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If you search “smart writing” on Google, you’ll come across Moleskine’s smart writing system, but you won’t find much more information on the term. What’s smart writing, anyway? It’s not a term reserved for Moleskine. It’s something much broader; something that affects all of us.

In its simplest definition, smart writing is a writing practice that serves a purpose. It helps you achieve a precise goal. You plan how you’ll achieve that goal, and you organize the process of writing in a way that helps you get there.

When it comes to launching your future as a professional in any field, smart writing can really help. You can start the practice before you even graduate, and you can take it further when you’re ready to hit the job market. We’ll tell you how.

  1. Start With Your School Projects

When you’re at college or graduate school, a big part of your responsibilities are based on writing. This is your chance to practice smart writing. These are not mere assignments without any purpose. Oh; they serve a big purpose: they teach you how to conduct research and develop arguments based on facts. You’ll benefit from those skills no matter what career you choose. Whether you’re a doctor, economist, marketing expert, or social sciences, research and writing will be a big part of your professional progress.

So pay attention to these projects! If you’re not a good writer, the best paper writing service can help you develop these skills. You will work with a professional writer, who will guide you through all steps of the planning, research, writing, and editing.

If you’ve already graduated, then you can learn by going through the papers you’ve written. You surely stored several of them on your hard drive, right? Well, it’s time to improve them. Do some smart writing! What can you do to make them more convincing?

  1. Start Blogging

Let’s get back to those school projects. Are you confident enough to share your research with a wider audience? This will boost your smart writing practice. When you connect with like-minded people through your blog, you’ll learn from their comments. Some of them will ask questions that will require more research. With time, you’ll learn how to develop stronger arguments and convey them through content that people love reading.

Your blog doesn’t have to be reserved for research projects. Regular blogging can be smart writing, too. Just pick a niche that corresponds to the career path you want to follow. Then, start working on different topics and write awesome content!

A great blog requires an investment. You’ll make it successful not only through high-quality content published on a regular basis, but through a SEO and social media marketing strategy, too. It will take a lot of work, but you’ll yield great results in return.

The blog can literally start your career! When you submit a CV or resume for a job and you include a link to your blog, the potential employer will be curious to see what you’ve got. If they see an influential blogger who knows tons about the industry, you’ll definitely get an interview.

  1. Improve Your Vocabulary

No; we’re not saying you should become one of those people who write endless sentences with “big” words. That’s not smart writing. It’s silly writing!

However, smart writing still has a lot to do with vocabulary. The language used in research projects, professional blogging, and business communication is different from the language you use for speaking or personal writing. This means you’ll have to explore some new, more influential ways to express yourself.

For starters, you should learn more about the industry of your choice. Understand the slang! You won’t want to use it so much when you write for a general audience, but you still have to understand it. You should know how to define and use all terms related to your profession. Strong vocabulary will make your writing more convincing.

  1. Learn from Constructive Criticism

This is the biggest favor you could do to yourself: hire an editor for the important content that you’re going to publish. Yes; it’s an investment. However, it will greatly improve the quality of your writing. It’s not easy to see your “baby” taken apart. The editor will remove all unnecessary parts of your sentences. They will make the content more readable. They will contact you with advice to add information where the logical flow fails.

This will test your ability to learn from constructive criticism. You don’t have to hire an editor every single time. Do it only for the most important smart writing projects. You will not allow the editor to change your voice, tone, and message. However, you should certainly accept their detached involvement.

The same thing goes for the comments you get on your blog. Sure, you’ll be getting some of the “keep up the good work” stuff, but that won’t be all. Some of your readers will be critical. They will argue your point. You should listen to their criticism, too! It actually helps you to write better content next time. Progress – that’s what smart writing is all about.

Are you ready to start this journey? Smart writing can make you a better professional in any career. It makes you a more attractive candidate for employment or promotion, too!

About the Author  Mark Delarika is a professional content writer, teacher, and a blogger. He taught in more than 10 countries for students all over the world. He is major in educational innovations. Mark is a business writer at best paper writing service. He helps students to improve writing skills, shares his personal experience and gives practical tips for educators. 
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In a just a decade or too, artificial intelligence has gone from science fiction fantasy to an everyday reality for many of us. Do you have a smartphone with Siri or Google Assistant baked in? Perhaps an Amazon Echo standing on a bookcase back home? Those disembodied voices, linked over the internet to a vast network of servers and self-propelled neural networks, are AI – and they are moving ever closer to passing the legendary Turing Test.

