

The good news is, it doesn’t have to be that way.

Here’s what top leaders are saying about Didn’t See It Coming:

“Seriously, this may be the most important book you read this year.” Jud Wilhite, Lead Pastor, Central Church

“Powerful, personal, and highly readable. ” Brian Houston, Global Senior Pastor, Hillsong

“Whatever challenge you’re facing, whatever obstacle you’re hoping to overcome, whatever future you dream or imagine, there is something powerful for you here.” Andy Stanley, Founder, North Point Ministries

“Uncommonly perceptive and generous…You have to read this book.” Ann Voskamp, NYT bestselling author

“Masterful.” Reggie Joiner, CEO Orange

“Deep biblical insight, straightforward truth, and practical wisdom to help you grow.” Craig Groeschel, Pastor and NYT bestselling author

“This book is sure to help you.” Daniel H. Pink, NYT bestselling author

Over the years, one of the things I’ve enjoyed most about being a public speaker is having opportunities to hang out with Carey…It’s not a matter of if you’ll run into these challenges; it’s a matter of when. Be prepared by spending a little time with a leader who has already been there.” Jon Acuff, NYT best-selling author

“Nieuwhof’s book provides expert guidance…with an accuracy that pierces the heart.” Nancy Duarte, CEO Duarte Inc.

“A refreshingly transparent guide for all leaders in a wide variety of industries.” Bryan Miles, Co-Founder and CEO, BELAY

You can learn more and get your copy of Didn’t See It Coming here.

Subscribed Yet? 

Subscribe for free and never miss out on wisdom from world-class leaders like Brian Houston, Andy Stanley, Craig Groeschel, Nancy Duarte, Henry Cloud, Patrick Lencioni, Francis Chan, Ann Voskamp, Erwin McManus and many others.

Subscribe using your favorite podcast app via

Apple Podcasts

Spotify

Google Play

Stitcher

TuneIn

Spread the Word. Leave a Rating and Review

Hopefully, this episode has helped you lead like never before. That’s my goal. If you appreciated it, could you share the love?

The best way to do that is to rate the podcast on Apple Podcasts and leave us a brief review! You can do the same on Stitcher and on TuneIn as well.

Your ratings and reviews help us place the podcast in front of new leaders and listeners. Your feedback also lets me know how I can better serve you.

Thank you for being so awesome.

Next Episode: Christine Birch

Christine Birch has been part of three large churches in both Canada and the US. How do you connect people in a large church, and how do you connect them at your church? Christine shares her experiences on both sides of the border as they apply to large and small churches alike.

Subscribe for free now and you won’t miss Episode 232.

The post CNLP 231: Jon Thompson on How to Discover Your True Calling and Gifting And Why Operating Outside of Either Can Be Exhausting and Dangerous appeared first on CareyNieuwhof.com.

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So…if you had to describe yourself, would you say you’re an optimist, a pessimist, or as pessimists like to say in social settings to be polite, a realist?

For the record…my current theory is that realists are pessimists who don’t want to call themselves pessimists.

Most leaders (not all, but most) are optimists when they start out. I was. I’m an idealist.

But as you may have discovered, your optimism gets tested—really tested—in leadership.

Leadership not only throws you curve balls, it throws you hardballs. As in a 103 mile an hour fastball aimed right at you.

Which is why so many leaders find themselves in a place where they hardly recognize themselves anymore.

The budding idealist feels his heart go flat.

The eternal optimist finds herself rolling her eyes the next time someone says “Hey, I have a great idea.”

And the guys who used to roll out of bed in the morning excited about the future now thinks about the grind and winces at the thought of yet another meeting where nothing will get accomplished.

Recognize that person?

For so many reasons, I found my pessimism growing exponentially in my first decade of leadership.

Then, after a tough battle with burnout, came out on the other side to reclaim my optimism, which is, fortunately, absolutely possible. (I outline the journey and the principles on how to do it here.)

Here’s what I’ve learned. Pessimism and cynicism go hand in hand. Scratch the surface of a pessimist, and you’ll almost always find a cynic.

Sure, it’s hard not to grow cynical in the world we live in. In fact, a lot of people think cynicism is inevitable in life and leadership. That once a cynic, always a cynic.