Of course, none of these products are genuinely self-aware, in the broadest sense of the term ‘intelligent’. But that is coming (probably). Popular futurologist Ray Kurzweil, who now works for Google, believes we will achieve the so-called ‘singularity’, the point at which artificial intelligence overtakes the human variety, in just a few decades’ time. That’s either an exciting or scary prospect, depending on how you look at it.

But what does the gradual spread of AI mean for us today? Physical factory robots have existed for decades, freeing people from the most repetitive and wearisome tasks but at the same time causing job losses. Since then they become ever sophisticated, and their development has run alongside the growth of AI. Now we find ourselves at a point when a notable number of non-factory positions are also under threat from machines – more than at third of administrative and support service positions for example, and just under a third of financial and insurance positions. Finance, in particular, has taken with enthusiasm to AI: many loan and insurance assessments are made by machines, and stockbroking is now hugely automated, with computers buying and selling shares between themselves at tremendous speeds and with little human intervention.

This will only continue, so is there anything we can do? Is it possible to future-proof your job and keep the robots from the door? The first thing to realize is that AI, at least in its current form, can only do certain things, and all that must be rigidly programmed in. AI cannot be creative, think spontaneously, or tackle the multiple intricacies of social interaction: although scientists and engineers are doing their very best to teach them all those things. But it’s a tough task: these are all tremendously difficult things for machines to grasp. No matter how polished a user experience they produce, AI is, fundamentally, a product of computing, and that in turn boils down at the deepest level to binary ones and zeros. Not very human.

So the more human your job is, the safer it will be is from AI: for now, anyway! But what if you work in a field that is vulnerable to the rise of the robots – for example, transportation, wholesale distribution or manufacturing? The best approach is perhaps to accept that the robots will be always better at repetition and heavy lifting, and AI will always be better at crunching numbers. Instead, move sideways and adapt to the new opportunities that will present themselves. Learn to repair the robots or programme the AI. Become a manager or supervisor – a position no robot can take. Or move into a customer facing role and specialize in all that tricky social interaction.

For all its continuous evolution and intricacy, AI is still characterized as much by what it can’t do as what it can. As HAL famously put it, “I’m sorry Dave, I’m afraid I can’t do that…” We humans aren’t redundant just yet!

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Many people think that the safest jobs are those that involve being in an office all day. Sure, you likely aren’t going to have any heavy objects falling, or have to deal with injuries involving heavy equipment, but working in an office comes with its own particular set of health hazards. In fact, a lot of people who work in offices are less healthy than those who work at jobs that are much more physically demanding. Today we are going to take a look at 10 things you can do to help you to stay healthy if you work in an office.

  • Walk to Work – If you don’t live far away from the workplace, keep your car parked at home and start walking to work. You may not always be able to do this (lack of time, bad weather, etc.), but the more often you walk, the healthier you are going to be.
  • Use a Standing Desk – We are learning more and more about the dangers of sitting all day long. In fact, they say that sitting is the new smoking. It is important to be able to stand and sit, so if you have an adjustable desk, you can sit for periods, and then stand up for periods as well.
  • Use a Fitness Ball – Instead of using a regular chair, get yourself a fitness ball. Sure, it may look a bit kooky, but it is a great way to work the muscles in your back and legs, because you have to be able to balance yourself on the ball as you work.
  • Don’t Eat Out – One of the biggest problems facing office workers is eating out. It is so easy to grab something quick from a take-out or the cafeteria, but it isn’t always the healthiest option. Stop eating out, and bring your own healthy lunches and snacks to work instead.
  • Bring Exercise Gear – You can exercise both while you are working and while you are on breaks if you have some fitness gear in your office. Bring some dumbbells or elastics to work, and do exercises while you are reading notes, making phone calls, etc.
  • Exercise in the Office – There are loads of things you can do right in the office that are going to help you to stay in good shape. For instance, you can start taking the stairs instead of the elevator. Do various exercises right in your chair, such as leg raises and isometrics. Move around as much as possible. 
  • Ask for a Fitness Corner – Many companies don’t have the space for an in-house fitness center, but you can suggest that they offer a fitness corner with one or two fitness apparatuses, such as a mini trampoline. This can easily be set up in the lunch room, or any other corner in the building and as this article by Groom+Style suggests can be completed on a small budget.
  • Exercise on Breaks – Instead of sitting down for lunch and other breaks, use this time to get some exercise. If it is nice outside, go for a walk. Find a work buddy to walk with you so it is more enjoyable. You may even find a group of coworkers who want to start walking regularly.
  • Hold Walking Meetings – Another way to exercise while at work is to walk while you talk. Instead of holding meetings in the boardroom, get everyone to go for a walk in the park, around the block, etc. You can talk about everything you would in the boardroom, and get some exercise too.
  • Set Up Fitness Classes – Get together with your fellow employees and hold fitness classes in the workplace. These can take place during lunch hours, and they are not only a great way to stay in shape, but also a great way to get to know your colleagues better in a non-work setting.
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Veterans face many challenges as they transition from active duty or reserve status back into civilian life. The University of Denver is doing its part to help veterans reintegrate into civilian life. Nationally, the average age of a student veteran is 28; this includes graduate and undergraduate students.