But here’s the truth. Life doesn’t make you cynical. Leadership doesn’t make you cynical. You make you cynical.

Cynicism and pessimism aren’t inevitable and they are reversible.

If you’re interested in some help with that, I just released a free 5-day devotional plan on YouVersion that can help you wrestle down cynicism. (The surprise for many people is that their cynicism is also a spiritual issue.)

And if you want deeper motivation to change, how about this, leaders? It’s harder to follow a cynic than it is to follow an optimist in leadership.

Cynics think they’re better leaders because they have it all figured out.

But what they miss is that it’s actually really hard to follow a cynic for at least three reasons.

Here they are (and there’s some big help at the end of this post too…so keep reading.)

Life doesn't make you cynical. Leadership doesn't make you cynical. You make you cynical.
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1. A Negative View of the Future Inspires No One

Has a pessimist ever inspired you?

Didn’t think so.

What unites cynics, pessimists and realists? A negative view of the future.

The financial forecast is bleak.

The trends are negative.

People have tried this before, and it hasn’t worked. And while it may be a great idea, pessimists can tell you 100 reasons you’re probably going to fail.

Guess what?

A negative view of the future inspires no one.

Cynics never change the world. They just tell you why the world won’t change.

Cynics never change the world. They just tell you why the world won't change.
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Even in the throes of one of the darkest moments of the 20th century as Hitler swept over Europe, Winston Churchill saw how bleak the future looked and–against all odds—cast a vision for hope and freedom.

People thought Churchill was naive and stupid. Fortunately for millions, his stubborn vision for a better world won the day.

There’s a fine line between discernment and negativism.

The discerning see the obstacles, plan for them, and then forge ahead with hope. And they inspire dozens, thousands or millions to follow.

There’s enough darkness in the world. What the world needs are brokers of hope.

A negative view of the future inspires no one.
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2. Pessimism Has No Vision For The Future

One of the challenges of having a consistently pessimistic view of life is that you end up with no vision for the future.

Pessimists know what’s wrong. They just can’t figure out what’s right. Similarly, pessimists don’t know what they’re for. They only know what they’re against.

How can you build a vision for the future around that?

Exactly, you can’t.

When cynicism and pessimism infect the senior leadership of any organization, vision becomes a serious challenge.

Instead of focusing on what they can accomplish, pessimistic leaders focus on what they can’t accomplish. As a result, nothing gets accomplished.

This is why, when a negative mindset takes over the senior leadership of any organization, you see a shift from leadership to management.

Instead of leading into a better future you create, you manage the current reality you have.

Sure, leadership without management produces chaos.

But management without leadership produces a constantly shrinking organization.

If you have no vision for the future, you end up with no future.

Pessimists know what's wrong. They just can't figure out what's right. Similarly, pessimists don't know what they're for. They only know what they're against.
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3. Encouragement Will Die…Fast

I recently heard Frank Blake, former CEO of the Home Depot, drop this line in an interview he was giving:

We’re all pretty disappointed in ourselves.

Then he dropped the mic. No, he didn’t, but okay, he could have.

You know what most of us need every day?

Encouragement. Massive encouragement.

I have never met a single person I encouraged who said Carey, can you please stop? I’ve had my lifetime dose of encouragement. I’ve had enough.

Anyone who has sat down with a board of bean counters or cynics knows how frustrating it can be to share ideas knowing that they’ll be shut down or spun in the most negative light.

I agree with Jim Collins, reality is your friend. So is sober thought.

But fundamentally leaders are dealers in hope. You have to find the gold in people (thank you Brian Houston). Your job is to find the one thing that might work in a sea of things that won’t work.

Encouragement is the fuel people run on.

If you want to motivate your team, encourage them, deeply, honestly and constantly call out the best of them.

If you want to discourage your team, point out why everything they’re doing won’t work.

If pessimism infects your culture, encouragement is one of the first casualties. And when encouragement dies, so does hope.

If pessimism infects your culture, encouragement is one of the first casualties. And when encouragement dies, so does hope.
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Motivated? 3 Things That Will Help You Reclaim Your Optimism

If you need some encouragement and some concrete help to overcome cynicism, pessimism and negativism, here are three things that can help.