Most veterans departing from the military are unfamiliar with the career skills they need to begin their civilian career. DU’s Veterans Services has partnered with Career & Professional Development to bring our student veterans the Right Foot Forward (RFF) program. RFF matches current student veterans with a mentor in the field in which they wish to pursue a career.

The participants must also attend two career fairs as well as schedule three meetings with Career & Professional Development to review their resume/cover letter, LinkedIn profile and practice interview skills. After these objectives have been completed they are matched with their mentor, a senior executive with at least five years separation from the military, and/ or five years professional experience in their field.

After completing the five meetings with their mentor Veterans Services accompanies the participating veteran to Brooks Brothers for a custom suit fitting at no charge to the veteran.

RFF has experienced great success and has been asked to speak in front of the State of Colorado’s Senate Committee on Education (see picture) along with CU-Boulder and CU-Denver’s programs which have programs similar to DU’s Right Foot Forward.

For more information about the Right Foot Forward program please contact Damon Vine at damon.vine@du.edu or  303-871-2074.

 Submitted by Damon Vine/Veterans Service Coordinator and Patty Hickman/Director Graduate Career & Professional Development

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I see many students in Environmental Science and Geography who are interested in exploring career options in sustainability, field research, educating others on protecting our world, urban planning and transit…the list goes on. I find that students who gravitate toward these majors in particular have a deep love for giving back, and are often interested in so many different areas that it can be tough to land on just one or two.

In general, I love guiding students through career exploration because it’s a long process, but it has the potential to provide great results. Imagine being able to identify what it is you’re good at, go deeper to get a sense of what speaks to your soul, and share it with the world? With Environmental Science & Geography, it’s even more rewarding to see the connection students make between their why (what gets you out of bed in the morning) and their career paths.

Here are a few practical tips, and questions you might want to ask yourself, as you begin to explore your options in Environmental Science or Geography.

Start with why

I often will begin career exploration sessions with students by asking them, “What brought you to Environmental Science? Why did you choose to study Geography?”

I encourage you to begin asking yourself that question.

What about Environmental Science spoke to you that a major in Biology or Sociology could not?

To go a little bit further, I often suggest that students take some time to look at their full degree audit. Ask yourself:

  • Which courses have I enjoyed most?
  • What is it about those courses (the learning community, the concepts, the programs) that resonated with me?
  • Which courses do I find myself procrastinating for? What am I replacing that time with? Does (some of) it relate back to my major and/or potential interests?
  • What skills am I learning? Which skills do I like learning and practicing?

Research your options

Once you have a decent sense of what drives you in the classroom, you will want to begin identifying career paths that speak to those skills, concepts, and interest areas.

Some resources you may want to explore include:

  • O*NET: A comprehensive database of many occupations. Start with the “Green Economy Sector,” perhaps?
  • Pioneer Careers: Check out the “Research Tools” > “Outcomes Index” tab to look at what DU graduates in recent years have gone on to do, and where they are working
  • LinkedIn Alumni Tool: View specific career paths taken by folks in your major

To connect these career paths back to your skills and interests, you may want to explore our options for career assessments. I highly recommend the Strong Interest Inventory as a way to get a sense of the work environments where you may thrive! This is especially useful for students who are deciding between areas such as field research and wilderness education/search and rescue; both are great career paths but consists of two different skill sets and work environments.

You may also want to look at databases such as GuideStar to identify causes that mean a lot to you, and see where your interest in geography and the environment might intersect with those specific areas. How can you plug in? Talk to someone? Start to volunteer? Apply for an internship with those organizations?

Get connected!

While the Internet is an excellent way to begin exploring your options, there’s nothing like sitting down for coffee with a GIS professional to learn more about how they got to where they are today, or to meet a Wilderness Ranger in the backcountry for job shadowing.

There are a ton of ways to get connected with the larger DU community. I recommend starting with Pioneer Connect, a tool specific to DU where alumni sign up and volunteer specific career development resources to current students.

But, leverage your network! Chat with professors, peers, upperclassmen, current graduate students about their experiences and why they made the career decisions they did. It’s a great place to begin figuring out where you want to go after life at DU ends.