A Short Cynicism Quiz

How badly infected has your mindset become? It’s a good question, and it can be hard to tell.

I developed a short, free cynicism quiz that might help you assess where you’re at.

You can take it for free here

A New 5 Day You Version Plan on Beating Cynicism 

I really believe cynicism and pessimism are spiritual problems.

At least my journey back to optimism was a spiritual problem for me.

I created a five-day devotional plan on YouVersion that you can do for free here.

This might even make a great team devotional or congregational devotional if you’re a church leader.

The Best-Selling Book

My latest book, Didn’t See It Coming: Overcoming the 7 Greatest Challenges That No One Expects and Everyone Experiences deals directly with cynicism and how to overcome it, as well as burnout (I think cynicism, pessimism and burnout are closely related…they all involved the death of hope).

You can get Didn’t See It Coming in hardcover, Kindle, or audiobook (I narrated it myself).

What Are You Learning?

Those are my thoughts on why pessimists and realists are hard to follow as leaders.

What do you see? Scroll down and leave a comment!

The post Why Pessimists (and Realists) Are Hard to Follow as Leaders appeared first on CareyNieuwhof.com.

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See if you recognize this.

There are some kinds of leaders (often in churches and not-for-profits) who are wonderful with people, but whose organizations don’t produce great results. Often there’s little accountability, a general drift, poor metrics and just a lack of overall excellence. But the leader’s a really nice person.

There are other leaders (often in rapidly growing churches and businesses) who are not so great with people, but there’s tight accountability, laser-like focus, clear results and tremendous progress.

You probably already recognize your own style in the above descriptions.

Maybe you just love people, but it’s just hard to see progress in your mission. Deadlines mean almost nothing. Most people show up for an event both under-prepared and unclear about what’s really going on. The quality of people’s work is mediocre at best, but most people just shrug it off anyway.

But at least you somewhat enjoy being together. Except there are no new people to join the party because the party just isn’t that great.

Or maybe you’re driven. Results are everywhere. All your graphs go up and to the right. You’re gaining a reputation for quality and excellence. Sharp thinkers and bright leaders are attracted to your organization. Unlike so many of your peers, you get it done. You’re crushing it.

But you’re also losing people. If you’re honest, you look back and there are casualties everywhere. Staff doesn’t stay that long. Volunteers give it a run and then step back. People can’t keep up with the pace. And everyone who stays is silently fearful and discouraged.

The question is: which style is better?

Leaders who care about people but not results?

Leaders who care about results but not people?

The answer?

Neither…and both.

In an ever-changing culture and workplace, the future belongs to leaders who value both results and relationships.

It’s been a long journey for me on this (I’m way more a results guy than a relationship guy when it comes to work), but I’ve learned some lessons along the way. While I don’t always get it right every day, I have seen in my own organizations and in others, that there’s a single best way to motivate your team: to value both relationship and results.

Here are three keys on how to do just that.

The future belongs to leaders who value both results and relationships.
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1. Get over your fear of the other side

If you look at what leaders who care about people are afraid of, and what leaders who care about results are afraid of, they often have a false (and opposite) fear.

Leaders who care about people don’t want to become soul-less taskmasters who crush others. Pastors and relationally-driven people are particularly guilty of this. They feel like the cardinal sin is accountability, and although they want progress, they can never seem to find it because no matter how much they seem to care about people, the dial doesn’t move.

Leaders who care more about results worry about the exact opposite: they fear that if they start to care about people, their growth will slow down. They’ll sacrifice results, and for whatever reason (usually an unhealthy one), that terrifies them.

Here’s the truth.

There are no meaningful results without people. And people feel far more alive when they’re moving together toward results.

In the same way, a lack of care is tremendously demotivating and unfulfilling, a lack of progress is tremendously demotivating and unfulfilling.

The takeaway? Get over your fear. It’s false.

There are no meaningful results without people. And people feel far more alive when they're moving together toward results.
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2. Be easy on the person, tough on the issue

Whatever your natural approach to leadership, it’s clear that there’s a tension between what you should go easy on, and what you should be tough about.

Relationally driven leaders will be easy on the person and easy on the issue, letting standards slip, making excuses and allowing shoddy work to continue.

Results driven leaders will be tough on the issue and tough on the person, ensuring progress on the mission but creating low morale and/or high turnover.

So what approach is better?

Try this: be easy on the person and tough on the issue.

Being hard on a person rarely helps. Secret: while you may be working with the occasional narcissist, as I outline in detail here, most people are actually quite insecure. Your harsh words will hurt people enough that they can barely recover well enough to tackle the issue.

You may not think you’re being harsh, but as Larry Osborne says, when it comes to senior leaders, the larger your organization gets, the more your whisper becomes a shout.

And even if your team does recover and meet their goals (which many will), fear is a terrible motivator. You bring out far less in people when they’re motivated by fear than when they’re motivated by encouragement.

And when you’re hard on people, people feel judged. Judgment is a terrible motivator. Very few people get judged into long-term change. Many people get loved into it.

Judgment is a terrible motivator. Very few people get judged into long-term change. Many people get loved into it.
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I had to learn this over time, but now every time I go into a situation where I have to address a tough issue, I try to remember to love the person and tackle the issue.

So how does that happen?

First, start by affirming what’s good about them, and then move alongside them to tackle the issue.

Think about it: as frustrated as you may be with your team member, you hired them or you recruited them. Unless you routinely hire idiots, there is something good in the person you’ve recruited. Look for it. Build on it.

A second way to do it is to affirm their intention. Unless you have clear evidence to the contrary, assume good motives, as in Hey, I see what you’re trying to do here. I love that. I’m just not sure it’s getting either of us what we hoped for. Can we talk about it?”

Finally, be clear about what’s missing. A general rage or frustration rarely produces great results. Saying ‘everything’ is wrong helps no one.

As a team member once (very helpfully) said to me: make sure that after a conversation with you people leave with their dignity.

So so true.

If you want to motivate your team and get results, be easy on the person and tough on the issue.
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3. Use this formula in every one-on-one meeting

Dealing with a crisis or issue is one thing, but how do you nurture results and relationships on an ongoing basis?

Easy.

In every one on one meeting you have (this could also work in a very small team meeting as well), begin this way: ask people how they’re doing before you ask them what they’re doing (thanks to Jeff Henderson for this language).

The results-oriented people will naturally only focus on asking people what they’re doing.

The relationally oriented leaders will naturally only ask people how they’re doing.

Smart leaders do both.

Starting by asking how someone is doing is wise because it begins the relationship on a personal level. In some corporate cultures, it may seem weird to start that way because it sounds too personal.

But think about, when you hire someone, you hire the whole person. if things aren’t going well at home, that spills into work. If someone’s not sleeping well at night, it impacts their performance. If they’re struggling with a difficult child, an addiction or a challenge they can’t seem to solve, that’s going to show up in how they do their job.

While you can’t solve their problem for them, knowing you care about them helps people care more about your mission. And it makes them ultimately more loyal to your organization. People who know that you care will care more about you and your organization.

People who know that you care will care more about you and your organization.
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The other thing this does (and this is huge), is having this as part of the regular dialogue really helps team members sort out what issues are work issues and which issues are life issues. There’s a huge bias in our culture toward blaming everything on work. Sometimes work is to blame, but you’d be surprised how often it’s not.

I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve sat down with a team member and said, “Thanks for sharing that with me. Is there anything we can do here at work to help. I’m sorry you’re so overwhelmed” only to have them say “You know, I appreciate that, but actually this has nothing to do with work. This has to do with my life. But thank you for caring.”

Do you know how much tension that exchange gets rid of right there for everyone? And you didn’t have to say “Hey man, that’s a life issue, not a work issue.” They named it for themselves.

So that’s for results people. What about the people-driven leaders?

Well, start your meetings with how people are doing, but don’t camp out there forever.

Move on after a few minutes and start talking about work, goals, metrics, accountability.

Ask questions like “Well in light of all this, what can we expect next month in terms of delivering on X?” Or “Is there anything you need from me or from us to accomplish Y? We’re here to support you and help you win.” And then follow through and do it.

Keep good notes, and then come back to what you said you were going to track in the next meeting and pick up the conversation.