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Over 100 are employers registered for the upcoming Career and Internship Fair.  Log into your Pioneer Careers account to research employers, who they are recruiting (grads, undergrads, alumni or international students), what positions they are filling and which academic programs they are targeting.

6 STEPS TO GET READY

  1. Develop a Plan:  Check the list of companies attending in Pioneer Careers to see the employers attending the Career Fair. Prioritize and do your research by reviewing the company’s website. Employers expect you to be prepared with questions.
  2. Get Your Resume Ready:  Not sure if it’s ready? Attend Resume Review Day on Tuesday, February 20th from 12:00-4:00 PM on the Driscoll Bridge.
  3. Dress:  Dress like you would for an interview. There will be a lot of employers, students and alumni. You can stand out with a well-chosen outfit.
  4. Prepare to talk about yourself:  Employers expect you to state your name, degree, a couple of your strengths or skills as well as why you are interested in their company and the positions they are hiring. Think about this interaction as one of many you will make while you develop a relationship that hopefully leads to a job or internship.
  5. Be Enthusiastic:  Show your interest with a smile, firm handshake and good eye contact. Practice all of these with a friend, boss, mentor or colleague before going.
  6. Follow-Up:  Within 24 hours send a brief thank you email and connect on LinkedIn.

See you this Wednesday at the Career and Internship Fair!

  

Submitted by: Patricia Hickman

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Pioneer Career Blog - University of Denv.. by Alexandra Tilton, Bs Finance '17 - 6d ago

For a term that sounds like so much fun, Super Day can often be one of the most stressful days during the interview process. Super day is the final round of interviews, typically for financial firms, at which point a small group of candidates participates in hopes of landing an offer. They can last anywhere from a couple of hours to a couple of days. Here is some advice from personal experience. 
  1. Come mentally and physically prepared. This may sound like a no-brainer, but it’s easy to underestimate how demanding the day(s) can be. Make sure to get a sufficient amount of sleep the night before, and eat a filling meal before you go.
  2. Remember that the entire day is an interview. The firm will likely have many employees from all levels taking time out of their busy schedules to participate. Even if you don’t have a sit-down interview with someone, you still have opportunities to make an impression. Be courteous to all, and don’t be afraid to strike up a conversation with someone to ask them some informal questions about their role 
  3. Be flexible. Your interview times, locations, and interviewers may change. Remember that the firm is taking time out of their schedule to meet with you, so it is only polite to remain amenable to any changes they have to make. 
  4. Show your interest. My final super day was much more fun than some others because I was genuinely interested in meeting everyone and learning everything I could. It is much harder to survive an entire day of interviews if you’re not excited about the firm or job. Moreover, if you feign interest, the interviewer will be able to tell.
Be calm and confident. Remember that you are at super day for a reason. Whether you’ve made it past one or four prior interviews, the firm is interested in learning more about you. Be confident in what makes you a great candidate, trust in your preparation, and remember to have fun! These are exciting times, and they move very quickly.
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Often, when we think of social media and career development, we think of networking and connecting to new people. Certainly this is a useful benefit of social media. But did you know that social media can be helpful for your career at any stage, even before you’re ready to start networking? In this post, I’m going to share a few ways that you can use Twitter and Facebook to explore and learn about different career options.

Twitter Hashtags

Twitter brands itself as an opportunity to “join the conversation,” and indeed it is! Following hashtags in your interest area is a great way to learn more about that interest and talk to others, even the experts themselves. To find new hashtags to follow, you can try a few options:

  1. Search Twitter for a topic that interests you – you’ll likely find links to articles, blogs, or discussions about the topic.
  2. Find a thought leader in your field, and pay attention to the hashtags they are using as they tweet.
  3. Follow professional associations or companies and see if they host a regular chat on Twitter, such as #Bufferchat, or if they are live tweeting a professional conference or tradeshow, like #APA2018 or #OutdoorRetailer.
  4. Look for a hashtag directory; the most useful will likely be hosted through an association or website specific to your field. Example directories* include these about politics, sustainability, higher education, and mental health.
Facebook Pages and Groups

Another way to explore careers is through Facebook. Like on Twitter, you can follow thought leaders, associations, and companies by liking their pages. Another option that’s popular on Facebook is to join a group for people exploring or studying a given career field, where you can ask questions about the field and how to enter the career. Some example groups* include:

Perhaps you prefer to spend your time on other social media platforms; you can use these strategies on those platforms as well. Some people use Pinterest boards to gather career ideas, and others network through blogging platforms like Medium or WordPress. Regardless of where you spend time online, the common thread is that you can use these social platforms to not just read about a career field, but also engage with those working in it.