You’ll be amazed at what you learn. Example: I remember a staff member told me once that it was taking 8 hours to upload his work online because we gave him a slow computer. I had no idea. We ordered a computer that day, and it cut his processing time down to two hours instead of eight for massive files. Do you have any idea how quickly that 5K for a new high-end computer paid back? Plus, he loved having great gear to work with. Churches and not-for-profits cheap out on stuff like this way too often.

Remember, the future belongs to leaders who value both results and relationships.

If you really want to value relationships and results, ask people how they're doing before you ask them what they're doing.
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Want To Improve Your Personal Leadership? (Last Day For Bonus Offer Too)

Don’t have time to work on things like we talked about in this post?

I share all of my personal productivity tips in my High Impact Leadership online, on-demand course. It’s helped thousands of leaders get time, energy and priorities working in their favour.

Today (Monday, November 26th) is the last day to get my special bonus offer.

If you sign up before 11:59 p.m. PDT tonight for the High Impact Leader course, or for my other courses (Breaking 200 and The Art of Better Preaching), you’ll get a free personally autographed copy of my best-selling book, Didn’t See It Coming: Overcoming the Seven Greatest Challenges Everyone Experiences and No One Expects, inscribed for free to you or to anyone you choose. All shipped to you in time for Christmas.

Use this link to jump into the High Impact Leader or any other course access the bonus offer.

Click here to get started today.

What Are You Learning About People and Results?

What are you learning about people and results?

Scroll down and leave a comment!

The post The Single Best Way To Fully Motivate Your Team appeared first on CareyNieuwhof.com.

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Larry Osborne has been in ministry for over 4 decades and at his current church for 38 years…and he loves it.

Larry talks about how to thrive, why he’s never had to take a sabbatical, why he never uses an alarm clock (unless he’s travelling), shepherd leadership, and why raising up gifted, talented young leaders is so wonderful but still personally hard.

Welcome to Episode 229 of the podcast. Listen and access the show notes below or search for the Carey Nieuwhof Leadership Podcast on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts and listen for free.

Guest Links

Larry Osborne | Facebook | Twitter | Lead Like A Shepherd

CNLP 096: Larry Osborne on How to Close the Back Door at Your Church and Truly Align Your Team

Episode Links

Maximize giving at your church. Visit Pushpay.com/Carey to receive a special offer and discover why churches see an increase in giving by using Pushpay’s digital mobile strategy.

Find a healthcare solution that is more affordable for you as an employer and for your staff at RemodelHealth.com/Carey. Receive a free quote and buying guide just for checking them out.

The Problem of God by Mark Clark

Didn’t See It Coming by Carey Nieuwhof

3 Insights from Larry

1. Solutions are found when seeking answers outside of the tribe

Most of us have a tribe of people in our life who are easy to go to with questions in a place that’s close and comfortable when we can’t seem to find answers on our own. But what do you do when that tribe no longer has answers? What do you do when the group gets stuck inside a limited bubble with a problem that can’t seem to be resolved?

The answers to life’s toughest problems are not found in solitude or in the closest of community groups. Getting beyond stumbling blocks can only be done by going outside of one’s self and beyond the cozy, familiar tribe to seek insight from people who may see things differently than you.

2. A shepherd doesn’t build walls

When the time comes for a leader to pass the torch of ground-level care to someone else, it’s still important not to lose the heart required to make sure the job is getting done.

There’s a difference in saying, “I can’t help you anymore, so you can’t reach me” and “I know someone who can help you faster and better than I ever could.” One creates a wall, the other puts the needs of others first by getting someone in place who can help quickly.

Being a shepherd doesn’t require taking care of every individual lamb yourself, but it does mean making sure that every lamb is taken care of by someone.

3. Giving more than you get is the nature of servanthood

After 38 years in ministry, Larry has come to know the importance of keeping his motives on track and staying committing to a servant minded leadership style.

Often leaders look for new opportunities when they become frustrated at work – feeling they aren’t being heard or that their gifts aren’t being utilized. It’s so important in those seasons to remember that a servant gives more than receives. A servant is often taken advantage of and efforts easily go unnoticed.

There are always boundaries to draw – like protecting your marriage, your family, your health, but remember that to truly serve others you will always give more than you’ll every get. That is the nature of servanthood and not something to run away from.

Quotes from Episode 229

There's a difference between what I have the potential to do and what I have the calling to do. @larryosborne
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My job is to prepare the horse for battle, it's His job to decide whether I win or lose. @larryosborne
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Being a Shepherd doesn't mean you're taking care of every individual lamb. It means you're making sure that every lamb is taken care of. @larryosborne
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I discovered the answers to life's toughest problems are not found with me, my team or my tribe. They're found outside my tribe. @larryosborne
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If I'm really a servant leader, when the score is kept I will have given more than I got. @larryosborne
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At the end of the day, there are some relationships where you just give more than you're gonna get and that is the nature of servanthood. @cnieuwhof
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Read or Download the Transcript for Episode 229

Looking for a key quote? More of a reader?

Read or download a free PDF transcript of this episode here.

Solve the Problems Most Leaders Miss: Didn’t See It Coming Will Help

If you want practical help overcoming some of the biggest challenges leaders face, my new book Didn’t See It Coming: Overcoming the 7 Greatest Challenges That Nobody Expects and Everyone Experiences tackles the seven core issues that take people out: cynicism, compromise, disconnectedness, irrelevance, pride, burnout, and the emptiness of success and provides strategies on how to combat each.

I wrote the book because no 18 year old sets out to be cynical, jaded and disconnected by age 35. Yet it happens all the time.

The good news is, it doesn’t have to be that way.

Here’s what top leaders are saying about Didn’t See It Coming:

“Seriously, this may be the most important book you read this year.” Jud Wilhite, Lead Pastor, Central Church

“Powerful, personal, and highly readable. ” Brian Houston, Global Senior Pastor, Hillsong

“Whatever challenge you’re facing, whatever obstacle you’re hoping to overcome, whatever future you dream or imagine, there is something powerful for you here.” Andy Stanley, Founder, North Point Ministries

“Uncommonly perceptive and generous…You have to read this book.” Ann Voskamp, NYT bestselling author

“Masterful.” Reggie Joiner, CEO Orange

“Deep biblical insight, straightforward truth, and practical wisdom to help you grow.” Craig Groeschel, Pastor and NYT bestselling author

“This book is sure to help you.” Daniel H. Pink, NYT bestselling author

Over the years, one of the things I’ve enjoyed most about being a public speaker is having opportunities to hang out with Carey…It’s not a matter of if you’ll run into these challenges; it’s a matter of when. Be prepared by spending a little time with a leader who has already been there.” Jon Acuff, NYT best-selling author

“Nieuwhof’s book provides expert guidance…with an accuracy that pierces the heart.” Nancy Duarte, CEO Duarte Inc.

“A refreshingly transparent guide for all leaders in a wide variety of industries.” Bryan Miles, Co-Founder and CEO, BELAY

You can learn more and get your copy of Didn’t See It Coming here.

Subscribed Yet? 

Subscribe for free and never miss out on wisdom from world-class leaders like Brian Houston, Andy Stanley, Craig Groeschel, Nancy Duarte, Henry Cloud, Patrick Lencioni, Francis Chan, Ann Voskamp, Erwin McManus and many others.

Subscribe using your favorite podcast app via

Apple Podcasts

Spotify

Google Play

Stitcher

TuneIn

Spread the Word. Leave a Rating and Review

Hopefully, this episode has helped you lead like never before. That’s my goal. If you appreciated it, could you share the love?

The best way to do that is to rate the podcast on Apple Podcasts and leave us a brief review! You can do the same on Stitcher and on TuneIn as well.

Your ratings and reviews help us place the podcast in front of new leaders and listeners. Your feedback also lets me know how I can better serve you.

Thank you for being so awesome.

Next Episode: Pete Scazzero

Pete Scazzero will be the first to tell you that while he was successful on the outside as a leader, he was immature on the inside, and his wife had had enough. That moved Pete on a journey to figure out what was wrong and how to make it right. Raw, honest and gut wrenching, in this interview, Pete will help you gauge your level of emotional and spiritual maturity and help you make progress.

Subscribe for free now and you won’t miss Episode 230.

The post CNLP 229: Larry Osborne on Why He Never Uses an Alarm Clock, The Keys to Staying Fresh in Leadership Four Decades In, and The Hardest Part of Raising Up New Leaders appeared first on CareyNieuwhof.com.

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