*Linked resources and groups are not endorsements and for example only.

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It’s frustrating when friends and family members use clichés after you suffer a career setback. You don’t want to hear that another door will open when one closes when you are panicking about losing a job or failing to get a promotion. As time passes and you gain some clarity, you may realize that launching your own business is exactly how to bounce back. You also may realize it’s the best decision you’ve ever made. The following tips will help you get started.

Image by: mangpor2004 / Freepik

  1. Take Some Time to Think

When you’re in the throes of ambition and a crazy work schedule, especially if you balance work with family, you focus so much on your career and climbing the ladder that you don’t take time to think about your personal goals and whether the rat race is worth it. Only when the ladder gets pulled out from under you do you have time to stop and think about what you are trying to do and why. Getting ahead for the sake of getting ahead isn’t the best way to live. Use this time to determine why you had your setback.

Get honest feedback from your company and determine whether it aligns with your goals. Many people realize that the company they worked so hard for didn’t value their work or align with their philosophy, anyway. One Harvard Business Review article encourages you to actively determine what went wrong, how you contributed to your setback, whether you evaluated the situation correctly and reacted appropriately, and what you would do differently if you could. After doing some soul-searching and facing some painful truths, you may realize that your career path wasn’t leading you where you wanted to go.

  1. Set New Goals

After you know what went wrong and accept it, set new goals. If you had the chance to do it all over again, would you? You may surprise yourself and admit that your heart wasn’t in it in the first place. Many people who suffer a career setback go in a completely new direction

Reflect and be honest with yourself and then set specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and time-bound (SMART) goals that will motivate you to go in that new direction. Focus on the big picture and what will make you happy. Break your goals into smaller, more manageable targets that lead to your ultimate goal.

  1. Start a Business That Makes You Happy

For many people, a career setback helps them realize that they were not doing work that was fulfilling. They see it as an opportunity to pursue a hobby or a passion that they otherwise would not have had the courage to turn into a career. For example, if you love animals, you may want to start a dog-walking business. You will get to set your own hours, spend time outside, and get to know lots of dogs and their owners in your community.

Other hobbies that have the potential to become careers include cooking and baking to start your own catering business, restaurant, or bakery; writing to become a freelance writer; or painting or drawing to sell your works on Etsy or eBay. The Muse offers more tips and strategies for turning your hobby into your career.

  1. Jump Into the Sharing Economy

If you need some more time to get your ducks in a row to turn your hobby into a career, jump into the sharing economy to supplement your income while you save to start your own business. For example, people in nearly every city are becoming Uber or Lyft drivers. If you love kids, become a sitter with UrbanSitter. The possibilities are nearly endless with the sharing economy, as you can share everything from your clothes, to your house, to your knowledge and expertise.

After you’ve come to terms with your career setback, take some time to think about what you want and set new goals. Then, start a new business rooted in your hobbies to make yourself happy. Jump into the sharing economy in the meantime to make some extra cash to fund your business.

Author

Larry created ReadyBrain.net to help give people the mental workout they need to have a healthy brain.

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You’ve likely heard how important it is to network. Professors, family, career advisers—everyone insists that a strong network is just as important to achieving your professional goals as a resume or cover letter. That’s all well and good—but how do you build up such a network? LinkedIn is a good place to start, but many feel that it can be overwhelming and impersonal.

Enter Pioneer Connect. Like LinkedIn, it is an online platform where you can find professionals from a variety of backgrounds and industries. Unlike LinkedIn, however, Pioneer Connect is exclusive to the University of Denver community and you don’t have to be connected to someone to reach out. What truly makes Pioneer Connect special though, is that this community is made up entirely of Pioneers that have expressly volunteered to support other Pioneers. No need for nerves –  Pioneer Connect members are waiting to help!

If you aren’t yet a member of Pioneer Connect, join today! We recommend signing in with your LinkedIn credentials—doing so will automatically update your Pioneer Connect profile to match your LinkedIn page every time you sign in online. After you’ve completed your profile, you can begin to search for students, alumni, parents and faculty within the community. (Check out this short tutorial on how to find Pioneers in the system.) Once you’ve found someone you’re interested in connecting with, Pioneer Connect will provide an email template to help. The system will remind users to respond to your request, but don’t be shy to follow up yourself!

Be sure to review some of Career & Professional Development’s informational interviewing resources, to help you prepare for the conversations you’ll be initiating. If you need additional help with Pioneer Connect, be sure to reach out to your career advisor.

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